18 Burst results for "Ed solomon"

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Just talk a little bit about what that is so how did you decide to take co back on once you were fired how did you deal with incorporating other people's joe were like how did you get the point where because you get back on it how did you figure out and get yourself disciplined enough to go well this is going to it's good i'm going to keep this bit because actually you know that'll be good for me when things like how did you do that do that math for yourself and i mean one of my friends was one of those writers i'm sure you're friends with them to now separately but what was that experience i mean what was that experience it's like and then you know you did write a movie that is one of the crucial movies of our age you know for me anyway i mean i do know that movie by heart so man what yeah what did that whole experience when tommy lee jones came on board a he was the first actor to come on board he had just come off of the fugitive they just want his oscar and he was you know he was the big star there became a conversation about whether it should be drama or comedy tommy was literally said to me in our first meeting it's either comedydrama make up your mind asshole and no i'm sorry i said that incorrectly tommy said to me in her first meeting it's either comedy or science fiction make up your mind asshole and i said it's not good enough science fiction to be a drama needs the leap of faith you take when you set the mood of a comedy yes and he said i don't agree and then so that was one of the issues so then you were replaced briefly there was also the question of who's movies it because now tom is the star and it should be time he's movie because will wasn't cast yet in we'll wasn't even a star yet that part wasn't cast so an i believed fervently that the point of view the movie was the charac turnpike by will smith the the the newbie coming in tommy as the sort of wise and old guy was more interesting to discover why he was so cocky and why he was so terse and you know better than having him be the lead of the movie you wanted to earn the.

tommy lee jones oscar tom smith
"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"It was you know i i put on twitter some of those original pages i'll try maybe i should put him out again people follow this is gonna come up go out tonight or tomorrow so it'll people do it tonight people be able to see it and then you already said you know it got rejected a lot over and over again there was a moment i remember my age my agents wouldn't send it out i gave it to them and they were like we don't we don't see this this is not good and there was a phone call from one of the agents i swear it was literally this do you hear this sound that's the sound of me falling on my knees begging you not to show this to anyone shit like martin short and the big pictures yeah i know and i went in to kind of rally the troops at the agency chris drove mehan left state because you knew it was good i believe in it you send it was funny you sense that it was funny but after about six weeks though where where i was like well maybe they know maybe they know maybe they know they know maybe they know is deadly yeah and so finally i went in and i said the idea was my passion for it we'll be infectious to bring the passion thing back if you guys don't believe in this maybe you're the wrong agency i think it's funny and you know and if you don't if you don't think so we probably shouldn't be working together which led them to say well we probably shouldn't be where i got fired governor agency yeah walked out chris like how to go as like we don't have agents you fired from your agency because of that because i went into say police and bill and ted another agent that i had rejected when i got the laverne and shirley gig because i made the mistake of instead of going with the hungry young agent with the the lower people at the powerful company who i'd heard of sure because the guy had given a speech at ucla sure and big mistake always a mistake powerfull agent they make the stay make the pitch where a big powerful agency but you they don't believe in you have to make sure the person yeah leaves so you go to this person david greenberg he read it he went i liked the script and i said well you sign us and he's like i don't know let's see us you know he was just signed he was just moving over to see at the time different agency than the one i had been with and thanks to him he got the script to a couple people and it it caught on and suddenly plume we're on the map as screenwriters and kind of the flavor of the month for a little while which is it is it sewn issue but did yeah that's tone which we can talk about another time how first of all did you lord it over those agents who passed on you because they have you know we do run into these people did any of them call you and be like dude you were right where it hits all of them it was satisfying you know to to some to varying degrees depending on the person but most of the time you don't watch it says it says it's you've done it done it says itself you don't have to say it i had all these questions but we talked about all this other stuff so but the last thing i have to i wanna ask toots to related things so how do you grapple with so men in black which was based on loosely based on a loosely a comic yeah and then you wrote the first the first raptor but are you the sole credited writer on it other writers worked on it right i got fired four times hired back four times as rehired five times fired four times were you want set for the movie some of but not much no yeah said the beginning i was so did you.

