37 Burst results for "Edinburgh"

Prince Philip transferred to a London hospital for infection treatment

KYW 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 9 hrs ago

Prince Philip transferred to a London hospital for infection treatment

"The Duke of Edinburgh, entered the King Edward the second hospital just under two weeks ago. At the time it was called a precautionary measure. Doctors later said the 99 year old husband of Queen Elizabeth was being treated for an infection. Now the palace Has announced Prince Philip has been transferred to ST Bartholomew's Hospital for further treatment and testing for a pre existing heart condition. Vicki Barker, CBS News London, Israel and doing a controversial policy that raised

King Edward Edinburgh St Bartholomew's Hospital For Queen Elizabeth Prince Philip Vicki Barker Cbs News London Israel
Fresh update on "edinburgh" discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

00:57 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "edinburgh" discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"And i think that if he continues to play this well and we don't have to go back into additional lockdowns and if the steps at his laid out happen for opening up society. Then i think he will be in a very strong position. People have already begun to forget all the horrors over complicated things the failures by ppa. The numbers of deaths is kind of audley over. Given if there's this kind of promise of you know osama is range. But that's how the public works that they just want to get back to some normality and if you can deliver that then. He's in a very strong position i think. Well let's turn out to end a bra. Anyone who has visited the city will know how packed its main thoroughfare. George street can get with cars and pedestrians vying for space on historic street. But now there are moves to pedestrianised city center as part of the city of edinburgh council tenure transformation project which will see city centre become largely car free over the next decade. Well earlier we heard from leslie mckenna's she's edinburgh council transport environment convener. The plan really is to return it to its natural beauty. Shall we see the moment. George c is a wonderful example of crack picture. It's one of those beautiful streets you could find but unfortunately it's neat to has no become dominated by cars. Commodity costs chuckling to try and find a car parking space. Well that sees everything. See the beauty of the street. Uc's expedient of the and also uses the environment businesses and hospitality businesses eighteen including the kind of venues and four things like that are festival events. So this is an attempt to remove the cars from it and make it much more accessible me considerable difference to the quality of the street in terms of the the story that we use on the on the walkways tell access to other sustainable transport options retain access for people with mobility issues that all sorts of potential benefit attached to this particular scheme. Leslie mckiness there sees a transport and environment convener for edinburgh council. She speaking to us earlier. On the globalist andrew. I like how when they were describing. These plans They mentioned how this would bring an european boulevard. Feel to george street. Now of course important to say they they are not completely lesser. Nizing the entire city Just some parts of it and reducing car usage. But how much of an impact can essentially you have on such a main thoroughfare as george street as well i so we should say that you know the these terms i european boulevard. That the image of that that kind of brings your mind wandering around on a summer evening. Let's be frank. Edinburgh has cold weather and lots of rain even in the winter. Bit line london for even tougher so is not just enough to pedestrian. Is these places. I think it can do a lot of good. I think it'd be very beneficial. If you control the amount of traffic if you make people feel comfortable about being outdoors demolishing period of the pandemic alfresco eating. And i think that can be sustained. Even if you do in a more covid way like you'd see on on the beautiful to paris for example where people do sit outside cafes and bistros but there's an attempt to cover up the street furnitures if it rains. It doesn't matter but is is not enough of itself versus reasons. I had to be in this in the town of stopped even last week and during my kind walks around the town it was. It was interesting is a town. That's been taken over by the caw in in in the twentieth century and the main high street bridge street is is. It was a wide road from in traditional times. And it's it's designed for the car and it is not very nice now. They're trying to these these plastic barriers. So that you have more payments based egypt's ugly and it is valid but then at the end of that there's another part where actually the home of shakespeare is and that is all pedestrian is but joy is no better is it. Strangely bland is is all one uniform. Surface is kind of okay shops. There's very little planting boulevard sense. Just because you'll pedestrian is saying so when you when you go into the process of pedestrian izing. That isn't an end in itself. You have to think about how you activate the space and that doesn't mean jugglers that means how make spaces where people feel comfortable sitting down and lingering how you bring places. Well maybe older people stop-and have nato with friends how you allow restaurants and shops to tumble out and use the space outside. Farmers markets are good. Activation space is but there's a limit to how many as you can have so we're all the other things that will be needed to activate the spaces so for edinburgh is great. But you know you. You can risk risk everything ending up a bit less square here in london which is kinda great because is is senator causing rather anymore but it's not exactly an appealing place to go and sit so is not enough in itself. What else are you going to do to make sure all of these things work. I think it's still even though i have been in the uk for eight years and a few months One of the things. That still shocks me is how excited. Sometimes my friends will get about a certain place at house outdoors area and how close it is to accrue road. Would a card that does that division of allowing it to breathe a bit in What's what's spills onto the street from businesses..

UK Leslie Mckenna Eight Years Twentieth Century George Street Last Week Edinburgh Leslie Mckiness London George C Osama European Boulevard Andrew Shakespeare Paris European ONE Next Decade Edinburgh Council
Prince Philip 'responding to treatment' in London hospital for an infection

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 6 d ago

Prince Philip 'responding to treatment' in London hospital for an infection

"And Penny's Saint Martin. Press. Duke of Edinburgh has been in a London hospital for a week now and it appears he'll be there a while longer. Correspondent Vicki Barker reports from London. Buckingham Palace says 99 year old Prince Philip is comfortable and responding to treatment for an infection in the London hospital. Members of the royal family have continued with their royal duties. Prince Charles visited his father over the

Vicki Barker Saint Martin London Penny Duke Edinburgh Buckingham Palace Prince Philip Prince Charles
Fresh update on "edinburgh" discussed on WBZ Midday News

WBZ Midday News

00:23 sec | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "edinburgh" discussed on WBZ Midday News

"Prince Philip is changing hospitals more from ABC is James Long back. This is the longest he's ever been in the hospital now being transferred. I've got the statement here from the palace. The Duke of Edinburgh was today transferred from King Edward, the seventh hospital. To ST Bartholomew's, where doctors will continue to treat him for an infection, as well as undertake testing and observation for a pre existing heart condition. They say the Duke remains comfortable and responding to treatment, but he is expected to remain hospital until at least the end of next week, and from one prince to another double. BBC's mad, Shearer explains. Such an iconic riff, and now you can own one of the guitars that Prince took.

BBC ABC Prince Philip James Long Today Shearer Double One Prince King Bartholomew Duke Prince Duke Of Edinburgh Edward One Of The Guitars Seventh Hospital End Of Next Week ST
Prince Philip 'responding to treatment' in London hospital for an infection

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 6 d ago

Prince Philip 'responding to treatment' in London hospital for an infection

"Impeach him if he doesn't reside. The Duke of Edinburgh has been in a London hospital for a week and it now appears he'll be there a while longer. CBS news correspondent Vicki Barker reports from London. Buckingham Palace says 99 year old Prince Philip is comfortable and responding to treatment for an infection in the London hospital, members of the royal family have continued with their royal duties. Prince Charles visited his father over the weekend, The Duke

Vicki Barker London Edinburgh Cbs News Buckingham Palace Prince Philip Prince Charles
Britain's Prince Philip, 99, taken to hospital as 'precaution'

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:32 sec | Last week

Britain's Prince Philip, 99, taken to hospital as 'precaution'

"Palace schools the admission a precautionary measure taken on the advice of Philip. Dr Royal Officials say he's expected to remain for a few days off observation and rest. His illness is not related to cope in 19, the Queen and Philip were vaccinated against the coronavirus in early January. Charles Taylor Desmond reports, The 99 year old Duke of Edinburgh is experienced a brief preplanned hospitalization in December. 19 2040 Even of a pre existing condition. During England's current coronavirus lockdown, the Duke's been staying at

Dr Royal Philip Charles Taylor Desmond Edinburgh England Duke
Britain's Prince Philip admitted to the hospital

KYW 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | Last week

Britain's Prince Philip admitted to the hospital

"Britain's Prince Philip is in the hospital. Buckingham Palace is the Duke of Edinburgh, was admitted to a London hospital last night as a purely precautionary measure. After feeling under the weather for a few days. It's understood the 99 year old consort of Queen Elizabeth went by car, not ambulance. He is not believed to be suffering from Cove it Queen Elizabeth Maids at Windsor Castle, where the couple have been self isolating

Prince Philip Buckingham Palace Britain Edinburgh London Queen Elizabeth Queen Elizabeth Maids Windsor Castle
Britain's Prince Philip admitted to the hospital

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:24 sec | Last week

Britain's Prince Philip admitted to the hospital

"Buckingham Palace is the Duke of Edinburgh, was admitted to a London hospital last night as a purely precautionary measure. After feeling under the weather For a few days. It's understood the 99 year old consort of Queen Elizabeth went by car, not ambulance. He is not believed to be suffering from Cove it Queen Elizabeth remains at Windsor Castle for the couple have been self isolating since last March. Vicki Barker, CBS NEWS London

Buckingham Palace Queen Elizabeth Edinburgh London Windsor Castle Vicki Barker CBS
Prince Philip admitted to hospital after feeling unwell

The KFBK Morning News

00:27 sec | Last week

Prince Philip admitted to hospital after feeling unwell

"Of Edinburgh is in the hospital Looking and palace says 99 year old Prince Philip was transferred from Windsor Castle Toe. London's King Edward, the seventh hospital Tuesday evening after feeling unwell Palace characterizes it as a precautionary measure. Done under the advice of Phillips Doctor he's expected to remain in the private hospital for a few days of observation and rest. Philip retired from public duties in 2017. Tom Rivers. ABC

Windsor Castle Toe Prince Philip Edinburgh King Edward Palace London Phillips Philip Tom Rivers ABC
Duchess of Sussex expecting 2nd child, a sibling for Archie

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 2 weeks ago

Duchess of Sussex expecting 2nd child, a sibling for Archie

"Commentators say they'll be much excitement from the royal family and others following the announcement Harry and Meghan the jeep and Duchess of Sussex are expecting their second child royal expert I'm governor of Edinburgh council Alastair Bruce says the queen was always seen her family as her greatest pleasure she loves her children grandchildren and great grandchildren and that growing clan that she has been the matriarch for remain side is always the source of how gracious pleasure royal commentator Victoria Murphy says interest in the couple's baby news has peaked again whenever at the Sussex says that he would do anything particularly about that family you'll that personal circumstances there is a huge amount of attention and we've seen an absolute explosion of attention Murphy though points out a difference this royal baby may not see some of his or her family members for several months due to the distance and the pandemic Charles the last month London

