35 Burst results for "Edith"

12 Minutes: A New Time-Loop Thriller Video Game

Talking Tech

01:59 min | 4 d ago

12 Minutes: A New Time-Loop Thriller Video Game

"Learn more at atlassian dot com. Hey listeners mike schneider here and i'm brett molina and welcome back to talking tech so mike i hear you got to check out a new video game recently. That's right but i haven't gotten to see a lot of games lately covering all kinds of other stuff but it's going to be that time of year when we see a lot of games being revealed and a lot of games coming out. So i'm assuming. I'm gonna have more gaming in my future but the game we're talking about today is called twelve minutes. It's an upcoming game from independent publisher and a puna interactive They have a good history of indie games. Including what remains of edith finch florence outer wilds and sayonara. Wild hearts The premise of twelve minutes is kind of scary. A husband and wife sit down at the dinner table. There's a knock on the door in intruder claims to be a police officer. We don't know what's happening yet really Interrupts evening puts handcuffs. Claims wife is guilty of murdering her father. The wife's take it away but the husband wakes up in kind of groundhog day fashion with the events about two replay. But he remembers what happened. So it's the players job plan as the husband to figure out how to prevent his wife's abduction and the attack the resulting in getting knocked out. Now what adds to the mind. Bending mystery here is that everything occurs in a small apartment. So you have an open room. That's a kitchen dining room sitting room. You have one bathroom and bedroom and the point of view is top down so you know this isn't like a gigantic open world type game. You know like grand theft auto or anything like that. It's very small so you're kind of thinking. How am i gonna be able to solve this. And that's what kind of has kinda got me and shouldn't be able to play this game when it comes

Mike Schneider Brett Molina Edith Finch Mike
This Surprising Plant-Based Food May Bolster Muscle Strength

The KFBK Morning News

00:23 sec | Last month

This Surprising Plant-Based Food May Bolster Muscle Strength

"Really does make your muscles stronger. Yeah. Yeah, according to a new study. Diet filled with leafy green vegetables can improve, strengthen muscle function. Let me study new study out of Australia. I know you like Australia, Green leafy vegetables. Just the one serving a day can help muscle function, especially in the legs, right. This was done by the way at Edith Cowan University. Very good. Very good, eh? So

Australia Edith Cowan University
"edith" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

Happy Mum Happy Baby

03:53 min | 2 months ago

"edith" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

"Yeah it wasn't a walk or a bike ride yesterday. I was like. I have to do some kind of like stretch or yoga. I'm like a coiled spring. Yeah so i did. A i did like to twenty minute things yesterday morning in boston. Rode chillan i and and then are the this woman. Adriana donations are jonah. She's amazing isn't she. S yet and so. She saw her day thing. And you know what i'm going to do. The it doesn't matter what time of the day i'm gonna do it. Yes it's day. I started the day one. And i did it. A by four thirty said go. Dinner prepped. kids were having some like non school device. Time thomas any studio the dog was. I thought asleep and i was at the kitchen with my light and then dog wakes up. And he's like. I'm trying to do like the dog. And he's in between my legs and then he just lies on the ma by did the first day. So that's my thing is. I'm going to try every time. I get even if it's eleven o'clock at night. I'm going to see this through the whole of february and a couple of days in march. Do the start dating because even from like today and yesterday i feel so much better for it just i feel like i'm not hunched and i'm not feel a bit more all pen and a bit taller just a bit more kind of like he can breathe a bit better as well so majority of last year i felt like my body had completely been battered. And i think is that thing. Is that physical thing of parenting twenty four seven year at a as i read. I sit down toward in the day like you. Cons need doing and ferrying or whatever else and it's no wonder that we will philip. Adam bruised because we don't stop. I think i've forgotten to breathe So weird like this and the this first day of this thing love. It was about with your breath. And she's like a just and wordly that was starting to these meditations a spike. There's like a couple of them okay. Before we start to three big breaths. And i was like remember last time to a deep breath or like actually properly inhaled. An ex hailed even. That's kind of crazy but it's almost kind of like just because there's so much going on it's it's you know god the amount of food i don't know if you're large kind of how much food can small people consume in a day. Just want to ask that question what you want for lunch for a while or oh my god. Would you want for breakfast. It's just like so bored of making decisions as well about meals. My sister started saying alarms one in the morning. One name for snack times kosovo who would just have stocks coasties or. She asked for a side. Nope you wouldn't have this at school. You're not having a hair. That's a great idea. That's a great idea. Really start bacon which has been quite nice as well. You love bake off and stuff an there are having a bake off wait and see which is quite nice to give them the year eight day off of lessons and they're doing bake off So he makes an amazing lemon cards so he wants to make a lemon meringue tart. So that's quite nice because then it's kind of got to that. Point is where we're just like let them do it. Yeah so he kind of knows where the nez. if. I'm there if he doesn't or if he needs help by is kinda like no one you go you can. There's the recipe off. You go see. I really nice from my kids for me. I've got the recipe for crept up on the blackboard kitchen because they want to. They could make themselves.

yesterday morning today yesterday Adriana boston Adam february last year jonah kosovo eight day eleven o'clock at night march first day twenty minute seven year twenty four philip four thirty thomas
"edith" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

Happy Mum Happy Baby

04:14 min | 2 months ago

"edith" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

"There's just one heartbeat so thing and and you know and then it's just looking being excited and trying to work with you you do until this thing arrives hopefully healthy and all that kind of thing did you have wanted more. because if you ha- yes. So i kind of had to get an of a heart specialist. I go to and she does a full set of kind of scans and things on me every year and so my doctorate kind of made the decision for me early on the he said. Look one of the things it puts your heart under. The most strain is not childbirth. So i would feel more comfortable with at make this decision that you have a c. section so because we can have that choice to not put your heart under a necessary strain so i was like look. I'm fine. I'm not kind of you know the main thing is we're both healthy and we're fine after this on an and didn't really think about it. To be honest. I wasn't kind of. What are these people who felt like. I'd lost some kind of expediency of connecting with my child from like. It's obsolete bollocks soifer swear night kind of swear. And i think that. There's there is a massive stigma on and are experienced it when people when you go when four wherever the conversation is in the the person you're talking to discover the e r c section are two and they go. The almost can go and you like you don't know my situation. You don't know why that decision was made. It might be an emergency situation and stuff and you know. I had amazing support in the who leading up to and they expedient was amazing tomato playlist and we own in the are he was nearly sick hard to just turn the music up of that came out so funny and and yeah so that was that was that was made. That was the advice we were given..

both one heartbeat two one four every
"edith" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

Happy Mum Happy Baby

05:30 min | 2 months ago

"edith" Discussed on Happy Mum Happy Baby

"Could sound tracking with viscount. Finish that because you'll know her name. She's a mother to tvos as well. is edith dovan. Dec- is well. I've got you on my screen. So it's literally like you all here. Same lovely love. You look very well thank you. Thank you very much as the just out of bath digital. I had to wash my hair in the thing because we're not training at the moment. The youngest the third one and the situation very well and he managed to you. Know however much you say. Don't touch it. Don't touch it they. He touched it and he was his the next time. It wasn't there bay. Flexi i didn't know where he'd flicked it and then i moved my hair the way was like oh i thought oh great you can just smell can't you. You've got on it so weird. We dog about five months ago. Noise not four months ago it was almost like immediate thing similarly with the dog that you can. You know the smell of your own child's kind of we in poo farts. Yeah and so like immediately. I knew i knew i knew the dogs. The smell of the dog. Who so even when i just go in the garden i can tell. The fees are noise. Done a sneaky. Want to find it. Kind of it's hilarious. We are also pay like pregnancy knows. Because i think when you're pregnant your nose is just so tuned in and i don't think you lose it and once smell up your nose it's really hard to let go Yeah absolutely agree. I like where we star eight star..

edith dovan four months ago eight star third one five months ago Dec
Pope pays surprise visit to home of elderly Holocaust survivor

Snap Judgment

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Pope pays surprise visit to home of elderly Holocaust survivor

"A Vatican spokesman says Pope Francis visited a Holocaust survivor and Rome Saturday. Hungarian born author Edith Brock had been imprisoned in a serious of concentration camps as a child. She lost her parents and her brother there. Ah, Vatican spokesman said the pope wanted to honor those hurt by what he described as Nazi insanity. And stressed the importance that future generations know what happened. The Nazis and their allies killed about six million Jews and others in German occupied

Pope Francis Edith Brock Vatican Rome
"edith" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

05:03 min | 4 months ago

"edith" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"I judge santana and he told me he told me the up. America has to be white again now. He five with over yet. Did i would have grabbed that boy. I would have dragged him in a corner. I'm gymnast i have. I have muscle. I would have pushed him down. I would have stepped on him. And i would have said who do you think you're talking to i. My mother going to the gas chamber. But i think even today that people don't come to me they're sent to me and the most obnoxious version is your best teacher. So what was it like working with him. Working with someone who send those horrible things to you how i did him as i looked at the nazis Pity with pity that he gave up his freedom. And then when i did that i changed the whole atmosphere in my place. And guess what i said. Please tell me more because love is time. T. i m e time when you said he gave up his freedom. You said you looked at that white. Supremacist with pity because he gave up his freedom. What do you mean by that that you become a prostitute and the definition of a prostitute. You can be bought so he went. And he gave up his freedom to think for himself to have a voice prem himself it was fourteen years old his pants throw him out. You know. I worked with children of the nazis who through their children out of the house man. They question the parents. We don't talk enough about that. It's very very important To really look how the are going from generation to generation. And it's very important to revisit those places but don't get stuck in debt well and i'm curious what you think because if you draw the line between this this particular boy this white supremacist. Who sent to you. And and the fact that he gave up his freedom of thought that that he fell prey to an ideology which we know to be so toxic. And so wrong. The hatred of each other is wrong. How do you look at. What's happening today. The resurgence of a neo. Nazi movement the resurgence of white supremacy. The anger that these people feel when black and brown people and women and people who've been subjugated say we just want equality. How do you observe that coming back around. Now you know eichmann. Digit dot said that the holocaust didn't exist. And i very much like people to plato. Who tells us that you have to think. Well i and then you keep repeated repeated until people believe it. Our biggest enemy is ignorance. You want to crash to ignorance. Yes question authority. The them blindly not to authority. Because some people doesn't have any closer doesn't even shorts you know and to really find a way that we can open up communications. That's still only be be going to ever piece to be able to sit on the floor. And i did that. The children are not shaved. And i did that. In hungary and i did that and i was dead with car. Rogers and i've been very committed myself. Because when i came to america in nineteen forty nine. I've verdict in baltimore mode. And i worked in a sweatshop. I got seven cents to cuddle threats of boxer short but when i went to the bathroom one a wimsatt colored and i was in total shock after nazi germany. And come this gresh..

santana America eichmann hungary Rogers baltimore germany
"edith" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

05:30 min | 4 months ago

"edith" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Hi everyone sophia. Bush here welcomed a work in progress. Where i talked to people who inspire me about how they got to where they are and where. They think they're still going today. On work in progress. I am honored to share a conversation with a true spiritual warrior. She is wildly inspiring a model resilience and a deep. Well of wisdom factor. Edith eager doctor. Eager is a highly sought after psychologist author and keynote speaker survived the holocaust as a teenage girl and went on to thrive despite trauma that she endured. Easy as her friends affectionately call. Her obtained her doctorate in psychology and learned to use her imprisonment at auschwitz as a powerful analogy for the prisons that so many of us create in our own minds her mission is to inspire others to discard their limitations and find renewal and freedom within themselves after becoming a new york times bestselling author with her memoir the choice dr eager wrote a hands on guide to overcoming your trauma that just came out. This past fall called the gift twelve lessons to save your life somehow between her busy clinical practicing lawyer and her many speaking engagements this energetic ninety three year old made time to sit down for a chat with me in my conversation with dr eager. We discussed the power of thought how the most obnoxious person can be your very best teacher. Why the question. How are you doing is a stupid question. And how love is what you do rather than what you say. Counter eager also shares her harrowing accounts of arriving at auschwitz being forced to dance for joseph mandalay how she found the spirit survive at all within her own mind. Dr eager is truly one of the wisest people i.

dr eager sophia Edith Bush new york times joseph mandalay Dr eager
"edith" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

