36 Burst results for "Editor"

Fresh update on "editor" discussed on Geopats Podcasting

Geopats Podcasting

00:45 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "editor" discussed on Geopats Podcasting

"A similar stance that you would take a like bet you leave some second so silence but then again like you like she said when you editing you become your own audience. I your first audience. You have to george. The material the contentious. Any now and editing as spontaneous persists. Y- but what am i. Leave this two seconds of dead a it depends on the content you. It's you could innocent really sad topic very problematic topic and i think this could be an element. It could bring in an elements of something that i shouldn't booths three seconds. I think because apple three seconds it could sound like let's break there so breakage and enforcing it thing inefficiency so it shouldn't be too long for me to seconds is just okay. I hate when you're listening to a podcast. And you think that it stopped do you ever Oh is it still playing. And then i look at my notes out so annoying i usually. I was working with the bbc on a pasta. Was doing with them. And i i've never heard it put it into a numbers like Three seconds but that sounds absolutely right. Maybe that seems like the upper limit but the phrase that this my editor content editor not sound editor was using with me. She said you have it. Land and this is an. I was also doing the nomination. I was hosting this program. So i thought that made a lot of sense. That's just like you said. Silence is an element of sound and dramatic. Posits are overlooked sometimes like radio this major. Now i hate the facing radio lab. I find it really invasive. Doesn't let me stop and think about what i've taken in. It's like boom boom boom boom. There's no time to process. I would rather go let people think about what's been said now with with the question. Ships asked about incomplete thoughts. I i agree with both emily. You wanna keep it natural. I've clients who wanted to get every you know so. We did a season ticket a client and in the first the first episode. There is a lot of you know is an honest. which are they normally by the third episode. They had become super self conscious of it because they'd listen back and but there was still not able to control it right because this is not. That's not who they are. They're not presenters they're not host. They show up for an. They wanted to twelve hours in their lives to do a season and then they go back just being whatever they do so rather than making a conscious effort a conversation she couldn't stop there uh-huh and you know they put it on me to get rid of them. It was impossible. it sounded like robots. Where if you just take every single interjection or vocalized pause out become so clinical and so wrong so eventually we gave them a number like okay. Look this is what it sounds like we can do it. But it's horrible and your listeners are going to know so either stopped hanging in sound really terrible. Sometimes it may situations as well. I just try and find a happy medium like i have a few kinds. That don't like they feel self conscious of the Yeah you so. I just try to be funded middle ground. I'll take why can get away with al. Remove some but then i might. You need to have some of them still in there because it sounds not true and move. Yeah yeah i'm gonna go wrench and all of this i. I tend to take out repeated words if they're if they're so often but it's next to another word in it sounds choppier starts being absolutely positively. Not i don't care what client or my era say staying in there because that will sound on natural nuts happens as a listener when you too many repeated words too many false starts and says so i i think i edit like listen for my clients. I talk with them at the beginning. On what level of that they want. So it's up for my own podcast. I do tend to take out a lot of words and phrases and sounds and mouth. Sounds and all kinds of but silence. I agree with choppy on silence. Islands has powerful. There are moments you want it to be a narrative you take out accent silence during an emotional moment then it feels like the two people talking about the emotional moment aren't actually processing the emotions and that's just really bad. So yeah. Gem is got a comment. And i would like to respond to that Ah tracks and somebody's going. Yeah i definitely taken trainings for hosting interviewing as well and this is what we call radio manners. You shouldn't do that. Because as as host your the what i tell my clients is your the proxy for the listener and as soon as you step in and You're breaking dot intimacy and that illusion that your listeners have that they're part of it and you remind them that you're there and that they're not though. I really really push people not to do that. Unless there's just do whatever you want. I'm gonna mutune okay. So cross talk so chubby. Do you do that just for sounds in crosstalk or do you do it for when people talk over each other to it depends so when i just find their their whole goal is to put forward an idea of brand and there's more formal. There's not much room for crosstalk if that's happening. That's a problem. These are not. These are very structured conversations for general conversation too many panels and again. I think scared them all into behaving themselves. I love radio manners. I'm making a note of fray at two especially when it comes to laughter and not so much us but laughter and talking over each other if it builds momentum. I tend to consciously keep that in because i feel like although it will break the listener poster speaker barrier. I i think it kind of builds emotional connection between the people talking in the podcast. So it really depends. It feels like a lot of these answers are it. depends on that exact clip..

Apple First Episode Two Seconds Third Episode Emily Two People First Three Seconds Twelve Hours Both First Audience TWO George Second GEM Single Interjection
Blackout Hits Iran Nuclear Site in What Appears to Be Israeli Sabotage

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:46 min | 7 hrs ago

Blackout Hits Iran Nuclear Site in What Appears to Be Israeli Sabotage

"To curb. Iran's nuclear ambitions just got a lot harder on saturday. The country announced that it had restarted advanced centrifuges for uranium enrichment at its natanz nuclear facility by sunday and apparent of sabotage took out the sites power grinding to a halt. Iran has blamed the attack on israel which has made no official comment. Israel's prime minister benjamin netanyahu emphasized his country's opposition to iran's nuclear program on is never given up its quest for nuclear weapons and the missiles to deliver them and iran consistently consistently outrageously calls for israel's relation and word towards that goal the nuclear deal known as the joint comprehensive plan of action or. Jcp is an international agreement. Signed in two thousand fifteen in which iran agreed to limit it stocks and enrichment fuel president donald trump took america out of the deal in two thousand eighteen and talks for reentry began in vienna last week but the escalating tensions between iran and israel have made that far trickier. It's not even clear. If tomorrow's talks will proceed. The attack seems to have been the result of an explosive device that was probably smuggled into the natanz plant most likely detonated remotely when they took out the electrical systems and cause some of these centrifuges to fail. Roger mcshane is are middle east editor. The exact details are unclear. But i think what we can be pretty sure about is that israel was behind the attack. And that's because it's not being coy about. It has officials out there who were speaking to reporters off the record of course but they are talking pretty openly about their role in

Iran Israel Benjamin Netanyahu JCP Donald Trump Roger Mcshane Vienna America
Pubs, Hairdressers Set to Reopen as UK Eases Virus Lockdown

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 1 d ago

Pubs, Hairdressers Set to Reopen as UK Eases Virus Lockdown

"England is lifting many off its coronavirus restrictions after months off lockdown. The Prime Minister Boris Johnson, described the move as a major step towards normality, but urged everyone to behave responsibly. Is our business editor Salmon Jack. Shoppers, Jim fans, domestic holidaymakers, outdoor drinks and diners, plus those in need of a haircut will share the government's hated today is an irreversible step towards old and cherished freedoms. Say, Well, the business owners who will be welcoming them back, But this significant easing of restrictions is also an important test. Will customers want will be able to return and sufficient numbers for firms to break even? And if they don't What will it take to make the economy work again? Only two in five. Hospitality venues have any outdoor space on the rules on future indoor opening are still unclear.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Salmon Jack England JIM
Blasting Houston Leaders Over Opposition To New Voting Bills

Houston Matters

02:05 min | 4 d ago

Blasting Houston Leaders Over Opposition To New Voting Bills

"On today's panel houston chronicle editor of opinion. Lisa falkenberg vivian. Ho health economist at rice university and baylor college of medicine and marcus davis the breakfast club restaurant and host of fish grits and politics. Lisa vivian marcus. Welcome to houston matters. Craig thank you panel. Texas lieutenant governor. Dan patrick had some choice. Things to say. Tuesday about the houston area's leaders and voting procedures in the last election cycle patrick speaking at the state capital criticized harris county for twenty four hour drive thru voting and mass mailing absentee ballot applications to eligible county residents all efforts last november to improve voting access during the pandemic. And all of which would be outlawed if senate bill seven passes this session. Patrick noted harris county does not make policy and create law for the rest of the state. He was responding to a monday. Press conference here in houston in which leaders including mayor turner and harris county judge. Lena hidalgo criticized espy seven arguing. It would discourage minority voter participation. turner called the bill. Jim crow two point. Oh echoing criticism of similar legislation in georgia. Patrick called that characterization race baiting the rhetoric is strong from state and local leaders. Over sb seven and voting procedures. Is this good bad or ugly. Lisa falkenberg from the perspective of journalists. It's good because strong rhetoric makes great headlines right from a from a perspective of texan. Just a texan. Who wants my government work. you know. it's bad it's ugly. You did this. This whole argument is just ridiculous because during the presidential election no one at the aftermath. Nobody was screaming. Oh texas has all this fraud always went you know. We need a recount in texas. No everybody was perfectly fine with the way the election ran but afterward things are so bad that we need to have all this reform. Texas is already the hardest state of the union to cast a ballot in. We have no need for more restrictions