Edinburgh Council Alastair Bruce Sussex Victoria Murphy Meghan Duchess Harry Murphy Charles London
"edinburgh" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

03:33 min | 2 months ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Inaugural address at edinburgh university on being installed as rector of the university. By thomas carlyle it remains however practically a most important truth. Would i looted to above that. The main use of universities in the present age is that after you've done with all your classes. The next thing is a collection of books a great library of good books which you proceed to study into read what the universities can mainly do for you. What i have found. The university did for me is that it taught me to read in various languages in various sciences. So that i could go into the books which treated of these things and gradually penetrate into any department. I wanted to make myself master of as i found it suits me. Well gentlemen whatever you may think of these historical points. The clearest and most imperative duty lies on every one of you to be assiduous in your reading learn to be good readers which is perhaps a more difficult than you imagine. Learn to discriminative in your reading to read faithfully and with your best attention all kinds of things which have a real interest in a real knot in imaginary in which you find to be really fit for what you are engaged in of course at the present time in a great deal of the reading incumbent on you you must be guided by the books recommended by your professors for assistance towards the effect of their pre elections. And then when you leave the university and go into studies of your own you will find it very important that you have chosen a field. Some province specially suited to you in which you can study and work. The most unhappy of all men is the man who cannot tell what he is going to do who has got no work cut out for him in the world and does not go into it for work is the grand cure of all the maladies and miseries that ever beset mankind. Honest work would you intend getting done. If in any vacant vague time you're in a straight is to choice of reading a very good indication for you. Perhaps the best you could get is towards some book. You have a great curiosity about your then in the ready est invest of all possible conditions to improve by that book. It is analogous to a doctors. Tell us about the physical health and appetites of the patient. You must learn however to distinguish between false appetite untrue. There is such a thing as a false appetite which will lead a man into vagaries with regard to diet will tempt him to eat spicy things which he should not eat at all norwood but the things are toothsome and that he is under a momentary baseness of mind a man ought to examine and find out what he really and truly has an appetite for what suits constitution condition and that doctors tell him is in general the very thing he ought to have and so with books as applicable. To all of you. I will say that. It is highly expedient to go into history to inquire into what has passed before you on this earth. And into family of man the history of the romans and greeks will first of all concern you and you will find that the classical knowledge you have got will be extremely applicable to elucidate that there you have two of the most remarkable races of men in the world set before you calculated to open a numeral reflections and considerations a mighty advantage you can achieve it to say nothing of what they're two languages will yield you which your professors can better explain model languages which are universally admitted to be the most perfect forms of speech we have yet found to exist among men and you will find if you read well. A pair of extremely remarkable nations shining in the records left by themselves as a kind of beacon for solitary massive illumination to light up some noble forms of human life for us in the otherwise utter darkness of the past ages..

thomas carlyle edinburgh university
UK Royals

Travel with Rick Steves

05:16 min | 3 months ago

UK Royals

"Kings and queens with real power are a relic of the past in europe. Most of them today play ceremonial figurehead roles limited by their constitutions in britain pulls tell us most people are more or less supportive of the role. The windsors play as their royal family. Their lives are a regular beat for the british press and there are many elegance stops in british tourism connected to the queen and her family. Paul guest was an electrician on her majesty's royal yacht britannia when he was in the royal navy today. He works as a tour. Guide based in belfast. He's joined by. Elizabeth boardman a tour guide from bath not far from london. They're here to help us. Americans better understand the royals. In britain by the way our interviews recorded just prior to the global pandemic shutdowns liz. Paul thanks for joining us. Thank you very much right because if it's an interesting thing for us there's still kings and queens and in belgium and the netherlands spain over scandinavia. But they really have little power. But what's the purpose. Why do you. Brits willingly tax money to have kings and queens and princes printing around your country. I know that's a question that we always get asked his guides when we're doing our tours and yet one of the questions i always ask for members is put your hands up if you came on this tour just because we have a royal family. No one ever does that. We've got so much more to offer but the royal family are a big attraction for us as well because immediately. I'm sure if we just said prince charles prince william prince harry. Everyone has a visual of who they are because of the world media but for us as british citizens. It's a lot more than that. We're very personal about them. If we were to believe the Recent opinion polls approximately eighty eight percents of the british public are in favor of royal family which is quite surprising considering everyone still coming out of a depression and financial difficulties a hard but we like having the royals whether something actually practical about it and heavy responsibility to be a royal. Because do all the ceremonial stuff. I mean it's almost a fulltime job to be cutting edge hospitals and in the united states. We don't have anybody to do the ceremonial stuff except our politicians and in britain you can kind of divide. It threw the ceremonial stuff and politicians do the legislating. Yeah it's shared out between the royals. It's judy the of a sheduled which Follow i just want to reiterate what elizabeth sand and what what i think is It's a low for the royal family. I think we actually do love having a royal family On top of the huge amount of interest abroad and and brings in tourism and an income for the country to your heritage is sort of a celebration of england. Yeah goosebumps jurist. It's it's very interesting. So they are limited by the constitution so Do they have any political power at all. If a if a royal had a strong feeling about something what would they do. The house been royals of mid their feelings known especially prince charles on certain subjects. But as far as i'm aware they are told to sort of rain in a little bit on. Keep their opinions to themselves. So let's have a quick review of the royal family these days. Of course we've got queen elizabeth. She's getting old but she seems to be Still the metal name is did you of edinburgh also known as prince philip prince philip in their children so the eldest is prince charles who will be on next monarch followed by his sister. Princess own followed by his brother prince andrew. I'm also also a further brother. Who is prince edward. So all of these people are healthy and still in public Very match very much in the next generation. There's probably a lot of nieces and nephews. There is many nieces. And as we're speaking at the moment we've got three kings and one queen in waiting to go on the throne. What does that mean well. Basically what it means the next person in line for the throne when the queen dies will be prince. Charles right that will then be followed. By prince william his eldest son then prince william's eldest son prince george. Okay then we have his prince william's daughter princess charlotte. So i said that makes sense when the eldest son know if charles had an older daughter would she be next in line or is it still the old fashioned. Still be william. But when william and kate. Kate middleton who is william's wife when they were expecting prince george the eldest son. The law was changed if owner. So they couldn't grandfathered in but yeah grandfathered in so to speak the before the child was born. They changed the law. So they how that's historic it's historic. Donner gets the same rights in the lineage jackson. As it turned out they had prince george. But if prince george's had been girl it would have been a queen. Wow

Royals Paul Guest Elizabeth Boardman Britain Prince Charles Prince William Royal Navy Scandinavia Belfast Prince Charles LIZ Belgium The Netherlands Prince Philip Prince Philip Europe Elizabeth Spain London Paul Depression
UK Royals

Travel with Rick Steves

05:15 min | 3 months ago

UK Royals

"Kings and queens with real power are a relic of the past in europe. Most of them today play ceremonial figurehead roles limited by their constitutions in britain pulls tell us most people are more or less supportive of the role. The windsors play as their royal family. Their lives are a regular beat for the british press and there are many elegance stops in british tourism connected to the queen and her family. Paul guest was an electrician on her majesty's royal yacht britannia when he was in the royal navy today. He works as a tour. Guide based in belfast. He's joined by. Elizabeth boardman a tour guide from bath not far from london. They're here to help us. Americans better understand the royals. In britain by the way our interviews recorded just prior to the global pandemic shutdowns liz. Paul thanks for joining us. Thank you very much right because if it's an interesting thing for us there's still kings and queens and in belgium and the netherlands spain over scandinavia. But they really have little power. But what's the purpose. Why do you. Brits willingly tax money to have kings and queens and princes printing around your country. I know that's a question that we always get asked his guides when we're doing our tours and yet one of the questions i always ask for members is put your hands up if you came on this tour just because we have a royal family. No one ever does that. We've got so much more to offer but the royal family are a big attraction for us as well because immediately. I'm sure if we just said prince charles prince william prince harry. Everyone has a visual of who they are because of the world media but for us as british citizens. It's a lot more than that. We're very personal about them. If we were to believe the Recent opinion polls approximately eighty eight percents of the british public are in favor of royal family which is quite surprising considering everyone still coming out of a depression and financial difficulties a hard but we like having the royals whether something actually practical about it and heavy responsibility to be a royal. Because do all the ceremonial stuff. I mean it's almost a fulltime job to be cutting edge hospitals and in the united states. We don't have anybody to do the ceremonial stuff except our politicians and in britain you can kind of divide. It threw the ceremonial stuff and politicians do the legislating. Yeah it's shared out between the royals. It's judy the of a sheduled which Follow i just want to reiterate what elizabeth sand and what what i think is It's a low for the royal family. I think we actually do love having a royal family On top of the huge amount of interest abroad and and brings in tourism and an income for the country to your heritage is sort of a celebration of england. Yeah goosebumps jurist. It's it's very interesting. So they are limited by the constitution so Do they have any political power at all. If a if a royal had a strong feeling about something what would they do. The house been royals of mid their feelings known especially prince charles on certain subjects. But as far as i'm aware they are told to sort of rain in a little bit on. Keep their opinions to themselves. So let's have a quick review of the royal family these days. Of course we've got queen elizabeth. She's getting old but she seems to be Still the metal name is did you of edinburgh also known as prince philip prince philip in their children so the eldest is prince charles who will be on next monarch followed by his sister. Princess own followed by his brother prince andrew. I'm also also a further brother. Who is prince edward. So all of these people are healthy and still in public Very match very much in the next generation. There's probably a lot of nieces and nephews. There is many nieces. And as we're speaking at the moment we've got three kings and one queen in waiting to go on the throne. What does that mean well. Basically what it means the next person in line for the throne when the queen dies will be prince. Charles right that will then be followed. By prince william his eldest son then prince william's eldest son prince george. Okay then we have his prince william's daughter princess charlotte. So i said that makes sense when the eldest son know if charles had an older daughter would she be next in line or is it still the old fashioned. Still be william. But when william and kate. Kate middleton who is william's wife when they were expecting prince george the eldest son. The law was changed if owner. So they couldn't grandfathered in but yeah grandfathered in so to speak the before the child was born. They changed the law. So they how that's historic it's historic. Donner gets the same rights in the lineage jackson. As it turned out they had prince george. But if prince george's had been girl it would have been a queen.