06:20 min | 5 months ago

"edith" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"In the streets of paris. Her mother was a cafe singer and her father was a street. Acrobat when edith was born. Her mother abandoned her to the care of her grandmother. Who ran a brothel in the city. Edith grew up there singing for her own enjoyment. Little edith reportedly lost her eyesight at age. Three due to meningitis but recovered did a few years later. According to some of her bag refers eat is attributed her recovery toward religious miracle after some of the brothel sex workers joined her on a pilgrimage. When edith was seven. She joined her father on his travels with the circus. This arrangement lasted a few years before edith struck out on her own. She did so in part to escape her father's short temper. She began singing on the street for a meager living in one thousand nine hundred thirty. Two at seventeen. Edith met louis depaul and the two had a baby girl named maxell. The couple didn't last. Long and marcel died at the age of two from meningitis. In nineteen. Thirty five edith. Got her big break. She was discovered by louis Play the owner of the popular ludzhev cabaret off. The show's liza. He gave edith her first nightclub. Job as well as a name that would stick with her for the rest of her life. Lamb mon piaf. Or the little sparrow. Louis ran a substantial publicity campaign to attract a crowd for its first show. He also hired a tutor in the literary arts and gave her tips on how to present herself. It said louis was the one to suggest edith. Where a black dress as her standard costume which she wore for nearly every public appearance thereafter. Edith show was a hit. Her voice was acclaimed by famous actors in the audience and she became so popular. She recorded her first two albums in this same year. Me good either. I while easy simple lesson on any soon. Edith was singing in the biggest music calls of paris but tragedy was just around the corner. Louis was murdered. The following spring in the resulting investigation edith was under suspicion was questioned as an accomplice to the murder allegedly. She had previous ties to the gangsters who had killed louis. Edith was eventually acquitted but not before or storm of bad press. She recruited the help of rameau. Also a lyricist. The two became lovers and she became his. Is raymond commission songs. That romanticized edith earlier. Life on the streets and helped edith fine tune her public persona all of this helped her regain popularity and escape the scandal of the wiz death. Edith star continued to rise even during world war two. She held several controversial concerts. For german servicemen during the nazi occupation of paris after the war she was deemed a traitor to the country and nearly banned from radio appearances but members of the french resistance spoke out on idiots behalf. They said she performed at prisoner of war camps in germany and that she was instrumental in aiding allies jewish prisoners to escape persecution. Following the war. Edith gains more and more popularity internationally. She became famous for her ability to captivate listeners. With her emotive voice and songs about life love and loss in one thousand nine hundred forty five. She penned sang her most famous. Release la veon. Hose move off. Though her sad demeanor and dark dreary costume initially put off new audiences. She quickly won them over with her voice. She appeared in several movies. And even made repeat appearances. On the ed sullivan show. She also performed at carnegie hall throughout her career. Edith's personal life was a constant source of intrigue. She had several passionate brief appears. Perhaps her deepest relationship was marcel dog. A famed middleweight boxer. He was a celebrity in his own right and he was married. Their relationship came to a tragic end when marcel died in a plane crash on his way to meet her the following year. Edith reported the song him to love in his honor in nineteen fifty. Two edith met and married jack. Peel a singer. The couple divorced five years later during this time. Edith was involved in a near fatal car accident. Her slow recovery along with two other significant collisions exacerbated edith's pre existing drug and alcohol addictions by nine hundred sixty. Edith's health was declining rapidly. She hoped to retire but her career continued to thrive after she recorded one of her most famous songs titled no. I don't regret anything. no genetic tale in nineteen. Sixty two edith married. theo. Sarah oppo a hairdresser and performer. Who was twenty years her junior. The pair stayed together and even saying it. A few public appearances until edith's death. The following year edith died in october of nineteen sixty three likely from liver cancer. The archbishop of paris denied her amass due to her irreligious lifestyle but the people of the city were determined to honor her life. Thousands of people lined the streets for edith's funeral procession one of her contemporaries had the funeral was the first time he saw paris traffic standstill. Since the end of the war a testament to the little sparrows place in parisians hearts all month we're talking about local legends for more and why we're doing what we're doing check out our newsletter romantic weekly. Find us on facebook and instagram at encyclopedia lamonica special thanks to liz. Caplan and jenny kaplan burned biting. Need to guest. Host this episode as always. We'll be taking a break for the weekend. Talk to you on monday..

edith Edith Little edith meningitis louis depaul paris louis Play ludzhev cabaret Lamb mon piaf marcel rameau raymond commission maxell Louis la veon liza louis ed sullivan carnegie hall
"edith" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

04:24 min | 6 months ago

"edith" Discussed on 5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

"In fewer than ten minutes. My goes extract. Best advice in the world's smartest ammos interesting people might ask them just five questions my gas today as holocaust survivor and author dr edith eager at ninety three years old edith is one of the very few remaining holocaust survivors old enough to remember life at the concentration camps now as a clinical psychologist. She's processed her life trauma and shows us all how to stop being victims in our own lives in her new book the gift i've compiled questions from my jewish friends to ask edith for this very special podcast episode. My first friend jenn sutton asked a question. She goes a recent study. Found that twenty. Three percent of young americans believe the holocaust is a myth or the death. Toll is exaggerated and eleven percent. Think jewish people. 'cause the holocaust what is the best way to teach forthcoming generations about the holocaust in order to change these numbers. Nineteen young people. Have the right to question authority. I would relation very compassionately and not to deny any anything over what they tell you as so they know that you're not there to do anything other than letting them know what you know. And because you see it's all subjective is micro. send your true. You don't want to deny that too. If they tell you that they are causing exist. I don't think you want to see. Yes i know because i know that three good and she was in. It doesn't help you but what does have you is for them to go to the german consulate simply in a big city like washington and just send them to the people who supposed legal legal veal alleged. You know that that was such a thing as unfortunately ally and people believe it and juicer. Cancer to society. Because what's happening is that germany didn't win world war one and when the country is suffering economically. They going to a scapegoat and direct the engine elsewhere. You know i october did that. You know it's let's go kill carpenter and so on. It's a trick that they they really are not Fishing what is really going gone into them. So our biggest enemy is ignatz. And i think i would really listen to young people. And i would raise they on people and i would thank them for even be interested in history and what happened. Spent good people do bad things. Get not born bad and evil. No-bid bit love and joy in fashion at or does good things and young people are the future. I called them the ambassadors for peace and goodwill very interested in young people and. I want to back with romance. Don't them does beautifully said. I agree with that approach. And i think the best way of handling all this ignorance. We're seeing this division. We have is education like you said. Go educate yourself. I also want to let you know that you can teach anyone anything thing. Unless they have the desire to learn. Say you'll get to create. That have meant that curiosity chain. You'll know that curiosity that helped me in auschwitz. Not give up river. Because i don't find out what's going to happen next. And the next question comes from jr rosty who asks what obligation to young jews having preserving jewish culture heritage and history in light of the holocaust. I asked people not to overdo anything. Sometimes people tell me they don't want to be juice Because all day he is. The holocaust. Eighteen gets very important for us before we see anything to ask ourselves. Is it kind. is it very very important. We need to meet people read. They are and three them as if they were. But they're capable of becoming. I am very invested in our young. And i hope that the they he'd been now that they're going gonna be ninety three years old They're not gonna have time to hate that they're going to this passion and love and.

dr edith jenn sutton german consulate germany carpenter auschwitz washington
Debra Messing; AJCs Groundbreaking State of Antisemitism in America Report

People of the Pod

12:01 min | 7 months ago

Debra Messing; AJCs Groundbreaking State of Antisemitism in America Report

"Messing is probably best known for her role as Grace Adler on the long running Sitcom will and grace. She has starred in movies and even been the voice behind cartoons. But for the past several months, she has been one of the voices behind a podcast called the dissenters since May Deborah and her co host Donna Damiani have interviewed men and women who have made their. Mark Challenging the status quo but the penultimate episode that aired this month was particularly powerful Deborah and her co host invited Dr Edith Eba eager a ninety three year old Holocaust survivor to share her memories of the past and thoughts on present day politics and the future Deborah is here now to talk about that episode and her own experiences with anti-semitism Deborah. Welcome. Thank you so much. So tell us about this podcast, the dissenters what you're trying to accomplish with each episode and how your conversation with Dr Eager Fit that theme. The dissenters created as a response to the suffering that we saw around our country over the last few years, and also in response to the activists that have stepped forward and taken it upon themselves to try and make things better. My friend Montana Diani, she is the CO host. She was a religious refugee came to the country at six years old she and I have both been very active in activism reading these pieces about these extraordinary people from around the world doing extraordinary things, and we would send them to each other in order to sort of buoy each other when we. Would start to feel overwhelmed and it always sort of kept us moving forward and one day we just realized that as much as was uplifting us it would most likely uplift other people to hear about the works of these what we call accidental activists we wanted to ultimately inspire and empower people to recognize that you don't have to have a certain education. You don't have to have a certain following and social media in order to be an activist all you have to do is just recognize something feels wrong and take one step towards doing something touted doctor eager fit into this lineup. She is a ninety three year old Holocaust survivor. Who came face to face with Dr Mangala when she was a teenager at the camps, she lost her mom and dad and went through horrible torture and trauma, and came to America and created a family and. Got A PhD and has used her experience and trauma in order to help people coming home from war to heal from their trauma. She has written two books and she decided to become a healer. And we just felt like she did not have any idea what her life would be. Once she got out of the concentration camp. Yeah and she was able to look towards the future to have hope and ultimately choose to do something that would help others. How did you first discover Dr Eager Montana and I are just really really curious people. So we are constantly reading. We are watching Ted talks. It was a Ted talk of her that we saw and ultimately we felt given the fact that there is this surge of anti-semitism and racial strife in our country that it felt particularly timely and important to highlight her and her journey because in our research, we discovered that three quarters of millennials who are people who are in their mid thirties do not know what Auschwitz is such a stunning statistic and kind of unimaginable that we felt like, okay. This it's incumbent on us to have someone who was there and lived it to assert that it really did happen and to celebrate her as well. You mentioned the lack of knowledge about concentration camps AJC. Of course, just released its first report on the state of anti-semitism in. America. And found that more than half of Americans don't know the meaning of the word anti-semitism. Some haven't even heard the word before. With Charlottesville and. Is seemingly explosion of white nationalism and Antisemitism Nazis everywhere in juxtaposition to the second wave of civil rights protesting it's very interesting that people don't protest against anti-semitism people flood the streets, for racism. And when you look at Charlottesville, the Nazis were screaming about two groups about black people and Jews. And we really are the most natural allies in the world and it really was just something that I just sat with for a while about like why is it that people don't protest four us? You're Jewish grew up in a predominantly non Jewish environment. Did you experience anti-semitism growing up I? Did? Can you speak to that a little bit? Sure. I remember I was in second grade and we were lining up. To go to Jim and I got in line and a little boy me and said, get to the back of the line Kaik And I didn't know what the word meant the teacher overheard and immediately grabbed the boy and sent him down to the principal's office I. Remember everyone looking at me like I had done something wrong. And as much as I didn't understand what was happening I understood that it would have been better if I just stayed silent and I just wanted the board to come back and everybody to just be normal and stop looking at me and a couple of years later it was Halloween and my grandfather was visiting and we woke up and a swastika was painted on his car. In our driveway. And I recall my mother just standing at the front door looking at it and I felt her fear I felt endanger and I, remember no one said a word. Just, you know my mom said get in the house. And somehow the car disappeared. And we didn't talk about it. and. So it became very clear to me from a very young age that I was an other. That I was different from everybody the community and that difference wasn't good. And Somehow I had taken on a sense of shame about the fact that I was Jewish and I actually recall in highschool. My father was president of the Temple President of the Jewish Federation. My mother was Vice President of the Jewish Federation very, very, very active in the community. And we would stay home obviously for the High Holidays and I remember coming back in after the High Holidays and someone saying, why were you out and I said, oh, it was yom. Kippur and. He got really mad they were like. How come you get that off and you get Christmas off? Why don't we get off and after that encounter anytime I would stay home because of a Jewish holiday I would lie and say that I had been sick. Wow. I WANNA, go back to your conversation with Dr Eager and I'd like for you to share what your biggest takeaways were. It's so powerful because she speaks about will lasting that her mother said to her in the cattle car. That essentially reality is whatever you have in your mind and in your heart. And bad things pass trauma passes and her first night there. Joseph Mangla went into the barracks and made her dance and she loved opera and she said that she got through it because she imagined that she was on a stage and they were playing Makovsky Romeo and Juliet. And she said and I danced beautifully and I loved it. That's how I survived. For me what was really remarkable was hearing everything that she went through and the fact that she landed. was that she was grateful for all of the terror and trauma and pain that she had experienced. She felt that she literally calls them a gift. That is something that is so amped medical to the way at least. I think about someone who has survived the Holocaust it really was a full paradigm shift for me to hear how she got there and ultimately how she healed herself. Yeah. Well, certainly, the testimonies of the survivors are a gift to all of us in terms of preserving the memory and the lessons that we can take from their experiences. So thank you for giving Dr, eager another platform to share that story with another audience that needs to learn and learn the lessons of her experience. I will tell you one of the most moving parts for me was the separation from her mother when they got to Auschwitz and how the experience of children being separated from their parents at the border was a trigger for her honestly I can't do it justice. Let's listen to a clip. Van. Is Show children being separated that their border? I had terrible night mash. Remember him and my mother was. Towed to go this way, I followed my mother. And this guy told me that I'm GONNA see my mother very soon. She just GonNa take a shower and promptly I was on the other side which meant life. So you see mandating trigger today for the me The time and everything was taken from me. Why was it important to include that in the podcast? I. Think when we witnessed that kind of wrongdoing that is really a crime against humanity, it reminds us how fragile we are. That we don't learn from the past potentially and we have to be vigilant every day in making sure that what we are putting out into the world is modeling compassionate. Inclusion.

Deborah Dr Eager Montana America Jewish Federation Charlottesville Dr Eager TED Dr Edith Eba Montana Diani Grace Adler Dr Mangala Donna Damiani Mark Vice President Kippur
EVIT Criminal Justice Instructor Derrell Branch & student Sheyla Vazquez

Good morning, EVIT!

