22 Burst results for "Editor In Chief"

"editor chief" Discussed on Around the Rim

Around the Rim

05:07 min | 3 months ago

"editor chief" Discussed on Around the Rim

"Basketball fans and welcome to a new episode your favorite. espn's women's basketball podcast around the rim. I am to rica foster. Bradsby you our producer and i guess you can say host. I i mean like i kinda do that from time to time so i'll take that i'll own that title for today but i'm excited to be here with you guys and excited to kick off this show if i am introducing the podcast that i'm sure you have assumed that china robinson our host in fearless leader won't be joining us today. But do not fret because she has given the reins over to someone who we absolutely love who is more than capable and who we are going to enjoy sitting in the driver's seat today and that is none other than women's basketball analyst and play by play you may may have heard her on the pac twelve network and i'm sure you have seen her across social media representing for the pacific northwest. Cindy brunson super excited to have her acting as guest host today and she's going to be joined by two panelists who we know. Bring the absolute best to women's basketball. And that is rachel. Gallaghen of wind cider and the nine newsletter's founder and editor chief howard meg dole la- china is one of those amazing a women's basketball voices in analysts whose coverage goes beyond just our podcast and so and certain moments she needs to take a break Not necessarily because he's resting but because she's continually working to spread our game. It's a cover women's basketball so we're going to allow her an opportunity to take on some other endeavors and while she is out we are going to have some other voices on our podcast over the next couple of weeks. Some you may know some. Maybe you don't know In across all spectrums so espn voices. Non espn voices but we just wanna make sure that we provide an array of all types of analysis to help us as we head into the second half of the season just a couple of quick things to note before we get into the podcast. And i know the china usually has. It's her clipboard. Where she talks about some things that are very important to her. But i don't have a clipboard. I have a tablet. So we're gonna call this to reestablish tablet so just a couple of things on my tablet. I we want to most certainly give a congrats to ty young tamra young. She retired from the wnba this week after twelve years. You have seen her with the dream you've seen her with the aces you've seen her with seattle but most notably. I'm sure you remember her stint which chicago twelve years in this league and she announced via a video in a message on instagram. Why she decided to walk away from the courts. Or if you're interested in seeing her why you can definitely had overturn instagram and check that out but listen tie. Young has most certainly been one of the best in our game She spent the two thousand nine to two thousand seventeen season in chicago appearing in two hundred sixteen games. She was drafted Eighth overall in the two thousand eight draft by the atlanta dream and listen. She's played overseas She's just been one who has most certainly made her mark in the wnba. And so we just want to congratulate her and wish her well on whatever she chooses to endeavor post a basketball career. Also want to give a shout out to my colleague here at espn. Chennai go mckay as well as her sisters. Neka in erica. As they have been listed on nigeria's provisional roster which means they could all play together for the nigerian national team which is something that we have not seen before. We've never seen three siblings. All play in the olympics together in that way and so that would be super fears for them to do so. I know that there has been lots of controversy. Recently surrounding neka mckay's emission from team usa. And so this is most certainly something that i know would be very special to her as well as to chennai and erica day. Come from nigerian ancestry. Their mom and dad or nigerian-born and they themselves hold dual citizenship between nigeria. And the united states. So i know the pride that they have in their nigerian routes. I know the love and pride that they have in in for the game of basketball so just want to give a shout out to them. There has not been an official naming of them to the twelve persons roster just yet but just the fact that you know they have been named to the provisional roster and have the opportunity to represent nigeria in the olympics as a family is just something to be commended. So kudos to you. Ladies before we get into the show we just want to share with you. An opportunity for you to relive one of the greatest icons and most successful teams in sports history michael jordan in the nineteen ninety seven. Ninety eight chicago bulls..

basketball espn Bradsby Cindy brunson howard meg dole china ty young tamra young wnba rica rim pacific northwest pac robinson rachel chicago la instagram nigeria neka mckay seattle
How to Build a Successful Value-Driven News Membership Model

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

05:29 min | 8 months ago

How to Build a Successful Value-Driven News Membership Model

"Read many stories about news innovators in europe and the united states. But what is it like to lounge digital bone outlet in the global south. What are those challenges and opportunities for funders who take the plunge in those countries. Our guest today is one of those founders. He's name is tiny gut. He was editor chief. John one of argentina's newspapers and in two thousand seventeen. He laughed to find rhodesian one of the most innovative examples of digital newspapers in the global south today china will talk about membership human journalism and social empathy and how to measure success of audience participation chine- welcome and thank you for being with us today. Thank you very much thirty for this invitation for having here. I'm regulatory audience of this podcast. So pleasure and a privilege to be thanks. Thank you so much. So i want to start with a personal question. What did you do. Why did you leave a good secure job at an established newspaper to lounge a small new startup. that's a person in question and to make the long story short. I would say i when i was twenty seven year. Old longtime ago any flow very particular path. Down there are a decider graphic. satoru Decided rector innovation director and finally eighteen chief and twenty one is at the company and for years eight chief. I decided to step down And i would say sort of to change the nature of of my challenges. Of course it was a big and beautiful challenge to lead that talented newsroom of almost two hundred people And we work and we do have a lot of fun and success in bringing into the twenty first century Great media brand Born in the nineteenth century But on the other hand today i feel that is also an enormous and also beautiful challenge to create a new media bencher from scratch So to bringing a small but also very talented team That by building this this new media we are trying to answer some essential questions to to our craft journalism and also to me. So how can we acknowledge the the media fatigue And media avoidance phenomenon for example. Or or how can we cover the most pressing social issues we face as society and covered in a different way and probably the most interesting question. A how does this. But equally experience of the twenty first century people's participation can affect journalism. So i would say that the coral of of We are trying to hook like the broadcast. One way or the model per line that was born with us media And he's one of the challenges. Our industry spacey facing. I'm sorry it wasn't short. The the answer but i have two more things to say. There is almost no secure job now. Our industry I think everything is at risk An acknowledging daddy. I think it's a good thing on the other hand. I believe that in the end. I guess That why i step down being there to of great media. Well i guess it has to do a lot with a very personal calling on that I read a sentence which i found very very interesting. What you said. Human journalists can rebuild social empathy. Can you explain to us what it means Yes we believe that the problems we are facing us society. The challenges are very complex and of course Demands complex many times complex solutions and we are not going to find those solutions without an open dialogue between institution politicians and citizens So pariah station. For example. it's it's it's almost the name of the social conversation today at is preventing us to find those solutions. An in-depth sense. i believe. Journalism has an important role in terms of showing Other words helping us understand other opinions For amd we'd take this very seriously advocates axiom. So we been trying sort of new full matz that help how to help us our own To have more empathy with different lives people that lives in a different way of thinking in a different way than myself So it has to do with how we build a more robust set citizenship. That helps that public dialogue to evolve and on find real solutions. Gus dose dilutes might should have at the end semaine back in personal and institutional decisions

Satoru Argentina Europe United States China John Matz
test

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | 8 months ago

test

"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
"editor chief" Discussed on Work In Progress

Work In Progress

03:01 min | 8 months ago

"editor chief" Discussed on Work In Progress

"No voice in what would happen to them As kodak was downsizing and what new kinds of jobs would get created or not. Like the lack of voice and agency in the process Is something that you know. When i was eight or nine years old. I didn't have the language. But i could sense that something was wrong and i think years later as i began to study and understand the economy more as i thought about labor policy and doing worker organising. I really came to appreciate that. It was that early experience in my childhood that has really driven my passion for making sure. Workers have actual voice in agency the importance of collective bargaining rights. the importance of workers and communities shaping. Their future is being able to have a real voice in their future. I'm and then. I would couple that with the experience of being a woman of color of being an immigrant in this country and recognizing and learning The the deep rooted systemic racism that has been baked into the design of our democracy. The design very economy and resulted in these immense exclusions from basic protections and so that in itself also sort of impassioned me you know when in my early organizing days was with jopseh justice in chicago and when i got chicago i recognized. There is work being done. Really great work happening with unions. And i was seeing the growth of a day. Labor workforce in the city and there is no protections in place for these workers. And i was a part of helping to start the first day labor center in and that experience of being out at three or four in the morning talking to workers at temp agencies understanding what real challenges and barriers they were experiencing mostly black latino And polish immigrant workers. It just gave me such a different appreciation and understanding of why it's important dissenter equity in this work. Why it's important to censure the need for us to really confront white supremacy as we think about a next generation of labor and social policies and business practices. Nord's so that's really where it's like my childhood in rochester experience chicago organizing day laborers and rotter sets of low wage immigrant workers. That have really fed this passion that i have like the all workers are lucky to have you as a champion someone who has compassion understanding and knowledge. And i really appreciate you talking to us about it. Thank you sound matrimony. It's been great chatting with you. I've been speaking serena gupta of the ford foundation. I'm ramona shuttle hein editor chief of working nation. Thank you so much for listening..

