5 Burst results for "Ed Shriver"

"ed shriver" Discussed on The No B******t Marketing Podcast

The No B******t Marketing Podcast

14:01 min | 1 year ago

"ed shriver" Discussed on The No B******t Marketing Podcast

"A works is a different type of architectural firm and then it's architectural and engineering and it's been recognized as such and it also has something called the triple bottom line and that is actually even tied to your logo. Tell us the story about those two so You know culture what the business business stands for to me is is as important as what the business does And so we were you know we started off. It didn't happen right away. You know I call the first couple of years in business. You know. There's there's survival just kind of like a just get down and get dirty and get into the game and the fight your way through it to establish yourself so the first couple of years. I was really focused on your clients. Gate clients get work and of course two thousand thousand eight nine you. Everybody knows what happened. Then I'm thinking Oh man you know but it turns out to be a blessing in disguise. You know I'm willing to go where the work is his work harder than a guy can make that kind of commitment so that taught me a lot in his first couple of years. That was the focus but as we started establish ourselves shelves and hire people and and start to scale You Know I. It became apparent to me not by my own recognition by people who work for the company. Some of which to work to the company this day that that the organization has to stand for something if we need to have some some kind of identity beyond just what it is we provide and so I go to work. That's what I do. I you know when people come up with good ideas and my staff had the best ideas when I go to work and trying to find what those i. What what? What's out there so as I started researching that in and I did a series of Personal Vision Vision visiting exercisers internally. It's a company Where this this came to light in this idea of of the of the company haven't identity In my research I discovered triple bottom line. Companies triple bottom line businesses and companies. That are not just for profit but therefore good And so as I started researching that and and trying to get some scholarship on that on that subject y'All would engage with my staff staff. We started going through some training And and just so happened at that time in two thousand twelve June fourth twenty twelve days. Act The it was a day that the company was like the worst day professionally I've ever had where the company financially kind of flipped. There are a lot of things going on. I was aware of And you know that day which I could remember my counters. Constant reminder was is the most evident to me of how valuable that culture is. How valuable what you stand for is Ask compared to what you provide and and I had not addressed it. I was doing some research around it but like it was not full force forced so after that day and months ahead I worked my ass off to make sure that we didn't lose the business and I wouldn't disappoint so many people and and people who are working hard the company I got rid of those people in the company to be blunt who were contributors to the kind of chaos that was doing and but most importantly I worked on my shelf and worked on what it is that you know my role is and and what it has I should be doing As a CEO of the company. And I made a pledge to my staff then that I keep to this day which is is that I will always own the culture and by that. I mean that I'm responsible for that. So if you find yourself working in an environment eighty works ichard are proud of. I need to know that we need to discuss it. I may not agree with it Yeah people do come and go not everybody's fit for companies. They started working couple years. Maybe they're not the right. Yeah but we're going to have an honest conversation and at the end of the day. If if it's wrong I own it. And if it's right I you know. And I'm looking at not looking to shed dad or give that to somebody or delegate that and I think every CEO of any company founder everybody everybody runs companies. Owns that culture as not something. You can delegate you know when you realize something's Amiss and you go. Oh look what I've created because that's what I've gone through multiple jobs and wealth right now is ego. Oh I've created this trae as she with communication because I it was signaling that somehow unintentionally and so you you're right we have to own it. Petros near fatigue. Host knows how to capitalize on Amazon Amazon retail arbitrage. So much that he started Grenada. An ECOMMERCE retailer and brand management consulting company. I loved a challenge. My guest is to think of a time when they were the be Esser in here what they did to change their ways and learn from it. Listen in Petro's talks about how he had to fight ideas of grander under to recalibrate and now down his process now it is an obvious marking show. So I do have to ask you the one question. Is You know when were. Are you abuser when you were either. The difficult employees the tough boss the the tough strategic partner slash vendor when was your leadership or communication may be lacking taking. What did you learn from it? How'd you fix what you learn from it so this is sort of an ongoing process? I feel like I'm so early in the process. I've listened to some of your other guests in there. They've been been doing this for so long. They just for me. It's very recent you know it's when I first started my company. I had this these ideas of grandeur you know it it almost became a vanity project more than business at first because I was so proud of it and I wanted everyone to see it and I wanted to grow so fast and what I didn't do at first is focused on the the actual products in the service and the reason the customers would hire me in the first place and I got myself in a little trouble because I ended up being a pretty good salesman ellesmere but not the process in place to sort of back up selling so I've really spent the last few months nailing down his