02:26 min | 7 months ago

EVIT Criminal Justice Instructor Derrell Branch & student Sheyla Vazquez

"Her on Sheila. Could you tell me about your experience at Edith? Yeah, even I joined last year like, mr. Branch said I just wanted to get like criminal justice classes and even it was like a great opportunity to get those college credits without paying a lot of money for it. And so right now I'm on track to get my associates in me. He's really not aside from being a student in the criminal justice program. She also participates in the Mesa Cadet program with the police department so off your first domestic a dense program, what is that? So the Mesa Police Cadets is built with like fourteen or Twenty and a half year old. It's a transition from high school to log. Forcement we do a lot of Mesa PD like community service. So let's community service look like we did the drug take-back people would drop off they're expired drugs and we would help out directing traffic asking how they are just so they know it's not just law enforcement. It's high schoolers who want to go into law enforcement and just getting that face-to-face with a service member what a wonderful opportunity. So I'm going to switch back to our instructor and how you see this being important in terms of the cadet program and other programs like and I think it's an invaluable because none of the hurdles that are students go through is that they graduate from high school usually around 18 years old and then police departments won't hire them as sworn officers until Twenty-One. There's a little Gap Thursday but a program like this the cadets were experiencing that exposure to the criminal justice system so that she can decide when she's old enough at 21 if that's career. She really wants to go into age. Mr. Branch, I don't want to pay that back to your background being important Career and Technical education is always been something that I'm I think is really really important that I'm passionate about because not only do the students get off an education. They also get real world experience. So that transition between being a law enforcement officer and then now being an instructor I'm able to teach the students from that real-world perspective. And what does it mean to you to have an instructor with this kind of experience. It just makes life and class so much easier when I love how my sister Branch looks at it like he lets us know what he did in the field and it's so much better if that makes sense great. It sounds like it's very important

Mesa Police Cadets Mr. Branch Sheila Edith Instructor Career And Technical Education Officer
After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

Environment: NPR

08:06 min | 8 months ago

After 2011 Disaster, Fukushima Embraced Solar Power. The Rest Of Japan Has Not

"Before the earthquake before the NAMI and the nuclear disaster Japan got nearly a third of its energy from nuclear power. But after the Fukushima nuclear disaster in two thousand eleven, the country took all of its nuclear reactors off line, which has led Japan to increasingly rely on fossil fuels and also solar power. NPR's cat ORF continues our series on recovery and Fukushima. She only endo is saying a final goodbye. To the home she once shared with her husband and three kids and for Cosima it's less than a mile from the Daiichi nuclear power plant where three reactors overheated and exploded in two thousand eleven. They left fast only taking what they could carry. Their things left nearly exactly as they were the day everything changed to coffee, Cup sit on the kitchen table her daughter's old school uniform is laid out on a bed a calendar on the wall is still flipped to March two thousand eleven. clueless you the kit ago. Muluzi. Nice. This is sad. She says this House System Nice, but we can't come back. She looks around your moon to Ni life is so different diddle do remind us. To start from nothing even less than. A totally reinvent ourselves after the disaster digging up this. She's here to give the keys to government officials. This house will be bulldozed soon and the land used as part of a storage site for radioactive topsoil scraped from the earth and the massive cleanup effort Tschumi heads upstairs. And takes one last look at the bedroom shoes to share with her husband Hitter Yuki. He died a few years ago suddenly. And then she walks back down to hand over the keys. The thing is pretty unceremonious though in reality she only says, she said goodbye to this part of her life. Disaster when her family piled into a car and drove as far south as they go to the southern tip of Japan on the island of Kyushu. Here, she's a single mom to her bubbly ten-year-old son Cagey who was just a baby when the disaster happened, he doesn't remember Shema at all her other two children are grown and live nearby, and she only has found herself within unlikely job running a small solar farm. On a big hill overlooking the tropical landscape Ma hidden is yet. She never imagined. My life would be like this guy when we first moved here, I was in my late thirties my husband was in his forties unanue issue we were like, okay. Do we get new jobs? So we decided to do this. We saw as investment for the future month on her husband worked at the Nuclear Power Plant for over twenty years and for him, the switch to solar was purposeful. He felt that nuclear power had betrayed him do on didn't He grew up really believing nuclear power was safe and then he lost his home to come see today the energy collected by these panels has allowed her to build a new life. The power is sold to the local utility company and brings in thousands of dollars a month when her husband died suddenly a few years ago she only took over the work and the family placed his grave in the center of the solar panels show me walks over to tall marblestone. Hook. With an inscription that says. Good you send do essentially remember that this family is here because of the Fukushima nuclear disaster in two thousand eleven cocoa use. A message to future generations she explains looking away device. My biggest wish is for renewable energy to take over I mean look at my old home, it's going to be a storage site for nuclear waste. We can't deal with that kind of wasted drivers go. Joey's wish might not come true though her family started their business at the right time. The price was so generous and also delegration was sold loose. So anyone can register. Naida is the executive director of the Institute of Sustainable Energy Policies. In Tokyo, he says in the early years after the disaster Japan pushed renewables to help fill energy gap left after fifty four nuclear reactors were taken off line the. Government offered big incentives, new investors, lots of people like me and her husband jumped on board to build smaller operations. incorporations rushed in to build massive solar and wind farms but also the liberation was more strict compensation dropped. It got increasingly harder for alternative energy producers to connect into the power grid edith says, this was partly due to the big utility companies trying to maintain control and the government allowing. It to happen the sitting kind of a body of to north to Laputa increase anymore, the institutions make a big difference that's Jennifer Sclerosis of George. Mason University she studies energy policy in Japan, and she says, there is technology an interest for renewables in Japan, but the bigger power companies in government need to commit if people in place do not watch to implement policies to empower the economics and the. Technology innovation then it can't happen regardless of how advanced technologies earn regardless of how good the economics look many of the major utilities as well as the Japanese government are still waiting to see if nuclear power can make a comeback and renewables just aren't that reliable yet. So in the meantime, I would assume the defaults going to import gas import coal eater agrees is the most the early sick and Not so optimistic future, but one place in Japan that is optimistic about Renewables Hookah Shema the local government here has set a goal for the entire prefecture. The third largest in Japan to be completely fueled by renewable energy by twenty forty. It's a real turnaround for a place where nuclear power ruled only a decade ago especially in the former exclusion zone near Daiichi, there are solar panels everywhere from small ones on roofs and hillsides to massive mega-farms along highways making use of land available after the disaster some of these panels are run by big developers and others are not. Lake the solar panels on farmer. She get Yuki Corneau's field. He's seventy four years old and this land has been in his family for generations he gestures around it. This is all my land, but it's nonsense. Nonsense because it's relatively useless the wind carried radioactive material here after the disaster and the government has scraped off all the topsoil in decontamination efforts. The farmers here can't really far much anymore. So small local power company came and asked sugar. Yuki if they could rent land for solar panels, he said, yes could you go I was really worried after the nuclear accident how would we get power most of his neighbors also agreed but that means everything is different. Now he says there were Rice patties all around here with tiny frogs that created a kind of soundtrack for his life now it's quiet. He misses the frogs a lot and he says, and he doesn't make nearly the same amount of money as he did farming. But She Yuki says he sees this as a necessary change. He has nine grandkids they all live far away now but they were just in town the other weekend for visit running through the fields. Suze my grandparents farmed here my parents do. But now it's time for Change I've realized it's a new season pitcher. This he says looking out over the solar panels is for future. Generations Khatlon store NPR News Fukushima Japan.

Japan She Yuki Government Daiichi NPR Japanese Government CUP Fukushima Yuki Corneau Shema Tschumi
COVID-19: What You Need To Know

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

06:04 min | 1 year ago

COVID-19: What You Need To Know

"This is an ABC news special. Kobe nineteen what you need to know here is. Abc News correspondent. Aaron Katersky as this school year nears an end. Parents wonder about the start of the next academic year. We'll schools welcome kids back. What will the classroom look like or will there still be online? Learning the answers dependent part. On what the virus does to kids and how kids transmit the virus. The World Health Organization said over the weekend that children appear to be less capable of spreading corona virus than adults. The comment came from the. Who's chief scientist? Sumio Swaminathan who appeared on the BBC? What we have seen in countries where schools remained open is that they have not been big outbreaks in schools and where there have been seen associated with we defense. A lot of people gather not in regular classrooms and it's often been associated with Donald who's had infection and who spread it so it does seem from what we know now that children are less capable of spreading it even if they get infection and certainly are very low risk of getting from the Z's for more on what all of this may mean. We're joined by Dr Edith Bradshaw Sanchez. A pediatrician and professor of pediatrics. At Columbia University. What do you make of her comments here? I think some of the reports that we're seen in the comments that were seeing from the. Who are definitely reassuring. I just want more data so a number of things have gone into into these comments from what I understand and there are countries that have opened schools Germany Denmark Some parts of Canada in those countries are not seeing big outbreaks of covert nineteen in children linked to schools which is reassuring but we just need more data. These countries have also done a variety of things to keep kids safe in school Germany. For example we've rent reports that they are having children self test every four days and given a green sticker to kids test negative and allowing them to walk around the school without a mask on some schools are taking temperature. Some schools have introduced a variety of social distancing in hygiene techniques. So so when we look at this at these reports and we we look at the lack of outbreaks linked to children after they were allowed to go back to school. It is reassuring but we have to remember that there are measures that these countries have taken and that we don't have all of the information yet. Really the bottom line is can. My kids hug their grandparents. Yeah I think that's such an interesting point for a long time and longtime in the cove world is a few months for a long time. We've been thinking about children in terms of the risk that they pose to adults. We've been saying okay. Well my kid goes back to school. Can they? Then come home and bring me the corner virus or bring the current virus to to grandma and GRANDPA if they visit in now. Not only. Is it that that is very much too little consideration? But now we're starting to learn for example that there is a new rare but serious complication of covert nineteen seems to affect children very differently than an affects adults. And now I think that the conversation starting to switch to what is the risk to children themselves from Bo Bo from going back to school. What's the answer? I wish I had it but I just don't know we just don't know there are reports for example right there. There is a report of a child. I believe from England who was in the French Alps and then went home. Was In contact with seventy two people that child himself tested positive for current a virus. None of the seventy two people. He came into contact with tested positive. So that was reassuring but then we had another report of a six month old whose parents had couvert nineteen and the child had to be cared for in the hospital and so they were constantly testing this little baby six months old and he shut the virus at very high levels for sixteen days. The data so far has been mixed in. I think that's why it's so important that we collect more data in children and the NIH as you probably have heard launched a study at the beginning of May to follow two thousand families to try to answer this question. What exactly is the rate of transmission? What exactly is the risk to children because we just haven't been collecting the data yet. Pediatric Multi Symptom Inflammatory Syndrome. What do we make of that? Does it matter whether it specifically connected to cove it as the CDC seems to suggest that it is? I do believe that it is linked to covert nineteen. And I'll tell you why. This new syndrome seems to have some characteristics of Kawasaki disease but it also has some characteristics. Overlap toxic shock syndrome. And I'll explain very very briefly Kentucky Diseases and inflammatory condition. It is cost by inflammation and then the the blood vessels in the body are affected. Ultimately different organs can be affected. The one that we worry about is the heart children present with fever with the red. Is the rash The swollen hands feed swollen. Lymph nodes some of the same symptoms that we are now seeing in this new condition but the difference one of the many differences that we're still learning is that these children were presenting with the new syndrome also seemed to have some of those symptoms from toxic shock. They are very sick when they present to care. They sometimes have low blood pressures and signs that there multiple there's multiple organ systems that are affected. And that doesn't go with Kawasaki. Disease it also here before cove it so we can of spectacularly Why are they testing? Summer testing negative for the antibodies and the virus itself. And that is absolutely puzzling. But I think at the end of the day you just sort of have to take a step back and think okay well. Even if it's not linked terrific can't prove it yet for some of these kids remember them majority are testing positive. And where was this before cove

Abc News Germany Aaron Katersky ABC Kobe Dr Edith Bradshaw Sanchez Bo Bo Kawasaki Disease World Health Organization Sumio Swaminathan Professor Of Pediatrics Kawasaki BBC French Alps NIH Scientist Donald Trump Fever Columbia University
Should I Prune My Magnolia?

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

06:18 min | 1 year ago

Should I Prune My Magnolia?