Royals Paul Guest Elizabeth Boardman Britain Prince Charles Prince William Britannia Royal Navy Queens Scandinavia Belfast Prince Charles LIZ Belgium The Netherlands Prince Philip Prince Philip Europe Spain London Paul Harry
Texas HS out of playoffs; player faces charge

Mark Levin

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

Texas HS out of playoffs; player faces charge

"Season is is over over after after a a star star player player slams slams an an official official to to the the ground ground during during a a game game last last night. night. Fox Fox is is Matt Matt Napolitano Napolitano Reports. Reports. The The Edinburgh Edinburgh Consolidated Consolidated Independent Independent School District Friday announced at Edinburgh High School's football team is withdrawing from the playoffs. This in response to a Bobcats player attacking a referee after being ejected from Edinburgh's win over P s G, a high school. Enberg C S I. D in a statement condemned the actions of senior defensive lineman Emanuel Diran for slamming head ref red grassy after being assessed a second unsportsmanlike conduct penalty getting him tossed from the game. Deron was escorted out of the stadium by police charged Friday with one count of class a assault. Gracia was evaluated for a shoulder injury and concussion like symptoms. Matt Napolitano

Fox Fox Matt Matt Napolitano Napolitan Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh High School Enberg C S I. D Emanuel Diran Bobcats Football Edinburgh Deron Gracia Matt Napolitano
Tim Blackman, Vice Chancellor at the Open University, Discusses The Return to Campus

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

02:18 min | 3 months ago

Tim Blackman, Vice Chancellor at the Open University, Discusses The Return to Campus

"By the. Are you being the the the only covid secure university but actually you do have a compass and people work there and students study at it. So i'll be really really fascinated to know what your plans offer january and the year. Yeah we are in a different place. No sorts of ways compared to the rest of the sector which i think actually has been doing an amazing job but yes we we have a real campus milk gains and we've got sites in manchester and nottingham as well. Of course our nation offices in cardiff belfast and edinburgh very much a four nations university and always having to work with the different policies of the four governments. So we tend to adopt an approach at the moment of going with the most safe vicious and guidance of one of the four jurisdictions in terms of what we do across the four nations so just one example of the many ways we have to work as very much a four nations university in everything we do even more normal times so that's added an extra complication for us in terms of what guidance and what measures do we actually follow as one university across jurisdictions. But we've had our challenges in the first lock down. We had to move nearly four thousand stuff off our campus about four thousand of our staff. The ucla were already hung based so we've got a lot of understanding how homebase works. But we have to adopt. And we're still having to adopt. We research students and researchers on campus. Where that research is essential in terms of lab provision. We're not going to have to manage these huge population movements though of students going home coming back to campus which very much reflects the The unusual situation in the uk of how dominant the residential sector is in higher education with these huge mass migrations of young people Beginning and end of term. So yeah what we have to do is is different. But like every university in the sector putting the wellbeing and health of our staff and students First and that is how we are working But i wish the secto with managing the scale of these population movements over the coming weeks and months

Nottingham Belfast Cardiff Edinburgh Manchester Ucla UK
Scottish leader says she could seek 2021 independence vote

KCBS Radio Midday News

04:35 min | 3 months ago

Scottish leader says she could seek 2021 independence vote

"Appears headed to another independence referendum as soon as next year. First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said today that she would campaign next year in the Scottish elections to hold the vote in 2014, Scotland, voted to remain in the UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said that he won't agree to another vote being held. Form or on all this. We're joined live on the case. CBS Ring Central News Line by Sky News reporter and a Brady. So, Andy in the fast forwarding from 2014 to today, we've had Brexit Debate. We've had covert 19 of those factors. And what's bringing this back up again? Yeah, massively. So I've been working in Scotland the last few weeks. I've been in Edinburgh. I've been in clouds Go and let me tell you People are talking about Scottish independence again. Two reasons. Exist, means that the United Kingdom on January the first will be pulling out with the European Union. Gotland in that Brexit referendum of 2016, Scotland voted overwhelmingly 58% in favor off staying in the European Union. So Scotland is being removed from the European Union and all the benefits. Freedom of movement travel around Europe, No passports, no visas. You know none of the hassle and Scotland's being dragged out of Europe against its will. And then feed in the corona virus situation. Where Nicholas Star gin, her leadership she has every lunchtime. Since the pandemic started here at the end of March. Really, she has hold hosted the daily TV and radio updates without fail every single day. Boris Johnson missed meeting after meeting news conference after news conference sent deputies sent assistance. People in Scotland have seen strong leadership. They see it in Nicholas Sergeant, and that is fed into this. Is we mentioned? UK Prime Minister Horace Johnson says he doesn't want another vote to be held. Does he have the power to block that from happening? Yes, he has. So that's the problem for Nicholas Sergeant and everyone that wants Scottish independence. Gotland being part of the United Kingdom. It does have the Scottish Parliament. Those of the elections that are coming up in April. Now Nicholas Sergeant Hart Party, the SNP Scottish Nationalist Party. They would be the odds on favorite to be the overwhelming Party of power again in Scotland, and I'm sure they will be so she will be hoping from mandate from the Scottish people for her leadership and her dealing with covert but also for her manifest off discussion dependence on if she wins the elections, as she surely will in March. On April. I mean, it's it's with never going to happen that the other parties they're going to be there because our numerically historically her party is being so strong. She will then say to Boris Johnson. The people have spoken here. We want another referendum. His party, the conservative Party in Westminster. They've already said that the 2014 referendum was a once in a lifetime opportunity and people voted to remain in the union. And is this strictly an internal debate within the UK or do European allies way in one way or the other on this? So ultimately the decisions will be made and taken and decided in Britain, You know, in London, it will be the prime minister's call. As to whether or not there is the referendum on then, if there is a referendum, you'd be looking at the tail end of 21 into 22 on it will be the people of Scotland who discovered that decide their future if they won't remain the United Kingdom or they want to go on so long beer. Independent Republic of Scotland If you like. Well would be external factors. I mean, you know a lot of countries around Europe a lot regions around Italy. Take Catalonia, For example, in Spain, Barcelona being the capital there, you know they would look at Scotland. And be envious of a country that has that kind of opportunity. These regions that want to go solo and become independent republic, So it's huge. It's fascinating, and I'll tell you one thing. You do really sense when you're in Scotland. Working is Very, very distinct separate identity, You know, from people's accents, even the cash the money you use. It's still a pound sterling but Scottish banknote. And everything is different, and it's really interesting. I mean, this will be a huge 12 months. Big election. Nicholas Star Jin will be confident. I mean, she speak so clearly everyday people in Scotland lots of rules and regulations to follow, but because of her leadership and how distinct she sounds an hour, her clarity off communication the whole way through the pandemic. People know who she is and what she's done for.

Scotland Nicholas Sergeant Boris Johnson European Union Cbs Ring Central News Gotland Nicholas Star Gin Nicola Sturgeon Prime Minister Horace Johnson SNP Hart Party UK Europe Sky News Brady Edinburgh Andy Scottish Parliament Conservative Party
What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

The Guardian's Science Weekly

12:52 min | 3 months ago

What the immune response to the coronavirus says about the prospects for a vaccine

