17 Burst results for "Ed Galloway"

"ed galloway" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:16 min | 2 months ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"City. So this place is open for business in April, 1929 and it has never closed its doors. Wait. It's never closed The store. But there were some dark days in the mid 83 was in such terrible shape and the people in the community they've done all the fundraising and all of this with publish Mint has been done just by volunteers. Coleman is a perfect example of what can be achieved when communities are united. You can produce so much good and speaking of good. You know, Jen and I have a few pretty good talents We don't often talk about But playing the organ isn't one of this. It's now time for an iconic route. 66 lunch, and I'm thinking that this stuff could be named for Rodney. Well, I am crazy for hamburgers. And Whelan's worse a period how you know this restaurant. I've been here for 47 years. Get back here and 1973. Great Hamburger. Thank you Started. What? Everything here is made to order. The nostalgia is free of charge. Next, a very rare 9 ft wide stretch of road known as the route 66 Ribbon Road or the Sidewalk highway. So Legend has it that when they went to put this road in, they only had enough money to go either the full distance across the county and half the width or they could have gone half the distance at full width. This'd what they arrived in. This is the original asphalt in the original concrete in the entire country. This is the only place you're going to find a 9 ft wide cyborg highway anywhere back on the two lane and after the Avon Voter Court, built in 1936 still has three of the remaining cabin standing. It's a favorite photo stop among route 66 Road warriors today. After crossing this beautiful bridge and Chelsea Ah, field of totem poles and other unique art is waiting. Just four miles off route. 66 had Ed Galloway's totem pole park in oil Oklahoma. An expert would worker an artist. Mr. Galloway taught woodworking at a nearby orphanage until he retired to this land stand to get Manny feet. It's here. He built the world's tallest concrete totem boat. As well as smaller ones and unique furniture. He also built a fiddle house for all of his beautiful violins. Each one is crafted from a different type of tree. There's even one built of poison oak and wonder if musicians are just itching to play that one way that all 15 United States and 70 to 100. So many people. We in America. Should be grateful to God for the blessings. He's given us. Don't let anyone tell you that America's best days are behind her way have got to fight for this nation, because I believe with all my heart. This nation is in fact, one nation under God. Welcome back 67363 11 10. Hey, um Listen, folks, I would imagine.

April, 1929 1936 Jen America Ed Galloway 47 years 9 ft 70 67363 11 10 100 mid 83 1973 route 66 Ribbon Road Chelsea Ah Coleman Galloway Each one Oklahoma four miles two lane
"ed galloway" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:39 min | 2 months ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"There were some dark days in the mid eighties was in such terrible shape and the people in the community they've done all of the fundraising and all of this with purpose. Mint has been done just by volunteers. Coleman is a perfect example of what can be achieved when communities are united. You can produce so much good and speaking of good. You know, Jen and I have a few porta good talents We don't often talk about But playing the organ isn't one of this. It's now time for an iconic route. 66 lunch, and I'm thinking that this stuff could be named for Rodney. Well, I am crazy for hamburgers and Whelan's were superior. How you know this restaurant. I've been here for 47 years. Wow. Get back here, and I could 73 right, Hamburg. Well, thank you. Everything here is made to order. The nostalgia is free of charge. Next, a very rare 9 ft wide stretch of road known as the route 66 Ribbon Road or the Sidewalk highway, So Legend has it that when they went to put this road in, they only had enough money to go either the full distance across the county. And half the with or they could have gone half the distance at full wits. This'd what they arrived. It thistles the original asphalt in the original concrete in the entire country. This is the only place you're going to find a 9 ft wide cyborg highway anywhere back on the two lane And after the Avon Motor Court, built in 1936 still has three of the remaining cabin standing. It's a favorite photo stop among route 66 Road warriors today. After crossing this beautiful bridge and Chelsea Ah, field of totem poles and other unique art is waiting just four miles off Route 66 at Ed Galloway's Totem Pole Park in oil, Oklahoma. Expert woodworker, an artist. Mr Galloway taught woodworking at a nearby orphanage until he retired to this land stand to get 90 ft. It's here, he built the world's tallest concrete totem, Bo. As will a smaller ones and unique furniture. He also built a fiddle house for all of his beautiful violins. Each one is crafted from a different type of tree. There's even one built of poison oak on wonder if musicians are just itching to play that one way that all 50 United States and 72 foreign countries, So I've met people from.

Jen 1936 47 years 9 ft 90 ft 72 foreign countries route 66 Ribbon Road Galloway Route 66 Hamburg Each one Coleman Totem Pole Park 50 two lane mid eighties Ed Galloway , Oklahoma route 66 Road 9 ft wide
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"And Mr Ford's handling of the the the covid nineteen crisis has certainly helped his poll numbers a little bit. But I think we're starting to see that taper off a bit just anecdotally you saw yesterday the Prima Kinda lashing out at unionized inspectors. A complaining that they hadn't wanted to go into long-term care homes in April and then the union firing back at him and saying that wasn't true so it's more of the old style of Premier Ford rather than this new kinder gentler Kind of conciliator. Since March seventeenth basically went Ontario has been in a state of emergency. He has been very much so pater. Familia for for the for the whole province and trying to everyone you know. We're all in this together kind of Combined so I I don't know he could be that. It was chippy. Yesterday I mean he's been working hard and they they actually are having too many of these press briefings. I think I think it's starting to wear on them. All Selima. Is there an opportunity for the federal government and taking what you said about how difficult this is. But is there an opportunity for the federal government to swoop in and and and be saviors in this and say listen? You know what this is a crisis and we're going to act and yes. The provinces are concerned about this. But we have to take the national interest at heart here. There is absolutely an opportunity to do that and I think that that will really come from from the way that prime minister lays out the way he presented and the way he has to be careful in how he says things in terms of not being seen to impose something but there is absolutely a place for him and you see you see all of the liberal ministers releasing as errands said. This is an issue. This is an issue. We've known for a long time. They're not using the word national. Shame but but it's there the idea that this has to be fixed so so there is a place for them to say. Look we could go this route. We could go this route. Which do you prefer for the provinces a but but publicly the prime minister cannot say. We're GONNA do. This could be about a ballot box issue and people have said this crisis certainly in the last week or so that one of the reasons why drags on is because it's not an issue that grabs voters attention certainly has now and so I mean an election isn't on the horizon immediately. Presumably although it could be I suppose Could this be a ballot box issue so well and that's the thing this is an unprecedented pandemic and we're seeing this drastic portrait of the conditions. This is the one thing that could finally make this. Ah ballot-box issue that that long term care homes and the conditions that we see in the absolutely need to be improved. Healthcare in general has never really sexy election. Topic never really becomes ballot-box issue always sort of slides off into other things and particularly for seniors homes. More you know easier issues like Pharma care takeover and they did with the Liberals in the last election I it really seems like that will could not really be a priority for the liberals going forward when we see what's happening in the long term. Care home so they can't do both. So so yeah. Does this become the moment that people go? We absolutely have to do something about the situation. The federal government will take a leading role in leading the provinces to the table. And see what can be done. And what sort of funding can be given to the provinces to fix this problem? Aaron briefly is is your sense that people in Quebecer are seized by this issue politicians. Certainly in those who have family members in these long care homes but generally across the province. Is this the kind of issue that would motivate people in in Quebec particularly around the ballot box but also to give supports to politicians to take decisive action? That definitely so. It was about box issue in the last election Two years ago when the show a new government one and Partly on the strength of the of Lagos promise to fix the nursing homes and could be one of the reasons that the former liberals lost the election because of problems with the healthcare system Our news media is focused on this. A lot of quebecers are focused on surveys The horse here Were just absolutely shocking and And we we do have a Ombudsman who's going to be launching an investigation into this so this will fuel New Stories to come. So it's definitely going to be about box issue During the next election for you rob looking at at Ontario in the last minute or so that we have What's at stake for the premiere in terms of addressing this in a meaningful way well the premium has promised to fix it. He said this he said the system is broken. It's rare for a politician to admit that something they administer is actually broken and he said that he's going to do something about it now as Aaron his saying and and know is there may well be the political will to do it. It's just it's going to cost a lot of money matt and I think that people have to get their heads around that but as people are living longer we have to have to say as a society that we WANNA warehouse our seniors in these conditions. And I don't think that we do so. I hope that it's an election issue in two thousand and twenty two Ontario and it may be resolved before then hopefully but what he says. The buck stops with me. I mean that that suggests that he feels as though he has the mandate to address it. Yeah I mean they're certainly. They're certainly pressure on him from the opposition parties. And there's blame enough to go around for all of the political parties and Terry who have all been empowered last quarter century. Great to speak with you all about this. We will talk again in the meantime. Thanks thanks cue. Thank you salina shows. You is a senior Parliamentary Hill reporter with the CBC Robert. Benzene is the Queen's Park Bureau chief for the Toronto Star. Aaron d'urville is a healthcare reporter for the Montreal. Gazette the BBC news is next and then Hamad is. Marlene is still looking for justice. He knows exactly what that will look. Justice to me is to find a tooth to find what happened that night that morning any on and to see the perpetrators in an international court smile even lost his daughter and wife and Ukrainians airline crash in Iran. We'll speak with him about fifteen minutes time. I'm Ed Galloway. You're listening to the current on. Cbc Radio One stakes. I'm Dr Hillary McBride. Take your microphones. Rarely go into my therapy office. It's where my clients hurt. He'll and ultimately thrive. You're going to hear private conversations that we rarely ever have with ourselves. Let alone share with others. Welcome to other people's problems maybe along the way you'll discover that other people's problems are a lot like your own season. Three's out now subscribe on. Cbc Listen or wherever you get your podcasts. Good Morning. I'm Matt Galloway. You're listening to the current.