twitter six weeks
"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"I wrote a spec script and then i wrote another spec script movie script my agents were like write a movie script movie script they would call me into the office and that would be their entire thing right drove down for them to say register tried to write one tried to run another one a year went by urine almost two years went by i was out of money i made about thirty thousand dollars on burnin shirley i was living pretty chief but took me two years but i ran out of it my parents were loaning me money and all that same time during those two years my friends chris matheson ryan row and two other guys marks andros ski and anymore jaffe were doing improv at a theater on sunset that we write it rented for i think it was twenty bucks just to work out no audience just to work out and we we would just push each other and make other laugh but again never recording anything and one of the sketches we did was to guys who know nothing about history studying history chris was bill was ted just randomly there was a guy named bob actually there was rufus and there was a ted stat and chris and i just love doing the characters we just found him funny and sweet and there was something infectious so we were we would do those characters for year just on and off on and off on and off and then sort of at the end of the second year of being unemployed i was like hey man let's write something together which we and we said what did we did bill and ted is movie and we went for it and it just you know we do meet every day we know he was in grad school in san diego and so we talked on the phone a lot and then but once we decided let's write it as a movie we had two or three note sessions that was it and then we said let's just go and we we just blasted in a week we did an outline in three days in script handwritten script in four days we rewrote it over the sitting in a room together coffee shop down yeah and you just wrote it by hand we wrote a by hand and.

jaffe bob chris matheson ted san diego two years thirty thousand dollars three days four days
"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"I mean literally i think fifteen or twenty people it was a giant and i was at the opposite end he couldn't physically see me after this swear to god is true afterwards and i spoke a little bit but not too much afterwards when the thing was over i went up to him and i said it's really funny kerry last time that you won't remember this but i came up to you after a panel you gave and i wanted to tell you something and i said to you i used to work on laverne and shirley and he's like oh yeah yeah and then i said and what i wanted to say to you was i'm not working in tv anymore and he goes well you keep try again did you fight through it i tried to tell him i was on the panel with you but he but then other things happened and i was so that was my last words to gary unreal i know but i just want to we know that much time as we covered up even though i wanted to do this get into your story but i think it's all been very valuable for people i'm sure of it actually how do you retaliate take us through the bill and ted's things so you're you're you're on the vernon shirley you getting stuff on the air it's happening how do you come up with this idea to write a movie at the time it was a little more romantic to do film like film it's it's flipped now you know the the good work in the seventies and eighties was not in american tv it was in american film was like really amazing that's completely flipped i mean we're we're american film was then is where tv is now an ambiguous great work in both but you're totally right it's harder to do in film film now for the most part is unless you're working with a handful of people can dana tony it can still make a michael clayton but most people can't figure out how to get that done totally yeah but they're not being made you should see the list of you know scripts that i mean the types of jobs that are you know this i mean that are available to screenwriter certainly that are generated by studio and then you know talk about writers writing in a calculated way you know again if you're just breaking in right thing you're passionate about it's your voice that is going to get your script to be seen it's not the fact that you know what happens on this pitch of that page but in movies now they're basically anthems that you can sing along to but back then it was the place to go so i had written so i got delivered in shirley job and i got an agent and my agents were like get a write a spec script writer spectrum i thought well i'll get another job in tv but it didn't happen for me and it didn't happen because i was okay i wasn't great i was good i was fine but not good enough to move onto another show and i went oh no i suck maybe and i didn't i kinda scramble that didn't know it was really hard to write how many seasons did you do i just want season liver in shirley a while while my senior year of college and graduate college at the same time and then i didn't have much money in the bank because i had been paired with a partner on paper so that they could get two of us the price won't which by the way totally worth it for me to do without question sure a chance for me to you know get in produced credits on oh for network television show that was a huge hit oh yeah yeah it was it was really worth doing but it was really hard and i wasn't prepared professionally or emotionally and i didn't know who i was as a writer and a super blocked up and i tried to.