Harris County Lisa Falkenberg Vivian Lisa Vivian Marcus Houston Marcus Davis Baylor College Of Medicine Houston Chronicle Dan Patrick Rice University Mayor Turner Lena Hidalgo Patrick Craig Lisa Falkenberg Espy Texas Jim Crow Senate Turner
Officials rush to defend AstraZeneca Covid vaccine after UK, EU blood clot guidance

Today in Focus

02:05 min | 4 d ago

Officials rush to defend AstraZeneca Covid vaccine after UK, EU blood clot guidance

"The oxford astrazeneca vaccine under uncomfortable scrutiny medicines regulators in the uk and the eu have judge that its benefits outweigh any possible risks. But they haven't ruled out a causal link between the vaccine and rare blood clot conditions in a tiny number of recipients resulting. This week in britain's regulator the are recommending alternative vaccines be given two hundred thirty s. All of which is worrying when it comes to competence in this back saying because as the observers science editor robin the key points out the stakes are incredibly high. It is the vaccine which the world depends. Because it's so easy to store and distribute a little cost so it's an incredibly important vaccine for the planet we might in the west. Get away with visors. Madonna's leaves astrazeneca. There's no doubt about it from the guardian. I'm a niche kristalina. Today in focus understanding the risks and rewards of the astra zeneca vaccine robin. When did this start. When did they first notice. But there might be a link between the vaccine and blood clubs. I miss in scandinavia at the leg. Ego muffled memento through dot com the live it will be weakening at astrazeneca seneca walks in norway and denmark. A proper schooners vaccine and they've begun to spot. These links of these tastes on gemini finds. Stop stop stuff. The in china from ministers bondi influence middle astrazeneca forces tiber asthma also advising defiant britain finds cases the british medicines regulator the hra says. It's like done defied. Thirty cases of red blood clots and people who've had the astra zeneca corona virus vaccine.

Oxford EU Britain Astrazeneca Astrazeneca Seneca Robin UK Astra Madonna Scandinavia Norway Denmark Asthma China HRA Red Blood Clots
LG Bows Out of Smartphone Business

News, Traffic and Weather

00:33 sec | 5 d ago

LG Bows Out of Smartphone Business

"For its Electron IX, is bowing out of one sector L G is getting out of the smartphone business. Gizmodo, editor in chief John Biggs says. L G has a long history of memorable phones. Algae made one of the first nexus phones for Google. So it was a was one of the early android phones. The big says Well, phones like the $1000 Wing grabbed the attention of reviewers. Customers didn't always materia. Allies that combined with the growing popularity of Apple and Samsung phones met, LG was forced to cut its losses and the answer that competition is eventually you just have to cut and run. By Michelle

John Biggs Gizmodo Google Samsung LG Apple Michelle
Streaming music services fighting for your ears

Morning Edition

01:47 min | Last week

Streaming music services fighting for your ears

"Has never been more important. You see in the new world of streaming If an artist can create that perfect single, their song will be streamed billions and billions of times, making them anywhere from 2 to $3. Welcome back to for my Mariana Trail that was comedian Trevor Noah, making a music streaming joke while hosting last month's Grammy Awards ceremony. This hour. We've been talking about artist compensation in the age of music streaming and in the age of the pandemic, I'm talking with Cody Fitzgerald and Josephine Shetty, both co founders of the Union of musicians and Allied Workers. And both musicians themselves. Josh can the CEO at Band Camp and not still going? Oh Sky associate editor here at KQED for KQED Arts So Trevor Noah joke on a stage like the Grammy shows that there's pop culture level awareness enough to make a joke that you know the audience will get nasty. Do you think this could be an inflection point? Culturally, where organizing efforts can maybe move the needle on artist? Compensation? Is this movement that will gain momentum? You think Radio. I think for so long music and art in general, such an individualistic pursue and then also not to mention artist kind of a lot of the time feel pressure to project this image of financial success, which makes it really hard to transparently talk about the economic realities of music. So I think just the fact that artists are building collective power and just talking about how much they make out in the open and identifying as workers is actually a big cultural shift, But I think we'll make this Conversation. Keep progressing. And Eric

Trevor Noah Mariana Trail Cody Fitzgerald Josephine Shetty Union Of Musicians And Allied Kqed Arts Grammy Awards Band Camp Grammy Josh Eric
He said, Xi said: America-China ructions

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:53 min | Last week

He said, Xi said: America-China ructions

"Japan's prime minister suge yoshi. He visits the white house this week. One subject will dominate discussions china. Tensions between america and china have been building last week. America accused chinese officials of committing genocide and crimes against humanity in the province of seen john. The mistreatment of its muslim leaguer minority had already been the basis for internationally coordinated sanctions on chinese officials to which china's swiftly responded with its own sanctions on american officials at all a hostile meeting of the two sides last month. The first under the biden some had hoped the relationship would become less heated and confrontational than had become during donald. Trump's presidency instead. It seems only to be deteriorating. I'd say that the us china have gotten off to a pretty rough start under the administration. Gotti epstein are china affairs editor in their public remarks. Everyone from joe biden himself on down. I've tried to make clear that there's not going to be a new page turned in. Us china relations. They have an overall goal to become the leading country in the world the wealthiest country in the world the most powerful country in the world. It's not going to happen on my watch. We saw that play out last month. In alaska in the first high level face to face talks between the us and china secretary state. Antony blinken opened the meeting with china's top diplomat young by referring to concerns over a number of china's domestic and foreign actions including in xinjiang hong kong taiwan cyber attacks on the united states economic coercion toward our allies industry. Young gave a forceful response by the taylor. One million of winning mcquaid susil cheapen wage all basically told the us who are they to lecture china.

China Suge Yoshi United States Gotti Epstein White House Japan Biden Donald Trump Joe Biden Antony Blinken John Alaska Xinjiang Taiwan Hong Kong Mcquaid Susil Taylor Young
Jordanian prince claims he's been placed under house arrest

On the Media

00:54 sec | Last week

Jordanian prince claims he's been placed under house arrest

"In Jordan has issued a statement saying that Prince Hamzah, the half brother of King Abdullah, and the former Crown prince has been asked to stop any actions targeting the country's security and stability while the number of officials have been arrested, our Arab affairs editor, Sebastian Nausea, reports A statement by the Jordanian military said that a former minister, a member of the royal family, and a number of other unnamed officials have been detained. It said that it was part of an ongoing security investigation. As part of this Prince Hans. I was told to hold any actions that might affect Jordan's stability that the military denied reports that have been appearing on other media outlets that Prince Hamzah had himself been arrested. Which is triggered speculation that there may have bean on attempted coup. The events is so far officially confirmed our, however shocking enough in Jordan, where such high level arrests a rare Germany's

Prince Hamzah Sebastian Nausea Jordanian Military King Abdullah Jordan Crown Prince Prince Hans Germany
High-Profile Figures In Jordan Arrested For 'Security Reasons'

On the Media

00:54 sec | Last week

High-Profile Figures In Jordan Arrested For 'Security Reasons'

"Has issued a statement saying that Prince Hamzah, the half brother of King Abdullah, and the former Crown prince has been asked to stop any actions targeting the country's security and stability while the number of officials have been arrested, our Arab affairs editor, Sebastian Nausea, reports A statement by the Jordanian military said that a former minister, a member of the royal family, and a number of other unnamed officials have been detained. It said that it was part of an ongoing security investigation. As part of this Prince Hans. I was told to hold any actions that might affect Jordan's stability that the military denied reports that have been appearing on other media outlets that Prince Hamzah had himself been arrested. Which is triggered speculation that there may have bean on attempted coup. The events is so far officially confirmed our, however shocking enough in Jordan, where such high level arrests a rare Germany's president, Frank

Prince Hamzah Sebastian Nausea Jordanian Military King Abdullah Crown Prince Prince Hans Jordan Germany Frank
Matt Gaetz Is Said to Face Justice Dept. Inquiry

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

01:51 min | Last week

Matt Gaetz Is Said to Face Justice Dept. Inquiry

"Such a skis. That's how one campaign staffer described congressman matt gates after learning about the lurid accusations for which the florida republican is now being investigated. The justice department is looking into whether gates had a sexual relationship with a minor and paid for her to travel with him. Nbc news reports. At gates's communications director abruptly quit quote of quote out of principle. It's not clear what the principal is here but the daily beast reports that republicans have been waiting for years for a matt gaetz scandal daybreak. Why we'll see an end reports a gates used to show nude photos of women. He claimed to have slept with two colleagues on the floor of the united states house of representatives and business insight report. The gates took part in a game that scored female sexual conquests while he was a member of the florida. Legislature matt gaetz is denied that he's ever paid for sex or sexual relationship with a minor. He's not been charged in. The investigation is ongoing joining us. Now is matt fuller. Senior politics editor for the daily beast and cynthia ox me a former federal prosecutor who specialized in sex crime. She's an msnbc legal analyst. Cynthia joining us on the phone. Matt you have been reporting on the story or at least following this story for a long time and you suggested that we'd seen nothing yet. Yeah i think we've got a glimpse of maybe the endgame of this a little bit last night when the new york times reported that The justice department probe might be centered around basically a sex trafficking ring with this friend of his Joel greenberg Florida republican tax collector. On seminal county is insane story. This is a very serious very serious allegations Mckay has denied almost everything here. He keeps saying he's never had sex with a seventeen year old. Last time he had sex with a seventeen year old he was seventeen.