"With a number vaccine candidates against the corona virus sharing promising results in clinical trials and a growing number of studies elving into our mean response to infection. The spotlight has turned once again. On the body's defense mechanisms. I think two questions that really relate to the ability of the vaccine to protect us and our ability to fight off a second infection and so that is the quality of the immune response and the duration of the immune response this week. I'm joined by professor. Eleanor riley from the university of edinburgh to dove into these questions and more. I'm nichole davis. Welcome to science. Weekly ellena you came onto the podcast in july and talk to us about immunity and covid nineteen specifically the relationship between antibodies and immunity. So let's start with a recap on the major players in the immune system that are of interest when it comes to an immune response and potentially immunity so antibodies are protein molecules that are produced by immune cells kobe cells and these cells live in our spleen and narrow and they secrete antibodies off. They've been exposed to a foreign organism such as virus. There are two types of cells that produce. Antibodies on short-lived cells that produce. Antibodies for a few weeks national to the first line response and then some of those cells transition into lonely cells that goto a bone marrow and can produce antibodies for months years. Possibly even to case and then on top of antibodies. have that can kill virus. Infected host cells t cells the two types of t cells one of which we think of such of the conductor of the orchestra of the immune system and these kotei health cells and they very much help the b. cells to make antibodies produce. Growth factors may direct the direction in which the be cells developed and they will still give them signals to turn into cells and then there are the cdte cells and they actively kill virus infected cells and then Antibodies can also bind to these specific cells and help them to kill cells so they recognize little bits of virus on the infected cell bind to the infected so and kill it and then there are cells which are less specific cells that we call macrophages are neutral fills and they just recognized that. Something's not quite right with the cell. They don't necessarily recognize the infected with the virus and they kill it actually or bits of the immune system work together a little bit like you need a whole orchestra to make a good tune when you need all of these cells working together to make a good news arms. And i know you said in july that at that point it was too early to tell how quickly people were losing their antibodies. And we've got to remember here that it's a relatively new virus. What's the latest research saying that seems to have been some movement on that now. What we're seeing is if you all the data together. There's an early peek in the antibodies wants. Lots and lots of antibodies are produced to mop up all virus. That's in your body and then as that virus goes away the antibodies start to decline a little bit. Because you don't need them any antibodies anymore and they settle into a of steady class. O of antibody production. And that's very typical. This kind of two phase response the only peak lots of antibodies followed by sort of standing level of antibodies. That nick for a long time. That's very typical of an antibody response and it sort of relates to the short lived long lived cells. You have lots of short-lived cells making lots of antibody that off and then the long lived cells who that fewer in numba keep on producing. Antibodies for much longer so yes. Let's talk about these long-lived b. cells in the no said the t. cells. What is research telling us about what happens to them and how. How long do they hang around for. So we don't have much data on those are actually quite difficult to look at in humans. They tend to live in the bone marrow for example not very accessible and so we tend to rely on mathematical modeling of the change in the dynamics of the antibody concentration to predict what's going to happen even though we haven't actually been able to see it because it hasn't gone on long enough so the moment the infants is that we have suggests that things are probably okay these cells behaving as we expect them to the was one pay published early on suggesting may be a little bit of a fault with the production of these long midsouth. But i'm not sure that that's been replicated in other studies. I think i saw a preprinted study. That hasn't been peer reviewed yet. Which jested that these visas and t so's lost for at least six months is that. What are the problems here in terms of measuring this so we only have six months data at the moment and the virus really hasn't been around that long so what we can say the moment. Is that the cells assisting for as long as we are able to measure them at the moment obviously in six months or another twelve months time. We'll be able to go back to those people and say have they still got those cells. Yes or no. But in the meantime just looking at the change in the dynamics of the response and mapping it onto what we know the other viruses. My prediction is that these that there will be some long lift immunity to this virus. He said there might be some long term protection. How long term are we talking here. I mean i've seen a lot of people saying well current viruses such as that of course common code some codes of course by coronavirus is of course the protection only lasts for say a year or so. Do we think that our protection against the corona virus that causes covid nineteen mike baxter timeframe or or could it be longer. I think it's very difficult to say at the moment. Say all of the data. We have suggests that these antibody responses are going to be at least as long lived as response of corona viruses. And possibly i might think even probably going to last longer your immune response tends to be proportional to the level of threat that you face so the common cold corona viruses really only colonize our upper respiratory tract so on nose throat and so the virus doesn't go very deep into apology and we make rather grief that effective noon response nose and throat that controls it this coq nineteen causing virus goes much deeper into our bodies it goes down into our lungs into bronchial and therefore the immune response tends to be stronger and they struggle we call systemic immune responses do tend to last longer because they are recognizing that there is a more serious threat that has to be dealt with. Do we know if factors like ethnicity gender age factor in the scale of the immune response. She said stronger. Immune response to your first. Infection is is more likely to me. You have great protection against the second infection. Those factors correlated at all. There's very little day to so far on ethnic differences in the immune response the data. That's coming after the vaccine trials suggests that there aren't any major differences in at between ethnic groups in terms of whether the vaccine protects them will not but we haven't yet seen lab data on their antibody responses with at t cell responses. There is a lot of genetic variation in the immune response. People be aware that some people unfortunately have very severe genetically determined immunodeficiencies. That's just the tip of the iceberg of genetic variation in the immune response and some of those differences do have geographical and ethnic components to that certain genes that either make good or bad immune response on more common or less common in groups countries. But we don't yet know if any of that is going to influence really the totality of their immune responses. We just don't have any evidence much by age. It feels like ages is. It's very important given that the older you are the more risque from caveat nineteen so there are two components to that one is whether you are able to make an immune response again's a virus. You've never seen before and there is. I think really quite good evidence that you ability to make a completely new immune response does decline as you get older. The other component is that a lot of the disease we say in coke nineteen excessive inflammation. And there's also evidence that we get older with less good controlling inflammation so it's a little bit of a double whammy as we get older way are less able to make an immune response to a new virus such as the covid nineteen virus and if we then get the viral infection where less good at controlling the inflammation that it causes a so we know there are several different vaccines. Which looking very promising. You have the rene vaccines at you have vaccines which used a chimp. Virus to bring genetic material from the corona virus into cells. The question is is the immune response that generated the same as it would have been to a natural infection and do the t. cells and so on hang around in the same way. The vaccine is just a tiny component of viruses this spike protein which is on the surface of the virus and so if you vaccinated with spike protein. You make antibodies in tesol responses just to that protein. If you get the virus itself then you get many many more pro teams that you're exposed to a new may make antibodies to some of those. So you responded more limited but you might also say that your response is more focused because it's actually antibodies to spike coaching a really important for neutralizing the virus so the vaccine in juices a narrow immune response but one would hope it would also be focused on therefore stronger on the base the matter and would it be expected that this will provoke a stronger. Immune response natural infection. I've heard some people say that actually vaccine can producer a strong response it coun- if they initial infection is quite mild say with virus like sauce covy to which induces very mild infections in some people i would expect the vaccine to tobacco to jason mewes which is much stronger than you would get after nascent dramatic or mild infection. People get serious dose of coca to make a very strong immune response. And i doubt if the vaccine it doesn't need to be any strong national adopt if it is when it comes to and viruses the coups common code. It's been some concern that these viruses somehow elude the memory b cells. and so. that's why even though we have thousand cells to to the common cold viruses. We will often get reinfected with them. I wonder if they're those same concerns about the coronavirus behind covid nineteen so there is a little basic data. There's one paper that suggests that the sauce kofi to virus that causes covid nineteen disables particular pathway in the b. cell response leading to a poor long term memory response but these experiments done in the lab in a in a in a petrie dish. And i think it's too early to know if that's really what happens in humans so i think we do need to be a little bit cautious and we need to be aware that it might happen. Good news is that the proteins that are believed to cause that problem are not present in the vaccine so even if it's a problem in natural infection it shouldn't be a problem with a vaccine

Elving Eleanor Riley Nichole Davis University Of Edinburgh Mike Baxter Inflammation Nick Cold Infection Mild Infection Jason Mewes
From Farm To Pharma

Sounds of Science

04:54 min | 5 months ago

From Farm To Pharma

"Security is a growing global concern because obviously we all need to eat. In order to protect our crops from pests, companies are constantly developing newer and safer fungicides and pesticides. In order to increase yield, they are also developing better fertilizers however in order to not contribute to the problem of pollution and global warming these agrochemicals have to be tested. That's replaces places like Charles Rivers site come in. Here among acres of fields and greenhouses the latest agrochemicals are thoroughly vetted for toxicology. Do they seep into the groundwater? Do they linger in the plant causing issues for the human or animal that eventually eats it? Do they poison the plants pollen causing harm to already vulnerable pollinators these questions and more must be answered before the agrochemical is approved for use joining me today is Simon. Chapel, you functional manager of the Plant Metabolism Department here number. He is here to tell me about the exotic crops they house and how they keep them safe and sustainable. Welcome. Simon. Thank you Marilyn. Welcome to me actually 'cause I'm here joining you as opposed to the other way around. Thank you. So to begin with can you tell me about the site here and how long it's been in operation? Suddenly will this site be no printing since the nineteen seventies unplanned metabolism the operation for which I'm responsible has been operating since the nineteen eighties. Okay. How long have you worked at this particular site I've been working since the late ninety nine hundred s okay what? Kind of a off topic a bit. What are some of the biggest changes that you noticed in that time biggest changes here. we've punches. Sites within John's river, which is unable. To. Expand from Jeff's Edinburgh to Edinburgh. North Spain, which is enabled us to grow more crumbs. We've also had different types of studies of required. We also need to look at residues which lower lois regard to identify lower lower residue. So the types of analytical techniques we've had to develop an purchase on reflects become more. Refined yeah. I guess technology has also just gotten better. So can detect smaller and smaller amounts of these things. So. Do you have any legacy crops that have been here for a long time? Yes, we have enough annoyed. Coach twenty four apple trees. The we can use when necessary we also have an established field area. So grassland field area, which is agricultural providence for round three decades. On most of the crops, we grow grain from seat or can be purchased locally sourced from abroad tell me about some of the more exotic plants you keep here. So we support the global agrochemical industry. We often need to grow crops which far into the UK or even foreign to Europe for example, infamous common crops that we grow is rice support Far Eastern uses. But we have a long list of unusual crops such as bananas, citrus grapevines, mango sugarcane. The plans can be crowning temperature control glasshouses to simulate growing conditions here in the UK with. Not glasshouse rooms, which we can use when a study be. Does I understand from someone else who I was talking to earlier that the glass in glass houses can quite very you've got the typical glass but then you've got like What he say courts glass very expensive but allows you through and also some sort of special type of plastic that also allows the Youth v through but is has a short lifespan. Yes it's true. Sounds pretty cool. So I understand we have sister sites like you said in northern Spain. Do we use them to get a sense of how these chemicals behave in variety of climates? Yes. We have another science yet during the Nova Spain. and. That's operated by field crowns department were possible. We will run a study unto doors rather than glasshouse because out dose study. is exposed to natural sunlight. So the in life as the study with a crop Mike Citrus, cotton, olives would be in. Spain whilst that for crop like weeks. Oh, shook abate. As it make sense. He wanted mimic real world conditions as much as possible. Absolutely. What is your background this work? Why Line? Why this line of work? Why Agriculture? Having completed, doctoral and post doctoral. Studies in plant metabolism at Southampton University in that gave me foyers training in the underlying principles. Fun Recovers them under very specific analytical approaches associated with this type of work.

Spain Simon Marilyn Jeff UK Charles Rivers North Spain Edinburgh Nova Spain. Southampton University Mike Citrus Europe John
"edinburgh" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

5 Minutes in Church History

04:54 min | 6 months ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on 5 Minutes in Church History

"Welcome to five minutes in churches hosted by Dr Stephen Nicholson where we take a little break from the presence to go exploring the past travel back in time as we look the people events and even the places that shaped the story of Christianity. Story. Family history let's get started. In June of Nineteen Ten World Missionary Conference took place in. Edinburgh Scotland. This conference met for a total of ten days. It was international it was ecumenical. About twelve hundred delegates from mostly Europe and America and representing all sorts of Protestant denominations came together to spend these days talking about the need for world missions world missions can look like. In the beginnings then of the twentieth century, you can trace the roots of the World Council of Churches Actually. Back, to the Edinburgh Missionary Conference. The World Council of Churches was established in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty eight, and you could pull on the threads of various groups that led up to it and you'd be taken right back to Edinburgh Missionary Conference. It was a very pivotal moment in the twentieth century. So let's take a look at five aspects of the Edinburgh Missionary Conference. I as we've mentioned, it was ecumenical. Now at that time, it was predominantly Protestant when we're talking about ecumenical there were no Roman Catholics present. There were no Greek Orthodox president there were only Protestant denominations present. But as a term ecumenical continued to expand and expand and broaden in broaden. So. I you talk about within Protestant denominations then accu medical would come to mean Protestant and Catholic and Jewish. Then you would add Islam then you would add eastern religions today the word ecumenical is very broad in very elastic. Well. The second thing about the end borough missionary conference is related to that question of the Ecumenical Movement in that is the question of inclusive ism or pluralism. Then Borough Missionary Conference consisted of eight major reports, and one of them was on this topic the missionary message in relation to the Non Christian world and they began raising questions is Jesus Christ the only way Is the Bible, the true and final. Authority is Christianity that is biblically faithful Christianity is that the only true religion and so you can begin to see how those questions could be answered in the wrong way and lead to very deleterious negative consequences. Well, that's the question of inclusive ISM and pluralism. A third aspect of the Edinburgh missionary conferences that it did increase attention to missions. The nineteenth century, the eighteen hundreds was a great century of modern missions. It was the century of William Carey missionary. Expansion. Well, the twentieth witnessed even greater missionary activity, and during the Twentieth Century missionary activity was carried on even during and despite of world wars travel got much easier and so missions expansion increase. So the twentieth century was a great century of modern missions. One aspect of this in particular is our fourth thing and that is the impact on Africa. Of course, leading into nineteen hundred Africa was dominated by Islam and by the folk religions that were across the continent. But after this conference, significant attention was given to Africa and there was this major push missions. into the continent of Africa one book chronicling this was published in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, five, it was entitled Africa, an Open Door, and so the Edinburgh Missionary Conference inspired and encouraged mission endeavors. In Africa we'll fifthly the Edinburgh conference served to remind the delegates and the constituencies they represented of the great need of the big world that we live in in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ten, the world's population was one point five, billion people. In June, of twenty, twenty. The world population is estimated at seven point seven billion. It's the big world and that's a big need. Well, that's the one thousand nine, hundred, ten, missionary conference. I'm Steve Nichols. Thanks for listening to five minutes in Church. History. For more information or to listen to past episodes, please visit five minutes in Church history.