eight serena gupta rochester chicago kodak nine years old ramona shuttle four three first day years later latino foundation Nord
"editor chief" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:00 min | 9 months ago

"editor chief" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"More attention. What's going on these days? With Wall Street trading? You may not be familiar with terms like Robin Hood or read it. Or a company Stocks like games stop BlackBerry, But what's going on is kind of fascinating is small investors or collecting On forums T O push purchases of certain stocks. And they're often stocks that are pretty low price, but they've jumped up. I mean the story on game stop. It finally dropped today, but it had grown by leaps and bounds and just weeks $530 this morning, which would be very overvalued, and then it dropped to 126. And it's supposed to be obviously much, much lower than that. Game stop. You've seen them in shopping malls they sell. Video games video game, Taylor, but you know that whole business is going online. People are playing online. More so people don't really involves that much this these days anyway, it looks like the whole company is going the way of blockbuster rip. That's right. It used to rent movies. Videos, however. We'll have this We'll have gonna have Caleb Silver with ABC News is editor chief of Investing PD a explain this phenomenon now because it's a basic brings in the arena of hedge funds. Kayla. That's where it gets a little complicated for many people who don't follow this kind of financial news tale of how are you? Good. Thanks for having me and you're right. It's a fascinating story you mentioned Blockbuster Blockbuster was one of the stock that was heavily traded today by day, traders pumped up in those online forums, and that's his company That's been in bankruptcy for years. So this is upside down market where day traders have actually taken over the stock market for a couple days here, or at least taken all the attention that usually goes into the stock market and put it on themselves as they have been pushing stocks up of some very troubled companies and sticking a finger in the eye. The big hedge funds that have been betting against them, Yeah. Explained to us that means like against them, because because first of all, explain to people what hedge funds are in a liner to okay, hedge funds are big finance their big investors usually worth billions of dollars that take big positions and companies and they head to their bets. Sometimes they're betting that the stock will go up and sometimes they head to their bets, betting that stocks will go down or a different sector of the market will go down. So they hedge Just like you may hedge your bet They had their bets. Okay. Lot of hedge funds or some hedge fund. Okay, we good on that one. Yeah, and they do what they do is short selling. They bet that stock is gonna go down. Explain how they short sell, like, what's what's the props process to do that? Sure, so many of them are some of them are what we call short sellers and that they bet that the price of a stock is gonna go down and how they do that is by buying what we call put options through the options market is basically a bet on the future price of the stock, but they're betting that the share price will go down. So if a stock is trading at 20, but you're a short seller. And you think it's worth 10. You're gonna buy that. Option to buy that stock attend. And if it drops to that price you own the stock down there and you collect the profits for everybody that wants to buy it from you at the lower price. On the other hand, if the stock goes up against your bet that it's gonna go down, then you owe the money you borrowed to buy that stock and the difference between where you Thought it was gonna be and where it is today, So that's how they lose money. These hedge fund companies have a lot of bets in game Stop. Is that what was going on? Some of them did Many of them had bet against the price of Game stop because the price of Gamestop, which has been a troubled company, given the pandemic, given the fact that we're not going to shopping malls and buying video games, and for other reasons, the reasons that you suggested and that we get a lot of these things online. They had executive had joined their board, saying they were going to revolutionize and change the way they did business. The stock already started flying last fall. It was already up. Believe me, guys, it was up some 5000% in the past year, so the stock's already been moving when that happened. Short selling hedge funds gathered around some of them and said, We don't believe that peace is at all. We think this company is in a lot of trouble. We don't think it's gonna be worth what doesn't. This guy thinks it's gonna be worth we think it's going to be far less and they started betting against it. And then day traders who gather an online forums and places like Reddit Ah, popular One is called Wall Street Bets collectively decided they were gonna bet that the stock would go the other way, and they were going to buy that stock and push it higher and make that short seller lose money on their options. Bet that it was gonna fall. And they were doing them with AMC theaters, BlackBerry bed Bath and beyond all companies whose best days seemed to be behind them. Right, and exactly the troubled companies that short sellers have been attacking and betting their price is gonna go down these day traders and their million's a lot of them have joined the market in the last year decided collectively that they're going to pinpoint those stocks in particular and buy them and bid them up. Not because they believe in these companies not because they believe in the future of a game stopper of BlackBerry, which is probably not coming out with the new BlackBerry anytime soon, but because they want to stick a finger in the eye. These hedge funds and meanwhile, they're making some handsome profits if they're day trading responsibly in booking. Profits. The problem guys is that with so many people rushing into the crowded room when it's time to go, and people want to take their profits, there's only a couple of exits and it takes a while to get out. So some treasure is gonna wind up holding stocks They never wanted to hold to begin with, and they may be out a lot of money. When they do. These hedge funds have lost billions. In some cases had tons of lost billions because they've been what we call short squeezed and that the price of the stock that they thought was going to go down has gone up. So they have to cover their losses by now buying the stock to pay it back and to pay back the whatever they borrowed to buy the short, so they've been squeezed, and that's cost a million's. In some cases billions of dollars and many of these, A couple of these hedge funds have decided to leave those trades alone and disappear. So these day traders have effectively scared A big hedge funds out of the trade. And in some cases, some of these checks funds. We have to close their doors. They've lost so much money. Is that right? Out now. Yeah, now now, if they if the hedge funds So much money to cover these bad bets, Don't they then have to start selling all the other stock that they own and moved that Dr. Other stock prices down. That's the that's the risk, and that could theoretically happened now. This is not that widespread. There's not that many short sellers out there that aren't taking his aggressive moves. But there's enough of them. That is gathering the attention of these day traders who don't like the fact that they think hedge funds and big banks play by a different set of rules than ordinary traders like you and me or ordinary investors. They think the playing field is tilted. So when the big banks got into trouble in 2000 and 2009, who was there to bail them out? The government. Those big banks made some very risky, bad bets, and they were bailed out. Now we have the online brokers and some regulators wanting to put up more guardrails around day traders who want to trade in and out of these stocks on a daily basis, and that's making them very angry because they say, Hey, you bailed out the banks and let them do what they want..

Robin Hood Blockbuster government Gamestop Kayla Taylor AMC ABC News Caleb Silver executive editor chief of Investing PD
"editor chief" Discussed on The Main Column

The Main Column

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"editor chief" Discussed on The Main Column

"My name is Lena Nichols, and on the editor chief associate publisher hundred, processing a gas processing allergy publications, and welcome all of you to another installment hydrocarbon processing podcast series the main column today, we have a very special guests joining us today drawn Beck. Whose Marketing Strategy Director for Aspen, technology, they were going to be discussing the digital transformation self optimizing plant and where the industry is heading down in this digital journey. Now, before we get started, I do want to let you know that you subscribe to the main column Podcast by clicking on the subscribe button or by using your smartphone I saying, hey, Google Alexa where theory subscribing to the Baikonur podcasts. So, with that, I would like to welcome in Ron Beck Ron, how're you doing today? I'm doing great. Thanks for having me on the PODCAST. Louis I of course. We really appreciate your time today in providing some insights on the industry's digital journey. So let's go ahead and jump right in case. The Challenges for refining. Petrochemicals. Of course, continues especially with fallout from the covid nineteen and and of course, all of the oil and shifts. So we're kind of curious. What do you see as the best ways technology to help his from? Sure. So that's a good opening question. Lee. Definitely as everybody knows the industry's been going through a lot the last five months. And it's in a bunch of different directions but I think mainly what it's done is it's accelerated companies and executives thinking about what's happening in the industry. Made, everybody think now instead of a few years from now about. What's going to happen with the energy transition? What's GonNa Happen as holders? Expert. A plays retire and also with the uncertainty in supply and demand the global supply chains. It's really a matter of economic survival for a lot of companies in the industry. So technology is what a lot of executives are turning to as a solution and really with what the last downturn I think companies trimmed costs in all the conventional ways. and. Now they're seeing this time around really it's a matter of technology really offers the only real way to change change the business to make more agile. And also cut costs. Of course, that's a great segue into my next question, which of course, ask tag just unveiled its vision and strategy of the self optimizing plants. So it just a few words you kind of explain to the audience what that is in, and of course, why is it? So I think Aspen Tech about a year ago. Maybe a little longer we looked at two or three key things happening in the industry. The first is some information presented by several of the major global strategy groups. You're really ranking the process industries in general and energy in particular as quite far behind the curve compared to other industries, an adoption of digitalization AI related technologies. and. The other thing is that The the you know there is a lot of opportunity there fat very fast technology development. So We realized we needed to develop a vision because everybody wanted to change nobody really had a vision and so there's two ways you can go when you when you innovate technology in an in an established company like asthma attack was really an industry leader across the board and all our solution areas One is sort of incremental development. Were you develop come up with? New ideas every six months or a year, but the other is to set a future target. So we realized it was really time to set a future target because like I said, customers want to go somewhere but they terms of more automation more adoption AI, but there really wasn't a vision. So we stuck together a small group of people in the company led by our CEO and. Talk to a lot of customers and created a future vision and then tested it, and now we've announced it a few weeks ago to the public. gotten a really great response so far but We've really mobilized our whole company. It's a way to energize our entire company around future innovation towards a goal that will change the industry. So I, I'm glad you mentioned too mentioned Ai. Because I've heard industrial way in general I. so I'm kind of curious what does industrially I mean and then how is that different just general artificial. so Yeah, that's a good good leading question Lee because you know. Coming off of what I just mentioned about the self optimizing plant I didn't really define what it is. But fundamentally, you know companies realized that with advanced technologies. Hey I in things you can start taking people out of dangerous places out of the plan and certainly in commercial settings and insurance banking. Commerce AI has been big but an industry people have been very hesitant about a because of the risk of explosions, accidents, incidents in the plan, really everything about asset safety and integrity. So what I. Industrial Does it takes the knowledge of the industry, the industrial part, the domain expertise, and then it takes the part. And puts them together in a way that will. Make make the technology very easily adoptable by an industry like the process industry. So industrial the merger of domain expertise and advanced analytics and AI. And the embedding of that a I within industry specific solutions. So the normal workers in that industry can adopt them without having to be.