processes to make sure that the those mistakes happening happening in good good now another thing I always ask is it is about leadership and communication so talk a little bit about your leadership style in how you like to communicate best. Sure so I don't have to be the leader necessarily for my business which I am. I have to be leadership on a lot of these projects as well. Because I'm on the subject matter expert on this so I have to make sure to get buy in from the important people in the business that I'm trying to help if if the people that make the decisions aren't in you know they don't have the same goals to match the vision that I'm trying to create for them. It falls apart quick. Nick so what I have to do is make sure that I communicate exactly what I see as as the solution and make sure that everyone is on board with that and more specifically on board word with how long it might take to get there because sometimes you have to sacrifice your short term goals to reach your one year five year goals that you wonder each so that that that's the leadership that I try to take. How do you effectively communicate with others? That's the question Vista Chair. Clyde horner answered answered during his episode of the NO BS marketing show in this clip. He talks about the tactics that led to his communication success. You talk about the other side talk about some of your biggest communication success is what are things that you used over the years again and again maybe it was the cadence or frequency of how you communicate maybe it was the format of as a certain style of meeting. What were the things you've talked about the walking around at that one job out changed the game for you just by walking around and talking to people a couple of days a week? What are your most successful communication approaches? You come in the fist. `Age of arena. I've I've I've come to. I know several people that have a conversation model. Susan Scott in two thousand or so wrote a book called fierce conversations conversations. That helped me develop a lot of conversation around started how to end it and Edgar Papke. Okay who is one of my closest friends who's of issued speaker has a conversation Mardell. Also that I'm really encouraging gene members to use an myself and it's a real challenge because I have to stay with the model and it's very easy to get away from it. It starts with an intention statement in. That's the her intentions is. Why are we sitting here or standing here talking to each? Gather most of the time. When we started conversation we go busting into? Somebody's officer our home with our spouse and say we got a problem. We've got to sit down and talk about this right so now scarce the other person to death will go up. Big Guns come out and We don't talk about anything and Edgar has helped may realize that every conversation or import underpaid conversation needs to start off with an intention statement which is a relationship when ships statement about. I'd like to spend the next thirty minutes a having a conversation with you. So when we leave mm-hmm we you and I in our employees or customers or clients can function at the highest level possible or the highest level. Cuiv ever functioned before and just get permission. Can we do that. And most people will say yes and a and then I start off with my view of the world or whatever's going on and share my concerns and fears and then I asked the person sitting across from me to do this and I don't interrupt them asked him not interrupt me then we can after we tell each other. What's really going on and how we see things we can come to some shared understandings endings and just one or two and then after we do that we can come up with one or two solutions and then after that we come up with? Who's GonNa do what the commitments from myself and the commitment from the other person and finally we agree agree to come back next week or two weeks from now and test our new agreements are and I've found that that's the only way to have conversations? There's something different about strata architecture. And it's a credit to the culture they've created and cultivated listening as ED shriver. A founding partner of the firm talks about their philosophy and how strategic planning retreat gave him clarity on their mission. Tell the culture that this is not a cookie cutter a volume based architectural firm. Yeah I think that's true and thank you. I'm I'm glad that shows they're sort of maybe three silos one. Is the cookie cutter repetitious. Make money thinks you know McDonald's. When when she got McDonald's down you can make a lot of money? Doing McDonald's on the other end of the spectrum is the architect who doesn't really care care what the client thinks it's their project and they own it and honest to God. I have heard architects. A A. He hired me to do the job. Now get the hell out of the way. And I'll design had and that's the other end of the spectrum mostly because they don't get a lot of repeat clients but that's the other side we're more in the middle. I feel strongly that Strada is not so much. A design firm as it is a creative firm that we looked to resolve those issues issues in the most creative way possible to meet all the requirements that we had strategic planning retreat last week and the example I used. His Ideo is a creative design firm. It's not so much about what these iphones look like. It's the fact that there was no conception of this until I. Do conceived of it. That's what I think. Stratas is that what kind of combination of technical and artistic and practical and budget all together are. How do you make all of those pieces work? It's just beautiful and is not code compliant. Doesn't matter where you can't afford it doesn't matter so I think the Keith at least for for me and for strike and the penny okasan creative that's a lesson. Lisa Rios CEO. Of the Audi I group and Vista Chair Chair learned early on in her career the totter the importance of discipline and attention to detail. Find the penny in her episode coach. Also talks about buying into a mission. And why it's okay to make mistakes and.