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Wanna i wanna do what he does i wanted like that too i wanna be i wanna make an album books gary wasn't yet on knows arson nineteen eighty so just re carson pre carson wow and an interesting i didn't tell this in the documentary and i sort of wish i have i think part of the problem with the what's planet what planet are you from movie which i worked a little bit on with gary was it should have been an albert brooks movie you know he should have focused at down in the way that he originally wanted to do like a little character movie as opposed to trying to make it big studio commercial film with it which was anyway but the point being gary is the guy who said to me if you wanna write you could be a writer and let's talk about why and gary said when i was your age and gary was thirty i was nineteen when i was your age i drove from tucson to phoenix to see george carlin i showed him a bunch of jokes i came back the next day george looked at the jokes he told me you know these are good these are what aren't good and i'm doing that for you is sort of the subtext of it and he the next year so we were jokes with him for a year two years three years but my senior year he introduced me to a guy named mark kin who was producing laverne and shirley and mark came to see a play that had written that was being performed at ucla comedy and he hired me on and shirley which was going from being funny in these sort of weird in your dorm room or writing jokes at your you know little typewriter on occasion while studying to sitting in rooms with really funny professionals gary there gary was not there now what season gary gary marshall no although he did direct an episode that i wrote that's that was the only time i met him and oh my god i it's funny thing okay so i'll i remember from that is me for some reason coming back early from lunch and being the only one in the in the writer's room and in the office and getting caught in the phone's ringing and i was like somebody normally picks up the phone but everyone's at lunch i get to hello and it's garry marshall i need someone down on set i need a joke i was like okay and i was one of the writers of this episode but has like okay what's the i don't remember what it was but he needed but gimmie three alz and and he tells me the setup and he hangs up and like okay so i wrote a bunch tried went down to the set and show runner wasn't there no every was gone it was lunch and they were blocking you it was like blocking day and something so i delivered some jokes and he liked one and i was like oh so then two years three years later no more than that the five years later don't ted was just being made and i went to go see gary marshall talk somewhere on a panel and afterwards i went up to him as one of the you know see people that goes up to people after their speakers yeah and what i wanted to say to him was hey man thank you for giving me this opportunity but what i got out was so i used to work on the vernon shirley he's like oh fantastic he didn't remember having met me or anything fantastic could you an i said and i'm not doing tv anymore i wanted to say working in movies i said i'm not doing tv anymore and any pats me on the head and goes we'll keep trying unsure that's the only other time you ever saw them until about ten years later i'm on a panel with him but it's a giant panelist the writers guild and it's a comedy right and you're a huge at this point this black minimum black could come out yeah so you had written at the time the biggest movie ever basically your second biggest movie ever it was certainly had its notoriety but now picture a panel that was a long day with and.

arson gary three years two years five years ten years
"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"A tv script back so i would read the scripts and you know he knew i was interested so i must have been interested in it and maybe i didn't give myself because the punchline is your the young i mean i know this from reading about you and stuff you you end up being the youngest writer and television on laverne and shirley as a kid so what so you sort of have this thought that you like this stuff did you love comedies did you'll have half hours comedies i love half hours i loved woody allen mel brooks all the money python i loved the idea of being a comedian joke writer and where'd you go to college ucla went wrote a bunch of jokes in high school for the high school variety show perform them went down to college on my eighteenth birthday my college roommate who was a guy had known since fourth grade says hey there's a comedy store in westwood that has open mic night tonight and i was like oh i'll go down and do that i went down i signed up i did a set the set went remarkably well it was two minutes and it was clueless well it was like i didn't know what i was walking into you crushed it crushed it by accident and the reason i know it was by accident is the week later i had about twenty friends from high school who are at ucla you gotta come see me at the comedy store i'm thinking i'm not going to school and becoming comedian they come the set i do the same set utterly tanks which is what it should sell it wasn't good enough honestly to have i just hit that lucky wave than the week before and i was well i'm never going to go back to the comedy store also as an eighteen year old thinking had remember me some al from the list of one hundred thirty comedians that were on doing open mic night that night i got scared out of it it was so painful and i was in barest i decided well i'm just going to fall back on something practical so i decided to study econ and be a business student that so that is a reaction of failure to one two minute failure yeah it was amazing yeah you really said yourself well that's that that's i'm not an artist i'm not just it hurts too much yeah i was like humiliating i knew it i knew it i'm not cut out for this i can't do this i don't have the talent sick yeah and then i'm going go be an economics major and i studied and i just did econ a year later a year you don't do anything for a year nothing a girl i had had a giant crush on in highschool never liked me back for two years i was like in love with her she is two years younger than me and she is now i guess she's a june she says senior and she's looking at ucla with their parents can i show around campus sure you're a sophomore i'm a.