Ron Beck Ron Lee Google AI Lena Nichols Aspen Louis I Director asthma Aspen Tech I. Industrial editor associate publisher CEO
"editor chief" Discussed on Esportz Network Podcast

Esportz Network Podcast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"editor chief" Discussed on Esportz Network Podcast

"It's just it's Ben here for awhile again, , like I said, he , started as an intern and now he's really in charge of everything outside of the podcasts, , all the articles, , all the things that go on that East sports network insight and he's been getting great about it. . So that's a little brief about how you broke into the sports industry but just to you, , you know as we talk about how to get in does insurance industry that a lot of people wanna be a part of what we're yours started steps like into East sports, , and how's it developed over the last year? ? Well, , my starting steps. . I started I feel like as the average college student I only graduated college early this year by the way. . So I was starting my job while still in college and I think that's a big part for terms of getting internships I started as a college student in their late junior early senior level. . Looking into opportunities trying to see what I could find so I did a lot of job hunting a lot of networking. . Thanks to collegiate offenses will. . So I think. . The very start of all of this is taking your own initiative in. . Really taking the time to search through all the endless things that are out there. . Definitely yeah heart agree on starting the job before you leave school <hes> beyond internships it's a great opportunity but just networking in general, , you can have a lot of fakes responded to you like Hey I'm a student who wants to work at sports. . People are so used to get a weird product pitches and awkward business relations like I'd say like leak did or. . Email that they usually ignore those somebody reaches I was just like Hey I'm interested alert about sports usually the response for deposits that networking early starting with looking at opportunities early is really crucial break in this industry. . 'cause you can do it straight out of school like edgy levels effect, , but there's not even really require for college degree. . We're GONNA get into what? ? Role College plays in the eastwards later on in the show. . But I had a very similar experience and thirties or it's right after graduating school at already started doing a little bit of working as worth while I was in school <hes> started writing right afterwards and then. . Pretty. . quickly, , nobody ever asked if I had a college degree I did have one but nobody ever really asked in these sports and <hes>. . Once you get some articles published, , the ball starts rolling. . You can take those articles to another place and just keep going. . That's Kinda mind developed justice. . You've had a lot more consistent of a career than my first year was I worked for eight companies by I. . Did hear that on a previous podcast. . You're just going back and forth between all sorts. . Yet it was break the game started that I went to Action Ease for its then sport techy hotspot spahis or it's a radio station based in Europe for a second disrupt gaming <hes> an or sixteen were their podcast. . Football Post. . And then hots Bondar say one I. . Don't know it was a a whirlwind and I actually do recommend to people break into eastwards to be a freelancer because I wasn't full time for any of those companies and allowed me to be Pretty Nimble in Okay I've worked with these people for a little while like what they're doing here I'm GonNa, go , work here I'm going to go take this other opportunity and so I do recommend that to a lot of students that being a freelancer especially if you still have your parents. . <HES> health insurance to fall back on. . It is the biggest drawback of being a freelancer that you don't have health insurance or you don't have the benefits that come with it, , and if you have your parents health insurance, , actually you get that safety blanket right out of school, , and you also get the flexibility to start with a bunch of different schools so as I recommend for sure. . Share. . A lot of options and it gives you more of your own scheduling and timing pacing. . You can choose when you're ready to work. . Definitely. . But justice took a different path like I. . said, , there's no one clear path he started with these forces at work and he still works at sports that honestly that consistency is pretty nice and you're allowed to advance through company and learn a lot more when you're in a consistent environment, , what's been your favorite part of working for sports network over the years? ? I think my favorite part and part of it is lucky that we're a small company and one of the leaders here is that I get to choose the WE WANNA run. . Like If we want to cover more league of legends content this week maybe because we'll actually do this week world's drawings everything, , but I get to be able to choose and shift the focus of where we need to be and where I think we need to improve sometimes it's little more overwatch content. . Sometimes, , we need to cut the slack and. . Out Rainbow six for a little bit but. . A lot of options and I like being able to. . Help influence lead the company. .

Mitch intern justin amine editor Ben
Andr Leon Talley on 'The Chiffon Trenches'

The Book Review

03:20 min | 1 year ago

Andr Leon Talley on 'The Chiffon Trenches'

"When I wrote this I my first book was basically a Beautiful Ahmad to those two ladies, and then I, did cover some of the things about upgrade my background, but I do not go into the depths of what I have gone into this you find trenches initial find trenches in his epistle of love to the important narrative of my life getting. Under upbringing North Carolina all the way to twenty twenty. I go to the decades of when I was at the top of my career vote. In sitting in the front row in. Daily experiencing racism, sexism ageism, all of that and I decided to I had to be very very raw, an honest within a degree, and I told the truth about many things that I never spoken before one being my sexual abuse in childhood. Then I told things that had never been told before about how I experienced racism in the world of fashion. As the there are two different books. occas of sort of a a jewel of book and I'm very proud that I is well because. Of How these two women shaped my life, and became very important factors in my life how they overlaps, it's women, one of African American domestic made for fifty years of her life at Duke University, the other woman a mentor. Editor. Chief evoke in the sixties, and then she went onto the museum. The Metropolitan. When she created the modern fashion exhibit is thanks to her that people now have major fashion exhibits in museums globally. There's not one that has not been influenced by the work of the. So, is there a point in that seventeen year interim between these two books where you thought to yourself, you know I've left something out, or I need to go back and tell a fuller story now. That was never a point like I always just say I had an uncle, said just keep getting up everyday. Just keep getting so I never thought about it in seventy years. I've gotTA write my second memoir. My Document Jerry came out in twenty eighteen the Gospel according to Andrei benefits by the second memoir, because the response of people the outpouring of love. From that documentary was so beautiful. The response I got from People Street. Some people would see the film in the audiences. Remarkable so wonderful, and he gave me the confidence to write the Second Watch. The second while was born from the document. Jerry and I saw the duck return. I loved it by the way I loved what Kate Novak did what we did as collaborators, and then I decided well I. Think I. should not my memoir a second I only. But it never headed for seventeen years I left out. I never thought that I was GONNA. Write another one. My agent David Vigilante took me around, and it'd be had meetings with different companies, different companies, and we got to Pat Buchanan at Random House, and that was one on Friday and Saturday what he called me and he said. Random House is ready to preempt all offers an idea and said well I'm GonNa do it I did it and I have never looked back

David Vigilante Jerry Random House North Carolina Duke University Kate Novak Editor
A jetpack company just reached a major milestone in our quest to fly like Iron Man

Kim Komando

01:33 min | 1 year ago

A jetpack company just reached a major milestone in our quest to fly like Iron Man