Aaron d'urville federal government Ontario Matt Galloway prime minister Mr Ford Premier Ford Quebecer reporter CBC Ed Galloway BBC Dr Hillary McBride Quebec Lagos salina Marlene Terry Toronto Iran
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

10:39 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"I Matt Galloway. You're listening to the current when Dr Catherine Hankins was on the front line of the fight to stop the spread of HIV. She imagined that that would be the greatest challenge of her career and then she met. Covid nineteen another virus raising many many questions about immunity. Antibodies how it spreads. Dr Hankins hopes to get answers to at least some of those mysteries in her role as the CO chair of the Federal Covid Nineteen Immunity Task Force. She is a professor of public population health at McGill University. Dr Hankins Good Morning. Good Morning Matt. What is the focus of this? Federal Covid Nineteen Immunity Task Force. Well what we're trying to do. Basically is to catalyze and to support and where possible and appropriate to harmonize. What's going on across Canada? Already we've been trying to scope who's got Who Got Studies? That are planned. Who's got blood banks who has collecting blood? So that's one part of it is to see what's going on if we can harmonize coordinate support where there are gaps. We're also looking at. Can we get rapidly? Get essays standardized So we've had to essays that have been approved by Health Canada or antibody testing. They'll they're more coming in the pipeline. We're going to need more than one or two for sure so We're involving the Canadian Public Health Laboratory network to cross validate tests so that we can come up with really good tests for studies going forward and then we're looking at the field testing the field studies. That will give us a better idea about what's going on in Canada who has been exposed to this virus. Antibodies and then the final area we're working on is the immune science area. Which is so you have antibodies. What do those mean do they provide you with any level of protection? And if so for how long? What is the big question that you mean? I'm sure there are a lot but top of mind the question. You have the still want answered when it comes to this virus. I am personally really interested to know how exactly it's working and what we can do where we can intervene so I'm thinking back to HIV where we in the beginning thought everybody could get it and nobody was going to be saved and so on and we figured out then how it was transmitted and subsequently we've come up with prevention tools and with treatment we don't have a cure and a vaccine has completely us because this virus keeps on replicating and mutating and escaping for my antibody responses. So I want to know you know. What can we learn from? Hiv that we can apply to Sarah's Kobe to you know how does it? How does it attached to cells to enter cells? Can we block that What is our immune response? Why is it that you know? Some people have no symptoms. Some people have symptoms. Some people have severe symptoms. Other people have almost like a long tail. They're not over it in a couple of weeks. It kicks back starts to affect other parts of the body so I think we need to know a lot more about how we are responding to. This virus is totally novel Corona Virus. So we have no experience it prior to that now and then. What can we learn about who responds well to it? What was their immune response? And how can that help inform eventually Vaccine and I have to say you know we absolutely need a vaccine. Do you are you? Are you're optimistic about that? Because as you mentioned there isn't an HIV vaccine. There's talk within the scientific world. This may not be solved through a vaccine that we might have to figure out other strategies. I think we absolutely need a vaccine and I am hopeful. And I'm optimistic about it. I was you know I've worked on a number of different viruses and when I think about them. You know hepatitis. B. We got a vaccine for that human papillomavirus we got a vaccine for that Hepatitis C. We have a very very effective treatment in fact cure it's HIV. That's kind of alluded us As I've mentioned in terms of developing a vaccine I think we can get back scene for corona virus and I think that we've got such a tremendous effort going on worldwide Including one that was announced last week in Canada but I think we will have one. I'm concerned about the timeframe to get it. And I'm concerned about the manufacturing capacity to make sure that we can get to everybody who needs it because the vast majority of the world is vulnerable to this Corona Byron. Do we have any sense and part of this is about testing? Do we really have any sense yet? As to how many people have been exposed to this virus in Canada? No we don't. We can look at the number of cases obviously and testing strategies varied by province. So some people who had symptoms didn't get tested if they were not that ill As we know there are a symptomatic infections so we can look around the world to see where else people have been testing. And if I talk with my colleagues you know they say you know maybe it's one percent maybe it's two percent. Maybe it's three percent. I think we're going to be disappointed. Those people who were talking about getting herd immunity disappointed when we actually do were able to representative Canadian population survey to see what we've got and I certainly would predict to be below five percent so in the immunity tests in the best case scenario. Who would you hope to test? Who WOULD I hope to test for the immunity test? I mean I think you know our first thing to do is to try to get a feel for what happened across the country if possible to get so we're looking for sources of blood that are national and that can give us that kind of perspective We would obviously want to have it disaggregated by age and by sex and geography and Solon. Then we want to look at specific populations that have been highly exposed. And we know them. We know it's our healthcare workers. It's our care workers in homes for the elderly. It's our residents of homes for the elderly. Were INTERESTED IN LOOKING. At incarcerated populations indigenous populations were seeing outbreaks in communities we're seeing them infringe centers. We need to get a feel for who it seems. Go to very vulnerable parts of our society and we need to better understand that in order to be able to to know how best to proceed not just now in terms of the public health response but also in terms of who would be top priority for an effective vaccine. Just in the last couple of minutes I started by saying in some ways that you thought the work that you had done an HIV aids would be you know the great challenge of your career and then along comes cove in nineteen. What has this taught you about about the challenges that we face and how to face them. I I feel a lot of humility. I think there's a lot of things. There are a lot of things for maybe that we can apply to took over nineteen and the tremendous scientific effort on HIV the mobilization of communities to respond. And it's definitely sure that for covid nineteen. This is a whole society responses needed. We all have our part to play but a real humility and also I guess I feel really really passionate you know. I really appreciate the work of John. Cohen who's a science writer and he basically said this needs all of us addressing this. We really have to get out of this. And you need to be humble and you'd have a sense of humility in the face of something like that. Yeah because this is you know. We're learning new things. Every day. About this this is not a slam dunk. And so it's a challenge and I think we're all up to that challenge and we've got to be realizing it's as many people have said. This is a long haul marathon. It's not going to be a quick win. There are no easy solutions. But we do all need to work together on this. Take your optimism to heart because it is a long haul and I think that that can grind people down absolutely absolutely and I think we're seeing we're seeing the trade offs that we need to be making between you know protecting our vulnerable people as we start to re-enter and re stimulate the economy. And so on. How do we protect those? Who are most vulnerable you know? How can we move for the safely as possible? We've we've flattened the curve which is great But we now need to get more time. We made that time to save US waiting for the vaccine to come. We will talk again in the meantime a pleasure to speak with you this morning. Thank you pledge to speak with you Matt. Thank you Dr. Catherine Hankins is the CO chair of the Federal Covid Nineteen Immunity Task Force. She's also a professor of Public Health and Population Health at McGill University. That's it for the current for today. Coming up next on your. Cbc Radio One. It's cue Mr Tom. Power is the host and he is in his comfortable chair. Tom Good Morning Matt. How you you having these pandemic dreams? Now let me think about this. Yeah I've had dreams that the pandemics not happening. I've had dreams that I'm going through the pandemic with my family back in Newfoundland and I've had dreams that I didn't eat an entire box of triscuits. Last night I keep having dreams of being in an elevator. People keep trying to get into the elevator and somebody. Who's there with me says no? I'm sorry you can't get in the elevator. You have to wait for the next one. Is that a metaphor. I wonder I don't know what it means. Here's what I think. No I'm only joking. I don't have any sort of dream analysis. It is the worst ones and sometimes the best ones are the ones where I wake up and I forget that this all this stuff is going on. You know I wake up and go game time to go life back to normal so nice few seconds before you realize what's actually happening the you know. I'll take him cool show. Today man we got the winner Canadian winner of the Griffin Poetry Prize so live poetry on the radio. I look forward to that Tom. Thank you thank you manpower so host of its next on. Cbc Radio One right after the CBC news. I'm Ed Galloway. This is the current. Thanks for listening. We'll talk to you tomorrow for more. Cbc PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts..