Edinburgh Missionary Conferenc Borough Missionary Conference Africa World Council of Churches Twentieth Century Edinburgh Scotland Ecumenical Movement Dr Stephen Nicholson Steve Nichols William Carey Europe president America
1910 Edinburgh Missionary Conference

5 Minutes in Church History

04:16 min | 6 months ago

1910 Edinburgh Missionary Conference

"In June of Nineteen Ten World Missionary Conference took place in. Edinburgh Scotland. This conference met for a total of ten days. It was international it was ecumenical. About twelve hundred delegates from mostly Europe and America and representing all sorts of Protestant denominations came together to spend these days talking about the need for world missions world missions can look like. In the beginnings then of the twentieth century, you can trace the roots of the World Council of Churches Actually. Back, to the Edinburgh Missionary Conference. The World Council of Churches was established in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty eight, and you could pull on the threads of various groups that led up to it and you'd be taken right back to Edinburgh Missionary Conference. It was a very pivotal moment in the twentieth century. So let's take a look at five aspects of the Edinburgh Missionary Conference. I as we've mentioned, it was ecumenical. Now at that time, it was predominantly Protestant when we're talking about ecumenical there were no Roman Catholics present. There were no Greek Orthodox president there were only Protestant denominations present. But as a term ecumenical continued to expand and expand and broaden in broaden. So. I you talk about within Protestant denominations then accu medical would come to mean Protestant and Catholic and Jewish. Then you would add Islam then you would add eastern religions today the word ecumenical is very broad in very elastic. Well. The second thing about the end borough missionary conference is related to that question of the Ecumenical Movement in that is the question of inclusive ism or pluralism. Then Borough Missionary Conference consisted of eight major reports, and one of them was on this topic the missionary message in relation to the Non Christian world and they began raising questions is Jesus Christ the only way Is the Bible, the true and final. Authority is Christianity that is biblically faithful Christianity is that the only true religion and so you can begin to see how those questions could be answered in the wrong way and lead to very deleterious negative consequences. Well, that's the question of inclusive ISM and pluralism. A third aspect of the Edinburgh missionary conferences that it did increase attention to missions. The nineteenth century, the eighteen hundreds was a great century of modern missions. It was the century of William Carey missionary. Expansion. Well, the twentieth witnessed even greater missionary activity, and during the Twentieth Century missionary activity was carried on even during and despite of world wars travel got much easier and so missions expansion increase. So the twentieth century was a great century of modern missions. One aspect of this in particular is our fourth thing and that is the impact on Africa. Of course, leading into nineteen hundred Africa was dominated by Islam and by the folk religions that were across the continent. But after this conference, significant attention was given to Africa and there was this major push missions. into the continent of Africa one book chronicling this was published in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, five, it was entitled Africa, an Open Door, and so the Edinburgh Missionary Conference inspired and encouraged mission endeavors. In Africa we'll fifthly the Edinburgh conference served to remind the delegates and the constituencies they represented of the great need of the big world that we live in in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ten, the world's population was one point five, billion people. In June, of twenty, twenty. The world population is estimated at seven point seven billion. It's the big world and that's a big need.

Edinburgh Missionary Conferenc Borough Missionary Conference World Council Of Churches Africa Twentieth Century Edinburgh Scotland Ecumenical Movement William Carey Europe President Trump America
The Migrant Student Club

Latino USA

03:51 min | 6 months ago

The Migrant Student Club

"Eddie? Lurk Tech's says is a small city just north of the US Mexico border. This CD seats on the outskirts of mcallen, the Rio Grande Valley, and the land of here is wide and flat. Except over and sugarcane season and the fields full of workers. Among the farm fields in new housing developments, seats Edinburgh High School. It's a sprawling campus of two thousand, five, hundred students. A. An inside the. In a conference room with no Windows Group of eight young people gather around folding tables. Everyone here has one thing in common while other kids to spend their summer vacations going to come or at the community pool these students migrated north to working every cultural fields. who wants to go for a few and they are all members or former members of the migrant student club at Edinburgh. High. They gathered today to share their stories. My Name is David and I'm seventeen right now on voter turn eighteen on Sunday. Thank you. David, is a smile young men with shaved hair in the sites and he tells the room his honor working in. Michigan's Blueberry and Strawberry Fields, WACO four, five, six in the morning and okay let's go make yourself a tackle because that's all the time that we have for, and so we would go out and it's long and it's hard I mean to stick your hand inside the bushes you'd have to wear long sleeve. long-sleeve because you rip your shirt, rip your skin. You know he says, he thought he was pretty quick worker until he met other migrant workers I thought I was really fast I was like you know what like I'm a young guy I'm going to be able to be like really really fast this you know like these guys got nothing on me. I'd finish one bucket and the next me finish all six. Right. Next to David is Leslie and she's a former student. My parents have been migrant workers on my life. I was two months old when they first started migrating. Iowa she actually graduated in two thousand and seeks and went on to become a nurse. But she talks about how going to classes a migrant farm worker was a struggle. Especially switching between her school in Texas and her school in Iowa I felt. So out of place because I these weren't my friends, it wasn't the people I was used to. Me and everybody looked at me like what are you doing here? You don't belong with us. It's hard. It's very difficult to go back and forth you can't take the same classes you're never with the same people. That was hard. But I'm on a young men in red t shirt is on the other side of the table he chimes the in. One of. The younger ones there. This is my mother. Many of the students or former students came here today with her mothers. They wanted to give us a full picture of what being in a migrant worker family is like and we've been going to work for a good while like a family tradition. Once you turn thirteen, my grandfather would take you and warm weather will join us and they would take us up and we'd go. Work in Minnesota North Dakota but since I was a little bit on the short side, I had to wait until I was thirteen, and then when I was thirteen, then I was able to join them. He still remembers his bare you first year starting out in Fargo North. Dakota, when he realized the farmer dealing use pesticides and I thought that was cool until I realized that that meant like all the weeds and all the. Everything that didn't belong there. We had to take out by ourselves. So. That was a tough year to have as the first year because that year alone. The farmers like all of the weeds must go and since I was really new either didn't know what was weed or what was

David Edinburgh High School Mcallen Rio Grande Valley Leslie North Dakota Eddie United States Edinburgh Iowa Mexico Fargo North Michigan Minnesota Texas Waco
Scottish passenger train derails, at least 3 dead police say

Phil's Gang

00:21 sec | 7 months ago

Scottish passenger train derails, at least 3 dead police say

"Train derailed in north East Scotland after stormy weather, killing three people and injuring six others Today. The train's engineer is believed to be among the dead, but formal identification has yet to take place, according to the British Transport Police force. Six people were hospitalized, but their injuries are not considered serious. The wreck occurred about 100 miles north east of Edinburgh