"Calls it's time now for special feature that I like to call tomorrow's tech today because I want to take a look at where exactly the future is headed and this week we're gonna start with a staple of the sci fi world for many years it's the jet pack and you really need to watch this if you have a commando community membership you see the crown prince of Dubai shared a video of her French wingsuit pilot and it definitely looks like something out of a movie he's wearing the jet wing made by a company called jet man do by editor chief to major milestone BC before now I was at a loss from helicopters that's scary but for the first time the jetway was able to take off from the ground soar into high altitude flight about six thousand feet into the air is powered by for many jet engines pretty slick you can turn come to a full stop however and the pilot was able to reach speeds of almost a hundred fifty miles per hour climbing three thousand feet in thirty seconds before deploying a parachute what do you think crash you ready you are yes sure I'll do it I will be that person who can do just strap it on and just go for it my hands are getting sweaty just watching that video he goes up so high he's so fast and he looks like a month because of the antenna as a bonus hello yeah it can it can only stay airborne for thirty minutes so you can't go far but I was the good thing and good thing the Ironman didn't fall in the water because that would be the I. on man the candidates for the flat iron man the definitely yes

Dubai Editor
CES 2020: Let's see how tech envisions the new decade

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:35 min | 1 year ago

CES 2020: Let's see how tech envisions the new decade

"It is the start of a New Year and here in the land of tax and business that means CAS. It's the massive consumer consumer electronics show that dominates the tech industry for the week. That it hits Las Vegas in early January every year. I'll be there this week covering the event so we'll a lot of other tech journalist including wired editor chief Nicholas Thompson now historically has been a Physi- and fund celebration of Gadgets and TV's and drones and phones but in the last couple years the sentiment towards tech has turned a bit. I ask Nick Thompson. A new focus on privacy and the Tech Lash would be felt at the show this year. I think they're gonNA sidestep it again. I think that maybe you'll feel the response to the tech clash ten percent of the. Maybe it was five percent percent last year. He'll have a little more response. A few more gadgets that are designed to protect your privacy. Few more gadgets. That are designed at limiting surveillance but last year I showed up and I said you know what this is the year where CS response to attack lash first product saw was basically device that sells all. Your babies dated needed. Anybody let's talk about five G.. The next generation of wireless do you think that will actually give us some insight into what to expect from it. That isn't mostly marketing. Yes in five interesting because we think of it as one technology in one moment that will happen one day but but of course. It's not that right. It's chips that are compatible with five G. devices devices that work on five G. networks building those five G. networks than having applications that are specifically built for that so they're about a hundred steps in the equation to get us to five jeep and so we'll see improvements at each and every step. My plan is to go in there looking for products that genuinely don't work on four G. and will only work on five G. and then I'm going to try to think about what exactly those are. And what those will tell us about the five G. Future there has been pretty regular criticism last year in particular including for me there was criticism of CAS giving an award award to accompany that. made a sex toy for women than took back the award then gave it back again. They're kind of still working on proper representation. I guess so. You could say in a keynote lineups and across the show. What's your sense of? How has responded over the last year? Will I think that on the question of representation. I think like most of technology. It's become a far bigger question than it was was when you're over two years ago or three years ago and it's also with an event like CBS for you. Have you know a lot of legacy slot. Yes and similar companies with similar people with similar booths from year to year. It's like turning turning a large ship and harbor so I think that there is change range and it's not as fast as one might think on the sex toys thing. I think they'll be huge right last year. You couldn't show award award-winning sexual. I think this year they'll be tons of sex toys which is appropriate both for gender parody and also. Because it's Las Vegas right so we're going into the twenty twenty. I know that every year. There's this conversation about will there be anything new. Should there be anything truly new. But I feel like the pressure is on to start a new decade with something cool right. Do you expect to see anything. Truly new like is if there was ever a year to land a spaceship on top of the Convention Center like this is the year right. I think the nature of those that it's impossible to have something truly new because if you had something within truly knew it would be at one small booth in the corner one year and then maybe three or four companies would have the same idea something similar and so there would always be people will for whom it was new and people for whom it wasn't new so the notion that there's GonNa be some kind of device or some kind of idea that will completely completely blow your mind. I think is unlikely. But there's GonNa be all kinds of great stuff that we've barely seen before. I'm super interested in foldable. Oh glass for example right. We've seen it out there. A little bit hasn't quite worked yet. Probably it's not going to really work this year either but we'll be further along than we were last year. I'm excited buffet glass. I actually think that the yeah. It looks really neat. I WanNa see it get better. What do you think we're GONNA see? I mean so. We're obviously also in the middle of the tariff tariff war. We're in the middle of China really building arguably a parallel tech economy. What do you think we'll see from Chinese manufacturers? I think we're going to see a fair amount last year. There were many more Chinese companies that had ever seen before at. CAS part of that is because China's been catching up all kinds of ways to the US tech sector but this year is GonNa be tricky because China's tack is way more advanced but we've also driven a wedge between the two countries while we being put on the entities list US companies told. They can't work with wow way. It is harder for the Chinese companies in the US companies to work together

Las Vegas United States China Nick Thompson Nicholas Thompson Editor G. Networks Convention Center CBS
"editor chief" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"editor chief" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"And violin lessons **** the medical issues and her medical bills forced to run to the street she's homeless she's beautiful I know and she's singing this she's standing on a subway platform train platform in LA with a shopping cart okay I in my imagination there's such an image with that that is so powerful and now she became a street musician playing her violin to try to make some money just to eat and then instrument was stolen so she started singing in the subway a video of her on that empty platform in Korea town was posted by the Los Angeles Police Department over the weekend they posted it and it would viral okay now now the hope is if it goes viral something great's gonna happen right and something happens so Grammy nominated music producer Joel diamond says he has drafted an offer letter for some more got out he hopes to make a huge like classical EDM crossover hit record for the subway soprano do you know how big that things gonna be yeah I'm gonna sell that thing like how boring then it's so cool yeah and it's nice to see something good happen for her help works out for her I mean what it what a story she has I mean having her violin still land and she's not even a classically trained singer she's lost between musician but listen to her voice and not have it and not just the individual story but you couple that with the disaster in Los Angeles right now I know what the home which I so so sad and you know that the hopefully this can be maybe this is one of those moments culturally that turns the tide you how you know help in all right if you want to make some moves in your own career you can join us November fourteenth for becoming fearless it's a women's conference is that the hair center in Folsom we'll hear from Kate white the former editor. chief of cosmopolitan magazine as well as a New York times bestselling author all be there it's gonna be a great event November fourteenth Harris center dot net for tickets vaping why did it take so long for us to figure out how dangerous it can be the scientists on the cutting edge of the new research coming up in the next half hour Christina men don sat and Sam Shane trust worthy objective with.

Los Angeles Police Department Grammy Joel diamond Los Angeles Folsom cosmopolitan magazine Korea producer Kate white editor. New York times bestselling Harris center Christina Sam Shane
"editor chief" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