Canada Dr. Catherine Hankins Matt Galloway McGill University Covid Dr Hankins Mr Tom professor of Public Health and CBC news Health Canada professor Canadian Public Health Laborat Corona Byron cure Solon Ed Galloway US Tom Good
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"And he cooked supper that night for the first time in his life. I don't need any help. He said I'll call you when it's ready. He set the table by himself. Everyone got a paper towel as a Napkin. Coca Cola poured from glass bottle. It tastes better out of glass. Bottles said Sam proudly. Dinner's ready said Sam. And they all came into the kitchen and when they are sitting at their places sand carried one covered dish carefully across the kitchen to the table his bottom lip suck tightly into his mouth and he set the dish in front of his mother and Morley shook her head. The CHEF SERVED. She said so we moved it and put it down in front of his place. And then Dave said what are you cook thus and Sam took the cover off. The Dash and Stephanie said Kraft Dinner and Sam said Kraft dinner with truffles morally sucked in her breath and she looked at Dave or hand over her mouth and then she looked quickly over at Stephanie. Who remarkably hadn't said another thing and now was morally. You wanted to cry thanking watched her son earnestly spooning the sticky orange noodles onto the plate is sister was holding patiently in the air in front of him of how they had gone and how they were becoming no mistake about it remarkable people. These are the truffles. Sam was saying they bring out the flavor of the cheese. But you have to try it. It's hard to describe. Thank you very much. Stuart McLean in the Vinyl cafe. No tax on truffles. Monday is a holiday across much of this country. We will be here and you'll want to tune in on Monday to hear another episode of the Vinyl Cafe. Give you a little hint. It's one of the most requested ones. I'm Ed Galloway. You've been listening to an extended version of the current. You can find part two of today's show in your podcast feed for more. Cbc PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts..

Sam Vinyl cafe Coca Cola Kraft Dave Stuart McLean Ed Galloway Stephanie Morley Bottles
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"Yeah we we. I know that it's not only me. But a lot of people who work in restaurants and customer service and a lot of people who work in cleaning. They're giving like a good surveys but we need to ensure that people can rely on the hilty Things that the government the owners of the places are taking care like if for example. I go back to work and I start to feel like I'm getting sick or I can. I need to go back to self-isolation if I don't get like a lot of people. Basic days he goes you know that now we only have three days and what happened if we will need to go back home for fourteen days and I'm not receiving more the benefit for the government. So what's going to happen with all that Things that I need to have like for pay my rent for by like food or that's a lot to think about. I mean you really you really just juggling a lot of different things up in the air at the same time. Yeah he's like. I know that I'm not the only one this. Unfortunately there's like half a million people like have problems because maybe they're not Having like two four for the government and I feel like how can be like say in. How can we rely on that? We can go back to reopen when. You're not sure you're going to have like old this report to be safe on healthy money and it's it's a lot of things. I hope you get back to work soon and I hope it's safe. And in the meantime Caroliina thank you for talking to us. Okay thank you so much story is one that I think a lot of people will Will find familiar. Caroliina Lopez was working in the Food Service Industry in Toronto until she lost her job because of the pandemic were spending a good deal of time this morning talking about the state of our economy. And what's happening in this moment the? Cbc News is next and then more on the economic fallout of this pandemic. We'll talk about opening what that means and caroline point how to do it safely. I'm Ed Galloway and this is current parents. If you're looking for some screen free family fun will you're staying home check out the story store podcasts? From CBC kids and CBC podcasts. New Story Store shorties every week. These short original and hilarious stories fit anywhere in your day from breakfast to bedtime. The story store available on smart speakers. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Good Morning I'm Matt Galloway. You're listening to the current..