Matt Gaetz Matt Gates Gates United States House Of Represe Justice Department Nbc News Matt Fuller Florida Cynthia Msnbc Joel Greenberg Matt New York Times Mckay
The President Of Brazil Is Facing His Biggest Political Crisis

BBC World Service

01:55 min | Last week

The President Of Brazil Is Facing His Biggest Political Crisis

"The virus is killing more people each day in Brazil than it is anywhere else. And now this week political battle erupted pitting the president gyre Belson Aro against his closest ally, the military. NPR's Philip Reeves has more It was shy. ABORTION. AUTOS BIRTHDAY The other day, he turned 66 Boston out to mark the occasion by coming out of the presidential palace. Lambasting mayors and governors who trying to keep Brazilians off the streets by imposing pandemic restrictions. Thies tyrants are hindering your freedom. Also, now don't tells his supporters you can count on the army to defend your rights. Both tomorrow has a habit of talking about bristles army like this, says Eagle Gill of editor at large at Foley, a newspaper All the terms of all so I was really, really weak. He resorted to the military guys. Sometimes Paulson Arrow even uses the term my army says Kill. Off my army. Come on. It's not the Army's Brazilian army's. Most of that is irony. So it is very, very annoying to them. On Monday, both scenarios suddenly fired his defense minister, apparently because the minister believed Brazil's armed forces should stay out of politics. The next day, the Chiefs of all three services, Army, Navy and Air Force decided to quit in protest that sent a message to the president, says Octavio Amalie, Netto. Professor of political science that they should Tullio Vargas Foundation in Real ish Nero. They made it clear that he is not gonna further politicize the institutional Armored forces. Both tomorrow is NAMI captain from the far right. He was elected with huge support from Brazil's military. Generals hold key government positions. Nettle thinks they've become too close to the Boston Auto Administration. They made a big mistake. They let themselves be associate it with the government. And they benefited

Gyre Belson Aro Philip Reeves Eagle Gill Brazil Paulson Arrow Brazilian Army NPR Army Navy And Air Force Foley Octavio Amalie Boston Tullio Vargas Foundation Chiefs Nami Boston Auto Administration Nettle
Why TripleLift Went With Vista, And How It Will Crack CTV

The Big Story

01:51 min | Last week

Why TripleLift Went With Vista, And How It Will Crack CTV

"I don't know if you heard this. But vista equity partners has acquired a majority stake in triple f reportedly investing one point. Four billion dollars in a deal expected to close q- two so this week on the big story we tripled down and welcome. Guests are eline chief strategy officer and co founder of triple lift. And we're gonna talk about everything. Related to triple lift. I ryan joe managing editor of addicts danger and with me. Is sarah sluice. Hi ryan and of course the aforementioned ariella wine they ryan his there so ari congress on the on the acquisition hasn't closed yet. But i'm kind of curious now that it's been announced like what are the immediate next steps for for you guys so i. The deal has to close. It goes to things like antitrust approval alike and that takes about six to eight weeks but the next phase is sitting down with the partnership at vista and continue to have conversations about where we want to take the growth of triple lift. How do those conversations going to be different from like obviously that you had conversations before when you were talking about the the acquisition. So how'd the conversations like post closing differ. Well now it's real so now we're we're the nature of the discussions are different. Because we're we're on the same side focused on the same goals as a company. We think about things differently now. A month ago we were a potential quiry and where we're sitting today we are potentially an acquirer of other technology companies and so we started switch gears and the tactics. We have from a strategy perspective. Change with the with the new resources and partnership that we have with with this

Vista Equity Partners Ryan Joe Sarah Sluice Ryan Ariella ARI Congress
Clinical trials underway to test jab efficacy for children in the UK

The Leader

02:28 min | Last week

Clinical trials underway to test jab efficacy for children in the UK

"Some queued for hours outside wall substitute library for walk. In short of the coluna virus vaccine. Three thousand jobs were given here during the day earlier. This week it was announced that fifty seven percent of all adults in the uk been given at least one shot but now could the nation's children also joining the lines. Trials are apparently on the way. Our deputy political editor. Nicholas cecil has stored nicholas. How young are we talking about here. Well at the moment scientists and health experts in bristol. The building children's vaccine said they have a study underway involving children who are teenagers. And this is a study using the astra zeneca jab. They're expecting shortly to be given the go ahead to start recruiting younger children as young as five and the reason why they're doing these trials is that so far all. The clinical trials have been adults to check that the vaccine was safe and worked in adults. And now they're checking out with it. It'd be equally safe and effective for for for children for people under eighteen benegas. Do we need to give children a virus facts. Because i thought you know the whole point of them. Going back to school was because young people don't get the serious effects of covid nineteen if the contract. This is a very interesting ethical question children as you say if they do get grown virus they are very unlikely to get the disease severely. But there's a big issue here of nuts about the circulation of the virus so this study will look at whether the vaccine works in children and then the the experts expect decision by the government in the summer about whether to start vaccinating children and professor. Adam finn who's from bristol university one of the leading experts on this. He was explaining that to vaccinate children just for the benefit of other people that that could be questionable and he would feel uncomfortable about that but he explained that actually if vaccinating children meant that the disease was kept under control and that meant that schools could reopen safely in september then there would be a benefit to children and therefore actually giving the jabs to children we would be beneficial only to them but also society

Nicholas Cecil Benegas Astra Nicholas Bristol UK Adam Finn Bristol University
How Three Women Re-Wrote the Story of War

On The Media

02:05 min | Last week

How Three Women Re-Wrote the Story of War

"Before the vietnam war there was a law that banned women from reporting on the front lines of any war for the us. When president johnson refused to officially declare a state of war in vietnam in opening appeared no ban a handful of pioneering women bought one way tickets into the battlefield they had no editors no health insurance and little or no formal training reporter elizabeth becker former washington post war correspondent in cambodia and then npr's foreign editor and then national security correspondent for the new york. Times has just published. You don't belong here. How three women rewrote the story of war. Chronicling catherine lewa a french. Photojournalist franky fitzgerald an american long form journalist and author and kate webb in australian combat reporter elizabeth. Welcome to on the media will thank. You broke his great to be with you. I wanna start with where you started. You give your initial experience very short shrift. When asked why did you cross the ocean to cover a war. When you're so young you said the short answer was a nightmare. I was all too keen to leave behind. My masters adviser had rejected my thesis on the bangladesh war of independence after. I refused to sleep with him and he said one wasn't related to the other. Just tell me what happened. This was nineteen seventy two and there weren't that many women in graduate school and he made a move. And i said no. He pressed on and i said no he rejected. The thesis. said. I had to work harder on it. Then resisted any idea that one related to the other. That even made a pass at me. So you know you're young enough that you think that you have your whole life ahead of you and wary enough that i said i'm not leaving my life in this guy's

Elizabeth Becker Vietnam Catherine Lewa Franky Fitzgerald Kate Webb President Johnson Washington Post NPR Cambodia Elizabeth New York United States Bangladesh
The Internet, From Space

Reset

02:06 min | Last week

The Internet, From Space

"The internet. It's how we work. How go to school how we see friends and family but not everyone has a good connection. And that's where a few companies come in with a sort of modest proposal. What have we got our internet from outer space. Adam clark estes deputy editor at recode wrote about this and is here to talk about it. Hey adam so surprising thing in your story that a lot of people probably don't already is that a lot of listeners. Already get through internet via satellite. That's how we get wi fi on planes for instance. So why hasn't this taken off more. Broadly satellite internet has historically been just a little bit subpar. When you compare it to terrestrial wi fi you're down on planet earth. We have fiber optic cables which basically have limited bandwidth and to do satellite internet. You're basically beaming connection from the address. Drill network up to a satellite and back down and technology just hasn't been good enough To to get bandwidth to enough people so that it compares to terrestrial broadband internet you get from verizon or time warner but that's starting to change with a new satellite technology and what are called constellations of satellites and has the pandemic at all sort of raised the stakes for this work and made it more. Urgent less-urgent tell me about that. Dependent is absolutely accelerated development and especially investment in this technology just after the pandemic starting to became incredibly clear. That a lot of people don't have internet access and they're being left behind young students who are able to get online for classes people who aren't able to to to work remotely so once. It became so clear that solving this problem of internet access was urgent a lot. More investment went into xilai broadband initiatives The number of launches went up quite a bit. And i think we're gonna see that. Investment continue and more these networks go online in the near future.