08:10 min | 2 years ago

"editor chief" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Beautiful southern California thirty bringing you the greatest in bumper music and the greatest guest editor chief of ricochet, my friend. John Gabriel John Joe Biden is in the race. Go. Oh my gosh. Ridiculous. Has entered the race. I'm gonna join the hell out of this. That's about all I can say watching Joe Biden of all people. What does he forty seven hundred forty eight? That's what he has done is then Keith Richards. And looks at. Yeah. He's a showed a few miles. But. Watch him try to win the woke Olympics that is the modern Democratic Party is going to be so hilarious. I can't wait. Well, look when I think inter sexual intersection rally inter section -ality. I think. Doddering Caucasian with hair plug challenges. So I mean, he's he's in a lot of key demographics. You know insurance salesman. For bad insurance, bad term insurance. It's. He's he's the worst. It's going to be fun to also watch them because every month you'll be able to tell when he can't really make expressions anymore. He just got his new poll toxic Jackson's so it's gonna be penalized. Watching carries several years ago. You'd think at the you think if he doesn't get the nomination he's going to stand up on the stage covered in. Vegan paves blood slamming the door shut museums. Tele Connectik powers to recall, unholy revenge. Carey. Harry to camera Harris is the PJ souls of the democrat party discuss. Yeah. Sean young fan. Yeah. It's just oh gosh. Just watching him fumbling around the thing is to he'll ask ran in two thousand eight and you know, what is literally the last time we could run. Yeah. Yeah. It was one percent in the polls. I think really looking at it. I think it kind of animates his candidacy and Liz Warren's I think both of them are just kicking themselves. No, Iran constantly because they went holy crap. I could've won the nomination in twenty sixteen. I don't know. But I think they're just all of it. Just kind of like this last opportunity to like vows might time. I know I don't see and just Hannibal is going on the Democrats now. Jumps in just that the dumps on him. Pretty amazing. Here's a theory that I have heard floated by his producer, the generally Simodo that there is a real live metoo out there for Joe Biden. Now toast, grope, dude. But he's got this reputation as kind of a friendly guy in his his kind of hands Innis is played for laughs. What do you think the chances are that somebody out there has got a real metoo incident in his or her or, sir? I don't want to miss gender any of the five million democrat candidates pocket. Waiting for the right time to dump it. You think that's a possibility? Oh, I think that's definitely a possibility. And he's just always do, you know, and he's on weirdo. Yeah. He's just a strange guy. I know probably heard stories too. Two. Secret service guys who have interesting stories about does slow Joe Biden, I'm gonna take a naked swim wanna watch. You're not a Kennedy. But that away the car in there before. And there's a car in the pool. Teddy's home to the compound. Yeah. Yeah. I would not be surprised at that. And timing is everything I don't think that they would go in with this yet. Really, you know, we're paying attention to most of the democratic voters aren't paying attention to it at this point. And I think they would time for maximum packed especially out for that gal kind of tried to attack me to very minor may and it sailed. So I think they're going to hold off on on that armament. But gosh, if they could allege that taverna was running gang rape brings you know, just because he liked beer. I've you know, they could cope with anything on Biden. It's going to get really ugly for the Mets. What do you think of Biden groveling to Anita hill when he should be groveling apology to Clarence Thomas? Right. It's just he's trying to win over one thing. That's been entertaining as well. And really everyone before they've entered the democratic free. You'll see the month before they announced their candidacy. They apologize every day for some evil sin against the woke that they you know need to attend. They'll be ever going to forgive them for and Biden was apologized racist here policies for groping that woman. I apologize for Jackie Nita. Hell I you know, it's just one thing after another and this guy he just one's off at the mouth. He's he's gonna be drop or another, you know, gas every other day, and he won't be able to apologize SAS enough. It's just going to be a big joke. He's dropping gaffes like a rapper drops runs. Joe, and he's busting a move look. Yeah. I I can't help. But think that there with, you know, six hundred and fifty thousand Democrats running for the nomination, and they're all running to the left to cross the woke finish line that there's room louver on the relative right for somebody says. Yeah, I'm not gonna apologize because my great grandfather came from Edinburgh, and I'm not gonna polish is. 'cause you know, I'm a dude. And I am dude. And identify as dude, and I will always identify as dude. And I'm not going to apologize for any of this. And I further think a lot of your political correctness sister souljah is stupid. But you think there's room for that? Oh, they're completely is room for that. In the media will hate every second of it. But those are the majority of democratic voters people who just checked when they turned eighteen and never bothered to change it. And you have a lot of voters out there. Like cramp, these people talking about you anytime? Anything happens are smashing Starbucks window that they're like that person doesn't represent me. So it will be interesting to see if somebody can thread that needle. But there's a lot of rules or racing the left so quick. And not where the American people are in. I'm sorry. That's not where the majority of democratic voters. Are nobody seems to be trying to do it? Now, Joe when he came out with his message yesterday, which is I'm Ryan this race because half, you Americans horrible racists. He also he explained his goal. Let me let me just play. You short eleven second clip number five. Please. Yes. Merican coming.

John Gabriel John Joe Biden Democrats Democratic Party Keith Richards California Liz Warren Sean young editor Starbucks Mets salesman Iran democrat party Carey Jackson Innis Hannibal Jackie Nita Clarence Thomas Teddy
"editor chief" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"editor chief" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Pain to get their children into elite colleges has shocked the nation. Meanwhile, a more prevalent and insidious problem campus, politics and intolerance goes unnoticed. The latest comes at Hoster where students demanded that a Thomas Jefferson statue be removed since it represents a legacy of racism, and bigotry never mind that the author of the declaration of independence fought slavery. It his first draft called for abolition students ignorance of history, and judging leaders of the past my today's standards, create intolerance and weaken education. Meanwhile, at Oregon state came a cold abandoned veterans student association from using a student lounge on campus students said they were vulnerable to the ideological and practical consequences of letting veteran students meet their campus intolerance may not be criminal. But it is every bit as dangerous. I'm David Davenport. The Pepperdine graduate school of public policy impacting policy decisions today, preparing public leaders for tomorrow. America first with Dr Sebastian Gorka, eight sixty the answer. Mr. ROY can use that every day. Okay. Yes, indeed living at the speed of Trump feels like plumbing down the highway in an M G with your backside about two inches off the Tomek and life is a highway especially when you're gonna analyze with people like rotting Qassam, but you the global editor in chief of human event. I envy. Global editor editor chief except for the Brexit local editor. Regional national. Great to have you in the building. He's just Instagram doubt. The fact that we are here to.

editor editor in chief Thomas Jefferson Dr Sebastian Gorka David Davenport Oregon Trump Mr. ROY America Brexit M G two inches
"editor chief" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

06:35 min | 2 years ago

"editor chief" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"FM talk in the triangle and ninety four five W P T I in the triad. Continuing our conversation here at eight twenty two. Patrick alley editor chief big league politics the website that to last week. Maybe you had not heard of in. Now, you have because they were the ones out I with the with the picture the infamous picture that according to governor Northam he was in. And then he wasn't in from the medical school yearbook. There was a period of time between when you publish that. When Twitter was really interesting because at that point, then Twitter wants to take the well, nobody's verified this. You can't believe those guys because who the hell are they and then it was I think the second verification was the pilot where somebody walked down and independently verified, it what was what were you guys just sitting back where you re talking with people on social media, or I mean, how do you played at that point? Where people have maybe learning about you for the first time and with his many websites are out. Out there. This is your moment to get the name recognition. Are you are you engaging? Our other reporters calling you or they independently verified. Yeah. There are other reporters calling and trying to take credit. Of course, reporters are real scumbags. In terms of trying to know other people will say we had to protect our turf a little bit. We weren't watermarked the photo. Yeah. Very important. No. But I mean, are they calling you and and not were they calling you and saying, hey, let's go and get you on right now where the calling you and saying. How can we go verify this? I mean, what will I I don't I'm asking the wrong question here. Where were they taking you seriously when you were interacting with the because you're not a legacy media is speaking of scumbags, they they are. They can't stand. The fact that they're the whole models changing. Yep. And so they have to beat this out of existence because you scoop them on it. Right. Was that happening almost at the Geico. Yeah, they were trying to get the photo without the watermark. So they could take credit. That's okay. And let's talk about the media. The media actually has played several components here. The first of which is that was the get out of jail free card for the Lieutenant governor saying that the Washington Post they've seen these allegations. They said that there's red flags they were unable to corroborate. It's a bunch of nothing the Washington Post push back were you surprised by that? Yeah. I was surprised by I think is progress. I mean, look this. This woman Vanessa Tyson is a Stanford fellow. He's a liberal woman. She's been photographed with Nancy Pelosi. Okay. This isn't a right wing plant. This is a woman who genuinely believes that she was sexually assaulted in a hotel room at the democratic national convention while this Fairfax guy was working as the body man for John Edwards, by the way. Okay. So look this is a credible allegation. And the fact that the Washington Post covered it up and spike, the story in the first place proves that they have an agenda and the great thing about these stories that we've broken is. The narrative is breaking down. The narrative is being complicated in ways where people are realizing that the Democrats are in the clan hoods and some of the worst metoo offenders were listener for the just before we get into your tent. I my take is that we've gone too far on how. What were the amount of weight that were attaching to things that happened in in in these cases before I was born from a on standpoint. And when I was in my infancy, but these are the ground rules that we've been told that we have to play by do do you guys think that it's fair for people to be data mined back in the eighties. If if if it wasn't already the rule. And say that this is the person they are now look at the fact that governor north on put this in his twenties and a medical school professional yearbook means very clearly that he was trying to get the message out to other professional people that these were his beliefs. This was not a stupid highschool party. This was a professional signal other people that he was involved in this kind of racist activity. So absolutely because you know, this isn't a stupid gaffe. This is his ideology, this is what he believes I do feel that the media has gone recently so out of control attacking the Covington Catholic heads, for instance, setting them up really and just going around and targeting private citizens. People are tired of being harassed by the media. They don't wanna see Jim Acosta from CNN on their foot lawn. And so I think with this story, you know, we're going to have a national conversation about media ethics and how the media needs to stop acting like the mafia because the people that they're protecting in the democrat party are guilty of some pretty. Bad things to or if you're going to go out, and you're going to be a jerk, and you're going to be on people's lawns. At least commit to be on everybody's long. Yeah. Harassing that. Remember, the lady that they were harassing who had forwarded something on Facebook. But it was a secret Russian plan to four lazy. You know, get off my lawn. Meanwhile, the entirety of the organization for that Charlotte event that caused a truck to be arson an interstate to be blocked the da same deal. And I the re they didn't cover that portion of it two minutes left. And I guess my question would be you got anything else. Like, you're going gonna go for three for. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You know? I thought herring was going to be number three. But they preempted us. Yeah. We're we're going for three four definitely not question about it. So stay tuned to big league politics. Getting like a timeframe on that. Oh, yeah. We're we're in real time. We are kicking out the jams and just covering every development that happens as these guys try to hang on. But I think they're going to start resigning pretty soon. Oh and actually had because I can't not ask this question. How the hell did the GOP not get that? Who's who was who's doing Otto for those guys? The GOP is an extremely incompetent cowardly party. Yeah. I would not disagree with that. Which is why I don't get invited the parties in in in that instance, here right now, this is great. Thank you know, it's easy to say Glaspie should get his money back, but damage nature this time. All right. Well, I I really thank you guys. Patrick Halley big league. Just wanna make sure have the URL rights. So that we re tweeted big league politics, politics dot com. Okay. Wanna make sure I didn't screw that up Ross's..