Caroliina Lopez CBC Cbc News Matt Galloway Ed Galloway Toronto caroline Food Service Industry
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

13:06 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"I guess I guess my preference to that would be that Some of my best friends are bureaucrats. And so you know when we when we look back in the lessons from this. I think that there were real failures in February and March You know people died. Who didn't need to die because we couldn't make decisions fast enough But I think that this is a collective failure. It's not a bureaucratic failure. I mean you know an ordinary time when when the bureaucracy performance perfectly the rest of us sort of say to like yeah. That's your job. And when they whenever they get it wrong they are breaking the public trust. They are wasting taxpayers money so we asked for a bureaucracy to really focuses on on on minimizing the number of wrong decisions And so I think the question becomes because this isn't the last crisis is going to be the next one and so I think the question are what is our permission structure in a time of crisis you know. What are some of the broad principles that we allow people to just make decisions under going to be And we gotta get our stakeholders ready for that. You know we gotta get citizens auditors ready for that we gotta get boards and shareholders ready for that because when the next crisis comes life. We want to respond differently. Chris good to speak with you. But that's what an experience you've had three you. Thanks very much Chris. Turner is the author of the age of discovery navigating the storms of our second renaissance. This is the current on. Cbc Radio. One I Matt Galloway joined now by noted Long Distance Runner Tom Power host. Forgive Matt Galloway. Our Five K. Don relation texture over the weekend. I mean I should say if you're listening to this that I came into Matt's he was where the beginning of the pandemic and I sat in the studio and I said I'm thinking about starting this running thing and you were so encouraging and you were so wonderful and yet as a five k run her mass so now I'm just going to give it up for a couple of months the couches waiting. Yeah of course. I do in Five K. Back to couch ex. You're here to talk about Mr Daniel Brooks I am. I am so excited to tell you about this This is an interview that I thought was gonNA kind of I duNno. I thought it was going to be kind of meaningful and then it ended up being so much more than I ever could have believed. I mean we sort of like mouth agape sitting in our studio listening to Daniel Speak Daniel it legendary Canadian theatre director. He was supposed to be directing a run of. Chekhov's the seagull right now. That's of course on hold. Daniel Brooks is really thoughtful about what that means for him and what the pandemic means for him because he has stage four cancer so we got to talk about what he's learned about uncertainty that we can apply to our lives. Here's our conversation. Hi Daniel how are you? I'm good where do we go Tom? I'm sorry to hear about the seagull. Yeah well it was kind of interesting because we worked in rehearsal for about four and a half weeks and One Night I was having trouble sleeping and I thought why am I? This is not going to happen. This production is not gonNA happen. WHY AM. I going in exposing my immunosuppressed body to the world every day. Stop doing that. And that's when I stopped and then rehearsal stop the days later and it was really exciting rehearsal so as much as it was disappointing not to see the results of all that work. It was somehow tremendously a great boon to me that it was such a wonderfully productive and vital and goodwill rehearsal reminds me something you wrote in your notes about working on the sequel. He said I love checkoff because these plays he invented are symphonies working in dimensions of time and space and in body and in language. And in these you right time is Toronto Pressure Shimmering Mirage. A dream to tell me more about that. What is it that intrigues you? About time being a tyrannical pressure will You know night is falling. And it's a torrential of pressure as we try to achieve what we out to achieve in particular day but also I think in terms of what we imagine we might achieve with our lives what we imagine. We are So there's the Tarantula pressure of time which works on our bodies and makes us sick and eventually kills us. The dream part of it is that time is such Inevitably impossible to Manage experience and of course for me. Time is extraordinarily poignant and interesting reality given that. I don't know how much time I have left. I have staged for lung cancer and to even question what it means to ask the question. How much time do I have left like? What so. I get another three months so again? Another three years You know one is longer but at the end of the three months it'll be over at the end of the three years it'll be over. Eventually I will be meeting my maker as as day and it's almost irrelevant. How long I have because it's impossible subjectively to measure that time. And I think check off captures the experience of time the subjectivity of time in a beautiful way and and I think in creating a a checkup performance. That's part of the exciting work that a director and a design team have along with the actors is creating this kind of dream sense of time. You know I the one where the seems to be coming up. During covert nineteen is uncertain you know Cubans require a certain degree of certainty around their lives and right now we have no idea when we were going to be a lot out of our houses again. We have no idea what life is going to be like after this. We're we're even uncertain as to whether life will continue in the way we ever knew that it would and you know I can't help but think you know give him what you're telling me about living with stage lung cancer as long as you have. Uncertainty has kind of been your life for a long time. Do you have any perspective on uncertainty? I suppose in in a strange way. I live with less uncertainty now than I ever have in because I keep my horizons very close by that I mean I don't look too far ahead so if you don't look too far ahead then there's nothing to be uncertain about I you know I wake up every morning and I try to be as present as Possible in my day and in myself and in my relationships And so It kind of removes uncertainty. Because I'm not really asking too many questions about what am I doing? What should I do where shall I go? What's IT GONNA be like you know? What will it be like? We'll go to sleep at night will wake up in the morning. You know there are a lot of things that we do know. And I'm not so Caught up right now in guessing. At what kind of world we will have when we emerged from this thing. I don't even know if I'll be a part of that world if you don't mind me saying so like. I don't think it's a guarantee that you have the kind of perspective that you do right now. We'd like to believe that we would face something like you're facing right now. We would have some kind of greater perspective. But it's not a guarantee he seemed to have gotten somewhere with it. Your certainly can't compare myself anybody else. I had a life working With great literature and Great Great Theater in great ideas that I hope have taught me something. I'm also a the passing meditators and that's a I think helped me enormously in this journey But also I had one moment. That really helped me right off right off the bat. I camp with a a couple of families every year and I was. I went up for one day to this lake. We camp at and after a beautiful sunny northern Canadian shield summer day I was standing on the rocks looking at the water and I was looking at a rock over to my left where I had memories of my youngest daughter scampering on that rock and then I looked at the water shimmering in the light and I thought this may be the last time I looked at this in a realized. I couldn't do anything with that. So what if it was the last time what? How does that help me? What am I gonNA? How am I go? I can't lock it away. I can't own it. I can't can't do anything with this moment. Other than being it and that revelation about time has been an enormous eight me in the ensuing almost two years. Now since I've been diagnosed I can't do anything with that moment but being it is Is especially poignant to hear from someone who has devoted their life to theater. You know media that requires that sort of being in the moment. You know you can rewatch it like film. You can't rewind like television show that is central to what Cedar is. There are a number of of a very powerful metaphors. That theater can carry. And that's one of the main ones what I love about. You say when I asked. You you know not. Everyone gets to have the kind of perspective that you have. You said you know. I've I've had a life of literature and I've had a life of art. That is sort of helped me here and I think on this show. I'm always searching for kind of concrete examples of art mattering. Because I know it. Does you know I know deep down in my life that it does. But I'm always searching for those concrete examples and I think we're all questioning that right now. We lived through this time. And just to hear you say that is very meaningful to me because I I feel like I found one. What what can you say before we go? What can you say about what art can give to us? And what it's given to you on an integrator way in the world that I work in in the theater It relies on Collaboration between a group of Artists. And it just doesn't work without a collaboration. And I think that one of the things making art has taught me is the kind of unavoidable fact of our interdependence that human beings are interdependent whether they like it or not for the better for the worse it doesn't matter it's just the next essential fact of life and how we contend with that interdependence constitutes a great part of what our lives are and. I think that is something I've learned through both consuming and creating art it's meaningful to me then that you know as as you face cancer and as you face this play that had to be stopped for a little while. We hope you're giving those minutes. You have to teaching others in an online masterclass. What do you hope to give them to help? Ease the fear you know not. Many people get to spend two years with stage four lung cancer. It's a very particular experience. And if you take the fear away is something quite extraordinary about it quite beautiful about it so I guess one thing that I hope to do. Daniel thank you so much for your time today. I really appreciate it. I'm looking forward to seeing the production when when the time comes laptop. It does Tom Power Conversation with the Great Theater Director. Daniel Brooks I'm Ed Galloway. You've been listening to an extended version of the current. You can find part two of today's show in your podcast feed for more. Cbc podcasts Goto CBC DOT CA slash podcasts..