"Bonnie is the reader and she says I want to know. If you should prune in Edith bogue Magnolia minds about eight to nine years old. She says it's getting rather bushy and is more of a Bush than a tree. She wants to know what she can do about that. So it's a kind of a bushy plant. Naturally it is. I grow a few by the Rhode Screen. And they're fantastic and they're totally evergreen in my six zone six a garden but they grow their shrubs grow more like Christmas trees the lollipops and right. I just make mine a little bit tidier every year. Just a bit But when could printer into along lollipop or enjoy it as a fat plant that you can't see the road through? I think though at eight to nine years I mean it's it wants to be parameter is at the word Akira middle. I don't never know how to pronounce that. Which Act the accent should be on which syllable right is that? The question So so you know it's it's Bushier at the bottom and then narrower at the top and that's natural habitat great right so if it were young plant in the Field at the wholesale nursery when it was a baby and it was getting trained. That would be. The time may be more to shape it a little. You know what I mean that. Not Eight or nine years after. She's had it which means it's probably fifteen years or whatever you know twelve thirteen years after it got its early training. Whatever that was so once they get going. They're pretty fast. I think atr nine. That's probably a pretty big plan. That's what I mean is that Yeah So yes you can't I would never cut partway into a branch of one of these would you? I mean I would take out a branch would no I? I think you could shape it. yeah. I think I think of them as again. They have such a distinctive shape. A form Willie this bogus is kind of chubby in the shade. There gangly kind of call do okay. And as he said in the field when it's trimmed it probably is a Christmas tree shape pretty much or something like that right but in a garden and with a little shade and depending on the moisture and everything it could be mine gets Kinda out of shape and I do just prune back. I'll prune hathaway on a branch ticket sticking out in the wrong direction and it looks like it's misshapen. Oh so you'll go back part of the way into one. Okay okay all right all right. Good so So so the reason I bring that questioning. Even though we're GONNA digress. Slightly is that that Magnolia as I've been corrected grandiflora which is what I meant to say. Not Virginia another native. Make million species right. You know those are native. But they're not native where you garden or where I garden And so you know we're WANNA add more natives to our landscapes and so forth and you know when you and I began gardening most of the sort of it plants and really. I think it's still in many cases were Asian plants plants of Asian origin. Yes mostly will. They were aliens. Yeah we're exotics because some came from your too but I'd say that was SORTA. The trendy thing was for Asian plants because for example Japan and a lot of China has a very similar climate to our house. Yes we're patron. Japan have been around for since like eighteen fifties or sixties but China. It all new. Yeah so you and I both began. We got the bug and we began a sort of collectors of cool things from oddball catalogs before the Internet. Not that we're older anything and in fact you even did a book called the collectors garden in Nineteen ninety-six but two years before that you already had an inkling about natives sort of before its time has come in a big way and you wrote a book called the Natural Habitat Garden in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so here. Yeah well to yeah and you were kind enough to take meet all these incredible places where people who again were ahead of the curve gardening with natives. But here we are. We still kept collecting things. What are we doing sort of? What's the remedy you know if we WANNA be more ecological environmental etc? I mean I'm not throwing out my whole garden. That's the punchline for me but I'm trying to come up with ways to make room and I think you are too yes and encourage people to think about this in the future. I think that if I could have all native garden I would but it can't. It's not just because of the wonderful plants I planted over. The years has a lot to do with that but I will. There's some of them are so wonderful. So like you said I'm not gonNA plow them all under some of them are gigantic trees But I'm you know one thing I did is. I took a survey of the plants. That are here that are actually indigenous to my county in northwest corner of New Jersey and I found that there were over a hundred species in your garden. And they're planted like you know there's a flocks in with the other plants and there's somebody a an and you you probably remember. I have a woodland garden that I made from from the start twenty years ago with mostly plants from ten mile radius of this site and where I live but it's a very complex site because it's an island in a river and hardwood forest. So there's a lot to choose from but there is a lot to choose from many many places online. You're talking about online where you can find lists of plants that are indigenous or native to your area.

Natural Habitat Garden Edith Bogue Magnolia Japan China Rhode Screen Bonnie Bush New Jersey Akira Virginia Willie Hathaway
Fashion and War in America

Dressed: The History of Fashion

08:15 min | 1 year ago

Fashion and War in America

"Are currently in the midst of international fashion week. Yes and last week. We talked about the origins of the semi-chaotic relationship between fashion and Hollywood film. But we only got into the nineteen thirties so today. We're moving out of the thirties and into the nineteen forties. Which of course takes US straight into World War Two and on the show? We've talked a lot about fashion and war as it relates to Europe during World War One and World War Two but less so about the relationship fashion and war in America and it's actually incredibly fascinating because throughout the nineteen thirties. America's changing perception of their homegrown talent was reflected in Ariz- leading fashion magazines. Such as Vogue and Harper's bazaar at both of those magazines began to feature American fashion designers more and more throughout the decade. Elizabeth Haase reflected on this transitory period in American fashion in her book. Fashion is spinach which was published in nineteen thirty eight and in it. She writes quote in the late twenties ninety percent of the drawings and photographs. Where the work? A prison couturiers and. She's talking about Vogue and Harper's bazaar and then she says many pages and both magazines are now devoted to close created in America for American Life. The outbreak of World War Two and nineteen thirty nine mark significant shift in the fate of American designers who having continued to operate in the shadow of Paris throughout the nineteen thirties. Were suddenly left to stand all on their own and during the German occupation of Paris from June nineteen forty to August nineteen forty four. Many of the leading French couture houses were forced to close and those that did remain open did so under severely limited operations and some pretty severe restrictions as well right and for those of our listeners. Who might not have heard? April actually did a fantastic interview on stuff. You Mr History class which we featured a couple months ago so check it out if you want to learn more about fashion world war two so for the French fashion industry. This meant that communication with America during World War Two. It meant that one of their most important export markets was almost entirely broken and in one thousand nine hundred one after American designers and manufacturers presented promising fall and spring collections New York Times fashion journalist Virginia Pope well. She declared Murck City to be the fashion center of the world and AIRCON designers may have come into their own during the war but they did so under restriction and regulation beginning in nineteen forty two American fashion designers had to grapple with restrictions imposed by regulation l eighty five which were government imposed sanctions at severely limited. Just what designers could and could not produce the purpose of l. eighty-five was to conserve materials. Needed for the war effort and this included fabrics such as silk cotton wool. Leather Rubber Nylon. So you know pretty much. Every material that you need to make clothing and footwear and the regulations thus restricted just. How much material could be used in the making of new garments so we had campaign such as make-do-and-mend which encouraged people to avoid shopping altogether by mending their old clothes. Something we of course support very much today. L. eighty-five essentially challenge the very nature of the fashion industry itself. As we all know depends on the production of new seasonal clothing styles to stimulate consumerism and as we establish last episode Hollywood films while they were actively complacent and encouraging fashion consumption throughout the nineteen thirties and costume designers like their fashion designer. Counterparts were not exempt from L. Eighty five regulations during the war in an eighteen. Forty four article in the New York Times renowned Hollywood costume designer. Edith head called L. Eighty five quote. The greatest boone ever came to fashion designers in Hollywood so it would appear casts that in the nineteen forties costume designers still considered themselves as fashion designers. And she goes on to say about eighty-five quote. It vanished super luxury and brought us all down to Earth. Today we create sensible styles for women the kind that they can actually wear and she goes on to say how. Well I remember the day when we would swirl Fox skins around the hem of a secretary address or wipe satin uniform on a trained nurse. Now we hold to stark realism and by this time had been the head designer at paramount. For seven years she had taken over for her predecessor. Travis Banton in nineteen thirty seven and head like baton began her career in film working with Howard greer in the nineteen twenties as a costume illustrator before climbing the ranks and indeed head is certainly one of the most prolific and fame designers from the Hollywood golden age. Numerous books have been written about this prolific designer who April has eight Academy Awards for best costume design and wait for it. She has four hundred and forty four credits. On that's intense. She worked for almost sixty years in the film industry so she had an incredible career her first credit it dates to nineteen twenty five and her last film is dead. Men Don't wear plaid with Steve Martin. That released after her death in nineteen eighty two so she died in one thousand nine hundred. One at the age of eighty. Three head is quoted and Margaret Bailey's nineteen eighty-two book those Glorious Glamour Years as saying quote. I do not consider a motion picture costume designer necessarily a fashion creator because we do the script tells us to if we do a period piece then we recreate fashion. That was done before. And if we have a character role we do character close. It is only by the accident of a script that calls for fashion an actress that can wear fashion that some of the beautiful clothes will emerge. I don't consider myself a designer in the sense of fashion designer. I am a motion picture costume designer. So just how did head go from identifying as a fashion designer in Hollywood and the nineteen forties to firmly distinguishing herself as a costume designer by the end of her career? I love this answer. You pro because it actually lies with the advent of yours new-look which is a little unexpected as many of us know nineteen forty seven witnessed this dramatic and sudden change in fashion. Thanks to the unprecedented success of Christiane Yours Premier collection and he introduced dresses with nipped in ways. Those padded hips and full long skirts and they stood in direct contrast to the war regulated fashions of years prior which is why so many people loved them. Unfortunately for the many films released the year that this change took place. The costumes were immediately glaringly out of fashion again. Dino Dior's new look was significant reminder. That though film cost you may be perceived and interpreted as fashion it will never be able to truly contend with the whims and follies of contemporary trends. And Edith. Had designed costumes for eleven films that were released in nineteen forty seven so to say that she was affected is a bit of an understatement. Here and looking on this period for the book. Edith head's Hollywood edith reflected quote. I learned my lesson. The hard way just offered Dior brought out the new look every film I had done in the past few months. Looked like something from the bread lines with each screening. I vowed that I would never get caught by fashion trend again and became a confirmed fence sitter. Although despite her weariness of fashion trends did not keep her designs from apparently sparking them as was the case with address she designed for Elizabeth Taylor and a place in the sun which was a nineteen fifty film in a nineteen seventy-eight article for the American Film Journal. Edith wrote my dress for Elizabeth Taylor and a place in the sun was taken up by manufacturer of debutante Party dresses. Someone at paramount wants counted at a party thirty seven Elizabeth Taylor's dancing. All studio designers have created something that influences fashion. But a good costume designer. Shouldn't try to influence style though. Naturally he hopes to hit upon something that many people will like

Hollywood Edith Head America Elizabeth Taylor New York Times Paris Paramount Head Designer United States Vogue Europe Elizabeth Haase Dior Ariz Academy Awards American Film Journal Travis Banton Harper
"edith" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"edith" Discussed on The Current

"In Auschwitz very formed the expression expression the guilt of the survivors. He was the so the loud house. Day It is the fourth of December in the evening Ivan vetoed. It was very hard to May to go to visit because and they didn't let the block you know. And I came in anti-soviet she was under floor on the under stone floor in a coma and and the do rats have had evoke. Could there and back in the loop beautiful good little of my father and she how David David fighting to to to take to school the someone who didn't want to take and how they were fighting and and the vert the students rose you know I had a picture. Maybe he because I was still young. She was woman and and I so her really like something something special and she stayed in my mind like some special person that that you could do something important but they cut off her life so it was inverse happened at the top deal. Now I can tell you that I that I do understand. They cannot understand. I don't understand anything anything coffee. Do you know how many think of it. How did you survive? After I mean an and find the strength to survive after your sister you know I came from the camp terminally ill will be stupid in my leg and eighty years ago to build Colossus Sterno internees so so it was a little bit concentration of the leg because it was very paid for and I was limping. And deducted UH Jewish. Your doctor came to me and said edit you cannot go to work like these limping. You will be the same theme the key in the Gus Chamber. I can take you in the hospital for a few days. Delay New Transporti's organized. Then I will said send you back and so about two months show. Every time took me for three days after three days. She said go back back to work. Because I heard that they aren't making can transport after the transfer took me again for a few days evils so Monte Chevelle Bova very nice woman and she I can say that she safe me. v V these because been deposed has begun to be chronicle so indeed hurt anymore and had you been ill then you would have been killed. The if you hadn't been able to do that work. They would have killed. He'll do that's exactly right and the other thing you know. It's that Edith had a dear friend whose name was L. Rosenthal and sisterhood was a big part of Survival and what happened with many girls if they lost a family member of sister close cousin is it. Somebody else often stepped into that place and I write about it in the book. You know you couldn't survive in Edith says this you couldn't survive Auschwitz on your own. You had to have somebody with you. Who had your back and and helped you look after yourself and somebody you could look after and edith talks about how Elza says to her L. says to her I I can't survive without you and Edith says so I had to live that they needed each other? Yeah diva's I was fighting. I don't know if it was gotten nature my veal. I don't know it was something that pushed me to survive. Um and I want to tell you something very young and weaver full of live with all these terrible situation. Russian these these fear to fear every second in twenty four hours you know it was terrible but reverse reverse on Sundays on the bed and singing onto Don's we've wanted to sing. We won't be very young you know and you cannot stop these energy even not if you don't have enough food for Breezing v very young and and we be oh then somebody will survive the old bef- fight and on two end region. We are stronger than hate. It's a real pleasure to meet you. What a story you have? I'm glad that you survived. And it's important to hear you. I tell you the truth. I am glad all so for them but not for me. It's a hard life if you if you are sensitive very sensitive for a lot of things you know. So it's a hap life so dense vago entice speak. He tired sometimes because with children. You cannot tell them the whole twos visit the gas chambers with Gosling people we say woman a a beautiful clear lying in on the floor on the stone in in a coma she looked I when I super now she looked like it did cut. You know she was there with the hands like these so you cannot you. You know you you you cannot tell them everything so that you can you tell for other outside. Tell I'm but I cannot tell myself the true pet. You've done an amazing job easy to you. Have you have spoken truth. Thank you very much. You've any veil coming. Thank you thank you thank you had. Their mcadam is the author of nine nine nine. The extraordinary young women of the first official Jewish transport to Auschwitz. She was in New York. City Edith Grossman was one of those extraordinary young men. She's ninety five and she was with me here in Toronto for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

Edith Grossman Auschwitz coma mcadam Don David David Ivan Colossus Sterno Gus Chamber Breezing official L. Rosenthal weaver Toronto Gosling New York Elza
"edith" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:43 min | 1 year ago