Adam Clark Estes Adam Time Warner Verizon
Combatting Anti-Asian Racism in Fashion

The Business of Fashion Podcast

02:28 min | 2 weeks ago

Combatting Anti-Asian Racism in Fashion

"Hi this is imran ahmed and ceo of the business of fashion. Welcome to the podcast. It's friday march twenty. Sixth last june former us president donald trump began using racist language to describe the novel corona virus. That by that point had already killed half a million people. There's never been anything with so many names. I could give you one thousand nine hundred twenty names for that right. It's got all different names. Wuhan wuhan swiss catching on corona virus. Right kong flu suv hate crimes against asian-americans began to rise racism in the time of pandemic. young woman. Wearing a mask is attacked in the subway station sanitizing. An elderly woman is chased by a bully trying to squirt hand sanitizer on her time. Man in san francisco who had just gotten his kobe. nineteen vaccine. how celebrated his birthday a father a grandfather walking on the sidewalk. In broad daylight surveillance camera captured his attacker crossing the street shoving him to the ground. He never regained consciousness. During twenty twenty reported attacks against asian americans were up more than one hundred fifty percent in the united states. Many others went on reported and the world looked on in horror last week as the attacks against as merican escalated when a shooter killed eight people in atlanta georgia including seven asian americans. Six of whom were women. But anti asian sentiment is not new in the us it goes back to the eighteen hundreds when chinese laborers i arrived to work on the railroads and in the coal mines official government policy at the time systematically discriminated against asians and this is not an issue limited to the united states around the world asians face overt and covert discrimination over the last few months. Asian fashion industry professionals have been organizing speaking up raising money and awareness about this urgent problem and they have been sharing painful experiences of discrimination within the inner workings of fashion this week. On the beauty of podcasts. I spoke to three leaders from the fashion industry. The designer phillip lim the editor in chief of law magazine michelle lee and the journalists suzanne allow to listen to their personal stories learn from their experiences and understand how we can be better allies in the fight against asian. Hate

Imran Ahmed President Donald Trump Merican Wuhan United States FLU San Francisco Atlanta Georgia Phillip Lim Michelle Lee Suzanne
[TEST BURST] BuzzFeed layoffs Update 1

WBZ Morning News

00:15 sec | Last month

[TEST BURST] BuzzFeed layoffs Update 1

"Today. Three weeks after Buzzfeed acquired the website Huffpost from Verizon and just laid off 45 people, Reporters editors. Other staffers, Buzzfeed says the website will is on track to lose. 20 million bucks this year. I'm Tom Busby Bloomberg

Buzzfeed Verizon Tom Busby Bloomberg
[TEST BURST] BuzzFeed layoffs Update 1

WBZ Morning News

00:15 sec | Last month

[TEST BURST] BuzzFeed layoffs Update 1

"Today. Three weeks after Buzzfeed acquired the website Huffpost from Verizon and just laid off 45 people, Reporters editors. Other staffers, Buzzfeed says the website will is on track to lose. 20 million bucks this year. I'm Tom Busby

Buzzfeed Verizon Tom Busby
"editor" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

03:58 min | 8 months ago

"editor" Discussed on Latino USA

"Roulette. . Welcome to let you know USA. . Thanks for having me to be like the one and only standing official dot co editor of the United States of America. . That's a big deal. . Congratulations. . Thank you. . It's an honor fed I don't. . Take lightly because I. . I have the responsibility of. . Not just. . For reading about the food but. . priding about the people and I think that's really the most. . Critical part of the job but before we continue. . People might be saying, wait , what's going on and so you're very open about the fact that you stutter that is something that happens and so we might as well just say, Hey, , , it happens in your cool with. . Saying Yeah and and moving on, , right? ? Yes. . I am thank you. . Yes. . It's part of my life and it's never stopped me from doing things like. . Live TV or radio segments I. . Love that. . I. . GotTa Say I really do I completely loved that. . So. . What you may not know is that I've been Taco fanatic since probably before you were even born, , I'm Mexican I grew up with this stuff. . You know I mean, , my mom made dot goes by our leader. Mehta . goes you're Puerto Rican you were growing up with this stuff. So . what's the story as to why this Puerto Rican dude ends up falling in? ? Love with TACO's growing up in the states I knew about duck was generally speaking at A. . Fast Food Product but. . As a Mexican food item. . was in. . Brooklyn from. . A. . China and I don't know. . Who I fell in love. . With I. . The woman. . or The food. . So before we get to talking about that goes which again we talk about forever. . One of the things that stood out to us is from the beginning of your book. . And this is where you refer to something you call the alita principal. . And having just mastered Jose, , you'll be proud of me finally having just mastered my I will lead us the you like I finally figured it out. . I'm just like Oh my God I can't believe it. . I unlocked it. . What is this thing about the alita principle when it applies to Dacas? ? So, , whenever people? ? Talk about Mexican food eventually the conversation. . Pros around to. . Well. . My Willett I made the best Mexican. . Food she made best diesels. . Hurling. . was, the , best or her? ? Malia was the best. . and. . For them. . That's as far as Mexican food goes. . Nothing else. . Counts as Mexican. . which is unfortunate because. . Mesko is a large country with micro regions. . And Different, , cuisines. . It's not that. . Simple. . We shouldn't box it in. . Boxing it in. . His misguided at. . Best and racist that worst <hes>. . Could also. . Be. . Maybe so and so's grandmother wasn't

United States America Douglas NPR Lebron James Latte Tacos Netflix Texas monthly magazine Apple United TACO Jose Mehta Brooklyn principal A. China official editor
"editor" Discussed on Delivering by Litmus

Delivering by Litmus

02:26 min | 8 months ago

"editor" Discussed on Delivering by Litmus

"So in today's episode I get the chance to sit down with two members of the team to chat about visual editor why and how it was built and who should start embraced visual editor in the workflow today enjoy. Anything, in, want me to mention. Getting, all my funny quips. Guess, we'll started thirty reporting. So this is this'll be the be roll. On the blueberries. while..

editor
"editor" Discussed on Journey to $100 Million

Journey to $100 Million

04:46 min | 9 months ago

"editor" Discussed on Journey to $100 Million

"Join us on our journey to building a one hundred million dollars company. Hey, it's Eric J Olson. My New Year's resolution for twenty twenty. One of them is to publish a book telling the story about how we grew from nothing to over one million dollars in revenue per year, which only four percent of businesses achieve that means that ninety six percent of businesses. Die Trying unfortunately or struggle. It took me eight years you to that point and there's been a lot of lessons learned along the way a ton of learning because of made a ton of mistakes and I WANNA help. Entrepreneurs avoid those mistakes so I decided. I'M GONNA put all that information all those learnings, all the stories into a book, and where I'm at right now is the book has been written has been written for six months at this point. And I did a proofread myself, but I need an editor so I I know that I need a professional editor to reorganize the book, and then also to just make sure there's no type of does and sentences flow, and all that stuff and I don't know anything about book publishing. This is my first book, so. I'm really doing it the hard way. I could drop a lot of money and just have someone take care of all of this stuff for me, but I really want to understand the process. At least a little bit before I start handing over the reins to someone else in spending, tens of thousands of dollars to get this done so I'm going to hire my own book editor. And so when I started to look for a book editor I knew that there was like different just different concepts for what I want like I said I want someone to kind of like. Look at the book and. And tell me like am I. on the right path here or do I need to like delete check three expand on chapter five take the section Chapter Seven moving into chapter thirteen never have a chapter thirteen. That's bad luck. I don't know all these rules right? So I knew that I needed that and allison you someone to do like really low level I? That's the wrong word dummy. you use to, it should be Twa, but you wrote t o a stupid stuff like that. When you when you burn a book, you don't really want that kind of stuff out there, so I needed to like different like levels. If you will of editing and I I didn't even know what that was called so I had to do some research and I have a cheat sheet right here. I'm going to read off. See like a couple of different kinds of editors that there are. This is a specialty right there. Specializations in in inside of. Of Editing, and not just any editing, but there's like book editing There's like sales copy editing there's there's like specializations of editors, but within each while at least within book publishing. There's Beta readers these this is someone that's GonNa. Read your book in advance and just kind of tell you what they think. A proofreader, an online editor, critique partner, commissioning editor developmental editor. That's the one that I needed this like at it from a very high level, and says you know what this chapter needs to be deleted, and you need to add a chapter. Content editor copy editor copy editors, the low level one that looks like typos grammatical errors. I did not even know these things up until like a month ago I needed developmental editor and a copy editor I need I need those two things done, so I'm interviewing for people, and now it could end up being washy. I've already picked someone, but it could have been two people one person doing each of those roles or could have been one person doing both those things, but I need. Both those things done, and that's the Hassi built on scope. Skip work, so I've learned definitely a lot about. Well I. Don't learned Shit about book publishing, but I'm learning and put it that way and I've learned a lot of at least learn that there's a lot of different editors and it's important. You can't just say I need an editor like you. You need to know like what kind of editor you need, and that is very important, so. This is a journey as a matter of fact, the book is called Million Dollars Earning I guess this episode should be called Book Riding. Journey a book editing journey so There's a lot to it and I'm not done. Even though I have hired. An editor at the editing hasn't started doing a lot of reading rereading. We need a book cover we need. We need Amazon There's a bunch of steps. My goal is to have it out by January, so I wanNA have it done? By the holidays and then set a release date for early January. The idea being that people are going to want to Set News resolution and one of those very likely going to be start that company finally or get my company to a certain revenue amount. I WANNA. Be there when they make that decision..