Mr Daniel Brooks Daniel Speak Daniel Tom Power Matt Galloway Chris director Great Great Theater Cbc Radio Toronto lung cancer cancer Turner Chekhov Director Cedar Ed Galloway
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:40 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"Of Montreal Valerie Plant. She has an exclusive seat on a global task. Force here what she's doing to help cities bounce back from the virus and we'll hear from health reporter. Andre Picard making the case to go outside in the midst of the pandemic. That's ninety seconds. I'm Ed Galloway. And this is the current. Hi I'm Matt Galloway. You're listening to the current big cities across this planet have been hammered by the corona virus populated. They have crowded public transit systems packed shops and busy streets traits that have greatly contributed to mortality rates and the crippling of businesses and already leaders are weighing. How these metropolises can recover to do that. Eleven mayors from around the world have been appointed to a working group called C Forty Mares Covert Nineteen recovery taskforce. Valerie plant is the only Canadian named to that Task Force. She is the mayor of Montreal. That's the epicenter of this pandemic in Canada plant. Good Morning Good Morning why is it that Montreal is having such a hard time bringing down the number of infections a wall? Of course I'm not a specialist here but What we're seeing is that Well well the one of the reason that was brought up to us is The fact that We had our our our spring break at the beginning where For example if I compare with my my colleagues and Ontario They were able to shut down the the province and all the activities before spring break but and also we have a lot of economic and cultural activities between The city of New York and Montreal. It's very yeah we're really closely connected and so there were also a lot of case Brought in that being said. I'm not an expert but we're definitely dealing with a difficult situation with our elders as well so We're we're working really hard to To to go through this and to minimize the curve because it's It's still a big issue in Canada and especially Montreal. In the meantime people are trying to figure out what happens and when things can start to resume some sense of normality yesterday. The premiere of your province Francois Ago announced the reopening of businesses in Montreal would be delayed by a week to the eighteenth of May have listened to why he thought that's the right decision. We want to reopen stores in Montreal. But we know that if we reopen and when will reopen stores will probably have more cases in our UH spitaels so right now distribution is under control with the we It's manage with the number of people that we have right now continuing to stay at home but if we open a bit we need to have a margin and we don't see this margin today. Tolerate plant is delaying reopening the right decision. Oh yeah absolutely. Oh reopening or delaying delaying the reopen. So for me. The fact that we There's an extra week Absolutely makes sense Here in Montreal though like the premier said the the situation is under control but it's fragile and for me Even though I'm you know like everybody else we we're looking for opening some economic sectors but it cannot be done Over publix had the population's health and so whatever time is needed. I'm totally willing to wait. How much pressure are you under to Reopen Society? It just wonder whether you're population is willing to stay patient. Well that is a very good question. I think that we can see There's a lot of people would say especially parents and elders. That are Really preoccupied by Sorry by opening schools and opening some economic sectors where for businesses and and people that are having a struggling right now. Of course. They're they're they`re. They're interested into opening their businesses. But so it is. It is a balanced to find and for me what is important just to definitely follow the public health authorities and and I will. That's been my number one priority since the beginning and I will continue to do so so if there's any chances that you know it's not a good idea to reopen Some sectors and Michelle. I will be the first to say. Let's wait you mentioned schools. The elementary schools in Montreal are set to open on the nineteenth of May according to this provincial directive. If your children were elementary school age would you send them back to school now? I think that I would. I'm not sure I would. I would do it right the beginning. Because there's huge challenges right now around like Finding their the the the right number of people because we need to double and triple the number of Schoolteachers and And Guardian as well because the classes will be smaller so I would probably wait a while but I can definitely see the impact. The psychological impact on on on kids and I can talk about my kids of not having the possibility socialize but again many of those question I think the premier would be in such a better position than me to explain because those decisions were made by the National Public Health Authorities and the government of Quebec but again We will follow the recommendation being put in place by public authorities. We've spoken with parents and we've spoken with with educators as well and there's a real sense of anxiety around the idea of of the timing of this and people again I I understand that they are desperate to get back to normal but they wonder whether this is too soon if there are hundreds of new cases in the province every day. A thousand cases This past weekend whether this sort of stuff is just premature. We just need to wait. Well I'm at the same place as you I'm I'm the UH being the mayor of the biggest city in March and in Quebec I do receive a lot of messages. Actually where the only level of governmen that still answers through emails and and social media all the questions so I'm getting tons and tons of question and we're trying to be reassured Reassuring to everybody having the knowledge and you know following the orders that are coming from above us but at the same time The fact that the everything is being decided Through the public health authorities to me is reassuring. This is where we are trying to put everything together as a city because the moment we reopened some sectors in schools it also means that we need to work on the The social another social space but were public spaces streets sidewalks intersection to make sure that we can keep the social the the sensing. That'd be so important right now. You've talked about keeping parks open and you've said that it's important for people in Montreal to keep an open mind that there are many people in this city who don't have a backyard. They don't have a balcony and so you have kept parks open. Tell me more about that. And why you've done that why you've created more space on the streets in the plateau for example so that people can be out and not have to worry about being close to each other so since the beginning almost at the beginning we we did decided to keep the park open though I have to say. We close the dogs parks or playgrounds for kids. Like all the places that the dissension Between the social thing is to keep and so because we're a big city we realize that even though people making lots of efforts to keep the two meters while they're going for the grocery store the pharmacy or just taking bit of fresh air. They're having trouble to to keep the distance. So while the parks are being are still we also started to create a sanitary corridors in some of the business treats so if you go to the grocery store and you're waiting in line then there's more space we've taking a parking space out of those treats To Really Support the Social distancing and now. We're moving a bit more. Were moving forward with creating what we call family and active treats which are shared streets where those are local ones local streets where It's your equal. Let's put it this way. Whatever you're driving your car for local reasons or your pedestrian they're a cyclist everybody's equal on those streets. And so we're going to be creating a lot of those in the coming days and weeks to really support at the social distancing. That is very important. Do you see this as an opportunity. You use the phrase your equal when it's which is interesting in terms of whether you're walking or riding a bike or driving a car. Do you see this as an opportunity to rethink. What our streets. Inner cities could look like after. This is done Yeah and I think that a lot of people have realized how much space cars are taking. And I'm not judging you that the use of cars and and it that's not the point but people are realizing that when you're walking in the city you have very limited space comparing two cars and so I find a great time to show what will be possible so even downtown and in many areas that many borrows will be closing streets to do full pedestrians area especially on the commercial streets. And we'll be creating big corridors. We will be taking some space out of the for the cars to give more space for cyclists. So I think it's an opportunity and we'll see how it goes. There's less cars writing right now and But I think it's time to to rethink of how we share. We share the public Public space outside. This is a health crisis. It's also a financial crisis and it's a financial crisis for cities across this country and around the world. How badly hit will the economy of of Montreal be out of this? It's huge it's huge and we're trying to just stay positive and we're trying to put all the efforts to keep the the budget Balanced because in we have a responsibility at the municipal level. You need to have a balanced budget It's the only order of government where you cannot have a deficit and so we're right right now. We're challenging with. How are we going to keep our employees as much as possible in much? Twenty eight Taliban people working for the city throughout the boroughs. And it's also. How do we keep on giving The services that people needs So and and the fact that in cities we depend on the On the tax we impose every year on on houses. It's quite limited. We don't have lots of sources of revenue so it is very tricky problem and especially in big cities where there's a transportation system to support. We have lost a lot of people like they're not taking it so a lot of revenues as well so we've been asking the big cities Canada been asking the government of the federal government to support. It's up to about ten millions and it would be based on the population but also on the The number of How could I say the ridership That would definitely support big cities Montreal Toronto Vancouver and all the big city. This is a global crisis and as I mentioned. You're the only Canadian on this International Task Force of mayors looking at how we get out of this..