two years one two minute eighteen year two minutes
"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Know i probably i might know better i'm gonna listen if the notes better i'll do it but if the note doesn't make it better we won't do it david i and then if you won't make it that's fine we'll move on it takes a while to get to a place where you view in note as an opportunity to assess whether you've actually hit your marker and that's right as opposed to a criticism yes and sometimes when they're they and then you have to train yourself that actually the one that makes you the most annoyed is the one you secretly knew you had to do until once you get there it's really easy ju jitsu to go oh shit i have to do that just to be really straightforward by like you know what we knew we should have done that and we're gonna i never knew in the room is the problem like whenever well sometimes i do but i i've also had enough of the experience where i think i know in the room and i react to get an i react immediately only to find that a week later i was wrong or i was wrong about what i was right about you know and and i've also found his this is different in film than tv especially in tv when your show was working and you're the captain of the ship in film as a writer and parenthetically if i were starting now i would not go into film at all i would not be a screenwriter i would go into television i go into theatre i'd write fiction i would not subject to myself too what i you know the screenwriters existence because you're not really a writer it's a similac rim of a writing process you're you're you're you're living like an artist but what you're creating but man by that what i mean is you are digging into yourself you're trying to make something really work you're put you're you're putting everything into it but what you're creating is essentially a series of suggestions for other people than do what they want with it's really not art what you're making at the end of the debt your art is your screenplay but nobody sees that sometimes i think sometimes sometimes but that again is like working with the right person you know or working with people that can putting wasn't bill and ted's and execution really close to what you guys hope to do it's funny at the time at i mean when i look back at it i i'm deeply grateful and i think my god we hit a much higher percentage of our intention than i ever would have expected but at the time it didn't feel like it at the time it felt like a series of compromises that we had to do to placate the studio or placate the you know various different people involved in the production and in hindsight would our version if we fought pervert certain things have been better i don't know i don't know it we we've you'd a more sort of raucous unpolished film but but what we got was a really lovely i mean the sweetness came through in a big way and i love the sweetness the tone yeah the voice yeah that actually is the thing that we that was preserved and was the most important thing of all so we're who were you that like when you guys wrote that how did it come to be first of all when did you i know you were like an artist of some sort where did you ever would you still st northern california massachusetts in northern california i still struggle with that conception i have to convince myself like dude you've been doing this your whole life it's literally been your only job you are a writer but i still feel like i'm a poser you know like like i'm writing because it was the only thing that i all my friends were they were actors or musicians they had talent and i when you were growing up in college when i was in high school i had really talented friends and i was like what can i do that would set me apart or maybe i'll be the right or the comedian now maybe that's like giving myself enough credit because prior to that i know i had written sketches and camp and i had written jokes and i you know my dad used to my dad worked for sylvania electronics company sometimes had visit film sets down in l a because like they were using a motorola product in dragnet or something so we bring.

david
"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"Is is a key determinant i think about how well how long you will last and what i mean by that is you should i do not mean bend over backwards to appease people i have made that mistake quite a few times again rooted and insecurity especially in earlier parts of my career i think if i look at the first half of my career i was i was spotted one of two ways and they were each on opposite ends of the spectrum but they were both bad one was that's stupid you know yeah you would say that i would i would say it with my manner and he'd gotten okay why like why do you think that that would kind of ruin that don't you like i was really defended and then i flipped the other side okay okay god damn it i kind of do that okay okay sure okay to to appease the person when i think you know the truth is i guess the the more the middle path i guess for lack of a better word is really the place to go which is to hear the notes to not react to recognize that when you get a note you feel so many things on a personal level that make it very hard to actually hear the actual note for what it is and so you've you notes as a an onslaught that you have to protect yourself from and you're protecting all these things that you don't even realize your sense of self worth your sense of was this even the right career and when you're early in it when you're first starting it's like i quit that job at starbucks and i you know i had four months to give 'em to write i had enough savings to pay rent for four months and now my script isn't working and you know that's a lot of real pressure but the further you go in your that feeling is still there that feeling of ulmer ability that feeling of exposure is still the best to yourself out there you you you've put the best of yourself out there and now it's not what you wanted it to be brings you to that moment of like you get in the read through or you get in when you get notes which is it's not what i expected it's not i'm not getting the respond and then you have to be able to go what do i listen to what do i not and how do we deal with i have to wait till i meant dispassionate about them so if i have to set them aside right for a couple of days i will hundred percent and then be able to just look at them as suggestions and thoughts this process with showtime has been his by far super far the best i've ever gone through the are smart and careful about their notes so it's a good process but i will say also trust you and they know that you enabling they know your goals are aligned at all it's all left to us to decide because you work we're making the exact same show yeah as they are so the notes all come from that place the movie note process more complicated way more and figuring out because some people can take ownership over their note at the in forgetting vacant forget what they're trying to serve and so it's very diffe i think it's i find it difficult i also think i'm more comfortable being an asshole if i have to be and i i never let because i because of the and i want to know how you came into it but because of the way that i started doing this where i was in my life the age i was and like you because the first movie had even though my first movie wasn't a hit it had a very big cultural impact i felt that a certain point you.