"edith" Discussed on The Current

"A reading by Auschwitz survivor. Roman Kent Today Marks Marks the anniversary of the end of one of the darkest periods in human history. Seventy five years ago Soviet soldiers liberated the Auschwitz death. Camp Edith Grossman was seventeen. Seventeen years old when she and her sister Laya arrived at Auschwitz from Slovakia part of the first official transport of Jews to that Camp Edith is now ninety eighty five and lives in Toronto and joins me in studio. Her story is part of a new book called nine nine nine. The extraordinary young women of the first official Jewish transport two outfits the author. Heather mcadam joins us from New York City. Good Morning Good Morning Good Morning. Good Day Edith. A wonder if you could start by telling me about what life was like in the town that you lived in Slovakia when the government the Nazi back into powder in fifty and so from March nineteen thirteen nine Slovak state and independent state route our our laws against the Jews. These Indian newspaper our lows against the Jews I've streaked and then Jerem German sprout proud of it you know and the president will say we'll say priest doctor diesel a Catholic priest in signed everything so so he'd begun the juice juice could have or the goal or they have to give up they could have domesticated animal Matica. Don't they don't will. They could leave on the main. The main steady you know heather white in you've written about this. Why did the government at the time decide to send those Jewish girls and women into Nazi Germany? Well it's it is a big mystery Why would you pick teenage girls to go literally literally demolition buildings? That was the idea that they were going to build The new homes where the Jews were going to be rehome that was the euphemism. Awesome for death That the Slovak Republic used or the Slovaks use sorry There's no actual paperwork no documentation stating why they would use young women however Doctor Pavel Meshed An and other historians around this history and myself included. You know there's a couple of reasons that we come up with one is if you want to destroy race of people you attack. Young Women Because they are your next generation. They're they're going to carry the next generation and women are nurtures of culture. The other thing is that parents were more likely to give up their daughters than their sons and so You know the end and they were lied to so Edith's parents and all of the parents they were told the girls were going to work in a factory for three months and Slovakia was the largest manufacturer of army boots and so everybody thought. Oh It'd be a shoe. Factory may be Munitions Factory They'll go away for three months. Then they'll come home. They had no idea that they were going to Auschwitz and it was just a blatant lie in in order to get parents to let their daughters go which of course A few months later. They President T.. So the Catholic priest said well. Oh who wants to join your daughters and everybody said yeah so I tell you something. My Mother didn't want to let us go specialty. Did Not because of me she. She looked at me. I was the smallest in the family. You know leverage store and the and the ad a human being educated and Dole and beautiful and and so my mother sent layout you go you will go to Hungary and my father author sit. I don't let my kindle keep kids away from me I am the father. I am responsible for the kids. and My mother said about Luke d'oro so he said it's a bad law but we have to respect it and you know my father died v. so to believe that layer is dead. He couldn't catch himself DETI. He let he's that die. He you know heather. What do we know about how the parents of these girls reacted when they learned that that that their daughters weren't Being sent to work in some sort of shoe factory that they're being sent they didn't find out until they arrived in Auschwitz and part of you know and they were on their way eight of the gas chambers Part of the story You know this is a multiple narrative. So Edith story forms at a narrative spine for the book but I have loads of free search of other families survivors. Non Non survivors and one of the stories is the Hartman family which is just heartbreaking. And there's postcards that go back and forth forth between the family and Slovakia and and Cousin of hartman daughters and the you know the postcards they they have no idea they just don't understand that keeps saying. Why haven't we heard from MEG? Duska Newton see and and and of course the postcards coming back from Birkenau. Now are coded and they're coded so well that the family can't tell that those girls are already dead and it goes on for two years and and it's just heartbreaking so parents just they didn't find out edith's father Emmanuel Friedman sent somebody who worked in his. His store are two outfits to try and free the girls who was a gentile and he went with their paperwork to try and free them. I you know and went up to the gate and said I'm here to take the Maya Friedman home and the SS were like well. What's their number and of course he's like a number and he looks around? I mean he's his life is threatened he looks around and he sees crazy women who are half naked wearing Russian men's uniforms barefoot in field in in mud. This was one of the work details. They were spreading manure with their bare hands and he thought that Auschwitz was an insane asylum and he left and he went back to Slovakia and he said to Emanuel Freedman. Your daughters aren't there. I don't know where they are and of course they were there. How do you take down criminal network doc hidden in the shadows? I tell them that. I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the dark nets the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police who hunt down online predators the environment that they're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made hunting warhead subscribe. Wherever you get your podcasts there were nine hundred ninety nine women girls on that train? Why I'm not a thousand heather? Well that's a really interesting question and The I I believe. Hitler was very heinrich. Taylor was very very into astrology and hired a historic astrologer to look into the number as well as the astrological dates and everything thing matches. I mean the date of the announcement is is trying with Hitler's birthday Hitler's name if you do the numerology of it his his Heinrich Leopold Himmler is a nine nine nine his birth year and date equal nine. And you now they they believed some weird stuff and I truly believe that That it was planned as a way of sort of stacking the deck would. What do you remember Edith about about that transport tell me about the train to Auschwitz? I don't delighting. We've had about fifty in one in Van Wagner we're GonNa and Van V. So then we heard two closer to close it from outside so that it's not go and then we fell that it's not good and V. Yongin have an older sister. Where crank would do you think the V. Relieve relieve will believe? What will they do we south? Who will who will take us where we going so diverse? I panic converse. Really panic you know. be or stay at their life because the late transported came from Belgium or from whole Antonio taught. I don't know a lot of debt people already in the India Today when when you arrived at Auschwitz what you remember seeing the drive to Auschwitz and we didn't see anything on our bite. Mark Fry verdict is making you free and vetting the packages. We had to take twenty kilos. But what came. He didn't have any idea idea these verse for us. A SHOCK EB unbelievable shock. Voday did visas after after you know what was what was the first shock. What was the first thing that happened? I tell you I don't like to mand to tell the story but the make so a Biki impression on me. We almost over the good standing. Go got their mom on slee and holes and the whole snow was bloody and these picture. I sold the second time mend when remade Excuse me I feel now everything a lot stronger than then I came from Auschwitz. I tell tell you the truth because then we are so happy to be free. It was almost unable forty. I don't normally see to Asian and now when everything stops stabilized anti CD throughs. And I cannot understand how could it happen. How Kutab take a tragedy like these at bill never be discovered? I too believe me. How could it be diverted to rue de the ease or heard about dis like nothing? You know nothing happened so bought so what you know and I think we had to survive and to ask. Who's who says is these nature? God I don't know V.. Hit to be messengers. Somebody had to survive to tell the story and tell the story you went with your sister told me about your sister Leah..

Auschwitz Edith Grossman Slovakia Heather mcadam Camp Edith president Slovak Republic official New York City heather white Toronto Germany Laya Hitler Hartman Leah Maya Friedman Birkenau Emmanuel Friedman Hungary
"edith" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"edith" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"A show that takes history and squeezes it into bite sized stories today is December Fourth Twenty nineteen and the day was December fourth eighteen. Sixty five edith edith. Louisa cavill was born in England. Cavill was a nurse at known for hiding allied soldiers from Germans during World War. One cavil was the oldest. I afford children when she was young. Edith was educated at home mostly by her father. who was the vicar in Sorenson? where she was born she later I went to boarding school then? Worked as a governess for an ethics family. Edith time travelling in Switzerland Bavaria and Saxony gaining an interest tryst in hygiene and medicine and Brussels cavill worked as a governess but when her father got sick she went back to England to care for him. Cavill soon began her nursing. Education started gaining experience in hospital. Work to worked in different hospitals in the London area and she took jobs as a private nurse. Belgian surgeon Antoine Pies invited cavill to Belgium to help with the direction of his new nursing school. which would be influenced by the model developed by Florence tiding Gal as an English trained nurse who was fluent in French? cavill foot the bill for who he was looking for. She became the director of nurse. Training at Birkdale Medical Institute and within a few years was working as a nurse trainer at several hospitals and schools cavill also began publishing the Nursing Journal. La La Fermier but as the first world war began Germany invaded Belgium entered Brussels. Her Clinic in Nursing School were turned into a Red Cross hospital. All she cared for wounded German soldiers. When a couple of injured English soldiers ended up in her clinic November of nineteen fourteen? She hit them and help them escape to the neutral Netherlands. As more allied soldiers began showing up at her clinic. She continued to shelter them and assist them in escaping to the Netherlands. Many of the soldiers. She helped British and French. She began working with an underground network of people who supply the allied soldiers with food money clothes and am fake documents. Soldiers were moved from location to location in the network and Cavaliers Clinic was one stop the network also assisted French in Belgian men who were of military age that feared being imprisoned by the Germans cavaliers resistance work in harboring allied soldiers. In helping them escape was against German military law but the system broke down when members of the network were caught in linked to unlawful activity. Cavill was under suspicion and she was arrested arrested on August. Fifth Nineteen Fifteen. She spent weeks in solitary confinement and she signed depositions admitting her guilt she was charged ars with war treason and helping. Soldiers escaped to Britain which was at war with Germany. That meant she was aiding an enemy. Cavalry went on trial and was found guilty. She was sentenced to death and executed by firing squad on October. Twelve after her execution cermony used her death to discourage resistance resistance the British on the other hand used her execution as propaganda to encourage enlistment in the British army people around the world announced that the German had executed a nurse and believed the punishment was too harsh after the war was over. Cavaliers remains were exhumed and transported to England. I'm Eve Steph coat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did. Yesterday you can keep up with us on social media on twitter facebook and Instagram at td. I H C podcast. And if you would like to write me a letter you can scan it turn it into a pdf and senator us via email.

Louisa cavill edith edith Brussels cavill England Netherlands Cavaliers Clinic Cavaliers Edith Belgium Germany Nursing School Nursing Journal Sorenson British army Saxony Birkdale Medical Institute La Fermier Antoine Pies
"edith" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"edith" Discussed on Backlisted

"Mr Gobert CLIFFE's up. I came to say. I hope you're feeling better. Moaning Gerber noted slightly canary sang in a window. Sunlight oblivious Livia of Ovallis. The boy wrote some flowers. Dick Okita vase for them. The woman went out. I didn't know what to say walking around a little going back to work soon. Now maybe that was a bad idea. Didn't they want to go back to work. Why should he if he was being paid as usual salary may be more fun countered insurance? I hope you're feeling better. CLIFFE's said Richard Gerbert looked to him with hauled hard amusement with a kind of glint he had not completely lowered his trenton standard onto his sheet covered lap cliff. He felt the coolness sweat on his forehead after his first words about Gerber feeling better. What the Hell Gerber expect that you get down on his knees begging him to use it influence to get his driving licence back post a promise that he wouldn't ever drive a car again? For instance didn't lock. People hit people by accident in the duck. What the hell are we doing in walking along the edge of the road like that Clifford could've out Gerber? Well you pissed who may be. I have to pay for it for the rest of my life. I suppose uh-huh or something like that advertised had not left Cliffe's Gerber look like an old German Ham beef beef animal of some kind. There were creases across his forehead. Gray has these only browse a strong guy stupid too but damn sure of himself. The way a lot of stupid people were sure of themselves. CLIFFE's courage drained. But he stood up. Straighter tossed his paper up. Chrysanthemums on the foot of the bed. I'm put his hands on his hips. Just then the woman returned to the room a move slowly to the bed and took the flowers when you sit down. She said politely to cliff. CLIFFE's knew he had cooked it by tossing flowers out Gurbuz face at hardened by a couple of degrees. Here's I'll find younger generation in good but said Oh Dick. The woman's shrieked in a soprano like something out of an opera. She had an unusually high voice anyway. Cliff he tossed a smile at her. He's come to see you said the woman he didn't have to do that cliff. He looked for a few seconds into Gerber. Steady unfriendly is an unrealized that they were both furious but not furious about the same thing. Their minds were on two different things. I'm sure the boy sorry for what happened. The the woman said all right. I'm not sorry. Cliff retorted at once and ten Denise Hail to Dole One I had on the landing then he found a stash and dash down the woman behind minded but he was going much faster if you found himself smiling broadly as soon as he got into the open. Air The hell with them. He saw the family car across the street. Treat faced in the direction for home. Edith smiled seeing his smile windchill right cliff got in and shut the door perfectly. All right nice nice going cliff. He didn't look to see. Mrs Gerber was on the Front Porch. As the car drove think Patricia highsmith thinks there are two types of people in the world. SOCIOPATHS and victims and one of the brilliance of her work is her ability to talk about the sightsee Pathak elements in all our personalities rights so she invites you to identify with people who then do awful things. The you might do if you felt you could get away with it but if society gave you permission to do that then you might act in that. What Definitely I feel that you lend yourself to her very easily. And that's why I became addicted to uh-huh and now feeling again after eating edith's diary I wanted to know what happened next even if what happened next when I turn the page was nothing. I mean that seems to me. One of the great skills vets keep it bouncing along. The Graham Greene famously called her the poet of apprehension. We should wind up. I'm afraid that is all we have time for. Thank you to Karen and John Fa- facing this drink for drink. Nikki watching I levels to unbound for stocking the fridge. Add to Jonathan the team at books at a crow and the literate denizens of Crystal Palace making so welcome thank you Bookseller Crow you can visit bookseller. Crow WPRO in Gipsy Hill Stroke Crystal Palace Stroke Norwood Stroke Croydon stroke south London but even more exciting. You can order books from the direct so the next time you want to buy a book for an independent bookseller. Instead of say a tax dodging organization. You can go to the bookseller crow websites and by ordering a book from them. You are helping keeping culture alive rather than kill it. which is what you do when you book from other places uh-huh speaking of which you can download all one hundred five previous episodes plus follow links clips suggestions for further reading by visiting our Website about listed dot. FM and. We're always pleased if you contact us on twitter facebook via boundless but before we go I think we'd we'd all like to toast the memory of brave unclassifiable. Brilliant writer to Debra all whose idea this book was to Debra which is.