editor copy editor Content editor Eric J Olson twenty twenty Amazon allison partner
"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"It's Monday the fourth of May twenty twenty. I'm lane green. The economists language columnist. Welcome to editor's picks where you can hear three of our favorite articles from the paper. This week they read aloud so you can listen wherever you are. Our cover story looks at what to expect from life after lockdowns and what we're calling a ninety percent economy since China began to ease up. Its factories have become busier and streets are no longer empty but it is missing large chunks of everyday activity across the post lockdown rich world. Life will be tough at least until a vaccine or treatment is found the longer the world has to endure the ninety percent economy. The less likely it is snap back after the pandemic could this radicalize politics faster than ever next a bus stop in Brazil. Where the Justice Minister storms out can cause President Bolster? Nado scofflaw and finally solitude is both a blessing and a curse to timely books. Explore this dichotomy. These stories are just a sample of what's on offer in the economist. This week with a subscription you can read or listen to all of our content to get twelve issues for twelve dollars or twelve pounds goto economist dot com slash.

Nado scofflaw Justice Minister editor Brazil China President
"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"It's Monday the thirtieth of March twenty twenty. I'm Zanny Minton betters. The Economist Editor in chief. Welcome to edit his picks where you can hit three highlights from the paper. This week. They are read aloud so you can listen on the go for the first time. In one hundred and seventy six years we. The economist have been producing the entire newspaper remotely. Throughout the nineteen pandemic our team of journalists remains dedicated to bring you the highest quality news and analysis from around the world. I will cover in Britain and America. This week explains how the role of government has expanded to deal with the virus. It's the most dramatic extension of the state since the Second World War yet. For believers in limited government and open markets Pov- nineteen poses a problem. The state does not always give up all the ground it takes during crises. Our cover in the rest of the world looks at the damage. The disease will due to poor countries where healthcare systems are in no position to comb. It is in rich countries interest to think globally if covy nineteen is left to ravage the emerging world. It will soon spread back to the rich one and finally Corona Vars lockdowns have driven professional and social life out of the physical world and into the Virtual Realm. Videoconferencing will require a whole new etiquette. The stories you are about to hear our justice sample of what's on offer in the paper with a subscription. You can read or listen to all of what we do. So please subscribe go to economists Dot Com Slash Radio. Autho to get your first twelve issues for twelve dollars or twelve.

Editor in chief Zanny Minton Corona Vars Britain Autho America
"editor" Discussed on Smart Kitchen Show

Smart Kitchen Show

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"editor" Discussed on Smart Kitchen Show

"To do and I left the house for five for whatever the half hour to go. Get IT AND COME BACK. And it was easy and would do again And you know but this is bigger right like it's in the way a WHO's GonNa go to. What's it going to be going to crowded bars over the next year or you know hugging people are shaking hands? Like everything is just so different and what I want to. I think it's really important to note you know as editor the spoon that we're kind changing things up as well here like we're trying to adapt. I mean I wonder if you could talk a little bit about how we're sort of how the spoon and smart kitchen summit is adapting. You know in the face of all of this. Yeah I mean we're trying to exercise our our muscles around doing online events we had For lack of better word a a a a Webinar last week on the city of cloud kitchens but We are actually trying to do an online event for our Kobe. Nineteen called Kobe. Nineteen virtual summit basically to try and bring people together online and come up with strategies for dealing with all this and so we wanNA help out I think Christie wrote a post last week basis as. We're trying to figure out how to help people and one of the things we think we can do. Is Maybe convene people online and bring experts together. So we're like everyone we're trying to figure it out. We're while we're trying to bring the news. They're also trying to figure out our own business going forward so That I mean I think this may there's actually a lot of speculation whether or not people will get together as much trouble as much business wise and I wonder if some of this this change will be permanent so One of the things. We're trying to figure out. Yeah I mean it's we're we're all trying to do we at the spoon. Just want to be of use to people. We really want to help them. Navigate the news. provide information. That is actionable for them. To figure out how to navigate their business if they are in the food tech world and we want to hear from people. Like how are you doing? What are you doing? What have you changed up if you run a restaurant or a software company or a restaurant company or something? Let us know how you're adapting in what you're doing these are really interesting questions and For other reasons interesting times or what you need like what one of the things that Jenner and I have been well all of us. But we're going to be writing about is like how people are like. Here's how you can support your restaurants. You can buy gift cards. You can take out. You can donate to these relief organizations and it's like okay but say I'm a person with a limited budget which we all are and I don't eat out that often anyway where my dollars be put to the best use So talking to different people to hear their opinions on that and try to figure out like as a restaurant or a Bar. What do you actually need the most? What would be the most helpful I was just GONNA say? I'll echo that with an with a focus on tech. I mean I think and this is not to depreciate anybody's efforts because the the rally the food tech Community is made in response to a lot of this is inspiring truly yes That being said I think in terms of like all the different tech solutions being pushed and free installations and waved fees and things like that It's a lot and I. I think. Businesses restaurants bars Maybe even grocery store is a little bit need to you. Know need really think about what they need in terms of tech stack. They're going to get a lot of stuff thrown at them. Not all of it's going to be beneficial. Some of it will be greatly beneficial and I think it's about helping folks find the solutions that are going to work for their business kind of cut through the noise if you will yes well and I think it's important for people who read the spoon to know that we aren't turning we're pivoting to become the Cova did site but obviously it is the global story right now and it is having a big impact up and down the food stack so that will be driving a lot of our coverage but we were always looking for innovation no matter and not related to the Kobe at all. We'll still be operating that but I think together after this of interest is like how innovation in tech is helping US solve some the current problems. I think those are the stories. We we really wanNA tell and also we're going to continue to write about I actually have three or four stories that have. I've interviewed people for their about new products. I just haven't written yet because it's so busy so I think some of those stories. Those stories will keep coming as well. So but that's really it for today. I want to thank you guys for trying this new platform. It's we'll get some good just workout But it's been a lot of fun senior as faces as we talk and those year listening. I encourage you to go to the spoon dot tech and check out Look for the Koby summoned to sign up for that. That's April sixth event and that'll be a lot of fun It'll be interesting hearing from people who are really smart about doing interesting things out there to try and solve their new. Our new worlds or traversing. So but thanks for getting together and it's been a lot of fun. Yup Yup good all right bye guys but..