CEO McDonald Edgar Papke Amazon Amazon Audi Grenada Susan Scott Esser Petro partner Stratas Clyde horner Lisa Rios Nick founding partner ED shriver
"ed shriver" Discussed on The No B******t Marketing Podcast

The No B******t Marketing Podcast

10:06 min | 2 years ago

"ed shriver" Discussed on The No B******t Marketing Podcast

"I had in mind was Walt Disney Imagineering because Disney Imagineering was built out of basically set designers and lighting technicians and people like that, and Walt Disney started putting those people together to create his own design firm, but it wasn't all bunch architects. It was a whole bunch of different design talents together, and he would throw out some new concept. I think we ought to do a show around pirates of the Carribean and then. A bunch of them. Sit down and figure out. What's the story? You know what's the set to support the story? How do we create the lighting? How do we create the sound effects? How do we do all of that? All of these people are in the same design firm effectively, and then they go out and they build it. And that's my idea of what strategy would be doing a sitting down with experts. We have architects, we have interior designers landscape architects. We have exhibit design. We have graphic design. We have a whole bunch of different expertise in the firm. We really liked to find Polly, mass people who have multiple interests in different areas, because those kinds of people are curious, their creative. They're constantly seeing things from different perspectives. And that's the. Kind of people, we wanted Strada is the kind of people who they're interested in architecture, but they might also be training dogs for the blind, or they're learning statistics online at Ed X that kind of curiosity and interests are the kinds of talents that we want to pull together. You can see your passion come out when you talk about Imagineering and design with people in mind, and how they're tied together. You've done some work with Disney in the past and you're doing more now. Well, we're still finishing up the Japanese project right now. We've we've submitted our portfolio to the contracting folks to see we can be put on the approved architect list. So we'll see how the goes, but certainly like to do more there. It's exciting to have you with Disney now and do some rapid fire. When to go back to those three examples that I gave. To start the show. That's Trotta worked on here in Pittsburgh. And I want you just take a few seconds and just tell us the one thing that you remember that's a memorable part of that project, and we'll start first with market square place in downtown Pittsburgh today, that project was the g c Murphy buildings because it's actually seven buildings was the crux of the problem in Pittsburgh, when Tom Murphy, was the mayor and the fifth and Forbes Michael's work on the master plan. Nobody could figure out what to do with that. The Preservationists wanted the building saved, but the developers wanted a tour down. And so that was basically the hang up for g c Murphy for years and client of ours, milk craft finally stepped up and decided to take a shot at it. And our her member, the first meeting the kickoff meeting, and it was in our conference room. There were ten or twelve people and client said, okay, you know, we're gonna kick this thing off. Our plan is to tear the building down. And here's what we want to do. And I said, you can't do that. The Preservationists just crucify haven't you been watching? You've been watching the news for the last three years. I said, it'll never happen. And we had a thirty forty five minute heated discussion about tearing down versus not tearing it down. And finally, Jack by the president of the company said, okay, fine. We won't tear it down. But remember, this is your idea. And so we worked out a way to interconnect seven different buildings and their CFO. Brian Walker worked out of way to make it work economically, there's creativity to Brian would work great in Strada, but anyway, so we created a project that is both economically feasible, it is lead gold level and a historic tax credit project all that without tearing the building down. That's a success are. Let's go to advanced technologies in Pittsburgh. What he remember most about that project. It was the most creative challenge. I can remember as a project not because it was a hard program or anything. But the schedule was. Tight the, the program was constantly evolving. Because when you're doing research, you're trying to guess two years ahead. What kinds of construction you need to do, but the rate of change is so fast that you're tearing out stuff before the painter is because somebody's got a better idea. And things were just volving people were coming go. And from the, the crew it was my most challenging project manager management project. I think it's beautiful. I like it a lot. I just love working with Mark people. You get to work with two hundred PHD's and robotics people. And it's gonna be fun to nother success and the third. One was the north shore place, nor sure place is one of our longest running projects. We actually when they tore down three rivers stadium and opened that whole space. The city put out. Out a request for developers to develop that space in between it and continental real estate was selected to be the master developer in conjunction with both the pirates and the Steelers and so- continental decided that for their first project, they would do a design competition, and they picked, I think six firms actually initially they picked five firms than they added us. We were already working with continental on smaller another smaller project. And somebody said, well, maybe Strada, we gotta give them a shot. So we took that on designed what is now the equitable building. Well, I call it the equitable building now. It's the insurance company over there. But we designed that the third hand report about the, the selection process was that all of the continental real estate, all continental people got together after having all looked at the, the submit. From the Sixers so firms and continentals. I guess he's president or chairman from Frank Cass and his son, flew in from Columbus, as part of this decision, and Frank's son came in and before everybody's even set down, yet, he walks in, and he says, well, if anybody doesn't think stratas the only choice, the year an ass and then he sat down and everyone's looking at each other going well, that was a short meeting. So we got picked and since then we've built everything between the stadiums, except the Hyatt place hotel. What's that like to as part of the architectural from the drove that so anytime you go to the north shore anytime you're in market square is got to be a sense of pride? Yeah. It's great to look around the city and realized, you know, we did that we did that we did that my wife's a tax accountant, and she always tells me that she really envies the fact that I can point things and people can see what, what I do. She's I never get the show anybody their tax return. So it's a great profession. It's a great pleasure to see things get built to be able to point those things out. And there is, of course, the downside, which is when people all look at it and say, I not very good. But it goes with the wow, that's great. You know, sort of washes out it, what's a tool that you could tell our audience that you use on a daily weekday quarterly basis to increase productivity, improved communication or help with your leadership. I don't know that I have any tools in particular, the leadership skills, I learned I learned in, in the army, and it's basically take care of your people, and they'll take care of you. And I think that it's really important that you're always teaching you're always mentoring, but you're also always protecting the people that work with you. And they respect that, that some Nobis words to live by it was there, anything you thought I'd asked you, that I didn't or any last comments you'd like to make. No, I really haven't thought about what you were going to let you. We're gonna ask. No, I don't have anything there. And I think. I've talked enough will, thanks.