four months hundred percent
"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"I feel so horrified by by what i was unable to yeah exactly so a table read just for people who are listening is when you get the actors together and you read a script that's going to be shot and usually with enough time to make adjustments sometimes if that at pressure in that there are a movie people from the movies too who are potentially sitting in judgment so i love table reads because i'm as miserable as you movie table reads but the opportunity so that balance is an especially on our show the table reach are my favorite par event in the you know the preproduction period because the moment that everybody gathers all the people who are passionate about telling this story and who love each other are inner room and we're trying to look at this thing that's been written in the best light put it on its feet and then it gives you the chance to do this thing you're talking about which is to go wow you know some of that really did work man that section forty two minutes in doesn't i'm so glad no this is like i was what brought you saw what you might have heard is brian basically i me jumping up in my chair and brian seeing that going back that's what i mean by this this thing is what it is it's not what you wanted it to be and meditation has helped with those feelings of pain when it's not there living in not knowing which they've done studies that have shown that creative people in general have an easier time living in with uncertainty with uncertainty the brain is our weapon and it wants to solve problems so we can also spin out an anxiety with the uncertainty and hundred percent do both things yeah the and so wanting to solve problems quickly which is another big problem we have i think in terms of getting notes and and when there is something like a table need now you have you can view it as i find them painful but especially in movies because in movie in in tv shows it's different your here's a team everyone knows what process also you're the arbiter and you're the arbiter in movies actors don't perform when they read it table read and movies because they're saving it they know it's a you know months long process of you know a couple of pages day and they're not in they're still finding the characters they don't do the thing like you do in tv that they don't know their characters they don't i don't know why on earth the workshop plays which cost almost nothing to produce but you don't workshop a movie i mean unlimited yeah some some people did lament did it on every movie and it was making moves my favorite book ever about how to make movies and he talks he two weeks on every movie it's a great thing to be able to do but you just can't do anymore but that thing of viewing notes or in your case like getting having a table read and being able to go where are we here now objectively that thing on page forty two oh boy how you respond to that i think is one of the key delineating factors between whether you will have longevity or not and i'm not talking about professional necessarily like i eat especially in film you'll get fired if you say no you know if you say these notes are stupid but how you respond to criticism.

forty two minutes hundred percent two weeks
"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"I i am any real there's no relationship there's no way that i spend a minute in my time i'm not somebody who will go to dinner with people that i don't feel passionately about really i've organized my life in a way to never fake the funk really to the point of like having problems when i refused to to do stuff so i can't imagine writing something about which anymore about which i'm not passionate it starts curiosity and fascination i have to be fascinated i think you wanna agree i don't think it's the thing of right what you know writing what you know already who cares but when i walked into a poker club and my life i was so fascinated by these people and so passionate about what they were trying to do that i had a fucking teller story and it's the same thing about this or about the best movie i ever made solitary man that i wrote and directed i was furious with anger about something incredibly passionate about telling the story so i can't make it work without that feeling i can't get up to do this work i write every day regardless but i can't journaling and all that shit to keep myself in a state of flow but i have to have passion yeah are i can't do the work but wouldn't it sounds to me like you're saying i don't want to sit with people that i don't wanna be with i agree with you on that i don't want to write a story that i can't see myself writing i agree with that i will fight forever to get something made yeah we've been working for renault eleventh year trying to get this third bill and ted movie made for instance i've got a bunch of scripts that i've worked really really really hard on this long thing i just finished on spec it worked almost two years on it amazing right i'm i think you do have i mean i it might be a different definition because i think what you have passion for is the life that you're leading and the qualities that are important to you in that life you know it's it's hard to write every day it's hard to generate stuff it's hard to not feel horrible about it's not hard not to feel vulnerable it's hard to not feel insecure especially when i'm in a unit i've had a little bit of twitter interaction on on this a little bit which is especially when most of what happens is failure and i don't mean just professional course i don't mean like oh that movie didn't work or that show didn't get bought or though noone noone like that script i mean every day fit writing his failing failing consistent totally one hundred percent yeah and it's failure so how do you deal with that what do you what's your what's your formula for that well just to get up and write literally it's to write the next morning so the failure being i didn't succeed i didn't hit the target it but the path for me the intellectual engagement level has to be so high that that's i translate that engagement level into passion for me that level of engagement that will allow me to obsess right because you i have to obsess over it to make it work so that level of that level of crazy commitment when i'm editing and the episode eight out of ten people just put it out dave and i are the same in this though i will i will walk around in a funk for three days if i can't solve what's wrong in the thirty minute to forty minute mark of the episode if i can't and you know so so it's the love of this the love of the actors the love of of making the show is what enables me to give so much time and energy and obsessive nece to it the desire to tell the story so much and i'll say this on maybe it's not the do you not feel when you look back at your work something's feel more dead than other things some things didn't work i can look back and go like like i'm fucking i remember i was miserable writing that i didn't care right i could do it it's all the stuff i could do it intellectually i had some curiosity about it they paid me a lot of money we got the movie made but something was dead in me writing it and then i.