Kobe food tech Community editor US Christie Koby Jenner Cova
"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"And finally looking through the eyes of options traders. Every stone knows or has board you silly about the third I. It is the imaginary oracular organ. You develop as a side effect of taking hallucinogens. The data from hazy late night discussions in college dorms in the nineteen sixties. Quite clear on this the straitlaced to middle of the road to grasp what is really going on in the world. The third eye allows you to see what they simply cannot. Every investor could use third. I bought there is one who can claim to need it. The most options traders. They have to keep one eye on the most outcome and one eye on each of the best and worst scenarios a lot of the time the middle outcome the average the midpoint. The most common is a good predictor but for some things some of the time the middle lies on shaky ground this is the world in which having options or the right to buy or sell assets at a predetermined price is most valuable. The action that matters is not in the mental but at the fringes to understand. Why imagine you had to bet on the high to the next man to walk into the coffee shop? You are sitting in a good guess would be one point seven five meters. That's five foot nine inches. Which is the average height of an adult male in America? It is likely that you would be wrong but not by a whole lot. Many of the men who could walk in will be close to average height. Very many will be an inch or two below or above it and only very few will be a lot shorter or taller. The middle the average is a good predictor of how something entirely random will turn out a throw of. Two dice is similar. There are thirty six possible pairs of numbers. Some throws more likely than others. There are six ways to throw a seven but only one way to through either a two or a twelve. If you display each possible throw by how often it occurs. It will follow the outline of a special kind of bell curve known as a normal distribution a lot of very different kinds of measures. Iq Exam Scores Height. Also look like this feature is that the values deviate from the average in an ordered way. Two thirds of dice throws twenty four to thirty six within one standard deviation of the average throw I e within a range of five to nine in a normal distribution sixty eight percent about comes within one standard deviation of the average and ninety five percent a with into the standard deviation volatility is a key concept in options trading the vix or volatility index is the best known gauge for it it is the level of volatility derived from the price of options on the S. and P. Five hundred share index put options confer on a buyer the right to sell the index at a specified strike. Price call options confer the right to buy it key. Inputs to the value of an option or expected volatility and the gap between the strike price and the index price. The more violently prices move the more likely the gap between the two will be bridged in which case the opposition pays off if the vix says that implied volatility is fourteen as it does now traders expect an annual standard deviation of fourteen percent in equity prices the level of implied volatility depends on the way to buyers and centers vol sellers in effect supply. Insurance they are betting on the middle that the world will stay regular normal or become more so people active in the options market describe all investment strategies as if they were options trades to buy corporate bonds with low spreads for instance is like selling volatility. You get a low premium and cross your fingers. It doesn't default Vul- buyers in contrast seek insurance. They don't believe the middle they think the world will become more disordered. And sometimes they're right. Asset price is not distributed in his ordered away. As Heidi's extreme events Sanchez market crashes a more frequent. The normal distribution suggest volatility has been remarkably low in stocks bonds and currencies viruses populism trade wars paypal applications and royal bus stops. Nothing seems to move the needle match that no one can sure how long the age of plasticity will last people with squeegee clean. Third is insisted volt must eventually go up. They blame central banks which have relaxed monetary policy whenever markets panic for suppressing volatility. The central bankers have been free to do so because inflation. Their main obsession has gone missing. A revival in inflation will one day force them to stop managing the markets and his the big bet of options buyers. In the meantime the standard investor will keep his too is firmly on the middle. Thanks for listening to editor's to read or listen to the whole of this week's edition. Goto ECONOMY DOT com slash radio offer? I'm Edward McBride in London. This is the economist..

Edward McBride America editor Heidi London
"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

08:34 min | 1 year ago

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"I was super calm. Yeah you were really nervous you. You're nervous and floating out in nowheres Ville with a story and you could tell that you were you. Were really pitching hard. And and the relentlessness in your desire to to get the facts out there and tell all this everything that was in there and to make sure that we were absorbing it sound exhausting you a little exotic and of course yes I remember you playing us the recording And outlining the reporting that you had which seemed significant. That's the recording of Weinstein Weinstein appearing to admit to a sexual assault during a twenty fifteen police sting operation. You've heard it a few times on the show I had played the tape at NBC. You were executive. Seemed at best ambivalent about it Deirdre had a different reaction. I felt you know how it would be to be in a hallway alone with him not in contact with the police who were supposed to be you know intervening When it got to this point and how scared she must have been and then on of course? There was the admission but I felt at the whole tape was really powerful. I thought that it was a story that needed to get out and there was material material. They're already. That was strong enough that the world should see at the time. I was still fighting to get the story on Air Right. NBC David made it clear that if I lost that fight he was interested The the notion that you didn't have a story coming through the doors nonsense but he. He didn't make any commitments. That day. I left the New Yorkers offices with a maybe an an offer to stay in touch with Deirdre and you are in a sensitive position at that point because we hadn't during let the story so you weren't under contract. It was an uncertain time for the reporting soon after that meeting. NBC finally Said said. They didn't want to be associated with the story in any way and Weinstein and his intermediaries were beginning to threaten legal action saying they knew I no longer have the protection of news organization. Do you weren't yet one of our writers officially so you Weren't kind of under the magazines legal cover yet And and I think that that left you very Alone in the world more women were still going on the record and I didn't know whether to cancel those interviews to. I had a news outlet. That would protect me. I call Deirdre News that up that one interview and you weren't sure whether to go out and do it and I told you not to cancel let to go out and do it then. She did something unusual. I wasn't associated with the magazine yet. But she called the New Yorkers General Counsel Anyway to see if talk to me that would be Fabio. BERTONI got a call from an editor at the New Yorker. Who Says Ronin GONNA call you in a minute? He needs some help I wanted to be a journalist and I went to Journalism school and I did a dual degree with the law school. Because I thought the law would help my journalism. When I was still a law student I did some clinics where it represented people in Housing Court and I stopped someone from getting addicted did had sort of that immediate instant gratification and it was sort of like a mainline drug like I did this thing in the world and it mattered in someone's life and And that really for me was the power being a lawyer. You wanted to help and I want to well. I wanted to to help people But they don't want to make myself out to be a sane it was. I'll do that for us. Worry about it after law. School Phobia worked did a few firms and then add American lawyer magazine articles. The bulk of my job is reading articles prior to publication in determining if there are legal legal risks and how best to support the journalism to make sure that We don't expose ourselves to unnecessary legal risk if we get sued. What would be our defenses of course in August twenty seventeen? It wasn't Fabio's responsibility to do any of that analysis for the Weinstein Story. He called me anyway. I made it clear you in that conversation. I don't represent you at this point. I'm looking for the magazine and Not your lawyer but If I were this these are the issues that I would advise you to be concerned about and these are the issues that are advising to worry so much about and it made such a huge difference in my life and in the life of the story that you agreed to get on the phone because I was paralyzed by the pressures pressures of all of these legal threats coming at me. I'm glad to hear that you were in this position. Where you didn't have an institution behind you and and there's a lot of reporters that don't and and if if I'm an institution as a lawyer and I'm able to use use the power that institution to protect journalist? Who's doing important work? Then you know what else is the institution for but to but to do that. Fabio you said he thought going ahead with the pending interviews was worth the risk people threaten prior to publication but they're unlikely to sue prior to publication because a lawsuit would republic and they would be publicizing the very facts that they want to keep confidential. You know I felt strongly that they're not going to sue you and expose this whole story. I had sat in rooms with these NBC executives. And even the lawyers Sue Kim Harrison Susan Weiner and heard them repair Eric Weinstein's argument on this. You know if you're interviewing people who have nondisclosure agreements that could expose a stall of this legal jeopardy I mean I thought then that it Selena Lina thing. If it's proven to be a silly argument both Fabio and Deirdre had the same message you never stop reporting and Weinstein acting the way he was acting going through all these intermediaries In this threatening manner only made it clearer that there was fire there was all this smoke And that he was he was scared of what you had. I did keep reporting and staying super. Chill with Deirdre. I've never had a reporter call me as many times a day as you did. I apologize for that. It was an intense time. It wasn't tenth on August twenty fifth. I sent in a draft version of the story and on September v I went to the New Yorker offices to hear their final decision. You came in and you did seem a little desperate the word you were pitching you were pitching a story And you were pitching us at a facts and you were making making a case for your journalism. There was nothing that that was going to be able to talk you. Out of your completely understandable nervous state. He puts you at ease while at the same time. Asking really tough questions and there were questions I wanted. We know the answers to to. We have grilled you on a on a bunch of those issues. What are the foundational elements? Here what are the facts. What do we have have? What what do we know for sure in you? Had there's been a lot of public discussion about what I had when the New Yorker took on the story. NBC has repeatedly claimed that no women were willing to go on the record that that only happened after the magazine came on board. I was very aware uh of the on the record off the record issue because when Ken Oletta tried to do the story In two thousand fifteen. We didn't have people on the record so When you walked in the door with people on the record I felt like okay? Let's go this is this is it from the Gecko the Gecko from day one with the New Yorker This was a story that that was defensible. What do you make of media outlet pushing the the narrative that there were no names in that story when you saw the there were? I can't fathom it I don't know I don't know I. I don't know.

Deirdre News NBC Eric Weinstein Weinstein Weinstein Fabio Weinstein Story nowheres Ville American lawyer magazine assault executive Sue Kim Harrison Susan Weiner Ken Oletta Housing Court BERTONI David General Counsel
"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