Strada Pittsburgh Disney Walt Disney Imagineering Walt Disney Carribean president g c Murphy project manager Brian Walker Polly Frank Cass Trotta Nobis rivers stadium CFO Tom Murphy Steelers Jack
"ed shriver" Discussed on The No B******t Marketing Podcast

The No B******t Marketing Podcast

16:15 min | 2 years ago

"ed shriver" Discussed on The No B******t Marketing Podcast

"Marketing firm today, we have part two of my conversation with Ed Shriver, one of the founding partners of Strada architectural firm in the first episode Ed talked about why he chose architecture and how his experience in the military helped shaped his leadership style in this particular part of the episode, he delves into how working with Disney impacted him and how he was able to help Disney, and how he and the partners of Strada have infused their own culture and involved over time and how they focus on design with people in mind, hope you enjoy it. Then you get back to the United States New come back to Pittsburgh. Yeah, I came back to Pittsburgh. Couple of friends were either still hang. Around here or or when they heard I was back. They came back. And so I found a job with the little architecture firm that hated. Lasted about two months and I got another job with a bigger firm JSA, and I spent twenty years there and my best friend who inspired me to go into the army. He took my job with little architecture. And then a few years later when that firm folded he came to work at JSA as well. So, so we literally kind of our whole career was like that. But the twenty years at JSA any management and leadership positions there. Yeah. Probably the last eight or ten years were management positions beyond just project management that I, I was operations for longtime. I worked under the directly under the I guess he would be the CFO Tom Schmidt. He was my mentor. So Tom taught me what I hadn't learned in the army, but how how being an architect really worked, and he was great. He was great. I remember a story, I was the project architect for the renovation of the monroeville mall, and we were taking the ice skating rink out of monroeville mon- turning it in. To food court, and I was the project manager and the president of the company was the principal in charge of the project, and I had done all the drawings most of the design work. I did the budgeting, I did almost everything went out to bids and the day that the bids were due Jim Johnson. The president of the company was on vacation in Florida, so he called. Tom and said, would you go with Edward to the bid openings about? So we went out together. I think we had five contractors bid on the project and the average of the five projects was exactly my estimate, which is unheard of absolutely dumb luck. I did no credit for being a great estimator. It was it was probabilistic dumb luck. But after we finished as we're driving back to the office. He says, let's go have a beer, so. He stopped off somewhere in green tree, and had probably ten beers. At one point in the discussion, Tom said, so where do you want your career to go? What do you want to do? And I said, I want your job. And he said, great. That's what I'm looking for. So he became my mentor, and we worked together until yet heart attack live nother six or eight years after that, but he retired after the heart attack and. There was a great relationship. I learned an awful lot from Tom and still think about him a lot mentor is a huge part of all of our lives. Some glad you had the chance to talk about that we've learned a couple of things about Ed Shriver of Strada architects, that when the going gets tough drink beer to make decisions. That's how you ended up in the army. That's how you end up celebrating this great estimate, and then becoming the number two with your mentor. When do you realize the entrepreneurial spirit kicks in that it's time for you to start your own thing? I think it was drinking again. Well, I was part of the AA American Institute of architects, Pittsburgh chapter. I was on the board of the chapter at that time you were the founder, though too well, right. Yes of Strada not AI. Okay. All right now, I'm not that old. So I'm on the board of the a and Alkatiri was also on the board. We know our neighbors, and John Martine was on the board and other one partners. And Michael stern was not on the board. But Michael was a consultant to the chapter on a project we had been working on. So I knew all those guys and I came home after a board meeting and I got a voicemail is back before emails voicemail from the. The president of j they knew president who I did not like in did not have any respect for. But it was a voice mail saying that we, he had just hired a new marketing director for the company and the guy that they had hired name was Tony poli. Well, Tony Pola was Alkatiri partner up until the moment. I heard the had left. He didn't even talk to Allah's completely caught off go. And so, I called the executive director, the, the chapter because in and our good friends, and I said, what the hell do I do with this? I mean, you know, and of course we had been drinking. Yes. Always good to get a second opinion. When you've been drinking Lloyd, I know L del kick. This guy's ass made them. Well it, it got ugly. But, you know, so all of a sudden, there was this little explosion in the architectural community and so shortly thereafter, I got fed up with the JSA dick, and I said, I'm outta here and Al at that point was short a partner by about maybe a month. So when I quit, I didn't quit to go to work with ou-. But when I quit, I had kind of this idea of a firm made of the four of us. And so, I reached out to all of them, and I said, why don't we sit down and talk for a little while? I have this idea about a new firm that I think would be good for all of us. And we got the other head more drinking and kind of hashed out the idea of Strada it so important when you have a company to build the culture, and so you went out to find people at like-minded values and you found the four of you, and that kind of drove the beginning of Strada talk a little bit about how that culture began. And then how it's evolved to where it is today. I think that similar culture is import values are important. But I also think that different perspectives are important. You don't want a firm full of yes, men or people who all think exactly alike, but you do need the same values. And so our thoughts around, what Strada could be was that with these four different