East Scotland British Transport Police Engineer Edinburgh
"edinburgh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And the Duke of Edinburgh press interest in the royal family was relentless scandals was splashed across the front pages week after week tapes were leaked intimate phone calls between princess Diana and a friend in which he affectionately called her squeegee and then of even more intimate phone calls between prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles there were even premium rate phone lines that members of the public could cool to listen to the recordings themselves questions were also being offered about how much the royal family cost the British taxpayer and in November of nineteen ninety two things got even worse part of the centuries old wins a consul one of the queen's residences has been consumed by fire for much of the day a hundred and fifty five men of been battling the blaze which is because millions of pounds worth of damage former diplomat Charles Manson was the queen's press secretary my role as press secretary enough of my team quite a small team of ten wish to talk about the public churches of the queen and her family Sir it made the job in a little more difficult when people really wanted to talk more about the private lives of often quite junior members of the royal family on which really was not part of our mandate to to deal with by this point Queen Elizabeth the second had already been on the throne for forty years during a period of enormous social change don't forget when she first came to the throne anyone who had an appointment at Buckingham Palace came if they were a man in the morning search and a top hat and it was a very formal Monica is still but what made the job completely durable is the very high regard in which the queen was held on the steadiness with which she does her job the worst of times she was always calm no matter how difficult the issue may be a new institution mon okay whatever should expect to be free from the scrutiny of those will give it a loyalty and support not to mention there's a bank this sort of questioning can also act as an effective engine for change in the wake of the Windsor Castle fire the queen announced that she would stop paying some income tax and that the taxpayer would no longer pay for several junior members of the royal family and she started meeting regularly with a group of senior Royals I'm the closest advisers including Charles Manson to discuss how to present the royal family strategy for the future they call themselves the way ahead group the purpose of the monarchy and the main things it was doing which is simply not getting through and so we thought that actually what we needed to do is sit down and look at the program much mall systematically and make sure all the the monarchy remained rather send in a molten society the first task was to think about what the queen I actually did all day I mean everyone knew about opening a new bridge or opening a new hospital commemorating an important anniversary of the second World War those sorts of June which is of the Monaco world fetish trade for but looking at new areas of activity new jobs and technology new areas of Manson looking at the jobless looking at new forms of employment for young people really sort of widening in touch in that way to involve as many people in society as possible they started looking at a map of the royal family's engagements thinking about which parts of the country all parts of the community what getting enough attention the way ahead group influenced all sorts of things you nine times a of the garden parties you know just making sure that you got a wider and wider spread of people coming to them and that people do have done modest but very good things in their local area come to the attention of the of very much included is not just for the great and the good but for the society as a whole bunch of coasters through the taxpayers paying for the costs of the of the institution of monarchy the way ahead group held meetings two or three times a year they took place sometimes in Sandringham sometimes at Balmoral sometimes in London two or three hours finishing with lawn shoal from them and offering meeting finishing with taking another kind of thing it was a very open discussion but most of the things are discussing probably being fairly pre quote I mean the queen would have been consulted way ahead of a way ahead of group meeting did you get any push back from within the royal household no no tool no I mean once we were able to to show people how it's changed and how the nation is changing I don't remember it being a problem at but it meant a lot to change but I think in those question viguerie to bottle they the group could change the events the royal family went to and the people I met that they didn't have the same control of a public opinion I think it did work but always tempered by you know the things that can go wrong will cause controversy and I doubt if you lost many people you know which do not more about the problems of the prince and princess of Wales is a certain point hole you know how many factors of it invested in Northumberland genetically perfect chair they knew a lot more about one and a half things began to stabilize I'm Charles Anson moved on from his job at Buckingham Palace in nineteen ninety seven but later that year disaster struck this is BBC television from London Diana princess of Wales has died after a car crash in Paris she was taken to hospital in the is a very difficult time in a roster a lot of emotion some of them quite hostile other done and not being treated well sure for me not part of it working outside in the private sector I thought your name that first week off to Dunn's death this script be on the right is very difficult long period for the monarchy initially the queen was criticized how slow response to princess Diana's death but public perceptions of the royal family seem to be softened by the tragedy and by the time of the queen's golden jubilee in two thousand and two people lined the streets all over the country to wish her well people thought my goodness she's she's been on friend fifty years might not realize it it's that long you know and it was a kind of moment to sort of see what the monarchy meant and I think in those terms you know the work that was done in the nineteen nineties during sort of rather troubled yes you know this is sort of Phoenix it came out of the ashes today the way the world finally works is back in the news to think that there are echoes of the challenges of the nineteen nineties in today's situation I think come there all records and the always will be occurs because what you have in the monarchy is a very formal institution this goes back centuries initial source of ceremonial informal roles and then alongside it you also have human beings and always be something happening in other generation growing up but as long as you've got the sort of strong basis of public service and the that is evident the public I think you whether the school for storms the former press secretary to the queen Charles Manson was talking to Lucy burns stay with us we'll have more from history our in just a moment distribution of the BBC world service in the US is made possible by American public media with support from four X. dot com helping traders find opportunity in currency trading for over eighteen years forex dot.

Edinburgh
"edinburgh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh press interest in the royal family was relentless scandals was splashed across the front pages week after week tapes were leaked intimate phone calls between princess Diana and a friend in which he affectionately called her squeegee and then even more intimate phone calls between prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles there were even premium rate phone lines that members of the public could cool to listen to the recordings themselves questions were also being honest about how much the royal family cost the British taxpayer earned in November of nineteen ninety two things got even worse part of the centuries old wins a consul one of the queen's residences has been consumed by fire for much of the day a hundred and fifty five men having battling the blaze which is because millions of pounds worth of damage former diplomat Charles Manson was the queen's press secretary my role as press secretary much of my team called a small team of ten was to talk about the public chooses of the queen and her family Sir it made the job in a little more difficult when people really want to talk more about the private lives of often quite junior members of the royal family on which really was not part of our mandate to to deal with by this point Queen Elizabeth the second had already been on the throne the full two years during a period of enormous social change don't forget when she first came to the throne anyone who had an appointment at Buckingham Palace came if they were a man in the morning suit and a top hat and it was a very formal Monica still but what made the job completely terrible image the very high regard in which the queen was held on the steadiness with which she does her job but the worst of times she was always calm no matter how difficult the issue may be a new institution such a mall okay whatever should expect to be free from the scrutiny that will give it a loyalty and support not to mention there's object this sort of questioning can also act as an effective engine for change in the wake of the Windsor Castle fire the queen announced that she would stop paying some income tax and that the taxpayer would no longer pay for several junior members of the royal family and she started meeting regularly with a group of senior Royals I'm the closest advisers including Charles Manson to discuss how to present the royal family strategy for the future they call themselves the way ahead group the purpose of the monarchy and the main things it was doing which is simply not getting through and so we thought that actually what we needed to do is sit down and look at the program much mall systematically and make sure all the the monarchy remained rather send in a molten society the first task was to think about what the queen actually did all day I mean everyone knew about opening a new bridge or opening a new hospital commemorating into an important anniversary of the sec will rule those sorts of G. which is of the moment can have a world fetish trade for but looking at new areas of activity new jobs and technology new areas of Manson looking at the jobless looking at new forms of employment for young people really sort of widening in touch in that way to involve as many people in society as possible they started looking at a map of the royal family's engagements thinking about which parts of the country all parts of the community one getting enough attention the way ahead group influenced all sorts of things you know in terms of the garden parties you know just making sure that you got a wider and wider spread of people coming to them and the people who have done modest but very good things in their local area come to the attention on the very much included is not just for the great and the good part for the society as a whole bunch of courses through the taxpayers paying for the costs of the of the institution for Monica the way ahead group held meetings two or three times a year they took place sometimes in Sandringham sometimes a bomb all sometimes in London two or three ounce finishing with lawn troll from them and offering meeting finishing with taking on and that kind of thing it was a very open discussion but most of the things are discussing probably being fairly pre coat I mean the queen would have been consulted way ahead of a way ahead of group meeting did you get any push back from within the royal household no no tool no I mean once we were able to to show people how it's changed and how the nation is changing I don't remember it being a problem that but it meant a lot to change but I think in those question viguerie to bottle they the group could change the events the royal family went to and the people I met that they didn't have the same control of a public opinion I think it did work but always tempered by you know the things that can go wrong will cause controversy and I dont few us many people you know which do not more about the problems of the prince and princess of Wales is a certain point hole you know how many factors of the investors in Northumberland genetically perfect chair they knew a lot more about one and a half things began to stabilize and Charles Anson moved on from his job at Buckingham Palace in nineteen ninety seven later that year disaster struck this is BBC television from London Diana princess of Wales has died after a car crash in Paris she was taken to hospital in the is a very difficult time in a roster another emotion some of them quite hostile other done and not being treated well sure for me not in all parts of it working outside in the private sector I thought Vernon that first week off to Dunn's death this could be on the road is very difficult long period for the monarchy initially the queen was criticized hustler response to princess Diana's death but public perceptions of the royal family seem to be softened by the tragedy and by the time of the queen's golden jubilee in two thousand and two people lined the streets all over the country to wish her well people thought my goodness she's she's been throwing fifty ocean of not realizes that long you know and it was a kind of moment to sort of see what the monarchy meant and I think in those terms you know the work that was done in the nineteen nineties during sort of rather troubled yes you know this is sort of Phoenix it came out of the ashes today the way the world family works is back in the news do you think that there are echoes of the challenges of the nineteen nineties in today's situation I think come there are acres and the always will be occurs because what you have in the monarchy is a very formal institution this goes back centuries of missiles Wilson ceremonial informal roles and then alongside it you also have human beings and always be something I mean of him nother generation growing up but as long as you've got the sort of strong basis of public service and the that is evident the public I think you whether there's so for storms the former press secretary to the queen Charles Manson was talking to Lucy burns stay with us we'll have more from history our in just a moment distribution of the BBC world service in the US is made possible by American public media with support from four X. dot com helping traders find opportunity in currency trading for over eighteen years.

Edinburgh
"edinburgh" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"Would it be the same up your gums because that's the real question milky way crispy rolls. I want one okay. I had an sauce forty quickly for us to have good. Let's see how we got up. Ask everyone this question knitting on and trying to work out by the answer ahead of time. I'm not sure this time. Have you ever seen a ghost. I think okay i think <music> swiped towards that are men but like <hes> savings quite a bit but just like because i'm really excited school go but i remember in little and look at like really young looking at me bedroom door and seeing someone coming up the stairs and a k a witches mask. Ask and i remember for years been convinced it was a goal but now we're not unlike probably me system jet but i remember for years being like no so where mosques died of with died when the trick or treat and they are committed to that moms and scooby doo you go suicide muscled the because they've not maybe someone tried to scare you away from the landing for some reason if there was plutonium mine ah over it can be easily spooked though you could easily convince someone you could tell the story now that this place is hone not not be like this is definitely if anyone relaxing people. I've seen people backstage. I also wanted to have those guys and they said they were the jacksonville adjusted media will close old man in my dressing room for juicy inside the writers and then when i went to the louis back i the same things by the masons masonic whoa i've been implying their murderous and sex criminals say buying saying and there was an old man sitting there looking at me. Maybe that was my warning to stop doing that. I'm still alive. I was thinking of prince when sunday the other day and still not clever got away. Got away can't do another one straightaway. Uh that's the way that was another question if you this is my favorite question edinburgh fringe surged question if you could take any one item for many art gallery or museum in the world have it for yourself and take over keeping which painting or item from museum would you like to. I would wanna take just the whole gift shop. How good would that be. Was we could run from your home run ornate from your house. That's how i'm going to get a mortgage. 'cause then every time someone comes to visit and be like do you want a pencil very overprice pencils. <hes> all these scams in the world more discounts which is being a comedian people paint by a good scam. There's lots of places that have that mark holiday. You'll have to mark. If you run a gift shop in the museum. You're allowed to mark up the price and you saw the feel of the customer feels they should buy something because he will not appreciate it any of the off by a postcard of the the most visually appealing piece of art. I didn't understand then. I'm still small food. You got the gift shop. You got all the posters as well so that post the pictures with them up reading the original one but it'd be nice to have the rich and just have security van gafa. I remember going to the castle museum museum in quasi which the world boss alone on and i walked in i was like i'm going to have a day off gallery. I'm so local jet. I did the whole thing in about three minutes and then i felt really bad as i looked the all and off so they're not another lap but then people would just lookin' is she's already ready dunlap and i was like look like the optimal half an nothing. I didn't just go with a gift shop. Now isn't for me. They really do feel like your beholden to go in and get some occasionally. You'll find one..