Montreal Canada Valerie Plant Matt Galloway reporter Ed Galloway Andre Picard National Public Health Authori publix Taliban Michelle International Task Force federal government Ontario Quebec New York
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"It's been tough obviously mad like Anyone I mean this is a tough season for everyone and it's tough to not be together. It's tough to You know go through something like this. Kinda cancel all the plans that we had in grease losses of that And be able to to hug or you know physically near each other but it's also what we try and make the best of it and I was sitting around last night like you know what it is and I don't love it. I'd also grateful for it because we just had to get Credo And try to have fun with it and obviously pushed our relationship in ways that we wouldn't have been pushed. If this wouldn't have happened you will never forget this and When the wedding actually happens it will be even more special than when you're actually not separated by a ditch and you don't have to yell back and forth at each other lutely it'll be a great moment is great to talk to you both. Good luck. Thank you so much savannah. Coop lives in Abbotsford. British Columbia Ryan Hamilton lives in Bellingham Washington and they are a couple but they are apart and trying to figure out how to stay together. Long undefended border as they say between Canada and the United States. Maybe you're in this situation. This is not I mean. It's unusual but it's not entirely unprecedented Maybe you have a similar story. Maybe you're just not even separated from each other by a country but it could be in the same city house to house. Let know if there is a long distance relationship that perhaps you did not expect to be in because of this pandemic he can let us know through the website. Cbc DOT CA slash the current. Click on the contact link. It is time to say goodbye to our listeners. In Newfoundland and Labrador Cross. Talk is of next for you. We'll talk to you on Monday for everyone else. Stick around. We're back in ninety seconds. I'm Ed Galloway. You're listening to the current on..

Coop Ryan Hamilton Ed Galloway Abbotsford Labrador Cross Newfoundland Bellingham Canada United States Washington
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"Well when she noticed the fish head. She sent me to the office and the principal. All my dad's Dave your grandfather I know said San just what happened. It took Charlie twenty minutes to get there to the school when he arrived. He walked into the principal's offices. Had Hello Net. What seems to be the problem here. Dave was sitting on the chair in the corner of the office. Where you sat when you're in trouble. And when his father walked in the first thing he saw was charlie head of fish head tied his belt. Lope father really do that. Yup said Dave. You really did. Then what happened? I don't know said David. He took me home. I think her fishing he might have taken me fishing. You don't remember. I do remember that. He put his hand on my shoulders. We walked out to the principal's office that made me feel good. Dave and SAM. We're coming up on the corner of the last Big Hill. Almost home. Neither said anything for a while. And then as they turned into Margaret Yard. Sam said that was a cool thing for him to do. It sounds like he was a good dad. Dave said that's what I said and then Dave said I think I still have. The fish at Sam shook his head. Sam said so weird. They found the fish head before they went to bed. In a box at the back of Dave's old covered with a bunch of stuff like that a little cast iron cannon set a hockey card some marbles it was leather in golden as if it had been smoked piece of green yarns still tied to the top. Sam was sitting on the bed holding it. He said it doesn't smell thought it would smell. They were both sleeping. Dave's old bedroom and Sam was already in his pajamas. Dave was getting ready. Sam said can I have it? He was sitting on the bed near the window turning the fish head around in his Hands Day said. I always kind of liked that. It was here if I give it to you. Would you leave it here take it home? Sam said I'd take it home. Dave said what would you do with? Sam said. I'd wear to school on my belt? Like Dave said why Samson because when I have a kid I'd give it to him and tell them the story and he'll to school and then it'll be a family tradition. I think GRANDPA would like that. Dave laughed. Yes he said. I think he would like that very much. And then he turned and stared out the bedroom window. His breath fogging the glass with the trees. Still not in bud. He could see right over the house where his uncle used to live? And all the way down to the roofs of the storefronts on Railroad Street far away the steeple of the United Church at one end tallest building in town. The clock tower on the town hall at the other. All these little moments he thought who knows which ones are going to count and which ones will be forgotten. It's never the things you think. It isn't a fishing trip or even fish. The fish head. It's the small. Never the fire and the smoke is Wiley wispy and the smell of it gets in your hair and your clothes and no matter how much you try to duck around the flames. The wind always change. Is it always gets in your eyes. What's the matter said Sam? Are you crying just a little today? But it's okay. It's not unhappy cry. It happens when I come here. Sometimes it's like there's a big fire here from me and sometimes when I get close to what the smoke gets in my eyes. He turned away from the window and sat down on his bed beside his son tomorrow. He said we'll help grandma with the garden and then before supper we'll go out to the graveyard. Show your grandfather's grave. Can I bring this? He was holding the fish at joy to hear him again on. Cbc Radio the late Stuart McLean and fish head from the Vinyl cafe. Maybe I have no power over anything. Maybe place more vinyl cafe in the weeks to come who knows how long this will go. But we'll see it's always nice to hear comforting voice and that voice mclane is one of those voices coming up on the program. I'm going to speak with the advice. Columnist Amy Dickinson. You may know her by her pen. Name ask amy the beauty of the advice. Column and of course. It's an incredibly old John Right. It goes back to like the Campfire and the elder dispensing advice. But it's also a really old printed genre. The agony aunt goes way way back. What's beautiful about it? Especially in the old days. I guess it was a one way street. You know people write in and you know the they bury the lead. They leave out a lot of details but it's totally their point of view about what's going on with them and I made a really crucial decision at the outset. When I decided not to rewrite the letters and I will shorten and trunk eight the letters a little bit but I never ever ever rewrite anything the richness of the voices and stories. And whether it's somebody who is like totally kidding himself like my son one stop being gay really you know that guy actually wrote that to me and ATT UP. Ma'am you know so. There isn't a lot of. It's really not a two way street. And that's the beauty of it. That's the advice columnist. Amy Dickinson. She misses getting questions. That have nothing to do with covert nineteen. So we'll ask amy a few questions that's coming up in about half an hour also on the way a love story. One that spans borders which is pretty complicated in this era of physical distancing. The hear about a couple that was trying to make it work across a line. That's coming up. I'm Ed Galloway. This is an extended edition of the current on. Cbc Radio One. We're back in ninety seconds. Don't go.