perspectives. John John Martine, who is award winning architectural designer John's a great guy. And he's in my mind. Best architect going certainly the best architect, I've ever worked with as a designer Michael was is still outstanding urban designer and landscape architect. Michael went to Harvard. He taught it university of Virginia. He was the project. Manager for the city of Pittsburgh when they redid the entire downtown master-plan. So he managed that whole process. That's the process that put the stadiums where they are. Now it identified the fifth and Forbes corridor as a target that was critical to fix market square. That's all done through Strada note. This was before strana. Okay. That was what Michael had with the city and then Alan, I both had strong practice experience, we knew how to be architects, and do that. Well and such though is a good. It was a good mix and values were there. We wanted to make a difference. We were strongly focused on urban design and city planning, and that kind of thing we weren't interested in doing McDonald's or Ryan homes or things like that. We wanted to work downtown. We wanted to make a difference. That was a period. It wish there were several development, schemes floated about the fifth, and Forbes corridor. And, you know, they were bulldozing sections of downtown and proposals like that. And we were looking at that gun, we could do better than this, both we in the four of us. And as a city, we can do better than this. So those were the kinds of discussions that sort of brought us together. So in in architecture with marketing will we can make fun of when there's lousy marketers? They do like bullshit marketing do lousy creative. They. Do stuff that's just garbage. Okay. Do that, too. But it doesn't doesn't really hurt the world much. I guess other than bad social media. Bad billboards bad messaging. But when there's architects that are compromising the values it impacts a city a region. Talk about that a little bit it does. But it's hard to judge a design if you're not on the inside, you don't know what the budgets are. You don't know what the program is. You don't know what the client's vision was in a weaken. Do phenomenal sculpture. But we can't do buildings until we have a client, who's got a program that wants that we can then solve those problems. But if the building cost ten million dollars and the client can't afford it, then it doesn't matter how pretty it is. And we can challenge the client, we can push them to try to make things better. But in less you. You understand all of those elements. It's hard to judge another architects, work. You know, you can look at the really nice ones and say, wow, that's you know, the Guggenheim wow, that's great. That's very cool. Building probably cost today's dollars twenty five hundred dollars a square foot. Most buildings cost honored and fifty dollars a square foot. Guggenheim's got money. They can do that, that being said, though, I think, philosophically, you're probably being humble, and politically, correct. Because philosophically, you can tell the difference between architects, and I've worked as a company or companies worked with a number of architects in other jobs. I was responsible for some building expansion. I've worked with architects, and there are some that have a philosophy that's a little bit more volume oriented and margin oriented. And when you walk into Strada you can tell the culture and everyone on our team has said this that when you first walk into Strada, you can tell the culture that this is not a cookie cutter a volume based. Architectural firm. Yeah. I think that's true. And thank you. I'm glad that shows, there's sort of maybe three silos one is the cookie cutter repetitious make money things. You know McDonald's when she got McDonald's down, you can make a lot of money doing McDonald's on the other end of the spectrum is the architect, who doesn't really care what the client thinks it's their project, and they own it, and honest to God, I have heard architects say he hired me to do the job. Now get the hell out of the way and I'll design it. And that's the other end of the spectrum mostly because they don't get a lot of repeat clients, but. That's the other side we're more in the middle. I feel strongly that Strada is not so much a design firm, as it is a creative firm that we looked to resolve those issues in the most creative way possible to meet all of the requirements that we had strategic planning retreat last week. And the example, used his idea is a creative design firm. It's not so much about what these iphones look like. It's the fact that there was no conception of this intil Ideo conceived of it. That's what I think, stratas is that kind of combination of technical and artistic and practical and budget all together. How do you make all of those pieces work? It's just. Beautiful and has not code compliant doesn't matter where you can't afford it doesn't matter. So I think the key at least for for me and for stratas focus on creativity. Your big idea is designed with people in mind, and I think you are alluding to that. But talk a little bit more about how design with people in mine resonates with you and your clients and your clients clients. Yeah. That we, we started the firm with that whole concept at that point. We were calling places for people, but it is where we start in the creative process. It's not sculpture. It's not music is it's people places. That's what drives us. That's what we're interested in. I'm fascinated with the whole concept of neuroscience how the brain perceives space, and how space affects our brains. Winston Churchill's great line that we shape, our buildings than they shape us. And that's absolutely true what we don't really understand is how that happens. And so we're working with Disney down at Epcot on expansion to the Japanese pavilion, and it's fascinating to me, how Disney designs their parks because they are so good at creating space that affects people, you know, that makes you feel this way or that way, and how they do that is really fascinating. It's, it's more set design than it is architecture. But when you work with them, you find out how hard it is to make the architecture to support the set design to create the effect. And it's been a real education as. To the neuroscience of architecture talk a little bit about your work with Disney specifically Disney's philosophy of a magic nearing when we started Strada, one of the examples that.