one hundred percent thirty minute forty minute three days two years
"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"The process so often i'll always right you'll write all the scenes the way dave and i split up the scenes how outlines then we write them but write them severally write them separately and then than each rewrite he'll put episode one together i'll put up to date however it works i'll do the first pass rewriting he'll do the first pass rewriting another one we've flipping back and forth but of course you have to go rewrite those scenes bunch of times before you even that you and then you look at the whole structure and sometimes you go fuck we i've done it a million times the thing doesn't work you said something about that i find fascinating because i view it differently which is used that it's not about what you're good at it's about what this given project needs and i've reached after the longtime in his career the opposite conclusion i'll only take the jobs i'll only right what i think i can be good at i think i have a set of skills a thing i know how to do a voice and i'm not that interested in compromising the voice i've the voice is what i basically think it's all that i have my point of view and my voice so writing hollywood jobs where your point of view is in in service became from me boring and work and i can't do it anymore so tell talk about that a little bit i'm going to violently agree with you traits because i completely disagree but i think we're saying exactly the same thing what i mean by that is i genuinely think that your voice and what you can bring to a project and what the project needs is all one activity i think that you assess the project and you go oh i can bring my to that that is the same as going oh this i see what this project needs i feel movement energy shirts of this thing i think that the process of a story and then your contribution to a store and your relationship to whoever is seeing the story the audience that you hold in mind in a certain way and i think there's a good way to hold ninety of mine in a really tragic death of deadly way to do it the the audience's experience of it they're all one fluid thing so when you're working on billions and you have an audience that knows the show and you feel hey this thing is flying right now i i would wager that you're less at risk of being off your mark then if and by the way when it's feels like it's flying that's always a good time it it doesn't mean it is working but it's always a better sign you know when you're hitting your head and it's not working again sometimes it means it's working but it often is a sign that you got to look at what's really wrong with it but i believe that that there is no platonic ideal of your story you're making your story up your doesn't exist in the world i don't believe the people that go well you know i just have to find the stone and cut away everything that's not the story i think that's selfindulgent bullshit michelangelo might have done it michelangelo also rewrote other sculptors actually david i believe if you believe the sarees life of the art then i don't entirely believe the story was it life of the lives of the artists whatever he wrote about michelangelo apparently some other person was chipping away at the stone trying to make a statue in michelangelo.

dave
"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"The last one you did and the assessment of that and the application of of wherever you are creatively at that moment to the assessment of what is the stories organic needs trying to tell you it it is that to me is is the dance for lack of a better word you know it's it's not we'll buy page seven this has to happen on page twenty two this asked to completely agree but then going into what you're talking about do you think it's different though in tv than in oran tv and movies are becoming one thing anyway but do you think it's different in long form like television or than it is from doing feature films in terms of that feeling of well it's flowing so maybe it's it's okay or you know i mean every episode has to be for dave and so every episode has to be great right for to us i have to love every episode if i don't find a way to love it i can't make it and i can't put him on television so that i we won't there are no scenes on our show where it's just two people vamping right it just doesn't work that way our show moves in a different way than that so here's the thing i so no i mean i can be in the middle of an episode right and feel like and then yes sometimes it's really useful often it's useful that's the thing because our gut is the thing that makes us good at this our taste and our gut is once you have the facility with words right the other thing is can you edit yourself can you recognize when it's the best work you do when it's not you do have to have the critical faculties they have to come in at some point in.

oran tv dave
"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

The Moment with Brian Koppelman

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on The Moment with Brian Koppelman