Washington Post Twitter GOP governor Northam Patrick alley Geico Nancy Pelosi editor Washington Jim Acosta Patrick Halley Vanessa Tyson democrat party Facebook Glaspie CNN
"editor chief" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"editor chief" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"Our guest today is Franklin four. He's a staff writer for the Atlantic. He's the former editor chief of the new Republic, and he's the author of the recent book world without mind. The existential threat of big tech Franklin. Welcome to if then beer the news. This week is that digital media outlets and print media. Let's have been laying people off laying off journalists. So BuzzFeed laid off fifteen percent staff. Huff post laid off seven percent of its staff Gannett laying off reporters that papers across the country. How does that tie in to this knowledge monopoly that you see companies like Google and Facebook, acquiring and maintaining? I think BuzzFeed is probably the best example that we should really zoom in on. Because in so many ways it is the quintessential media company of the Facebook era that when it was created by Jonah Peretti in more than ten years ago. The the business model for the company was all about creating content that would go viral Peretti. Of course was studied at MIT media lab, re became obsessed with the the concept of what make something go viral in that he'd to Huffington Post, and he saw the emergence of of social networks and wanted to create a business that could explain the power of the networks to produce content. That would that would become wildly viral. I think as time has gone on. It's clear that instead of mastering the platform BuzzFeed in some ways. Mastered by the platform, and so it I thought that it couldn't it wouldn't have to rely on Facebook for advertising revenue because so much of its advertising revenue was gonna come through was called native advertising where they were they were working with firms brands specifically designed advertising that was bedded BuzzFeed site in that was a little bit confusing to dentist, but that model didn't really work. And so then started to try to sell the same sort of digital advertising that Slade or the Washington Post or vox cells. But the problem is is that in that world of digital advertising. There's just no beating the platforms that accompany like Facebook or Google both has more data than BuzzFeed or any other company as in therefore can identify audiences better. But also just given their scale in the volume of advertising that they have they can competently. Undercut the competitors in the marketplace, they can always sell advertising cheaper because they just have so many damn eyeballs. And so we've emerged in this world where Facebook in Google have become this duopoly where they control over seventy percent of the advertising market. It's simply become hard for anybody else to compete in the tragedy of BuzzFeed is that they in some ways represented media's best hope that they were the company that best mastered. This new era that had the most the best technology the best digital savvy and yet as we seen from these layoffs. They just couldn't could hack it on the scale that they initially planned one. We're all using the same conduit to reach readers, our listener subscribers or whatever, I guess readers in this case, we all start publishing the same thing. And, you know, even though maybe more people are reading than ever, we have all this free content. We're actually kind of telling the same story over and over again. It's a demise of localism, but it's also homogenization of content. I'm wondering if you could speak to that is one of the ultimate ironies of the internet, which is supposed to be this niche defied highly customized personal space where you get what you want you find your little communities and yet the incentive structure for media in a world governed by fish book in Google is to produce to this kind of lowest common denominator. And really, I think the key term of our era is trending that all try to producing 's that are on a subject that at the trail head of a descent to popularity and we're all trying to scrape traffic from precisely the same subjects and part of this is the tyranny of data in the way in which we allow data to dictate the judgments of the industry, but it's also it's as I think you're suggesting it it's just embedded in this. Were all trying to we all we all of you traffic as something that we can glean from the platforms. And so then we're playing by the platforms rules, and the platforms are pushing us in a certain direction towards the the same conversation. Right. And so the fact that we now get our news largely from Google from Facebook instead of opening the.

Facebook BuzzFeed Google staff writer Jonah Peretti Gannett Huffington Post Washington Post Huff fifteen percent seventy percent seven percent Slade
"editor chief" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"editor chief" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"Our guest today is Franklin four. He's a staff writer for the Atlantic. He's the former editor chief of the new Republic, and he's the author of the recent book world without mind. The existential threat of big tech Franklin. Welcome to if then beer the news. This week is that digital media outlets and print media. Let's have been laying people off laying off journalists. So BuzzFeed laid off fifteen percent of staff. Huffpost laid off seven percent of its staff Gannett is laying off reporters that papers across the country. How does that tie in to this knowledge monopoly that you see companies like Google and Facebook, acquiring and maintaining? I think BuzzFeed is probably the best example that we should really zoom in on. Because in so many ways it is the quintessential media company of the Facebook era that when it was created by Jonah Peretti in beg more than ten years ago. The the business model for the company was all about creating content that would go viral Peretti. Of course was studied at the MIT media lab, re became obsessed with the the concept of what make something go viral in that he'd Huffington Post and he saw the emergence of of social networks and wanted to create a business that could exploit the power of the networks to produce content. That would that would become wildly viral. I think as time has gone on. It's clear that instead of mastering the platform BuzzFeed in some ways. Mastered by the platform, and so it I thought that it couldn't it wouldn't have to rely on Facebook for advertising revenue because so much of its advertising revenue was gonna come through was called native advertising where they were they were working with firms brands specifically designed advertising that was embedded in BuzzFeed site, and that was a little bit confusing to a dentist, but that model didn't really work. And so then started to try to sell the same sort of digital advertising that Slade or the Washington Post or vox cells. But the problem is is that in that world of digital advertising. There's just no beating the platforms that accompany like Facebook or Google both has more data than BuzzFeed or any other media company has in there four can identify audiences better. But also just given their scale in the volume of advertising that they have they can competently. Undercut the the competitors in the marketplace, they can always sell advertising cheaper because they just have so many damn eyeballs. And so we've emerged in this world where Facebook in Google have become this duopoly where they control over seventy percent of the advertising market. It's simply become hard for anybody else to compete in the tragedy of BuzzFeed is that they in some ways represented media's best hope that they were the company that best mastered. This new era that had the most the best technology the best digital savvy and yet as we seen from these layoffs. They just couldn't couldn't hack it on the scale that they initially planned one. We're all using the same conduit to reach readers, our listener subscribers or whatever readers in this case, we all start publishing the same thing. And, you know, even though maybe more people are reading than ever, we have all this free content. We're actually all kind of telling the same story over and over again. It's a demise of localism, but it's also homogenization of content. I'm wondering if you could speak to that is one of the ultimate ironies of the internet, which is supposed to be this niche highly customized personal space where you get what you want you find your little communities and yet the incentive structure for media in a world governed by Facebook and Google is to produce to this kind of lowest common denominator. And really, I think the key term of our era is trending that all try to produce things that are on a subject that at the trail head of a descent to popularity and we're all trying to scrape traffic from precisely the same subjects in part of this is the tyranny of data in the way in which we allow data to dictate the judgments of the industry, but it's also as I think you're suggesting it it's just embedded in this. Were all trying to we all we all you traffic as something that we can glean from the platforms. And so then we're playing by the platforms rules, and the platforms are pushing us in a certain direction towards the the same conversation. Right..