09:49 min | 1 year ago

"editor" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Hey we're GONNA be talking a lot about sexual violence in this series. There's also some language if either of those things are upsetting for you. Please take care while you're listening. I had bad dreams about Weinstein during that period. I had nightmares spending so much of my time. I'm on this story. And and reading their accounts that it really it really affected me as well deirdre fully. Mendelssohn is a senior editor at The New Yorker magazine specifically. She's my editor at The New Yorker magazine. At one point I also in the reporting process reading the transcript script one of the women's interviews. She described seeing him Get Out of a car and go into his house and I realized reading at that moment that he was in fact my neighbor And lived like half a block down for me and I walked by his townhouse in New York everyday going and to and from work while we're working on this story sort of a shiver. Yeah good thing. He didn't know about you until the very end when you were on those calls calls and quite possibly still wouldn't recognize you though you played this incredibly important role in his life ultimately. I'm sure he wouldn't one of the interesting things about being an editor. You're always sort of the person behind the curtain. This is the catch. Hatching kill podcast. I'm Ronan Farrow. We're living in precarious moment when it comes to the free press an active shooter situation unfolding inside the newsroom year after the murder of Washington Post journalist Jamal Kashogi. According to the journalist. She was ushered into another room. Where POMPEO unleashed a profanity laden tirade at her a few days ago I called the fake dues the enemy of the people and they are a lot of my reporting has focused on how the media this incredibly important important tool for creating accountability? That's actually protected in the constitution can sometimes breach the public's trust and how the truth can get buried as a result today instead. We're going to look at how it's supposed to work. At the incredibly meticulous hardworking people on the frontlines of that fight fight. People who make sure the truth doesn't get buried many of whom you've probably never heard of like the ones who rescued the Weinstein story at the New Yorker and stood up to repeated efforts to kill it. The editors like Deirdre fully Mendelssohn and her boss. David Remnant was pretty clear. That something stank deeply stank and the magazine's lawyer. Fob Uber. Tony One of the joys of my I working life is sending fuck you letters and it's fact checkers. Like Tammy Kim doing this level of fact checking just kind of tests you you in every way and Fergus. McIntosh shall we really had hours in the peak of the Weinstein Story. It was kind of like sleeping not sleeping the way they shepherded my reporting into publication says a lot about the power of the free press and what it takes to keep trustworthy. I'm from Santa Cruz. California California I grew up in an academic family on a college campus and a surfing town where I didn't surf and wasn't blonde deirdre fully. mendelssohn started in journalism early with a college internship at the Atlantic. She spent the next few years working different magazines about a decade ago. She even spend a little time as an assistant editor at the New Yorker. In early twenty seventeen she came back as a senior editor but the most junior of senior editors so. I was a little bit worried that everyone was still going to see me as as the kid around the office. She'd only been in the job a few months when her boss editor in chief David Ramnik. It came into her office to talk about a potential story. He wasn't sure about remnant. Came into my office Relatively late one evening and his down on my couch. David wasn't new to the Weinstein Story. If you listened to episode five of this podcast you'll remember that one of his writers. Ken Oletta tried to crack the story. The of Weinstein's alleged sexual predation in two thousand and two and came up short. He said that Canada had had written a profile of Harvey Weinstein a number five years ago. And that I should go back and read it. A Lotta had heard rumors about a sexual assault They haven't been able to get anyone to on the record but fight that he believes that there was there there. What did rim knicks seem like when he came to you and had that conversation Asian with you? He wasn't making any commitments yet but he was clearly curious I suppose he was. He was his normal self. You think my job is saying we need a fourteen thousand word profile on an Icelandic potter on the six year. Old Guy Pushing for much popular stuff. Otherwise we're GonNa die you know. I have the same sensibility. I want those numbers l.. Anybody David Remnant grew up in a middle class family New Jersey. His father was a dentist. My mother had a case of multiple sclerosis by the time she was. I don't know thirty and I was six and my father. Suddenly had had Parkinson's journalism was something by the way I thought would get me out of the house an out of this small town. What were your first experiences of journalism? I completely wrote and edited the High School newspaper. I wrote must maybe half the paper and and put it together with an exacto knife and so on on at my kitchen table. He interned at the Washington Post and later went back to work there. It's a pretty heady place to serve your apprenticeship at the Washington Post I in the eighties I ran into one of your editors who was praising your sports reporting that long ago well they asked me you know. Do you know anything you bet. Sports and I knew that a job was contingent. I said well yeah of course but I knew what what any person knows about sports if you watch on Sundays. I was a Knicks Fan. Or you know it's not like it was an expert. Sports led to features and then to an assignment in Moscow. My wife Esther Phonic We got got married and we went off to Moscow and she reported for the New York Times reporter for the Washington Post. That's such a cool love story. It was kind of like Pat and Mike He. He came back to take care of his ailing parents. And eventually got a call about writing for the New Yorker joined the New Yorker as a as a writer and I was a very very very happy writer writer for the New Yorker for five six years and then in nineteen ninety eight. He became the New Yorkers editor in chief and has remained. Since because 'cause we chose to become digital in many ways we had to experiment figure out who we were. This got to be more reporting. I'll tell you what I do want. I want some Metabolism Melissa in the New Yorker. Here's the thing. The New Yorker is a lean operation. It has a small staff and doesn't have bureaus around the world like newspaper. It can only take on so much having come from a newspaper and knowing what kind of equipment and how their kid out. We don't really have the the same Resources or a number of people to throw at a big story in the same way. Tell me a little bit about what your job is at the New Yorker like. What does the day look like for you? The crux of it is and where really we're wear. Your story comes in is saying yes and no a lot of pieces come in over the transom from freelancers far and wide the volume of a lot you live in fear of missing something good but on the other hand you have to be reasonably efficient. Get getting an answer to people and that brings brings us back to August twenty seventeen. Hey ruinous David Ramnik I'll be back. I'm just GONNA my son for a quick lunch. I'll be back by that to fifteen. That's a voicemail from the first time David Remnant called me all that year I'd been working on the Harvey Weinstein Story for NBC News but the network which was receiving legal threats from Weinstein had ordered me to stop reporting. I'd called Ken Oletta. Who'd introduced me to David? I didn't know who this guy was. I didn't know who this guy was an all but used to be called print. People are a little snotty about television people but David likes a big story. He agreed to me and ask Deodorant Joy. I said look. I need you to help me on this because I don't know what this is. I thought she could help us out and see what this is. Think it through with a think through even the decision whether to do anything about it. Of course I mean look I know in the end yes or no is in my hands. He told me that you Were coming in the next day and that you had some new reporting and that we were going to hear you out and so I spent actually a lot of the night reading various profiles of Weinstein. It seemed clear that that that there was something there and that everyone was just scared to kind to come out and say it. That's how on the morning of August sixteenth. I wound up in a New Yorker Conference Room on the eighth floor of one World Trade Center pitching the story today.

Harvey Weinstein editor Weinstein Story David Remnant The New Yorker magazine deirdre Mendelssohn senior editor Washington Post David editor in chief David Ramnik New York Ken Oletta writer Mike He Ronan Farrow New Jersey
"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

The Economist: Editor's Picks

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"editor" Discussed on The Economist: Editor's Picks

"We think they're essential pieces of insight and analysis. That will help inform you on the go. You can listen to them in just a moment now now over to one of my colleagues to tell you what's coming up thanks any. It's Thursday the twelfth of December Twenty nineteen. I'm lane green. The economists Johnson columnist on language Britain heads to the polls today for the third general election in under five years. You can follow our full analysis of the election election in our APP or at economist Dot Com Slash UK election. Twenty nineteen will be back tomorrow with a special election. In addition of editor's picks coming up our cover. This week focuses on the impeachment of president. DONALD TRUMP MR trump's behavior forced an invidious choice on Congress. President trump deserves to be removed for attempting to tip the twenty twenty election but the impeachment that has unfolded over the past. Three months will leave. Republicans unswayed voters divided and Mr Trump in office and next along promised pension reform in France will cuddle the old and squeezed the young and finally how British rap music is helping the left behind the stories. You're about to hear are just a sample of what's on offer in the paper. You're with the subscription you can read or listen to all of what we do so please subscribe go to economist Dot com slash radio. Offer to get your first twelve issues for twelve dollars or twelve pounds. That's economist dot com slash radio offer.

President trump DONALD TRUMP president Congress UK Johnson editor Britain France
"editor" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"What would the boss do? Either way boss would choose Hilton hotels and resorts to get down to business and the little pleasure checkout Hilton hotels and resorts and travel like the boss. This is Recode media from the vox media podcast network. I'm Lydia poll green in for Peter Kafka. I'm the editor in chief of huffpost, but I'm here at the vox media studios today in New York City because this is Peter show. I will tell you what he always says. Tell someone else about this show tweet about it or post about it on Facebook or just tell someone in person today. I'm really excited to be in the studio with Redick Jones. The editor in chief of Vanity. Fair for Deka. Welcome to Recode media. Thank you. Lydia. It's great to be here. So you have been the editor of Vanity Fair for how long now? It's been about nine months, nine months, long enough to make a baby. Does it feel like a baby has been born? I almost wish you could go into hiding for nine months and then come out with the baby. That thing about the thing about Vanity Fair is we're, you know, we're publishing hourly and republishing monthly, and you know how it is. So all of. The baby making is done, kind of, you know, every moment, but it has been great to start to cycle through this first year and kind of get an understanding. We cover so many with these core areas of coverage, Washington, Silicon Valley, Hollywood and Wall Street and celebrity culture also in general. And so I feel like over the course of the year just because of certain events like the Oscars, and also just because of the natural ebbs and flows of the news cycle, not that the f. so much anymore. You know you, you start to get a feel for the rhythms of the job. And so nine months in is a lot better than six months in which is love better than three months. So you took over this job from a one of the best known magazine editors out there? Graydon Carter a celebrity in his own, right? What's it like stepping into a role as yourself following someone who's a larger than life personality? Not that I personally have any experience with this having followed Arianna huffing. Even at at a huffpost. I think the thing that I try to be very clear about in my own mind from the beginning was that there was no way that I could replace Graydon Carter. He is still walking among us for one for one thing, and he's an incredibly iconic and creative and innovative editor. And I think that with these jobs, you have to just have confidence that you make the job your own. The brand has existed for a long time. Tina Brown was the editor before grading, and she too was icon. And so I thought a lot about tina's vanity Farren and I spent time looking at the archives and thinking about wh- what is the vendor Graham between the editor sensibility and the identity of the brand? And I think that's really the challenge for me is not, you know, do I imitate, Tina? Do I imitate Graydon? I could try to do those things for very long time and I would fail utterly because because imitating is not how you succeed in these roles. So for me, it was more about trying to figure out. What I could add to this brand to make it special in my own way. You mentioned Tina Brown. And I think I read that that you read her diaries, which I think was one of the most delicious reads, I devoured it basically in one sitting on a flight to India and one of the things that struck me in reading that book was just how different the media world is. Now, are you going to those kinds of parties that she goes to? Are you running the business in this kind of big ticket way that she was running in sort of women in the arena. I loved reading that book and I had an early copy because I was the New York Times..