Mr Gobert CLIFFE Cliff Mrs Gerber Moaning Gerber Edith Gerber Gipsy Hill Stroke Crystal Pala Dick Okita Livia Crystal Palace Crow WPRO Debra Ovallis twitter Oh Dick Richard Gerbert Patricia highsmith Clifford
"edith" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

12:41 min | 1 year ago

"edith" Discussed on Backlisted

"Called Eleven which is not currently in print and it has not one but two stories about snails? Oh I love the snow stories. And I'm Oh I'm GonNa do is if you don't want to hear spoilers go forward two minutes 'cause I'm going to read the final two paragraphs of this story story so it starts. When Mr Pizza cannot put to begin to make a hobby of snail-watching? He had no idea that his handful of specimens estimates would become hundreds in no time now that in and of itself is a magnificent opening statement of intense now fast forward to the penultimate paragraph a snail crawled into his mouth. He spat it out in disgust gust. He tried to brush the snails off his owns. But for every hundred he dislodged four hundred seem to slide upon him and falls into him again and as if they deliberately sought him out as the only comparatively snail free surface in the room. There were snails cruel cruel ing over his always and then just as he staggered to his feet. Something else hit him. Mr Robert couldn't even see what he was fainting. Wanting any rights. He was on the floor. His arms felt like leaden whites as he tried to reach his nostrils. His is to free even from the ceiling. Murderous snail bodies help he swallowed a show. It's almost becomes funny because of the reputation the words snail. Anyway I'll keep going choking. He widened his mouth and felt a snail crawl over his lips onto his tongue. He was in Hell Hale he could feel them gliding over his legs. Like a glutinous river pinning eggs legs to the floor. His breath came enfeebled gulfs. His vision grew black a horrible undulating black. He could not breathe a tool because he could not reach his nostrils could not move his hands then been through the slit of one guy. He sold directly in front of him only inches away. What had been? He knew the rubber plants aunt that stood in its port near the dual. A pair of snails were quietly making love in it and right beside them. mm-hmm tiny snails pure as Jew drops were emerging from the pit like an infinite army into their widening world. Aw I feel. Pat Might be revealing something herself in in that story about her feelings about how she treats characters right. Where do you get your ideas from Miss Highsmith Charon? And what does this book have. Say What is the story have to say about the role of women in the period. The hoist faces Royston. Now so she's wanting from the mid fifty s to the mid Seventies. which in theory is a period of liberal liberation? Yeah I felt she was very well. Edith Edith was very almost not there a lot of the time she was going through her motherly. GT's UT's really super doing basically the barest minimum. I fell a lot of the time but also she gives up a bit. That doesn't she starts off cleaning everything and Minnesota yeah becomes she gets more and more disheartened with feeding George. Yeah that to me was the most human cider house. She cared for George George even though she did you know starts really resented. She still did it until the end but it was more of mothering really with liffey that uh-huh demonstrated how she couldn't quite bring us off to do it but sort of got food ready but that was about you know she just left him to his own in devices. The the book is Basically Patricia. Highsmith saying that the life is in the book is in the writing and all the rest of it or if she does enjoy a drink and not drinking and smoking cessation rising. But it's it's not really there. It's it's the life his elsewhere and suit of theirs she's just not quite present. I think is a character and say she saying really that that that the she's eight hundred critique I think of also it's quite a critique of of marriage int- all of those sorts of domestic. Yeah yeah she was very very eccentric. Domestic wasn't she was sort of cleanliness fetish but also didn't like eating much as a great list of stuff that she liked liked and didn't like in the biography thing she did like we're box. Matthew Passion old clothes sneakers the absence of noise Mexican Food Fountain Pens Swiss Army Knives. Life's weekends with no social commitments Catholic and being alone things disliked the music of Sibelius the art of leisure live concerts for cooked meals television sets the beginning Sharon regime loud mouth people. And those who borrow money being recognized by strangers in the street fascists and burglars to this that she could have added suicide and actually regarded as cowardly that loves snails. Love Crime in the book. He's he's on its own. The thing is as I say this it sounds really crap And it's a tribute to Patricia Highsmith. Artistry that of course it doesn't feel the to crap when you read the novel but the crime is what the expectations of a woman could be over a twenty year period. And so that sends Karen you were saying about how she kind of loses energy and hope you can feel depression beginning getting to creep in. She can't do things and you can see that. She is a product of her environment. The national environment. That seems to be a big thing in this book for Highsmith smithian nodal such a domestic environment as well right. Yeah tightly she so there's this split and I think that said it's like the suit of physical edith gives gives up and the The diary if takes on a life having grandchildren it which is almost like an a repetition of of of what she's trying to avoid and so it's it's like a whole hall of mirrors in in a weird way. It's costly and I needed that because I feel like she's coming through me. She produce because it is her losing her reality if you look at the diary and see what the aspirations expressed in the impossible possible dream. Life of the diary. They're quite depressing. To only the rancho she wants to kind of lifestyle that is being fed. I took through television. Sort of you know what she gets through to the husband he disappears but she wants to son to have a happy loving marriage and at working in the oil industry in Kuwait. Yes yes having kids and celebrating Christmas. Almost a parody of sort of nineteen fifties happy happy family. That's the thing that is so arresting. I think I think about the book is. Is that you you kind of know that it's not gonNA end. Well there's a sense of gathering because and it's also it's Patricia Highsmith so you figure this isn't GonNA end. Well for Edith. But in fact I mean we're not giving away any spoilers. The ending his subsequent flashes. Well I sort of feel quite often as Whoa that as you get near the end of the book and so the second half of the book those aspirations from the diary she begins to try and replicate them in real life in the way that she's not doing in the first half the book so there's holes he he's trying to paint outside of the house so the outside of the House looks like this beautiful kind of keeping up with the Joneses. Kind of you've aspiration however the inside of the house is getting more remorse. Ramshackle and dirty Yes an awful no says she takes up sculpting and she scoped she scoped hopes and much more handsome head of classy than actual head. which everybody's very impressed by it because it's like is like the kind of cliff? Everybody wishes insisted. Yeah Yeah Yeah. By the end of it she scoped it the heads of the two imaginary grandchildren as well. But I love the idea within because well. You can't tell how talented she is in terms of creativity in other words she knows the opponent of the off-the-peg the peg aspirational lifestyle is that she should have a an interest in politics and be she should be a creative person but you have no sense of satisfying her. I mean I think one of the things. The book is about is about creativity. The diary is the surrogate for a northern novel. One little bit of good right I think in the diary. Which is she writes a poem into into Dari misery which goes at dawn after my death hours before the sunlight will spread at seven o'clock as usual on these trees which I know greenness will burst dark? Green shadows yield to the cruel benign in different son in different will stand the trees in my own garden on weeping for me on the morning of my death same same as ever routes a thirst the trees will rest in Brislin stone blind uncaring. The trees that I knew you that I tended and that was read out. heus mysterious as well. We were talking earlier earlier about Reuters routines and as luck would have it. We have a clip of Patricia highsmith appearing to talk about her routine as a writer. Have you got very strong routine in your day of discipline. If I'm working on a novel I like to do eight pages a day and almost the the same with short story short story can do ten and I try to To Take Care of the boring things in the in the morning and Work maybe four or five hours a day when you say the boring things what do you mean sure is like shopping writing a business business letter or things like that. Do you write in free hand or do you type. Your books are always on the typewriter. And where do you begin. You begin with the plot the book or are what I think I begin with certain action. Say maybe a kidnapping in the book or it's it's not an entire plot but I have to go the beef then forwards and then not primary I should say to go backwards to put came before and then forwards in the in my own thinking it tells you nothing nothing apart from lessing Mavis Nicholson knows how utterly weary shaved Mavis. There's no cousin goes well with the pen or a waltz. Think Oh my God still fifteen minutes on Thames. Slight risk that we might have made this book sound dull and unpleasant but it is like all of I Smith. I think he is readable to the point of you know you you you get stuck in you. You have to go put down extraordinary well. It's very funny in places and I think you know that she can get so much humor. Our of such adult characters and circumstances is kind of amazing and it's obviously very bleak humor that a fantastic set piece where cliff basically has has been drunk driving. He mows down a guy a middle aged businessman One Nine on his home breaks these legs and eat his forces him to go and visit him on. The visit is absolutely brilliant. I thought I would read that. Richard Gerber was embedded reading newspapers. A man with a broad had headstrong brown hair growing grey Bruni forums. He looked up at liffey. Like a perfectly healthy businessman disturbed by visitor morning..

Patricia Highsmith Edith Edith George George Mr Pizza Mr Robert snail-watching Mavis Nicholson Hell Hale Kuwait Minnesota Pat Reuters cliff Richard Gerber Matthew Passion Karen Swiss Army Knives Brislin stone
"edith" Discussed on Backlisted

Backlisted

12:03 min | 1 year ago

"edith" Discussed on Backlisted

"You put great store on your reviews defensive pensive Publications there in I suppose and I like reviews that had rather bad sometimes it for several years ago one review said that I was very careless list with by minor characters. At least it's it's more interesting than being praised but then would you then look to the books and think well the look at the minor gun. Yeah so I think I had do better next time. Yeah but you don't sought of feel anxious about them all wondering no no. That's not No I don't if the newspapers come to my house or something I I put off looking at them lately. It's getting. I can not lie there for two weeks before. I've got the courage to look at it. I urge people to watch the whole interview. 'cause you can see Mavis. Nicholson even through her. First fifty questions in the first ten minutes so We hit soon about Patricia. Highsmith and edith's diary as John said head. We didn't choose the book but we would like to say up front. But we've all found the experience of Reading Star one of the most intense books wchs in which not much seems to happen. I've ever read. Jim What were you assigned to me earlier about how it made you feel yeah. I felt personally attacked talked. I think all the way read together. I feel like she sort of sets out to unsettle you in that amazing way that she does in her crime Donovan. She's of sets out to do that but in a domestic no full And all that energy that would go normally into really sort of you. You know unsettling the characters through plot I feel like channeled into finding ways under your skin as the reader to make you sort of shutter. Maybe behavior that you've that you've had that you can see horrible. Echoes in this Oval Karen. You read it before your house with no I hadn't I hadn't hadn't come across it at all and I read it very quickly without really speaking to anyone two days. And let's just say infiltrated my dreams and say when I woke up on the second morning I was pleased to see Penn Jr Out The window and not I. I was still in the book. It's intoxicating and very odd and I want to speak to analyst analyst about it. Thanks for agreeing. What did you completely loved her? I'd only read a couple of the Ripley's before and had always thought I should read more Patricia. Highsmith I mean the publishing background is really interesting with turn down matching match turning down Patricia Highsmith but it was turned down by cannot Bob Gottlieb the editor not just turned down for the classic reason. WHY WE'RE GONNA put it in the bookshop now it? It doesn't neither if it's not. It's not the kind of book that you normally right. It's not a mystery or thriller but it's not quite alliterate novel either. Actually approved proved wrong with Simon and Shuster took it on and the reviews. It's one of the best reviews I think of all highsmith's novels it got really great reviews in the UK. It was reviewed by people like ovum war and it was reviewed by an Elson. I am Wilson's review here. This is one of those reviews that you can see. We delight in editorial an utter despair in marketing. I'll just read you the one of the saddest novels I have ever read a perfect unim- provable masterpiece. It isn't a murder mystery or a novel of suspense. It is a novel of boredom wretchedness. I Self Deception and depression shelter advertising. So Oh I'm just GonNa read the blurb on the back of the US edition just to set this up for people and then Cairns GonNa read the opening of the book so everyone here tonight will have started reading stories. edith. Helen's daughter is her most precious possession off the moving with her family. From New York City too suburban Pennsylvania Edith's husband abandons abandons her for a younger woman leaving her trapped in a bleak existence with a degenerate sung and his see Noel uncle. Oh you haven't seen along. The as edith life turned sour. She retreats into writing and wall life plunges into chaos disturbing tale of success assess and happiness blooms in her diary. She invents a happy life and as she knits for imaginary grandchildren. The real world recedes further still lil mocking a descent into madness. That may well be unstoppable. Originally published in nineteen seventy seven. AD story is a masterpiece of psychological suspense suspense a harrowing and totally written tale of an ordinary woman whose life is slipping out of control the author of strangers on a train and the talented. Mr Ripley get those. In Quick Wake Patricia Highsmith is one of the most original voices in twentieth century. American fiction and that thing John that you were saying about. There's a very strange flatness so highsmith pros whether in this book or in her other books which in a sense became became her stock in trade. That's when the bad things come they may not be the bad things you've been led to believe but you already feel pretty bad on the way there beneath the flatness. You can sense of excitement about what she's telling senior economic sense her excitement at trying to get these ideas this plot across and knowing the effect is GonNa have on the reader knowing how she can kind of play you play with the characters as well. Right she likes doing horrible things to the characters in the book that she loves it. Karen could you just read us the The opening and K Chop two one eight is had left her diary among the last things to pack mainly because she didn't no where to put it in a crate among the blankets and sheets in one of her own suitcases now it lay naked thick and dark brown on an otherwise is clear coffee table in the living room. The moving men want coming till tomorrow morning. The wolves were stripped of pictures. The bookcases of books and the rugs had been rolled up. Edith have been sweeping sporadically amazed at how much dust could stay under things even with a good cleaning woman like Priscilla who it had been helping. Eat If this morning now it was nearly five. PM Brett should be back soon. He telephoned an hour ago saying he wouldn't be back as soon as he thought because 'cause he hadn't been able to find the right drill is black and decker and was going to try bloomingdale's and now it is thought today. This evening was the last evening and night. The howland family would spend on Grove Street. They were moving tomorrow to Brunswick Corner Pennsylvania into a two story. The house surrounded by alone with two lows in front and a couple of elms and apple trees on the back lawn that was worth an entry in her diary edith thought and she realized she hadn't even noted the day when she in Britain cliffe's had found the Brunswick Corner House. They've been looking for some time. Maybe six months Brett was in favor of the move with cliff. E ten years old now a country environment would be a blessed thing for a child something. He deserved space to ride a bicycle. Michael a chance to see what America really was or at least where the same families had been for more generations than most families had been in New York. Oh was that true. Eighty thought for a few seconds and decided that it wasn't necessarily true. What do we think about that about the ending of that? Things not necessarily being true when it's so to say sets you up for the self deceit really means what she does. Isn't she highsmith. She puts it straighten their. I love the idea that she seating. I think I think one of the things the book is about is what what is. What is the truth for these people? It is. The truth is is the fiction contained in the delivery more true emotionally than what aid is tells. Her friends and her neighbors is truth. One of the things that You can have too much of if you're going to hold your family unit together. It seems that the different members of this family perhaps like our own families families held together with a judicious mixture of telling the truth and not telling the truth and also the idea about America. You Know John Lewis is a Mitch. This is a book about America Right. Yeah is twenty years it goes from nineteen fifty five through to seventy four. Really Watergate and Watergate tecate is sort of the symbol of society. That is unhappy that essentially falling apart. I mean I think we'll so interesting about the book you know. In the blurb. It says an ordinary Henry woman when she not that ordinary. She's a freelance journalist. They have hopes and dreams move out to the country. They've got political ideals and gradually everything goes wrong. It's she's commended for reasons that you can't quite understand. She's not a bad person she's kind person. I mean the husband is Dick. Let's be honest and her son is a psychopath Well no come on. Oh Sadist is horrible violent fantasies about women masturbating into a Salkin thinking about getting into his sock. He's the Dole because it's easier than dealing with actual human beings. I mean she was reading Erich Fromm at the time Highsmith Asif loving and the you know the nature of it just destructiveness and I think there's a lot of sort of psychology and that the other thing apparently she reedie was reading an unloving was. Tsa Elliott so the hollow men. The idea that there was a kind of a hollowing out of culture that people were empty are becoming empty. A great little review that that Ah Emma tennant gave the nails the phantoms of our present anxieties in these philly. That life has no point and a lot of the characters at various times that life has knifepoint that the bright television jogging which teaches us to pray. To God's we do not want the fear of friends who was quickly gone as the foam on the detergent. The loss of faith in carrying thing is a book about about the loss of face in everything she puts faith in. Let's down there's a fascinating thing in the first chapter where The story of where the diary comes from Beijing even the diarrhea is huge book. The huge blank book given when she was much younger by a much automatically when it's sleep with her and he gave us as a present she actually asked for a Bible but he didn't feel he could give her a Bible because it would get in the way of him being out sleep with her so he gave me this huge blank book in said and so in a way I sort of feel like the whole book is set up by the idea of what she writes in. The diary is replacing. You know that sort of morality that you might have expected in a sort of suburban American family of that era era she starts to Kinda create Haroon kind of moral universe in this. Diarrhea is in place of this Bible that she would have been given. Yeah and the..