"The corner hey this is the moment i'm brian koppelman thanks for listening excited today a guy don't know well but for whom i've always had very fond feelings ed solomon is here he's one of the great screenwriters of of our generation of screenwriters a little older than me but we're essentially of the same generation screenwriters and got that in their little older a little bit we'll know because i remember dude i remember among ed's movies i mean current movies now the now you see me franchises is his but and mosaic with steven soderbergh he just didn't so he's very current an happening screenwriter but man i remember the girlfriend i had when i was just out of college and your first movie bill and ted's oh my god came out and so he wrote bill and ted's excellent adventure and the follow up but with chris matheson with chris matheson and then really a movie that's one of my most seen movies and really one of my favorite movies and one of the big movies of all time men in black oh thank you but i do remember i'd never been to a circle k and then right near where this my college girlfriend lived was circle k and you know you really put i don't know how did you know that that was going to be taghi kind of line with strength things are afoot at circle k no we didn't think anyone was even going to read the script let alone make the movie let alone that the movie would catch on and especially because at every stage my agents wouldn't send the thing out then it gets picked up by warner brothers they put it in turn around dealer renta's picks it up they don't know what to do with it they shelve it we think is going to go straight to video if anything they get rid of it someone else picks it up nelson entertainment they go bankrupt orion picks up now they're bankrupt but we never thought and then it came out and it was this serrated by critics it was trashed so badly i remember and i know good critics would even they would give it to their fourth string critics who would then just trash it so bad that they would sometimes like weeks later be trashing another movie and then go back and retrench bill and ted i remember when could've going what it was some friday the thirteenth movie jason takes manhattan and he's like here's a better idea jason takes bill and i was just like did that was came out alright alone man i mean i wanna go granular ly into the all this and what it felt like to go through all this the rejection and everything as it was getting shelved but four weeks later how could the critics have hurt you because by then the movie was a sensation but then the movie had landed well better than we expected with with people and then weirdly culturally it just it just stayed just grew it's amazing no one would shit on the movie now which is funny like i had this experience with rounders where a couple of critics who shot on rounders when it came out years later ten years later twelve years later in some review would compare some other work unfavourably to the great movie and i would and some thing david i wrote they would then say like you know a far cry from their glory days of the great rounders and i'd be like dude you fucking hated i'll show you your it's crazy and you got to discipline yourself not to care but you were saying something right before we went on on my exhibit where you are now and i think it's great inspiring thing which is you said i'm fifty i'm fifty seventy seven years old i'm fifty to five years so i use it and i just you can't really see this but i look way better than brian even though i'm a lot older the first of all the pink shorts so you have that salmon these shorts and these these shoes are not as patrols there they're yellow all birt's you have to just picture that i also came over in the rain so it's fine no you really do look better than than i look and.

brian koppelman ed solomon fifty seventy seven years twelve years five years four weeks ten years
Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter sign on for third Bill and Ted film

Gallant at Night

00:59 sec | 3 years ago

Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter sign on for third Bill and Ted film

"So you guys remember that well today this happened the third installment of the bill and ted franchise will be titled bill and ted face the music according to the film's cast and creative team feeling ted three has a title a director and a most excellent photo appeared first on digital trends winter and reeves reunited with screenwriters chris matheson and ed solomon who penned the first two films according to winter the film has even more for fans to we went out and found a director revealed winter gene perez who we love heated galaxy quest which is a masterpiece yeah way bro no way no yeah i don't know what it's going to be about man it's going to be in the future obviously wild stallion was their band you think there may be superstars and if you're wondering is rufus played by carleen.

Director Ted Franchise TED Reeves Chris Matheson Ed Solomon Rufus
"ed solomon" Discussed on Mohr Stories With Jay Mohr

Mohr Stories With Jay Mohr

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on Mohr Stories With Jay Mohr

"No i will data a frana character doesn't get killed i have a lot of acting to do that of course my radio a witty we went met in berlin where he was shooting a movie and great meeting with witty and when i brought up the the meeting about um maybe eight months later on sat i had no but we have formed the berlin meeting in all i loved what he is ready to it'll moving in berlin and you were like a meeting i had in those two months i was there i i can actually see that just like maybe yeah i think it might have happened and all the things in that weird fever dream that was berlin and military my import of all imports to you on him it was like tuesday don't forget it it's kind of my coming for twenty minutes you all i talked to assure like whatever was moe he did with ben foster where they notified families of deceased military oh i don't know he was nominated that that over the cory yeah coral that bloom that was no more bullshit like this guy is absolutely fantastic wasn't ukraine three billboards yes oh my god yes that was my favorite movie of the year so far that movie was unbelievable to me this one i love rising fresh this surprised dislike the first since he was on cheers reelect who the hell is this guy yeah you placed coach i i i in verse met witty back then in cheers i was going to rewrite a movie actually way back then it was ninety one me so ninety one ninety two i was going to rewrite a movie it was not i don't know something ram then and where he was attached to be in it and so the producer brought me to meet him we went to dinner we really hit it off i really liked him we talked for while we laughed i had just bought a new crummy first fancy car had a three hundred zx a nissan right out of war the analyst kind of a it was a penis car.