Dave Sam Amy Dickinson principal Charlie advice columnist Cbc Radio San Big Hill Margaret Yard David Wiley Ed Galloway hockey Stuart McLean mclane John Right United Church Vinyl cafe Samson
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"Is the current on. Cbc Radio One. I'm Matt Galloway time for a pop quiz. I'll say a word. If you know the meaning of it feel free to shout it out might alarm that capture the dog or people who are around you and your isolation right now all right. This is an easy one. Start with cove immediate. How ABOUT CORONA CUT? You might have seen those might be getting one on the weekend Last one's a little more difficult colonials. Think millennials you can hope that we're doesn't stick these are all new slang words that have come out of this cove in nineteen pandemic. It would appear that this crisis is changing the way we speak Tony. Thorne as a language consultant at King's College. London has been documenting. All of this Tony. Hello Hi Holly you have coined a term corona speak. What IS CORONA SPEAK? Well Corona speak. He's is kind of casual all the Hashtag that I've come up with for all the new language which has been generated since Wasn't that long ago a couple of months since the beginning of the pandemic. Why is it? There are so many new slang words during this pandemic. Is it just because people have time on their hands to to work things up. Well that's certainly part of it but whenever you have an a big social upheaval. Think of the recession think of in the UK K. Brexit Think of wartime for example. Whenever you have a major social upheaval in the process of generating new language goes into acceleration goes into overdrive. More and more new languages needed and invented in these new completely new situation. How many words have we created so far? Well I've I'm I it's difficult to to answer in one way because I'm trying to collect I've collected more than a thousand Utah both technical medical language and language being generated by people under lockdown. But you gotta be careful because there's also journalists tend to invent a lot of language and then claim that this is. This is circulating. I'm I've I've got around two thousand that I'm quite sure that authentic examples of new language a couple of different parts to that. Let's start with the things that the the terms that people seem to be inventing. What are some of your favorites? Oh well it's hard to have a favorite. But if I'm really honest I guess my favorite is is my two favorites quarantine me and locked Taylor because this is at the end of the day when we we feel we're entitled to have a cocktail I think a lot of people are feeling that at roughly the same time at the moment. there's a lot. There's a lot of silly words cove immediate MORONA. Somebody behaving stupid. The corona usual when you use thinking stops getting disordered and you get confused The Australians very good things so we've got ice Ofa self-isolation but also in Australia. They took about an ice. Oh Bar that's where your quarantine is stocks I so desk is the workplace. You've improvised to look good on video in confinement and Dr -cation I like. I think it may be Canadian. Drive Passion. It's having a holiday in your motor home in your own driveway. So you're not leaving anywhere you go you just get in the motor home and stay there and look at the window and drink cocktails drink too many cocktails or have too much of the sour dough bread that you are making in quarantine you could put on what the Cova fifteen or the covert Nineteen Cova nineteen. Yeah that's an American for the nineteen pounds Extra Body Weight. You're supposed to accrue the YO set to accrue. I've got a feeling it could be even more than that in my case. I are there any that don't particularly like but they are circulating Well well first of all I guess. Zooming is is a bad thing. This is when people hijack an interrupt videoconferencing It doesn't have to be on the zoom platform. But this is this is troll and and Corona trolls You know people people who take advantage of all the Internet traffic in order to create bad content so In these are some of the negative aspects. I suppose you also mentioned unfamiliar. Perhaps to people who aren't frontline workers medical terminology that we're all using right now. Tell me a little bit of some of that. Of course we've had two. We've had to come to terms with a whole lot of language which normal people wouldn't have had to use the things like ventilation into bation P P which at least in the UK. I think there as well Personal protective equipment suddenly becomes a a huge issue. And it's on. It's on the tip of our tongue so we the new corona speak. I would say is coming from two directions. It's the official government and medical language of confinement lockdown and then ordinary people if you like a sort of fighting back. They're filling the gap and the official narrative which there with their own inventions describing their own their own private environments just in the last minute or so that we have how something like this shape the English language in the long-term well. It's of course it's at the moment we're all in the state of of a semi paralysis. We don't know how long this is going to go on but Previously the language of wartime some of it some of it disappears some of it subsides when the wars over the language of of the recession of of finance economics. Some of we don't use anymore once we think we're out of recession and I think that this is such a big social upheaval. And we're all concern for once everybody's involved I think some of this language and the the idea of medicalising the way we speak for example The idea of talking about our personal space is going to stay with us. Some of the language will stay with us. Tony you deserve. A corn teeny Whenever cocktail hour arrives. It's good to speak with you. Thank you thank you very much. Tony Thorne as a language consultant at King's College in London. You have a favorite corona slang word. That's being used. You can let us know on the website. Cbc DOT CA slash the current. Click on the contact link the. Cbc News is next. And then a conversation with Jason Rosenthal. He has a new memoir out. It's called my wife said you may want to marry you hear from him next. I'm Ed Galloway. This is an extended edition of the current for more. Cbc PODCASTS GO TO CBC DOT CA slash podcasts..