Strada Tom Schmidt Disney Michael stern Pittsburgh army partner Ed Shriver president JSA John John Martine McDonald Strada architects United States project architect CFO AA American Institute of archi monroeville mall
"ed shriver" Discussed on The No B******t Marketing Podcast

The No B******t Marketing Podcast

14:40 min | 2 years ago

"ed shriver" Discussed on The No B******t Marketing Podcast

"Ed has a alum stress career. He's helped change at Pittsburgh with many of the cool looks of the buildings that he and straw have been involved in some of the recent ones that we're gonna talk about today is market square place in downtown Pittsburgh. Uber. Vance technologies. Also in Pittsburgh, and north shore place where there's a burger Tori, that I hit every chance I get those are just the three that I like so we'll talk about plenty more from Ed Ed Traver, welcome to the show. Thank you. Ed, you and I talked before the show. And I said, I always start with that. First question that gets you to really talk about leadership and communication, and your career path your journey. Let us hear it from the beginning. All right. Well, graduated from Carnegie Mellon. Alan with a degree in architecture in dotted yet today, having d six I house trying to help you out Goodyear. Seventy six centennial year. Got a job with a small architectural firm. He was actually quite a trendsetter. He was one of the first architects to design and build his own designs. So he would build houses, and small offices design them, and then he would be the as well. So he'd build them, now, we call that design build, but back then, Joel was way ahead of the curve mos- name of the firm, Joel chronic architects, and he hired me. You're right out of school to be a construction foreman. So he was building a an expensive house over shady side and renovating a warehouse in east Oakland into office space. And I was running both of those projects us both of those construction projects. And it was quite a challenge. For eighteen year old kid coming out of college to be telling a bunch of thirty forty year old construction workers do this don't do that. And they would just look at you and say the hell are you. What do you know? And I was I was working like a dog and ended up one day when I got on the phone to call the suppliers, because I need more drywall and I called the guy up and I said, I need drywall truck loaded. Drywall can you get it here tomorrow? In the guy said you do realize tomorrow's the fourth of July. Right. And I said, oh, no. I didn't. I would just completely lost track of what time it was what day it was. I was just completely absorbed with the job and my best friend at the time classmate of mine had just signed up to go into the army, because he had to pay off his college loans. My parents, God bless them paid the whole ticket for me to go to see him you and Ray went into the army to pay off his students, and I was sitting there realizing tomorrow is the fourth of July, and I didn't know that I'm thinking I gotta get to. I gotta do something else for a while. I'm not even sure I want to be an architect. And so I joined the army and fortunately for me it was right at the tail end of the at Phnom. So they weren't sending new people over to Vietnam. But there were. Still people coming out of it. And I went in as a combat engineer to blow things up and my ultimate goal was to be a green beret. So I went to school for demolition. Combat engineers that I went to Fort Benning for paratrooper training. And then they ship made to Bragg Fort Bragg for special forces training and about twenty five percent of the way through the training at a training exercise. And I tore up my knees terribly, and the doctors said, well, here's your options. We can send you to Walter Reed where they'll take your knees apart grind down the backs of your kneecaps put some steel pins back in them, and you'll be able to jump or we can put you in casts for six weeks and your knees will he'll normally but you'll never be able to jump again. Now, I have a fear of heights. So jumping out of airplanes was really hard. So when the doctor said this is your choice, and I'm thinking, I would never have to jump out of an airplane again. And, and then the next lot was okay. Fifty percent of the United States. Army at this point is in Germany and twenty five percent of it is in Korea and twenty five percent of it is in the United States. So I got a fifty fifty chance go into Germany Oncle Sam. I said, I'm outta here. So I spent the rest of the time in Germany working as a regular grunt blowing up stuff. All right. Hold up. He will go on the first path. And then you took a turn that. I gotta say, I'm I was completely taken by surprise. I wanna go back to. So it's July third and you're unhappy with your job and you go on having my job, you don't go out drinking and have a binge you go. Join the army. So let's go back before that. So you got the drywall on July fifth, though. They brought the truck dri- while you didn't quit on the spot. Right. And those houses got built and everything. All right. So tell me when you decide to make this huge decision after going to Carnegie Mellon. Great school architect, you have your first job frustrates not going the way you wanted to. And you decide to go the army walk me through how long that was. That was agonizing was easy. It was easier than you might think it was a lot of. And yes, there was some beers consumed with some of my friends, but I spent a lot of time thinking in talking to my friends about is this really what I wanna do. I mean when I went to architecture school, you know, I, I had pictures of Frank Lloyd Wright houses. In my mind and doing really cool stuff in New York City. And what I was realizing fairly quickly, is most of architecture is really Monday technical how to build a wall, how to read the code in how to draft and put together specifications and things like that. And when I got out into the field it's like how do you get people to do what you know, they need to do? And the realization was I didn't