producer nissan berlin fever ben foster ukraine analyst twenty minutes eight months two months
"ed solomon" Discussed on Mohr Stories With Jay Mohr

Mohr Stories With Jay Mohr

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on Mohr Stories With Jay Mohr

"Team who worked with him but but add had the first the original idea and rebel as in and then the two of them to the draft and i worked on it from for a long time and i hope i'm proud of the first nicy me movie and feel like i really contributed to it in a a lot of that working there is mine in it's a real collaboration with bottom edge lotta motion but on the so on the second movie we actually had something that was going to be i think could have been improvement on the first movie but in this is my my bag i mean ultimately this does fall on me it was too long and we talked about riding in a meter like a sign it so to speak i broke the the form actually and that came back to haunt us a year later when you have you wrote movie eight is on page one fifty and they weren't in water yet i said what would i wrote was not really the garments i wrote a non literary bad version of by wrote just i wrote yeah i'm gonna take your dog here if you i think the the flawed the paradigm is flying across the globe to meet with individual actors to let them know like you're cool yours it's like the on a fucking plan right like rob lowe west wing just be on a play by so it's a guy like everybody's still friends like cracked by so it's i give you got a to prague to get mark ruffalo to like mark like you're the best actor on earth like just let's play it's me it said it's a phone call i think i i don't think you need the frequent flier miles at one i think that was the failure of of construct i think you know what happens when you eat you've got a studio had to come ziemia osorio.

mark ruffalo rob lowe prague
"ed solomon" Discussed on Mohr Stories With Jay Mohr

Mohr Stories With Jay Mohr

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on Mohr Stories With Jay Mohr

"I will make you roll meaningful and talk to them about what the part was what the arch of character was what was gonna and why on a character level it was worth doing second one okay so based on my word to them you know committed if you know the the committed to do the movie and then is set to write the script well it's such a big test and a great cast but when you've got seven really legit good actors to i'll say service but i don't mean that in a condescending right i mean to like real front man to yet to give like real legit roles to yell like everyone's lead on this idea yet you've got a really right meaningful roles in so then i ended up with a script that was too long and this is where it's my fault i had the script is like one hundred thirty page authority page it so then and then when we tried to trim it the actors who like hey man in legitimately you promised now my part is like sketchy small and be like no they have a good point and we tried really hard to bring as tight as possible we ended up with movie that was at the end of the day too long and so and it was a much better movie than the first movie in terms of was a better written movie and it was a better structured film it was actually a better movie in israel both so i mean that's fascinating here well i came on to rewrite the first one and worked for a long time on it the first movie the premise was great which wasn't mine the premise was at right court first ryder magician handle highest it's like oh man it was it was a brilliant premise of the brilliant cast and like of everything that i thought was great in that first smoothie um i think it's routes can be traced to the original writer at edward right a bull as yet.

writer israel edward
"ed solomon" Discussed on Mohr Stories With Jay Mohr

Mohr Stories With Jay Mohr

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"ed solomon" Discussed on Mohr Stories With Jay Mohr

"A there's three four credited writers on the inlaws wherever you in the pro i mean not the final writer and i have a handful those were not fund writer that's one of the things that is and it's a cross i'm going to bear for the rest of my life now that the enlisted english which i like i just sitting with you this law uh i i know you on the classic agency type muscular low to the ground it i probably give the reverend's that i do more so it's you know went it's it's the i i can't stand the fact that there's probably five or six things that have my name on him that i didn't really right you know that i wrote the draft or to draft so i have a credit on and it's the strangest thing to go through the world having some say princeton to the inlaws is a movie wear when i came onto to do the rewrite of it there was called till death do us part and i said as a good idea why i said to the to the people i said you know there's something about this very similar to the movie the in laws which i'm sure you guys know and they said an hour and he's had no no they said they said oh no no we had the rights to be in lot so it's not going to be a problem were and i was like okay and so i was working on a movie called to death was part as a rewrite and then i was working with a director on it on a different director who ended up me than the guy who making the film and then a new director came on a director name in beef fleming andrew fleming i think and you know took the script into to rewrite and it's like which is his prerogative in which unfortunately is one of the things that just happens in screenwriting all the time unless you the director and much are this ad yeah and much of the direct and fence and that's happened quite a few times were director has done a rewrite um.

writer princeton director andrew fleming