castle museum museum dunlap edinburgh van gafa jacksonville three minutes
"edinburgh" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"It. They added a fringe for too long right. I know that now i passed a homeless man in the street the other day he had a sign saying i meet sixteen pounds to get a room in a hostile. What did you get that. He'll make some money on paying the stay in the city. I've gone off his money but it was gone and yet the audio files complaining that the the the volume of we were home who are not paying for this fucking. They're saying that the noise changes volume. Oh you james depending on who's talking and what we're going and i should normalize should we we should normalize it cannot normalize what you do all their files you discuss dick nick discuss what they do to sound and sometimes fresh new sounds just been mate. Get away with it. Disgusting <hes> oh the news in today on the front page of shorter which is kind of their common comedians websites. Emily hud says talking about comedians getting on t._v. She she says some comedians don't have the right kind of audience to get on t._v. This is your fucking for you because this is. I just want to be on the telling because of you. You're not the right kind of audience. I brought me down if i was working t._v. Which i wasn't for you focus then. I'd be more worried about what people aren't watching t._v. They don't have because dad meet him. Good getting a podcast guys. You're all going to be doing. I'm so look we're going to crack one. I think yeah when we met over one hundred zero slot can go without even one show. That's been under hundred people in the audience. Second of all is still the cheapest taste dates right my i guess so well done for being over hundred my first guest day is probably best known four hundred workers being camera systems on cranston villas. We will come out today but he's getting ready to. We got him sit down. Pick up the mic. Hello hello how you doing. I'm really good how are you. I'm all right in fact i was. I was just saying gee backstage two years ago at this stage in the fringe i was doing my show freedom fifty and i would walk from this town to the pleasant so when i got to the bottom bit the presents a wolf five minutes because i didn't have agendas and you didn't have the energy to walk up the hill everywhere up when you go in down. It feels like it's up an armed batmobiles. Now are coming to tend to sweat and we didn't tell me. I'm always covered the film of sweat in this city warm if he's not warm it's raining always has that damp every twenty four seven yeah i'm <music>. I'm sweating but i'm still managing to a better place than there was two years ago fitter little bit fitter than i was two years from being an edmund for months well he can i i think i've got a little less fit than the star of edinburgh because i've been eating a lot of like cakes stopped eating chocolate and i've stopped drinking in edinburgh sliding door has likes donuts certain donuts but also when you when you do not sit on the hoof a lot of the time he just needs put something in me for a bit of energy and we're not doing drugs anymore with with john. Les cool shame really it is is we're not we're not. We're still young. He's still very young. You're kidding. Nobody they tell me about being the camera system on craxton villas. Do you remember the show it was before. It was at quarter past eleven. It was specifically designed for people coming in from the pub and i was a trainee camera assistants nor proper cameras and it was stop frame animation and i don't sitcom and it was really good. I discovered that i preferred working with people who graduate from art college..

edinburgh john cranston villas Emily hud trainee two years sixteen pounds five minutes
"edinburgh" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"Yeah hoops yeah yeah lots of people who will not get up to the Edinburgh fringe. You hopefully will come and see some of these comedians my might now I've. I ought to lock them. A day. It was in a right state was really hungry and east was waiting for his universal credit. Commend beware in six weeks and went went and got some food and Mooney said I want to work then. I walked away and far and Ernest. Do you want to be nearly Masher said. I've got him an outfit. Fit So we'll see if he tens of partner couldn't pay him for it. Your site just didn't pay him for if if I could just walk me more for my I have a couple by the end is good good Liam. Oh come on and do the kicks isn't good work experience for for Big Avian. Yeah no suture. I'll leave the tends to flat out terrific. Well aw come ask you that will get an update circle to these. Hey we go right. This is the final question I'm GonNa ask you if the sun wasn't GonNa come up tomorrow unless you through a member of of your family into a volcano which member of your family would you throw it to the volcano or would you not throw anyone in doom. You'll hemisphere icy death and probably further oh this member in this member of the family my dad's loyalties member Lance Jason crump throw your he still fairly avenue. He's not he's not used to have but it'd be shot to throw the admission. I'll Roman. Can I have your mind. He's giving Manley Fist going to save the Hemisphere. We just moved to Australia. I'll do that enough for your granddad started hip operation so he needs a.

Masher Lance Jason crump Ernest Edinburgh Manley Fist Mooney Australia partner Liam six weeks
"edinburgh" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Ago they were stopped from graduating is doctors from the university of edinburgh in scotland but this weekend they finally got their degrees posthumously of course the world sarah burned bomb has the story of edinburgh seven one afternoon in eighteen seventy a model of about two hundred people including some really angry medical students surrounded a lecture hall on campus it was where a group of seven female medical students be only women enrolled in the university of edinburgh and incidentally only women ever ever enrolled at any university in the uk where they rescheduled to take a test to see women approached the gate those rubbish withheld from multiple withheld at them and and they were very vocally abused as well just filler as a researcher at the university versity of edinburgh and it was one of the students the event she opened the gate to them and that the men and women went into the whole and they saw their knocked me exam and while they were sitting they exam the mold outside pushed eight sheep through the door if they examination hole and a professor on decide who is a professor at the time said look the sheep stay because it's got more intelligence and the group of people outside put together the search tall riot as it became known was covered in the press and pretty soon the whole country began debating whether women should be allowed to become a doctor even charles darwin weighed in on the side of the women eventually edinburgh seven were set to graduate eight at the top top of their class but opposition what's mounting in the university a petition signed by five hundred if the five hundred and fifty medical students said you know we had we known universe dude intended to take this closest auction and to admit women the students we would never have chosen university as ours ambulances were written to the papers at the time saying that clearly they invest she didn't care about its reputation it didn't care about don the didn't care about the sense of prestige stage who knows who is under a lot of pressure in any end university got the courts to say that the women including graduated and should have never been accepted in the first place but this weekend university of edinburgh decided it was time to to write this historical wrong the school chose seven female medical students to accept degrees on behalf of the edinburgh seven caitlin taylor represented matilda chaplain i think it's really important what's happening today to recognize they pavement these women but i also think it's useful gesture that will hopefully bring a spotlight on the ongoing debate in healthcare issues like the lack of women as hospitals ceos as deans of medical schools and this top editor medical journals as worthy edinburgh seven they didn't let universities decision hold them back so fi objects blake for example who is the ringleader of edinburgh seven finally got her medical degree in switzerland she then back to the uk and became scotland's first practicing female doctor and went on to establish to count him to medical schools for women and the university of edinburgh finally allowed the first women doctors to gradulate in eighteen ninety six for the world i'm sarah burn them high i wanna tell you about a new podcast called things that go boom it's all about foreign policy but not in the way you might think that things that go boom they tell stories about are live in the world around us in an effort to better understand the ins outlets in would have used of what keeps us safe on the new season they tell the story of the secret back channel meetings politico ployees and even broken bones that led to the iran nuclear deal and since president trump yanked us out of that deal they ask are we headed for nuclear war things that go boom second season called fallout is available now listen on apple podcasts wherever you get your podcast

university of edinburgh
"edinburgh" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"This week Christmas an automatic upbringing. You a special program recorded in front of a live audience at the Edinburgh science festival then joined by a panel of scientists to tackle the best in the bizarre developments in cybersecurity and technology space medicine as well as the micro by I'm an antibiotic resistance. Those experts off Chris Johnson head of computer science at Glasgow University. Best Bill up from the university of Edinburgh institute of stran- Amee microbiologist Luke McNally from the school of biological sciences. And bre and safety Gauguin's curator of biomedical science at national museums. Scotland now sometimes a bizarre idea quickly becomes the best idea and one experiment in particular rocked the world of genetics. As Christmas explores all the twenty second of February nineteen ninety seven in a world. I research is that the rules Lynn institute not far from here where we're sitting in announced that they had taken the DNA from the skin cells of an adult sheep and the head inserted it into an excel Wilson from a sheep from which they had removed its own deny. I like put that Xcel back into the uterus of a surrogate parent sheep and subsequently a lamb could Dolly was born and in Wilmot who's sitting next to me was the person who led the team that made that possible in is a huge privilege to have you here. Thank you for joining us. Point, which is very very important to make you need a crew of something like twelve or fifteen people to do this sort of experiment. So to say, I did it wouldn't be seriously misleading. Why did you start with sheep, though, Roslin Institute is has always been concerned with farm animals, and if you're thinking of using cloning ineffective on we'll species either to improve the performance to increase numbers the species with the gracious commercial interests would be the cow but Cutler extremely expensive to buy to maintain. And they have a very wrong just station. So that if you're doing an experiment where you transfer embryos as you said into a foster mother, you've got to wait, ten months, or whatever it is before we know the answer to the experiment. Mike comparison cheaper much easier to look after the a lot small of one thing that cheaper on their station is much than half that's of capital. So it was really thinking that sheep. Small cheap. Cows was the reason why we went which how did don't you? Go down will you sorta celebrated and did you get a good reception to what you announced to done or did you face quite a bit of controversy. We got an enormous amount of publicity, of course. And a lot of skepticism some people doubted, whether Dolly was really a clone. If you explain to people, the reason why you're doing this sort of thing, the majority would become supportive, but a small proportion would be half style to experiments with animals, and some people expressed concern that perhaps they would be accelerated aging, and that kind of thing on the politics. Dolly was was that bone out by experimentation is actually very difficult to do the experiments in cheap. It's much easier to do them in in mice. You really do have shorter generation into lifespan. I don't think that there is any evidence of this is quite a difficult and expensive experiment to do. You know, if you have to produce another generation in ways in another generation in ways. To see if you changing lifespan because it was a recent paper mother nature journals where they actually got the skeleton of Dolly and CAT scanned because one of the criticisms had been the that was premature oth- rightous. And did they not find from these studies that actually there was no evidence? Really that. There was an accelerated rate of all she didn't really show any signs of that compared with a sheet born the normal way. That's right. I'm aging was just a very slick journalistic expression to indicate that things went out, quite right. But I don't think there's ever been really good clear about the edging of clone animals. What would you like to see the long term outcome? Be. If you could wave a magic wand, and we'd be in a certain position will notice it and thing what is the final question that you would like to see on some now the gentlemen, understanding the thought Dolly was that once solid foam to particular type, it couldn't change or be changed artificially by..