know that I don't know how to do that. And the army was a logical place to find out how to lead how to manage and that's really kind of the bottom line. I didn't think I could be a successful architect in until I learned how to lead the. The shows about leadership and communication. That's why I wanted to make sure we got through that. And got to that point, because I think that's a, a huge point that when you graduate from school when you go to college, or whatever you do after high school when you start working. That's one of the things that we tell people is there's project management in any profession. There's leadership in any profession communication, in any profession and his glamorous thing about marketing, the slammers thing about architecture law, whatever your profession is that you're trained on is just that it's the glamorous small piece that you see. And there's all this other stuff that has to happen. So you go to the army to learn about leadership, and I do spend a minute. How did you get injured? How'd you get the knee injuries? We were out in the URI forest in central North Carolina, and it was raining hard, and they have an obstacle course and of course, insist special forces training, it's an obstacle course on steroids, and the instructor was a little bit annoyed apparently with the class. And so he said, okay, twice around the obstacle course in the rain in the mud and we're timing, everybody on how fast you get through this thing. And I came to an obstacle well called the motherfucker. Podcast. There you go. You could edit out anything you like. But it's it's basically three bars. One of which is about ankle, high one of which is about belt high, and one of which is about shoulder high, and they're about two feet, three feet apart. So the idea is that you run up step on the first bar jump up to the second bar step up on top of that and jump onto the top bar, and then flip yourself over, and I got through the first time, but the second time with all the mud and being tired and everything when a hit that first low bar. My legs went left and right instead of forward. And so, yeah, it was a. An ambulance drive into Fort Bragg and yeah, it was. We didn't have the surgery we do now. Well, the other part of it was this is this is right at the end of the at Phnom they were gonna they, they said, we'll send you to Walter Reed, which means basically, you get the best combat surgeons in the world to work on you, but their combat surgeons. They're not orthopedics. Bessul. They're people who are used to taking bullets out of your bones. Not. Not warped kneecaps. It was it was a pretty easy choice, actually. So you have you have an interesting, five years, or so, or six years or so going to school, the gratification of that. The first child, I shop the miserable. Experience you're having to lead people that aren't listening. They're double triple your age, there from tough blue-collar environment decide to join the army that's going well, and then you run into the motherfucker and you lose your knees. And so now come back and how long until you're healed and what happens next about six weeks in the casts. And then when you join the army you sign a contract and the contract says, if you do this, and this, then we will do this, and that, well my this, and that was, I had to go to through this training and be jump qualified to be green beret since I couldn't be a green beret, 'cause I couldn't be in jumps. Addis anymore. The army gets free shot at you. We get the send you wherever. So that was the fifty percent Germany twenty-five percent curry of twenty five percent US. I'm thinking, okay. I got a seventy five percent of chance of going oversee. That's a good thing for me or twenty five percent chance of getting stuck in fort sill Oklahoma for three years. That was the negative side but they sent me to Germany, and I spent two years in a place called Schaumburg, which is forty kilometers, east of Frankfurt. Beautiful little Germantown. And I was the only enlisted man in my company with a college degree. So I related better to the officers than to most of the troops in, in my unit, but I was always in this enlisted positions. So my company commanders would would. Put me in these weird positions like company is about eighty people and there's a company commander, and then there's platoon leaders in their officers. And then there is a staff sergeant or Master Sergeant who is the highest enlisted man in that company at that time my company didn't have an Senior Sergeant to fill that spot. So they said, well, you've got a college degree you can do this. I've now been in the army about eight months, and I'm the senior enlisted man in the company, not because I've earned it. But because I have a college degree, and nobody else does. So for a while I was operation sergeant for a while. I was the combo sergeant for a while. I was the armor, which means I was in charge of all the guns. I think this helps you with your leadership skills that you have when you were at the first job. Yeah. Probably certainly learned flexibility. But it was good training. I, I went through NCA NCO, noncommissioned officer training, which is probably where I learned the most about management, leadership and, and such, you know, in the army, they got, they got to train you to be able to respond to the guy in charge gets killed. What do you do? Now in fact, you know, the rule is you have to learn the job of the person above you. And you have to teach your job to the person below you that goes for everybody, whether you're a combat engineer, or a nurse or anything and it's a great rule. There was a mantra that they taught us about take care of the people because take care of your people because without your people, you can't accomplish anything then take care of the mission, because that's your whole purpose. And so they taught you a lot of really sort of fund. Metal but core leadership roles fell us that helped allot. Hear more of my conversation with Ed Shriver of Strada on part, two of the Nobis marketing show..