Patricia Highsmith edith life John Lewis America Brett diarrhea Nicholson Donovan Jim What Emma tennant US Erich Fromm Beijing Dole Pennsylvania murder New York City Penn Jr Bob Gottlieb
How Can We Film Giant Squid?

BrainStuff

04:54 min | 1 year ago

How Can We Film Giant Squid?

"Today's episode is brought to you by ibm. Technology is becoming more open data more accessible and the world more innovative i._b._m. Is combining their industry expertise with the open source leadership of red hat to bring you more freedom more security or flexibility. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart to work learn more at i._b._m. Dot com slash red hat. Welcome to brain stuff production of iheartradio. Hey brain stuff lauren bocom here. The giant squid is carnivorous invertebrate that weighs over four hundred and forty pounds or two hundred kilograms and measures around thirty three feet or ten meters long. Yes it can be as long as a school bus and has is the size of dinner plates along with a sharp beak in short. It's a little disconcerting. Perhaps apps more. Disconcerting is the fact that these wild creatures which have rarely ever been spotted alive have been popping up in the videos in recent years very much alive and very very large urge before two thousand four that only been found his carcasses washed up on beaches or captured by fishermen so what's going on under the sea is a rash shove giant squid sightings and indication that these see giants are taking over the waves in a word not but the sightings do indicate technology is advancing an and exciting new ways. We spoke edith witter p._h._d. The c. e. o. m. senior scientist of florida's ocean research in conservation association inc did she said it hasn't really been a rash of giant squid sightings. There have only been two times giant squid have been filmed in the deep sea both times the animals were spotted with help from a camera system and optical lure that witter developed to help researchers explore the creatures of the deep sea without scaring them away the camera system is called called. Medusa medusa is unlike any recording device used before because it emits a red light. That's an invisible to most creatures living in the midnight zone. That's the expanse pitch black water about three thousand three hundred feet or thousand meters below the ocean surface then there's the optical lure an electronic jellyfish that accompanies medusa down below the waves to help draw creatures toward the camera with an innovative method that takes inspiration from animals natural cues called an e jelly witter explained blamed the each elliott imitates the bioluminescence burglar alarm display of a common deep sea jellyfish bioluminescence burglar alarms are like scream for help using liked liked their last-ditch effort of pray that are caught in the clutches of a predator to attract the attention of a bigger predator that may attack their attacker and thereby afford them an opportunity for escape escape until just fifteen years ago. The only facts known about giant squid were gathered from their massive dead bodies since live ones had never been seen then then in two thousand and four the first live images of giant squid were captured and in two thousand twelve. The first video of a giant squid emerged thanks to medusa capturing specimen swimming off of japan's cassara archipelago. It wasn't until june of two thousand nineteen that another medusa shot giant squid video came to light this time of a roughly ten foot long. That's three remitters young swimmer in u._s. Waters around the gulf of mexico june twenty nineteen marked the fifth deployment of medusa on this particular expedition and when witter and her team examined the video the undeniable footage of a long tentacle creature reaching out for the jelly. It's hard to tell exactly how big it was because it was heading straight towards the camera. All these years of underwater chasing begs the question. Why are these animals so camera. Shy in the first place witter said the giant giant squid has been elusive because our standard methods of exploration using platforms with bright lights and noisy thrusters has been scaring away the only reason we even knew giant squid existed assisted is because they happen to float when they die so dead and dying specimens have been seen and photographed surface. How many other animals are they're living in the deep sea that we don't know about because we've been scaring them away and they don't happen to float when they die a good and perhaps even more disconcerting question indeed today's episode was written by michelle concept dusky and produced by tyler. Clang bringing is production of iheartradio's. How stuff works for more than this. Lots of other mysterious. Topics visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcasts from i heart radio is iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows instead of an ad today i have message from the ad council. Nobody likes an awkward silence but sometimes it can be a good thing use an awkward silence to ask your friend about their mental health. It can really help find out how at sees the awkward dot org.

Edith Witter Iheartradio IBM Lauren Bocom Florida U._S Mexico Apple Scientist Japan Elliott C. E. O. M. Conservation Association Inc Three Thousand Three Hundred F Two Hundred Kilograms Thirty Three Feet Thousand Meters Fifteen Years Forty Pounds Ten Meters
Amid Homelessness Crisis, Los Angeles Restricts Living In Vehicles

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:05 min | 1 year ago

Amid Homelessness Crisis, Los Angeles Restricts Living In Vehicles

"This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like xfinity x. by get get fast speeds. Even when everyone is online working to make wifi simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply around the country cities with big homeless populations have passed laws banning things like panhandling or sleeping in public areas here in los angeles. Officials are cracking being down on people living in vehicles but as anna scott from member station k._c._r._w. Reports the rules create their own problems. It's not unusual in l._a. To come across clusters of motorhomes like on this big commercial street in north hollywood this area right here thank god they're not following the signs. It's only for two hour parking but they're not bothering us right now. Edith graze is one of nearly ten thousand people who live in vehicles inside l._a. City limits some live in cars ars others and vans but campers. R._v.'s are the most visible and the hardest to park grayson. Her husband ran a window washing business until her husband in had several strokes and couldn't work that put us where we could make rant saw so we bought the motorhome but it's been tough. L._a.'s city council recently reinstated a ban on sleeping in vehicles overnight in residential areas. The rules also forbid living vehicles within a block of a park or a school school. I asked grays how much of her time is spent looking for parking. All of it and it's very difficult it causes a lot of stress in my life today evade. The parking people went by. They looked at us because we're only supposed to be here for three days. But where do you move to within the last couple of years. We started order to have <hes> campers. Mobile homes parked along cold water here. Walter hall owns a home near coldwater canyon avenue close to where the grades are parked and he says vehicle encampments have caused parking shortages and sanitation issues arbitrage and public urination. That's the type of the thing that we really would prefer not to see all supports. The city's rules even though they aren't strictly enforced and mostly just shuffle people around you know this. This type of thing is described as a whack a mole they disappear one plays only to reappear someplace else. One thing that could help is safe parking that is lots designated for overnight camping with security and porta-pottys l._a. Only has about one hundred safe parking spots for more than five thousand thousand vehicles. A tiny fraction of the need officials have promised to expand that but in the meantime critic say having strict parking rules is inhumane at this is a stupid law this law if passed is gonna directly contribute to these people being on the street several of the families as at my children's elementary school are struggling with homelessness and it's unconscionable that they would be criminalized erica ferston and mel tillakaratne. E were two of dozens who showed up at city hall recently when the parking rules came up for renewal laws restricting living in vehicles are on the rise around the country according to the national law center on homelessness and poverty and when l._a. City council voted thirteen to zero to extend its version protesters temporarily early shutdown the meeting during the break councilmember mcqueen harris dawson said he agrees is that the cities small safe parking program and widespread restrictions aren't a sufficient solution of course it's inappropriate. It's inappropriate to have thirty thousand people living on the st. I agree but the city needs time to get ahead of this problem. City council will take up. The parking rules again early next year for n._p._r. News i'm anna scott in los angeles.

City Council L._A Los Angeles Anna Scott City Hall Walter Hall Mcqueen Harris Dawson Hollywood Edith R._V. L._A. Erica Ferston Mel Tillakaratne Three Days Two Hour
Jimmy Kimmel Bringing 'All In The Family' & 'The Jeffersons' Back

Investor's Edge

01:04 min | 2 years ago

Jimmy Kimmel Bringing 'All In The Family' & 'The Jeffersons' Back

"Television city in Hollywood. Glenn? Kimmel will be hosting a new TV special honoring all in the family and the jeffersons ABC announced a press release on Thursday thing. The fifty one year old television personality will present a tribute to the classic Norman Lear series live in front of a studio audience Norman Lear all in the family and the jeffersons the tribute will recreate an original episode from both on the family and the jeffersons Woody Harrelson and Meriva Tomi will play Artie in Edith bunker in on family and Jamie Foxx and Wanda sikes will play George and whizzy Jefferson in the jeffersons on family rent for nine seasons during the seventies. And the jeffersons ran for eleven on CBS. The live ninety minute special will air may twenty second on ABC for

Norman Lear ABC Woody Harrelson Wanda Sikes Jamie Foxx Whizzy Jefferson Edith Bunker Glenn Hollywood Kimmel CBS Meriva Tomi Artie George Fifty One Year Ninety Minute Twenty Second
Jimmy Kimmel and Norman Lear to Host Live Recreation of The Jeffersons and All in the Family

First Light

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Jimmy Kimmel and Norman Lear to Host Live Recreation of The Jeffersons and All in the Family

"All in the family and the jeffersons are coming back to television live for one night only. Woody Harrelson, Marisa Tomei, Jamie, FOX and Wanda Sykes are going to star in a recreation of these Samantha so is from these incredibly influential sitcoms back in the nineteen seventies. Ninety six year old Norman Lear who created all in the family and its spin off the jeffersons and Jimmy Kimmel are hosting this. It'll be on ABC's prime time sometime next month. Woody Harrelson and Marisa Tomei will play Archie and Edith bunker with FOX and Sykes as George and Louise Jefferson Ellie Kemper justina Machado, and will Ferrell will

Woody Harrelson Marisa Tomei Wanda Sykes Louise Jefferson Ellie Kemper Jimmy Kimmel Norman Lear FOX Edith Bunker ABC Samantha Jamie Ferrell Archie George Ninety Six Year
"edith" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"edith" Discussed on Shedunnit

"The guilty. Verdict was delivered on the eleventh of December both Edith and Frederick was sentenced to death by hanging to the salacious delight of the newspaper voters in the press gallery Edith collapsed in hysterics at the news while Frederick shouted loudly about rennaissance since he was nine years young than her commentators enjoyed portraying him as an innocent youth led astray by manipulative older woman. He was a mere romantic chivalrous. Boy one wrote. Of course, this could have been what happened if Edith Thompson was indeed manipulative enough to have pushed Frederick by as buttons until he stabbed her husband to death. It is possible that she could also put on her extraordinary contradictory courtroom performance because she thought it would muddy the waters and get him a lighter sentence. It seems less likely though than the theory that ran a vice and others of put forward. Edith was just a sentimental flight. Young woman who completely lost her head when her romantic love took things too. For. A big part of miscalculation was in how the public and crucially the jury would respond to letters. It's possible. Of course, the thought Frederick would destroy them. So they could never be read by anyone. There was a heavy vein of sexism in the way that the case against her was built because the prosecution argued that love fanciful remanded books led her to indulge in lethal fantasies eventually lead to action. They made no such claim about by waters. Of course, he was reading will this stuff too. There was still ideas around in the nineteen twenties about the harmful effective, romantic or sentimental. Fictional women. It lingered for a long time because it's the same joke that Jane Austen was making fun of when she wrote north hangar abbey in eighteen or three Frederick did say during the trial that Edith liked to read a book imagine herself as the character in the book, not thinking that the jury would take that as an indication that she actually wanted to act out the role of murderous in the thrillers that she enjoyed reading Edith biographer Ren a vice. Has also hinted. A theme I discussed in the first episode of this podcast as an explanation for why she was convicted without any substantial evidence against her in nineteen twenty two Britain was still gripped by the idea compounded by the figures released for the nineteen twenty one senses that the country contained over a million more women than men after all of the male casualties in the first World War as I showed in that episode. This isn't strictly correct demographic terms, but this idea of the surplus women as disposable and unwanted was a powerful force regardless and to social conservatives at the time Edith Thompson was not a womanly woman. She worked she danced she'd been married for six years without having a child so presumably used contraception and she wrote in her letters to buy waters about how she enjoyed sex and had had an abortion if guilty. She had also wrote about the needless deaths of two men seen in this light. It's no wonder she was sentenced to death. She was a surplus woman written would be better off without a Louis did appeal the verdict, but unsuccessfully there was even public petition to stop the executions of Edith in Frederick with over a million signatures, but that was rejected to less than a month after her conviction. Edith was dragged into that shed Holloway prison and hanged as well. As being almost unconscious when it happened. She also bled a lot. I witnesses said it looked like insides fell out subsequent commentators, including vice have interpreted this as miscarriage suggesting that it was possible that Edith was pregnant if so she should never have been hanged the lower of the time forbade it even if not it was rever woman to be hanged the tool. Egypt was the first in sixteen years..