Dolly university of Edinburgh instit Edinburgh Chris Johnson Scotland school of biological sciences Glasgow University Xcel Roslin Institute Luke McNally Lynn institute Gauguin Wilmot Mike Cutler Wilson twenty second ten months
"edinburgh" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on World Cafe

"So they can't it's they have a separate whole thing. But. Yes. So he obviously couldn't engage with a toll especially when I was playing in really am. Low-quality pubs in Edinburgh in restaurants with Tiny's couldn't hear anything in. Everyone's talking. So it was really exciting for him. When I finally started playing the big venues because this massive science system. I remember playing a great clubbing King's Cross in London code Scala. And it was on his birthday, and is one of my first big shows, and I got the whole audience the sign language happy birthday him, and that was really super cool. And then I had the most emotional moment with him after he had a coke Lear implant. He had it done quite late when he was twenty three and we were in a supermarket. A few years later, I'm black horse and the cherry tree came on the supermarket. Speakers turns to me he says is this you. Like, how do you know? And he goes, I don't I can hear the rhythm. And I can hear it signs like your voice. I mean, it was just the most amazing moment. And it was amazing for two reasons. Firstly in primarily because my brother could hear it and could recognize something. But Secondly, I was like I have a sad. There's obviously like a signature signed that he can recognize if a deaf person knows who I am. Then everyone knows who. I am. Sees it was amazing amazing while we're in that do you think he'd play the song for us would love to? Okay. Do. Goes. Actors people..

Edinburgh
"edinburgh" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"End to Parkinson's disease. L? Okay. All right. So I love this one so much. Just the headline alone coming from now this is from lemme is from the university of Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh barrel. There's a borough. Vera, bro. Okay. The band. And so here's the research. Hey old people wander off topics in conversations because they're easily distracted and find it harder to bring up relevant information. But hold it right there that is misleading. Hold it right there because that's like oh people ever in. You know, that's like the thing you want to say like somebody older. And here's what they did. So I would I had to Wade through ten pages of research. How God condense it? Oh, you're so good. These studies Laurine. Okay. So the age of the people that they studied were eighteen to eighty years old. Nice mix. Right. Yeah. Big big age. Okay. And but here's what they found out is people age, they have more information stored in their brains, but find it difficult to choose which bits to share with others in order to avoid unnecessary detail. And some kind of go to a filing system in our brain to to get the right file. That's the only reason we're there deviating off topic is just the no so much, and they don't want to give the unnecessary details. We are. So smart. We are so full of wisdom and knowledge and those more likely to wonder. Tend to be more knowledgeable and older, but they were less skilled at selecting the most relevant parts of their wisdom. Us, but the lead professor research guys had but all ages get distracted by irrelevant thoughts from time to time. When you were speaking out loud. Interesting. That's interesting because we'll a lot of people will do in. You're speaking loud is not look at you. And try you can see them referencing in their brain. They're trying to work harder in their brain to to get information. Yes. Interesting. 'cause I know some people that do that. Yeah. And also, I mean, I wish they do this study. I'm why some people just can't tell a story at all. I mean, I hate when people just put in so many extras, you know, they don't I guess things. Don't think I know how to add it. Okay. Well, everybody I guess every rings..

Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh Parkinson Vera Wade professor eighty years
"edinburgh" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"L? Tone. Okay. All right. So I loved this one so much. Just the headline alone coming from now this is from lemme is from the university of Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh peril. There's a borough barrow Edinburgh. Okay. Me the band, and so here's the research. Old people wander off topics in conversations because they're easily distracted and find it harder to bring up relevant information. But hold it right there that is misleading. Hold it right there because that's like oh people ever in. You know, that's like the thing you want to say like somebody older. And here's what they did. So I would I had to Wade through ten pages of research. Oh, God condemn said. Oh, you're so good. These studies Laurien. Okay. So the age of the people that they studied were eighteen to eighty years old. Nice mix. Right. Yeah. Big big age. Okay. Any, but here's what they found out is people age, they have more information stored in their brains, but find it difficult to choose which bits to share with others in order to avoid unnecessary detail. And some kind of go to a filing system in our brain to to get the right file. That's the only reason we're they're deviating off topic is just they know so much, and they don't want to give the unnecessary. Details. Are so smart. We are so full of wisdom and knowledge and those more likely to wonder. Tend to be more knowledgeable and older, but they were less skilled at selecting the most relevant parts of their wisdom us, but the lead professor. Research guys had but all ages get distracted by irrelevant thoughts from time to time. When you were speaking out loud. Interesting. That's interesting because we'll a lot of people will do when you're speaking loud is not look at you and try you can see them referencing in their brains, and they're trying to work harder to get information. Yes. Interesting because I know some people that do that. Yeah. And also, I mean, I wish they do this study. I'm why some people just can't tell a story at all. I mean, I hate when people just put in so many extras, you know, don't don't they. I think I know how to add it. Okay. Well, everybody, I guess every..

Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh barrow Edinburgh Wade professor eighty years
"edinburgh" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"L? Okay. All right. So I love this one so much. Just the headline alone coming from now this is from this from the university of Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh barrel. There's a borough. Vera, bro. Okay. Kim is a band. And so here's the research K old people wander off topics in conversations because they're easily distracted and find it harder to bring up relevant information. But hold it right there that is misleading. Folder right there. Because that's like oh people ever in. You know, that's like the thing you want to say like somebody older. And here's what they did. So I would I had to Wade through ten pages of research. Oh, God Kandar said. Oh, you're so good. These studies Laurine. Okay. So the age of the people that they studied were eighteen to eighty years old. Nice mix. Right. Yeah. Big big age. Okay. And here's what they found out is people age, they have more information stored in their brains, but find it difficult to choose which bits to share with others in order to avoid unnecessary detail. And some kind of go to a filing system in our brain to to get the right file. That's the only reason why they're deviating off topic is just the no so much, and they don't want to give the unnecessary. Details. Are so smart where your wisdom and knowledge and those more likely to wonder. Tended to be more knowledgeable and older, but they were less skilled at selecting the most relevant parts of their wisdom us. The lead professor research guy said but all ages get distracted by irrelevant thoughts from time to time. When you were speaking out loud. Interesting. That's interesting because we'll lot of people will do when you're speaking loud is not look at you and try you can see them referencing in their brain. And they're trying to work harder in their brain to to get information. Yes. Interesting because I know some people that do that. Yeah. And also, I mean, I wish they'd do this study. I'm why some people just can't tell a story at all. I mean, I hate when people just put in so many extras, you know, again know to it. They don't I don't think I know how to add it. Okay. Well, everybody I guess every race..

Edinburgh Edinburgh Edinburgh Kim Vera Wade Kandar professor eighty years
"edinburgh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Would he feel comfortable performing at in turkey i think we should do mean via mother karago for his cat but turkey cuts for his peace because there is a stress a political stress in that country and if by any chance anybody from the government would come across it now we would need to be very careful about what we're saying or we are also like the peace evolved a lot from the work in progress we performed in edinburgh and now it has it doesn't talk about turkey it talks about as said operation in any sort of sense all over the world it doesn't have to be political oppression it can be your own oppression that you're you know putting a yourself your own censorship but there is of course there are seven turkish stance is involved and we're talking about this so there's always danger you know they're saddened things which are in the performance that it's difficult to describe but just the other day the dancer came to me and she said i think we should take this out i don't feel safe because there are friends of friends why known that have gone missing dezes selfcensorship that happens now with all the dances which is rightfully so because they day despite being a my production i think that is already a risk i would love to see how the audience reacts to eat and we had some turkish organs coming in and and some of them are extremely touched by its some of them where i'd be overthrown by didn't know how to react so it's very interesting i think the turkish origins should cd species.

edinburgh
"edinburgh" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Oil or krill oil it's both and now it's free just pay 495 worshiping and claim your free bottle call now one eight hundred three seven seven forty seven fifty one eight hundred three seven seven forty seven fifty that's one eight hundred three seven seven forty seven fifty blindscom gives you one hundred percent satisfaction guarantee which means that even if you miss measure you picked the wrong color aegis don't plane like the blinds you watered they will blake is for free net edinburgh 24th you can enjoy great sitewide savings plus a teed 20 percent off when you go to buys icombinator use the promo code medveded on playing like the blinds you watered they will remake your blinds for free now through december four you can enjoy great sitewide savings plus a guaranteed 20 percent off when you.

edinburgh blindscom
"edinburgh" Discussed on SRSLY

SRSLY

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on SRSLY

"So maybe we just have to put you on your on other that's what you're here okay well excite saying ceremonies exciting stuff to come vied actually just have a very exciting we yes you've been to edinburgh yeah i was in at number for two festivals the more wellknown edinburgh fringe festival which is of course of festival that runs throughout august in edinburgh seoul of comedy theater a whole mix of different kinds of life shows and also the lesser known edinburgh tv festival which is an industry specific festival for kind of people who write tv and make tv programmes will pop step he also pops that journalists who write about tv like me anyway you know people who live and work in the tv world so i was there for that to you which was quite interesting like that one lots of cool events about like tv is going and stuff and also i was a law of parties and did a lot of celebs pulsing big looks at steven morphou for in the kuna roll like oh charlie burqas here you know like rory bremner that's the kind of level that were up but yeah that was i actually did get see quite a lot of stuff at the fringe which i was worried i wouldn't have time today by basically did a lot of like literally running from show to show we should mean a couple of times like they wouldn't that me and because i was like two minutes late or whatever which was that was much entirely my info.

steven morphou rory bremner edinburgh kuna two minutes
"edinburgh" Discussed on Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"edinburgh" Discussed on Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

"And the one in edinburgh and i didn't miss a festival in between like my whole coin of identity so bound up in edinburgh the i don't really know what it's going to be like without but i feel know i feel i don't know how i feel i know that i can't do it so there's no real thing there was no real decision for me 'cause this practically but i think once everyone is there i will be thinking she wishes because the thing the thing is when you get rid of all the professional staff it's really hard because you want to run usually try reading out but when you strip everything all that other stuff what you're left with this month with all your friends in the same plans massacre haunting the tricky thing about being a comic it's unbelievable job but the promise that you know you're all over the place and you have most of your social life is sort of on the phone with your friends you know you like i'm coming back from someplace or call my friend how would you conduct law your friendships in absentia and it is even you know so when you it edinburgh like the first i want you meet on this thursday in your hike and again to allow the danish educational but it's one of those things where i think really miss it once it starts are definitely gonna come up with this thing to allow people when they take the first of like i've gone on holiday blanket of either because bullock i or my whole career to edinburgh like i have my thing i've got has been through edinburgh shows so i still have that like a law people really hired a i'll i'll love it over to miss it an edinburgh loves you does you like the person gets sort of made really made me.

edinburgh bullock