Facebook BuzzFeed Google staff writer Jonah Peretti Gannett MIT Washington Post Slade fifteen percent seventy percent seven percent ten years
"editor chief" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

04:56 min | 2 years ago

"editor chief" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"Guess today is Franklin four he's a staff writer for the Atlantic. He's the former editor chief of the new Republic, and he's the author of the recent book world without mind. The existential threat of big tech Franklin. Welcome to if then beer the news. This week is that digital media outlets and print media. Let's have been laying people off laying off journalists. So BuzzFeed laid off fifteen percent of its staff. Huffpost laid off seven percent of its staff Gannett laying off reporters that papers across the country. How does that tie in to this knowledge monopoly that you see companies like Google and Facebook, acquiring and maintaining? I think BuzzFeed is probably the best example that we should really zoom in on. Because in so many ways it is the quintessential media company of the Facebook era that when it was created by Jonah Peretti in beg more than ten years ago. The the business model for the company was all about creating content that would go viral Peretti. Of course was studied at the MIT media lab, re became obsessed with the the concept of what make something go viral in that he'd Huffington Post, and he saw the emergence of of social networks and wanted to create a business that could explain the power of the networks to produce content. That would that would become wildly viral. I think as time has gone on. It's clear that instead of mastering the platform BuzzFeed in some ways. Mastered by the platform, and so it I thought that it couldn't it wouldn't have to rely on Facebook for advertising revenue because so much of its advertising revenue was gonna come through was called native advertising where they were they were working with firms brands to specifically designed advertising that was embedded in BuzzFeed site, and that was a little bit confusing to a dentist, but that model didn't really work. And so then started to try to sell the same sort of digital advertising that Slade or the Washington Post or vox cells. But the problem is is that in that world of digital advertising. There's just no beating the platforms that accompany like Facebook or Google both has more data than BuzzFeed or any other media company has in therefore four can identify audiences better. But also just given their scale in the volume of advertising that they have they can competently. Undercut the the competitors in the marketplace, they can always sell advertising cheaper because they just have so many damn eyeballs. And so we've emerged in this world where Facebook in Google have become this duopoly where they control over seventy percent of the advertising market. It's simply become hard for anybody else to compete in the tragedy of BuzzFeed is that they in some ways represented media's best hope that they were the company that best mastered. This new era that had the most the best technology the best digital savvy and yet as we seen from these layoffs. They just couldn't could hack it on the scale that they initially planned one. We're all using the same conduit to reach readers, our listener subscribers or whatever readers in this case, we all start publishing the same thing. And, you know, even though maybe more people are reading than ever, we have all this free content. We're actually all kind of telling the same story over and over again. It's a demise of localism, but it's also homogenization of content. I'm wondering if you could speak to that is one of the ultimate ironies of the internet, which is supposed to be this niche defied highly customized personal space where you get what you want you find your little communities and yet the incentive structure for media in a world governed by Facebook and Google is to produce to this kind of lowest common denominator. And really, I think the key term of our era is trending that all try to produce things that are on a subject that at the trail head of a descent to popularity and we're all trying to scrape traffic from precisely the same subjects in part of this is the tyranny of data in the way in which we allow data to dictate the judgments of the industry, but it's also it's as I think you're suggesting it it's just embedded in this. Were all trying to we all we all of you traffic as something that we can glean from the platforms. And so then we're playing by the platforms rules, and the platforms are pushing us in a certain direction towards the the same conversation. Right..

Facebook BuzzFeed Google staff writer Jonah Peretti Gannett MIT Washington Post Huffington Post Slade fifteen percent seventy percent seven percent
"editor chief" Discussed on National Defense Magazine Podcast

National Defense Magazine Podcast

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"editor chief" Discussed on National Defense Magazine Podcast

"Chiefs of staff was the highest ranking US official conference was left to him to sherpa -ticipant s- that the United States will meet international security commitments for seventy years. United States has been the leader of the free world along with silence has guaranteed survival of the national order. Admiral Philip Davidson of Indo Pacific command reiterated loveless sentiment. He described the United States enduring Pacific power that will not change we could not leave region. Even if we wanted to. US congressional delegation met the press unr- asked about the disconnect between what was said by US military leaders of the conference and the rhetoric from the White House, ignore the president's words and the tweets look at the actions maker said Senator Jeanne Shaheen the Scher said there's a bipartisan commitment congress invest in the world and to continue to be engaged Senator Roger wicker Republican for Mississippi. So the president says he's not a globalist. He's a nationalist yet. He sending his secretary of state all over the world Ryan solve problems. One wonders what the late Senator John McCain lives about all this. This has been Stu Magnusson editor chief of national fence. Check out our blog and read more defense and homeland security stories in January twenty nineteen issue of national defense at WWW dot national defense, magazine dot org.

US Senator John McCain Admiral Philip Davidson Senator Jeanne Shaheen Senator Roger wicker president Stu Magnusson Indo Pacific unr Mississippi official editor White House Scher Ryan seventy years
"editor chief" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

NBC Meet the Press

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"editor chief" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

"Welcome back panelists here. Matthew continental editor chief of the Washington free beacon, former congresswoman Donna Edwards of Maryland. NBC news Capitol Hill correspondent and host of Casey DC on MSNBC, Casey and David Brooks columnist for the New York Times. Let me put ear speaking of the New York Times, David your newspaper. I did a pretty good job of trying to show what equivalent shutdowns with look like in corporate America. So for instance, the department of agriculture being down that's the equivalent of one Goldman Sachs. The department of treasury being shutdowns equal apparently three Facebook's employee wise in the department of interior ten net. Flicks is trying to put some context into this shutdown. David seems to be that's what's missing here. The sense of urgency is make it seem like so good. I mean, I'd love to shutdown Goldman Sachs. You're listening to the conversation. The thing that strikes me is we're the country that one World War Two defeated fascism. We defeated the Japanese we launched this complicated thing. And now, we're have we've shut down our government because we can't decide if it's a concrete wall or a steel fence or a row of ferns. It's just like a sign of government dysfunction and seems to me that answer here is just sitting in front of everyone, which is the wolf at the Dhaka deal. And the reason that has not gotten done is because both sides have loaded up a bunch of stuff on that simple deal and made it impossible for the other side to accept so some basic competence in negotiation would just get us out of this KC. It seems to me Capitol Hill would come up with that compromise. If the president were ball, it's possible. But I mean, Chuck how many times does congress. Do you big complicated? What would have to be bipartisan thing under this kind of deadline. It's simply doesn't work that way. And in this case, the political incentives are just all screwed up. I mean in previous shutdowns usually somebody has been trying to force a. Shutdown because they want to make a political point. That's not the case here. Nobody really wants a shutdown. Certainly congress doesn't want to shut down. And it's it's simply not clear how they get anywhere without somebody simply caving in. I mean, the president has essentially backed himself into a corner. I mean, this is I've covered now more shutdowns than I really care to think about and I do not see a way out of this one. Whereas the others you could see how the political pressure was going to build on one side. It was inevitable that they would eventually cave in the government would reopen. That does not seem to be the case here. Well, that's because many previous shutdowns the two sides arguing for the middle. That's not the case here. In fact, what you have is the Democrats have public opinion behind them public wants the government open, and they don't like the idea of wall, but the president has his Republican party and his supporters strongly behind him. They want the wall, and they're prepared to shutdown partly government..

David Brooks Goldman Sachs New York Times president congress Chuck Casey DC Donna Edwards NBC Maryland MSNBC department of treasury department of agriculture Facebook editor Flicks America Dhaka
"editor chief" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"editor chief" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Horn horn, golden shower experiences. No, not even about that. Dude. It's like a bodily like combustion thing where every time I go on an airplane. I gotta drop a deuce, and I and I do every time. Oh, that's the worst. It's not usually these are pretty good ones in the if something about the altitude in the condensed air, it makes it makes it. Okay. All right. Well, I'm happy for you. I guess I mean, that's great news. It's just like a weird thing every time, and I'm okay with it. On a plane. There you go. All right, Utah. It'd be to like a number two. Thank you. We gotta go. All right. That was a fast. Jason Cole editor chief at fan side is gonna join us talk about the upcoming NFL playoffs. My goodness. Vigilante in here talking about his pope. What are we gonna do? On the. NPR tonight on Cayenne VR six eight. The sports leader. Magic wake up with Murph and MAC. Wow. Now to halt. Yeah. With the replay reviews over it's over it over as a fan. I'm like, I'm almost ready to get rid of all I've been saying that for for rages. I understand getting the call right is important. But I think it's really dramatically affecting our. It's important to get the call. Right. But I got to do..