Edith Thompson Frederick Edith Ren Jane Austen Egypt Holloway Louis Britain sixteen years nine years six years
"edith" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"edith" Discussed on Shedunnit

"Reading habits in nineteen twenty two Frederick returned to London on leave and he needed three connected. On the third of Tober Edith and her husband were walking home from Ilford station late at night after going to the theatre in central London. When a man jumped out from behind some bushes by the road and attacked Percy with a knife attack around away and fatally wounded Percy died before help arrived. Later. Neighbors reported hearing a woman screaming no don't repeatedly at the time of the attack. When the police arrived Edith identified the attacker as Frederick by waters and explained his connection to herself. And her husband. I can only assume that she was confident at this point that she was considered to be just a witness to the crime. Otherwise, it seems like a strangely helpful way for murder suspect to behave. It was only after detectives had investigated by waters and found all of Edith let as he had kept that she was drawn into the investigation proper, the letters you see contained references to set and thrill as Edith had read including one called Bella Donna by Robert Hitchens in which a wife poisons husband as well as frequently declaring a passionate love for Frederick. These missives also hinted at a desire that he should replace perseus her husband possibly using violent means to bring this about if necessary at one point she claimed to Frederick that she tried to murder Percy by putting ground up. Glass in his mashed potato. She also made reference to young woman who lost three husbands while she Edith, cont even lose one. This was enough apparent knee for the police to invoke the lore of common purpose under which all those you plan to murder share, criminal liability for it. Even if only one physically carried out the attack the letters with their inclusion of husband murder tropes hinted Edith complicity in the attack. The police felt both Frederick and Edith were arrested and charged with Percy's murder..

Tober Edith Frederick murder Percy Edith London Ilford station Bella Donna Robert Hitchens
"edith" Discussed on Shedunnit

Shedunnit

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"edith" Discussed on Shedunnit

"It reads like a ready made morality tale or an inverted very story in which the heroine finds how prince only for her happily ever often it turned into a nightmare that ends in the hangman's noose a caused a sensation. While it was happening in nineteen twenty two and it has continued to fascinate people ever since the events themselves. What we would call the plot. If this was a novel rather than a horrifying Mitri story a shocking enough, but it's really the characters and backgrounds of the people involved make this tale. So compelling and to really understand that we need to go right back to the beginning. It is great him was bone on Christmas day in eighteen ninety three in east London. She was the eldest of five children of prosperous lower middle class. Parents her father William was o'clock and her mother Ethel, a housewife whose father was a policeman. William also had a part time job as a dancing teacher. And his daughter grew up to love before me. She left school at the age of fifteen in nineteen o nine and worked in the fashion industry doing well at a London Millan reform. She was promoted several times until she became their teeth buyer and even traveled twice to Paris work before the idea of the flapper had really taken stronghold in the British psyche. Edith exhibited a lot of the traits associated with that nineteen twenty stereotype, she was a hardworking career woman. She loved her fun. She put off having children, she had bobbed hair. She spoke French the list goes on. In nineteen oh nine Edith. Also, Matt Percy Thompson as shipping clock. Three years has senior. They were engaged for six years eventually getting married in nineteen sixteen when Edith was twenty one she kept working and the pair initially lived in south end before buying a house in the Audi's London bar of Ilford, the Thompsons live what appeared to be a happy, comfortable, married life. But judging by what happened next it would seem Edith was actually board or even depressed an Uni suburban grown up existence. The fateful meeting that would set Edith on the course to that boatswain's chair happened in nineteen twenty when she we connected with a young man, she had first met nine years before when he took dancing lessons from her father Frederik by waters was now in eighteen year old ships known Reese, you it. He was handsome and full of stories about his travels at sea. He was already friendly with Edith younger sister. Avis, and it seems that Percy like Tim to I. Because all four of them went on holiday that summit. The isle of white afterwards Percy suggested that Frederick lodge with the Thompsons in Ilford on the rare occasions that he got leave from his ship. And by what is accepted? What happened next feels inevitable? Now looking back at this story with the advantage of hindsight. But I'm sure is Edith was living it she felt like every glance from Frederick held a new and fascinating tential to save her from her humdrum existence. Not long after returning from that some holiday she and Frederick began an affair conducted under her husband's knows the house in Ilford. Of course, Bessie found out in the ensuing argument Frederick demanded that her husband allow if divorce that others could be together. But Percy just raged banished him from the house. Edith said later that Percy became violent afterwards hitting her several times and throwing her across the room. Frederick went to see again his job in September nineteen twenty one and remained away for a whole year. It's not hard to imagine the dispatch that Edith faced while he was away her borings above in life, rendered even worse by the deteriorating state of marriage. The really remarkable part of this. Story. And ironically, the thing that probably influenced the jury Edith trial. The most is what she did during that year that Frederick was away at sea. She wrote and sent him more than sixty long love letters that at least one week for a year that were informed by a love of literature in romantic fiction. There was over fifty thousand words together including details about Edith life her feelings her memories in her..

Edith trial Matt Percy Thompson Frederick Edith Ilford Thompsons William London Millan reform Frederick lodge boatswain London Paris Audi Ethel Bessie Frederik Reese Tim
Edith Hall, US And California discussed on Hugh Hewitt

Hugh Hewitt

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Edith Hall, US And California discussed on Hugh Hewitt

"Of victims of the devastating northern California wildfire is taking on a new sense of urgency. There's rain in the forecast and that could complicate those efforts. But it could also provide some relief for firefighters on the front lines the blaze, which is devastated. The Sierra foothills town of paradise and surrounding communities killed at least seventy seven people making it the deadliest US wildfire in a century. Edith hall grew up in paradise. He says she recognized many people at our recent vigil, not made it very emotional older people that might be, you know, teachers out only growing up I'm worried about allowing them and a lot of my

Edith Hall United States California
Charles Aznavour, the "French Frank Sinatra," dies at age 94

24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Charles Aznavour, the "French Frank Sinatra," dies at age 94

"Zero five two. The singer known as Francis. Frank Sinatra has died Charles Aznavour got his start as a songwriter and protege of Edith PF. He was ninety four years old. As Navarre wrote about one thousand songs for himself and other popular French singers the love ballads, she was on top of the British charts for four weeks in nineteen seventy four. I was born in Paris on may twenty second nineteen twenty four to Armenian parents who fled to Paris in the nineteen twenties. He was married three times and had six children. He survived

Edith Pf Navarre Frank Sinatra Paris Francis Charles Aznavour Ninety Four Years Twenty Second Four Weeks
2018 Primary Day is Here

Max & Murphy on Politics

04:08 min | 2 years ago

2018 Primary Day is Here

Wbai New York Wall Street Atrium Brooklyn Commons David Rothenberg Richard Homeless Richard Edith Richard Hole Central Park Amy Goodman Maxim Urfi Sierra Hohmann Dave Jesse Lent Donald Trump Seventy Second
 Facebook Stock Plunges on Earnings

CNBC's Fast Money

03:34 min | 3 years ago

Facebook Stock Plunges on Earnings

"We will bring you the latest on that story as well and who could forget about our one true love. We're talking about big point of course, but as a crypto has soared on hopes that Wall Street is finally getting on board the crypto craze. Blockchain capitals Spencer Bogart says they put all these smoking nears. He will be here to explain your live with the NASDAQ market in New York City is Times Square much more fast money on this very busy night. Welcome back to Facebook tanking after hours, accompany conference calls underway CEO. Mark Zuckerberg just revealed a metrically dot org, Julia? Yes. Melissa metric Facebook has never revealed before it's two point five billion. Now that's how many people Mark Zuckerberg says us at least one of Facebook's apps every month. Now for context, just over two point. Two billion users use Facebook every month. We have one billion users using Instagram's so two point. Five billion is how many people use one of those apps which could include messenger, what's up Instagram and Facebook Zuckerberg saying this individual people instead of active accounts, or you're not gonna have duplicates in there. And he says, is a more accurate sense of just how big and wide reaching Facebook is the call. So ongoing, Sheryl Sandberg is starting to talk. We're going to jump back on the con- we'll be back to Melissa with more later and they are. All right, Julia. Thank you. We'll see you then Dan national, you call this decline in the shares last. Week without breaking my arm, Pat myself on the back. I mean, the stock strata was like two weeks ago. So I mean, it just went parabolic when it broke out at one ninety. Five to new highs is I think it's up forty five percent from those April lows post that Cambridge Analytica scandal. I mean, here's the thing. I think this enthusiasm just got a little a little too much. So when you think about it, what am you're focused on here? US and Canada. One hundred and eighty five million users. It's kind of plateaued over the last year. And so the issue is at loads, how much can they monetize existing users? That's why they're giving us new metrics. I think it's really important to remember that their average revenue per user in the US and Canada is almost three x that of Europe. So when you think about GDP, are the regulations over there causing users to decline? It's not the biggest deal in the world and just saying, so really the issue is what is the fallout from all the expense, the Spencer expenses that they have to deal with this election that's coming up to deal with all the issues that they had. They told us last year there were doubling employs insecurity from ten thousand and twenty thousand. We know it's going to March. Margins are not the issue for this company. Let's be clear and to me, you know, I'm not. I'm been real bullets on this last run in Facebook. So I've been wrong, but you have to point out that this is for the scale these guys have for the size of this company. This is arguably the most compelling story of breadth of profitability of growth and the ability to actually have margin. So I mean there they're north sixty percent on the margins. Yeah, they've been squeezed a little bit, but I mean, that's the story. Now, the big issue for me is exit stencil. Are these guys going through a place where the centralized platform is? Is the parasite? And I, I think there's a lot of people that feel that. What do you do with the nine percent decline by Edith? Yeah, I like I love the verticals any. Like you mentioned, we've pulled all the way back to where it was two weeks ago. I mean, I was just looking at about July six. There was trading right around this two hundred dollar level, but I think I think the focus was the patient was, hey, they're probably gonna miss on some of the monthly active users daily active user. So I think that should have been expected. It looks like the reactions telling us it wasn't so everybody's selling it off. I think that creates opportunity. This is. Company that trades it a very reasonable multiple continues to grow at an incredible pace. It's Graham messenger, what's up all of that, and the fact that they're going to be moving more and more into the video side of things. I think this thing is very cheap, two hundred bucks what we start to show with less..

Facebook Mark Zuckerberg United States Julia Spencer Bogart PAT Instagram Sheryl Sandberg New York City Canada CEO Times Square Melissa Cambridge Analytica Dan National Europe Graham Edith
World-first melanoma blood test detects early stages of deadly skin cancer

Programming

00:55 sec | 3 years ago

World-first melanoma blood test detects early stages of deadly skin cancer

"Doors after three decades and business own cafe Opened in nineteen. Eighty-five on Woodward avenue in Ferndale restaurant posted on their Facebook page that they are closing because of financial reasons Australian researchers have developed an experimental test for skin cancer they, call it the first blood test capable of detecting, melanoma it has a high degree of accuracy. And scientists said Australia's Edith Cowan university hope by testing for antibodies in the blood they can catch skin cancer earlier and improved the outlook for survival melanoma is of special interest to Australia because the continents. Proximity to the ozone hole in the atmosphere makes Australians more vulnerable to the sons UV rays and subject to higher cancer rates the study is published in the journal uncle target on Jan Johnson WGN news time seven.

Australia Edith Cowan University Facebook Jan Johnson WGN Three Decades
"edith" Discussed on DLC

DLC

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"edith" Discussed on DLC

"Commend because not a huge time commitment and then for some people really resonate with in for other people you know have played it and moved on why i would even go further and not to invalidate any of that because i think it's all a beautifully said by both of you about these games that landed on you in very personal ways might experience with edith finch in particular doesn't come from any kind of personal connection in so far as i don't i don't have those kinds of experiences in my past pastor in my family but just in the sort of meditation on death which i think is a very universal idea is this game kind of directly confronts death and that is something that i think about a lot just as a human living on earth and i think that is one of the things i found so beautifully touching and moving about it is staring at that directly and asking if it's always a bad thing if it's if there's some beauty in it perhaps if there is you know what that means to be human being and i think that's what great art does i'm sick like you said that i i'm not trying to do too much self plucking here i just want to let you know that went pops up on not stealing it the third episode of hopley jump is about generations about new life about parents but the episode after that is about death and it's going to lean very heavily on edith finch and the same things you just said so.

edith finch