army engineer Carnegie Mellon Ed Ed Traver Germany Pittsburgh Walter Reed Bragg Fort Bragg Vance technologies Oakland Alan United States Goodyear Frank Lloyd Wright Joel North Carolina Ed Shriver New York City Fort Benning foreman
"ed shriver" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"ed shriver" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Because there's still no power. Yeah. We'll continue to update this list as we get to new information throughout the morning here on KFI PK. A California lawmaker is calling for an audit a Sacramento city unified school district as the threat of a state takeover. Looms? The school district announced last year. It had a thirty five million dollar budget shortfall and would be out of funds in November of drastic cuts were not made assemblyman Kevin McCarthy says he wants a deep dive into the schools pass spending to prevent it from happening again, they're out of cash on the verge of insolvency. But we don't know how we got here kind of like a forensic audit. Or an autopsy after the fact so when I'm looking for is looking at going back with our state auditor, let's say up to five years. Mccartney says he hopes the district can avoid being taken over by the state the district is working to balance their budget to avoid a takeover because. You don't want to take over the decisions will be terrible for our classrooms in our kids. If approved the state audit would take up to six months to complete Mike blunt, NewsRadio KF PK governor Gavin Newsom says California will not be part of what he calls the political theater at the border during his first state of the state speech Tuesday. He referenced President Trump state of the union address. Let's start with some of the fear mongering. That's coming out of the White House about this quote, unquote, so-called border emergency. The governor redirected national guard troops at the southern border with Mexico Monday to help with what he called the real crisis at the border like going after illegal pot farms, destroying the forests. He's also having troops gear up for the state's next major wildfire. Governor Gavin Newsom is turning to a familiar face to help fight Alzheimer's on Monday. Former California first lady Maria Shriver wrote an op-ed for the Los Angeles Times about Alzheimer's and the pending democ that's coming to the state a day waiter Shriver was appointed to lead a new Alzheimer's prevention in prepare. Task force. The appointment was made by governor Gavin Newsom during his state of the state address yesterday and Shriver will join what Newsom call some of the most renowned scientists and thinkers, and the LA times op-ed Shriver noted that every sixty five seconds a new brain in the United States, develops Alzheimer's, Jordan, Christmas, NewsRadio KFB K fake kidnapping calls. Have resurfaced police in Petaluma say mother reported receiving a call from a man who said he had her seventeen year old daughter and demanded money for her safe return. Yeah. The teenager was found safe and sound at her school in Marin county on Monday the same day as that phone call, according to police these kinds of calls usually come from fake overseas phone numbers or at the time is six oh six here at KFC K. Let's get you back over to Brian Noble's for a quick check of our traffic troublespot. Well, we do have a number of the mainly. It's all due to the weather very treacherous roadway conditions. We have spin outs on just about every single corridor headed into Sacramento right now. All right, traffic and weather together in three minutes. Also coming up one California sick. City is poised to become the nation's.

Governor Gavin Newsom Sacramento city unified school California Alzheimer Maria Shriver Kevin McCarthy Los Angeles Times Sacramento auditor Petaluma Mexico White House Marin county Mike blunt Mccartney President kidnapping United States Brian Noble