Horn horn Cayenne VR Jason Cole Murph NFL Utah NPR editor
"editor chief" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

PC Perspective Podcast

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"editor chief" Discussed on PC Perspective Podcast

"That's a nice upgrade path that puts Ray, tracing and more people's hands. Because that's where we're at. We're at that point. Now where this is the future. I mean, right. It's it's that's how long it takes to get. There is a question, but the more Ray tracing capable views. We can put the more GP's with dedicated Richardson, hardware, we can put into the market the better. I agree with you on being the future. Because if you think about the the story of three D, it's always seems like what we had available to us on the P C was a very very small subset of what was being used in like professional production for like three D visual effects. And then, of course, three d animated movies starting with Toy Story in the mid nineties. So Ray tracing is of course, used for big budget three d effects and movies. But it's like rendered over time. The idea of doing it in real time at home is kind of crazy still, and I I need a I probably see a lot more titles that support it before, you know, it really becomes a mainstream thing. But right now, we have battlefield five course is the one that everybody's using the test this we have a dedicated Ray tracing benchmark coming which will be nice. But what else is out there what besides battle? Five where are you race racing? Raider rarely does. Okay. No. It's already a pretty good-looking game to actually. That would be. All right. I'll have to look at that. There's so many things I'm gonna try try this OC scanner thing. And I wanted to try a bunch of, you know, special effects and things, but. In the brief time that I've served as editor chief so far I've had very little time to actually play with anything like I took those architects twenty eight and twenty seventy cards home. And I haven't been able to do anything with them yet. No shadow of the tomb raider for me, unless it's to staring at a benchmark. Yes, you will do much of that. This is your life now. And I know. It's it's cool to have hardware, but it's not as cool to actually, you know, test and write about it ad nauseam. Right. I just feel like I'm being punished because I got it home. And then it was like get ready for the holidays. And then it was the holidays. And now, it's the s I played no games. Of course. My do play games. I'm playing stuff that would run on probably a relatively powerful calculator. So like matrix mystique? Yeah. Yeah. I do want our audio listeners just briefly check out the video of this this episode and look at Sebastian setup. 'cause you if you've watched our episode video shows you've seen where he's in the same location. He has always been. And you wouldn't know it. It's it's those special effects. We're talking about. I'm actually being Ray traced right now in this three D rendered environment. Wow. So that's actually your basement now. Yeah. Wow. That's good. That's fast paint job. You got on there and new Ikya, desks? And well, those are the same ones I've had before this is what I what I've actually tried to do is recreate the office that I used to have before my son was born and kicked me out of my office is my wife insisted that he had his own room. Like why he's so small isn't need his own room. Well, we're seeing the basement basement. Yeah. Yeah. You could. Speaking of speaking of the basement little anecdote for everybody here. My son I found him down here yesterday. I lost him in my house. I have a very small house. It's seven hundred and eighty square feet. I couldn't find him. What's that? You've got a very small son to I do and I couldn't find him anywhere in the house. And I started to freak out the front door is still closed. Locked back door is closed. The I walked to the basement door was closed, and it has one of those like safety handle things on it. So we can open it. I couldn't find him. And I finally just went down to the basement, and he was just walking around. He had an iphone, and he was watching octa noughts, and he was just messing around with stuff down here..

Ray Richardson Sebastian setup editor
"editor chief" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:10 min | 3 years ago

"editor chief" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Alongside Tom Kaine. I'm Jonathan Farrow with futures deeply negative to kickoff. Twenty nine team. We are negative one point one percent on the s&p five hundred the risk aversion bleeding into the effects market with yen strength. Dolly yen down by seven tenths of one percents. Yen strengthen FX market in the bond market. The story shaping up as follows the treasury's yield slapped by three basis points to sixty five from me, Tom. We've got a data point in China sub fifty manufacturing. We've got a similar region Italy. Wow. Put together you have lower German government bond yields, and that's what we have on the Senate dramatically. Basis points lower unless twenty or thirty minutes, there has been a deterioration the tape or not back to where we were when I walked in the door this morning, but it's not. Deteriorating here at eight thirty one you'll yields on ten year piper. In Germany right now is fifteen basis points at the front end on a two year is negative sixty three. And it was only a couple of months ago. The was talking about perhaps raising interest rates in the back end at twenty nine thousand nine I struggling to find anyone that believes the European Central Bank could possibly hike interest rates at any point this year was Tom. Yeah. Well, the backdrop here, of course, is the gaming of all of this is market moves into economic growth. Joining us now Dana Peterson with CitiGroup their North American economist Dana, if I look at the city group, call have you people amended or adjusted your outlook for next year in the last two or three days? Now, we haven't we still expect the fed is going to be raising rates next a couple of times this year potentially in March and certainly the impasse in the federal government is not going to be a major factor in the fed delaying any of the. Activity this year. We'll tightening financial conditions. Be a big factor. Well, I mean financial conditions have tightened a little bit. But there's still quite loose. But I'm certain that the fed is watching that along with all the other economic indicators it pays attention to when it's doing a monetary policy calculus. But at the moment, the economic indicators the continues to surpass economic expectations of the economists the labor market and the household sector everything cows is deeply negative and disappointing. You see that turning around anytime soon? Well, I mean when I look at certainly the fourth quarter the economy still growing pretty robustly the two and a half to three percent range. Yeah. Some of the most recent economic indicators have been a little bit weak. But that is looking at inflation. The fed is looking at certainly labor market. And also, you know, GP still on most of those what we're doing. Well, I mean, we will doing -ticipant some weakening of inflation. Because oil prices are falling and also you have some other underlying factors. And certainly that might cause a considered you hikes this year as you perceive it as an economist are the Mark this has been my theme for this morning. I don't hate to bore people. But do you see markets is rational and normal with their new volatility or there discontinuities here that get your attention. Sure, I think you know, the different markets. There are reacting for different reasons. Certainly in the bond market is. Concerned about the he'll curve flattening. What signals that gives us? I would suggest that different. We haven't had QE in the past kind of muddling the signals of the yield curve, but certainly equity market has been very weak. I think some of that's just a little bit of a steam coming out. But also concerns about the global economy as well as the trade. So then what are you see within your North American purview of Weichel sepals cheap? I mean is this all about the trade war or their investment and consumption dynamics that are leading to these instabilities consumption still being supercharged by tax reform, but we are concerned about the deficit undead with the equity market weakening. That's certainly the signal for investors and certainly with respect to cap ex. They're not going to have another big injection from tax reform this year. And you still have concerns about trade. I guess to end with one final question than today. You say you haven't changed a city view. What is your view on fed costs? Because what we're hearing from guest after guest is a January thirty meeting his very suddenly become important. Yes. Absolutely. I mean, we we we've always had a March a hike a hike in in January, but certainly important for how the fed lessees economy, whether they're overly. Yeah. Rather more concerned about weakening inflation, if they're more concerned about weakening in China, and certainly the trade outlook for the US. And so I definitely think that's gonna be a very important meeting that we should be looking at. So as Dana Peterson was CitiGroup this morning, and this highlights what Bloomberg will do what Bloomberg will do. To forward here with more data and more discussion fed speeches and comments and that can be Michael Mckee tomorrow with Robert Kaplan. We'll have it for you surveillance. Arguably the first major fed interview of the year single-story to focus on now. Tesla rolling percent approaching five percent on the session. We've got a couple of stories that dig into first story to dig into is what is happening with the price of Tesla's the model S model accent model three the echoes Indian artists. Thanks, the prices will be the steps a partial attempt to absorb the cutting federal tax credits. Tom which came in at the end of two thousand eighteen got into twenty nine thousand nine so a slight cuts were absorbed. Some of that for customers. The other story that was just deliveries delivered sixty three thousand one hundred and fifty model threes in the fourth quarter. The estimate was sixty three thousand six hundred and ninety eight. I saw a football commercial while the lions are killing the Packers Chevrolet, they're offering a price cut. I mean the bottom line. John was cars are moving. Right. Well, this one's connected to tax credits. This one's a little bit more idiosyncratic. But I agree with you the broader story for the oil industry right now is that the aren't moving not just the United States locally as well. Yeah. I mean, I just. So the cutting the price of a test back to our our editor chief America's Matthew Winkler, saying look Tesla's out before all the other auto companies. Well, they a really really good into the relatively speaking insensitive stock price, which tells you something about a very small miss which translates into a big full of the stock. Tesla down by ran about four percent this morning. This is Bloomberg. Now, the news New York City. Here's Michael Barr. Thank you very much. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer plan to attend a White House briefing on border security as the government remains partially shut down over funding for border wall. President Trump has invited the congressional leaders to the White House this afternoon. President Trump has responded to send their elect mitt Romney's op Ed piece in the Washington Post. Romney, broadly, criticized President Trump's policies and character arguing that the president has not risen to the mantle of the office. The president tweeting this morning here we go with Mitt Romney. But so fast question will be is he a flake? I hope not the US is demanding answers on the Russian arrest of American Paul Whalen on espionage charges secretary of state, Mike Bombayo says the government is seeking to gain consular access as soon as possible we've made clear to the Russians. Our expectation that we will learn more about the charges come to understand what it is. He's been accused of. And if the detention is not appropriate. We will demand is immediate return Gumbo. Spoke in Brasilia Brazil, global news twenty four hours a day on air and tick tock on Twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty countries. I'm Michael Barr. This is Bloomberg com. Mcan. Thanks so much you now with the.

fed Tom Kaine Bloomberg Tesla Dana Peterson United States Senate Mitt Romney China CitiGroup President Trump Michael Barr Jonathan Farrow treasury president Italy Germany