Tina Brown Graydon Carter huffpost Vanity Fair editor in chief vox media Peter Kafka Lydia vox media studios Hilton Facebook New York City Redick Jones New York Times Deka editor Washington Arianna India Farren
"editor" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"editor" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Whatever about x. can you make these things theoretically key arm's length distance from it, or you actually say, we would like to create something. Can our people go out and find a sponsor for we won't make it if that happens, it's a newer version of that, or do you do either of those the ladder? For sure. I mean, I think that's like a normal sold built if sold and just making sponsor bowl products to me. That's. What it is and on the events side. Obviously with the vents, it's it's a little bit different, but not that much different. So let's pull back. You went to digital may seven and a half ago. I almost cut the math right prior to that you were at at week had wake you as a reporter. Yeah, I was digital editor, but that was I didn't edit anyone. So I, I've covered the industry for, you know, a long time, I guess. And I was at ad week for about six years. I think it was and I was looking for something new to do. Have you done anything that wasn't covering the business of digital media? I was a researcher for speechwriting firm in Washington DC for two unhappy years. Directly out of your link, did it says White House something, but it today you worked at the White House now? It didn't, but we really enough one time because of that Omarosa added me on Lincoln. She thought I, I think, worked at the White House. Have you tried any treadmills? No, I went back to find it and I think she like, I don't know what you unframed someone a Lincoln. I just I just got us Frank request from the woman who sings the song about Havana. It's a little rant. I don't what's whatever the, that's all. I think your name is Maria something and I assumed it was a BS thing, but I looked at it actually is her account. I don't know why that's linked in, but I know that was Facebook how Facebook, sorry, so well, that can be face. She went from ad week to digitally as I recall digital was, I mean, we polite a second or third to your industry trade well was mostly an events company, right? I mean, so Nick freeze our founder started digital about ten years ago, no funding just zone savings. And I think he took an early withdrawal and a 401K not to be recommended, but he started it with events because you know, as you know, to build media from from scratch is really hard because you need an audience before you can get advertising events is are difficult, but it's it's easier on the business side. You can, you know, he filled a room with about fifty publishers. I think it was who were trying to figure out how to make money. She, I find a lot of people look at vents and go. That looks great that they take a look at it go, oh, this is way horror the digital publishing digital publishing. I put something on the web or wherever the canvas is, and I. Made it once and then I can resell it as many times I want and sell ads against. My costs are super fixed and my, you know, I can't get into too much trouble. Whereas at the very basics rate, renting a room. Guy, right? You're already in the whole bunch and maybe no one shows up. It's a disaster. I think a lot of media companies are finding that now as they've sort of pivoted to events since advertising has become less attractive as the main part of your revenue model. And actually I joined Nick and I talked about about, you know, he always wanted to build it into a media brand, but you know, events were the basis of, and I thought it was really attractive actually to use the events as the basis of immediate company rather than usually it's the opposite right around and actually that was because of all things day, because what do we, what do we do? Well, no, because I think what what you guys were doing within within News Corp at the time was really interesting in that the events were a platform that was being used to power the brand, you know. And so not only is a really good economic model, but I think it pr-..

White House Omarosa Nick Facebook News Corp reporter editor Washington researcher Maria Lincoln Havana Frank founder six years ten years 401K
"editor" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

The Brain Candy Podcast

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"editor" Discussed on The Brain Candy Podcast

"I love it you've been spree lately for your hawaii of shanon okay i read an article about why women don't write letters to the editor oh just men do now tons and tons of men gosh write letters to the editor have you ever written a letter to the editor of anything yes the crossword book member when i thought errors that is so yes i have right and they never respond career they pass this along pass it along to the people editing to no one has to put it in our very important file trash can labelled very important filed six where they put it did you when you did that did you feel like i'm doing a good thing here no i felt like i'm definitely going to get a free crossword puzzle that's right imagine something all that i'm doing basically your job you should have said specifically and i would like if i were man i would've right i know so what are they saying in their letters to the editor okay this is what's great so file this under duh in terms of like wise women don't write letters editor they call it the confidence gap we all know about this where they did a study where you were given a science quiz and before the quiz you were supposed to assess how good you are in that subject matter and women consistently said they were worse than the ended up actually being and menton they either did it correctly or overstated their proficiency in scientists refers.

editor
"editor" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"editor" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"Do you become a good writer first and then a good editor do you have or or can you do it the other way around for for people who want to develop an eye for editing suppose which is also very very closely related to rewriting juvenille recommendations there any any books or classes or writers you would pay attention to perhaps to people who are listening to say you know what i really want to develop a keener eye as a writer slash editor yeah so a couple of things that i think are useful are for okay i to how to be like get a better sense of style and structure so one of the things that i was really important to me is that i found the writers i really loved and i just read their stuff out loud like that's sort of forces a low concentration attention pros i remember of go through the pieces of this writer katherine boo hoo new yorker my thought was maybe the best around and i would just read her pieces out loud what was her name again what you katherine boo how do you spell them the o other yom and a lot of pieces about poverty her last book was about india she doesn't right ton but which he writes extraordinaire but you can also do it with california or you can go back and do it with john mcphee could go and do it with from louis whoever your favorite your favorite writer or stylist or even just a piece that you loved you know we've had all kinds of teachers in wire.

writer editor california john mcphee katherine
"editor" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"editor" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"Do you become a good writer first and then a good editor do you have or or can you do it the other way around for for people who want to develop an eye for editing suppose which is also very very closely related to rewriting juvenille recommendations there any any books or classes or writers you would pay attention to perhaps to people who are listening to say you know what i really want to develop a keener eye as a writer slash editor yeah so a couple of things that i think are useful are for okay i to how to be like get a better sense of style and structure so one of the things that i was really important to me is that i found the writers i really loved and i just read their stuff out loud like that's sort of forces a low concentration attention pros i remember of go through the pieces of this writer katherine boo hoo new yorker my thought was maybe the best around and i would just read her pieces out loud what was her name again what you katherine boo how do you spell them the o other yom and a lot of pieces about poverty her last book was about india she doesn't right ton but which he writes extraordinaire but you can also do it with california or you can go back and do it with john mcphee could go and do it with from louis whoever your favorite your favorite writer or stylist or even just a piece that you loved you know we've had all kinds of teachers in wire.

writer editor california john mcphee katherine
"editor" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"editor" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Editor maybe right go don't no one else why on why does it i do the gal news the band money john good together man no.

Editor
"editor" Discussed on Mag Heroes

Mag Heroes

01:31 min | 6 years ago

"editor" Discussed on Mag Heroes

"Um but you as as i said before it's it's nice to be able to just jump in an an editor things having said that the the prince you know the the the the full met the prince format is is nice because it is so permanent and so now i look at my shelving this almost ten issues on my shelf and there's little things that are wrong with within this little little mistakes made but it is what it is and i'm i'm sort of proud of low on at least have something to look back on on with all the stuff that have done over the last ten uses weapons on there's not much left sir on really look at stuff that i've of than ten years ago unless you know there's a sorry of official file that i can open if it if it other than visual because there's another ten vision come out since then um yeah it's it's it's nice you just have have something uh have a record of what you thought of you stand even if it is perfect with khan really there's also notice no one point where it is perfect authorities it is done on you know it's ever it's every ending so whatever if you work in a team if you do website for a klein that has the internal work design will ripped evolving team you deliberate design and two weeks later overlooks different end two months later might be completely different to what you design because they changed it according to what the use of steps use us that some the the the athletics tools on tell them.

klein editor official khan athletics two months ten years two weeks