Tony Thorne Corona UK Cbc News Matt Galloway London King's College consultant Cova Utah official Ed Galloway Australia MORONA Jason Rosenthal Taylor K. Brexit
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:06 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"Here a lot of people from Asia Did what they do in Asia often which is really very comfortable wearing that. Let me let the January. Let me play you something. From the news from February this ran after an Asian Mall in burnaby British Columbia and being completely deserted because there was this rumor that was circulating on Chinese social media. That mall employee had covert nineteen. That rumor turned out to be false. This features the voices of the BBC Health Minister Adrian Dix and and e. p. m. p. Peter Julian since this matter began I have eaten here. I'm the Minister of Health for British Columbia. And I think that tells you what you need to know today. Politicians from all three levels of government came together with one message. Don't let fear of a virus turn into a fear of each other. I normally come to crystal once a month. I'll be coming every week. My wife and I will become any crystal ball even more frequently because we need to push back against the rumors and we need to push back against what is in some people's case races. When you hear that in hindsight what do you think of I think you know I think it's very complex and it's not As as simple as what I had thought before I started speaking to members of the Chinese community So absolutely there was stigma when you have parents Say Oh we need to make sure that all the kids that traveled to China shouldn't be coming to school. You have to realize that. Most of the infections that came into Canada did not come from China directly. You know I'd already kind of spread around the world. People were traveling from all parts of the globe. And and so. That targeting you know is definitely not affected from a public health perspective. But what should be noted? Is that for many of these Businesses that that lost revenue or going and visiting malls and whatnot A lot of that also came from within the Chinese community themselves as in the sense that the Chinese community are the ones that Frequent those areas a lot and as I mentioned a lot of them were already tapped into the seriousness of this virus. And so they were avoiding off places Chinese and non Chinese And and so you had the situation With you know for sure there is On the one hand public health precautions that are being taken and the other where it was kind of blown up out of proportion. And you're now stigmatizing or discriminating against communities And and you definitely has that doctors. Reluctant doctors in was reluctant to take credit for early intervention measures but in the remaining seconds that we have briefly there. One thing that you think. Public Health and emergency managers should learn from from what you've been researching absolutely and I think you know what what really needs to happen is realizing that. There's so much potential and capacity at the community level and that we really need to be listening and paying attention war and this is not something novel we talk about it all the time and emergency management that the community is the most informed that they are going to be able to really Understand the seriousness of the situation. Our help us understand how to manage it or mitigate it better than anybody else coming from the top down And here you have a case where the community was actually calling out and I think for all of us. It's just a matter of utilizing That having that exchange with People on the ground is so important and hopefully We we we move forward in that direction. It's great to talk to you about this. Thank you for Telling us about your research no problem thank you so much for having. Moody is an assistant professor of disaster and Emergency Management At York University case you needed a reminder. It's Friday the days of kind of flat out over the last little while these have been. I think it's fair to say a trying few weeks people need a bit of a lift. That is why next Friday a week from today. We will dedicate this show two stories that have brought us a little bit of joy. We want to hear from you. What has brought you some moment of happiness and hope. Maybe you have some sort of tip on how you've been staying saying through this pandemic. These are difficult times. And we WANNA know what's brought you a moment of joy over the last couple of weeks. It can be something small one of the most revealing questions you can ask. Somebody is tell me the best thing that's happened to you this week. Let us know a moment of joy that's happened to you. You can tweet us at the current. Cbc You can comment on our facebook page email us and the best thing if you can email a voice message go. Cbc DOT CA slash. The current click on the contact linked to find our email address. Let us know what's lifted your spirits. Put a bit of a smile on your face in this difficult time again. Go to CBC DOT CA slash the current and let us know your moment of joy by clicking on the contact link. We're back in about ninety seconds. This is an extension of the current. Cbc Radio One. I'm Ed Galloway stay with us. Hi I'm Matt Galloway. You're listening to the current fee. The groundhog early spring. Didn't we do this yesterday? I don't know what you mean. Don't mess with me. Pork Chop what days this February. Second Groundhog Day. I thought it was yesterday. This is your life. That of course was bill. Murray in Groundhog Day his character is trapped in a loop reliving that same day over and over and over again and yes that might sound like the life. You're leading these days. Recently Bill Murray played that character again in a commercial for jeep in. Its you see bill waking up about to relive the same day but this time he stays in bed and then on the screen the lines appear stay home when this is all over. The trails will still be waiting. Jeep isn't the only brand trying to figure out how to sell its products during covert nineteen. This is a tricky time for advertising. Crystal Molin is creative. Director with the AD agency R. P. A. Crystal. Good morning how are you? Well what did you make of the Groundhog Day g add I mean I I love that spot when I saw it during the superbowl and so I think that they're repurpose. Nabet actually make so much sense right now and bring some levity to a you know an uncertain time and it aligned so well with jeep brand purpose which is to get people off roading and they're just three imagining their call to action which is stay off the road But in a really literal way right now so I think it was really sweet and smart and I think the story behind. It is really great. I have a friend who who works on jeep and he was telling me a little bit about how Bill Murray was very gracious offering up You know the content and the footage to to be re imagined so I I I love that great. The reality is that jeep is still trying to sell you a jeep. And that's a pretty difficult needle to thread at this time. How do companies and brands have to strike that balance out? How are they going about doing that? Yeah I mean. I think that what's really interesting. Is that Brands Right now. Have to recognize that people are Feeling feelings they've never felt before and They I think brands need to think about their advertising than a different way because Our feelings and our anxieties or at such a heightened state and They're changing day by day. And so I think when when you think about trying to sell products You know brands. Especially you know the brands that I'm currently working on are well aware of the fact that you know the first thing that people are thinking about when they wake up in the morning and he's not oh can I get a good deal on a car or You know can I buy a new SOFA TODAY? It really is you know how am I gonNa get through the day? How am I going to teach my kids what they need to know? What are we going to? How for lunch and dinner and breakfast and I think that everyone's really living in the moment right now and I think that brands that recognize that and Speak to that which I think a lot of doing that already We'll have fix connecting with people. Let's hear some of these ads. There have been a number of them that had been released at this time that reflecting ways that difficulty that you're talking about this is from the car company fit. Jau It's quite a time We know thinks is difficult but we have found ourselves in tougher times before you know what there was always something that kept us afloat hour drive and determination to face an embrace. The unknown. That's the director Francis. Ford Coppola. Speaking about what's been going on in Italy and in the background you see these photos of frontline workers and people who are wearing masks. There are stories of people you know with feet cars. It's trying to strike this balance. Say How do you go by doing that? Striking a balance between the realities of the pandemic and getting your product out. There is that a good example. Yeah I mean I think that that's you know such a speed example You see I think generally we're seeing a lot of content where you're seeing empty road. You're seeing frontline workers Working really hard. The scene people in their homes and I think that The fee feed example is doing that and I think what's interesting about that spot and I think you guys will probably put it up online so people can check it out. all of these images Of frontline workers are people at home. People wearing masks are sort of interspersed with images that are parked. That are still better. Unmoving and I think that's in and of itself Sort of a pivot away from what you usually see in car ads. Which is the cars zoom about around? Chris I'm out you know along along. Cliffside or newman down a empty highway at night and so I think You know I think. Purposefully did that where they're staying there saying that people you know we understand. You're not in your car's right now. You're at home and that's important. It's a nice sentiment. What happens if you get it wrong? Oh I mean I think that if a brand gets it wrong they they. There's there's the opportunity for them to SORTA.

Jeep Bill Murray Asia Peter Julian Columbia Asian Mall China Adrian Dix British Columbia Matt Galloway Emergency Management BBC Canada facebook Crystal Molin Ford Coppola
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"We In the short term. We're hoping that the provincial government will give us at least a million dollars with our hundred foodbanks. We have across BBC. We're hoping that that would at least Enable us to purchase that food which we're having to do as I said donations are down. Yesterday were encouraged that are provincial. Government designated the food banks here as essential services in which they absolutely are. And so. We're hoping that that's going to be a turning point and that people will see and remember With all this going on. Hey I I need to support my bank and we're certainly You know talking with a lot of people donors partners and our government to make sure that we keep our doors open. And that's what I was just going to end within the remaining seconds that we have. We've seen great generosity across this country in the midst of this and you're hoping to see that fool your way as well absolutely people for the most part. Are you know people want to help? I we see This the generosity and the caring spring out of people they they have their own felt. The family took to be concerned about but They also worry about their friends and neighbors and those are the people that are going to the Food Bank. You don't always know who they are but they are. Your friends and neighbors are the ones that your kids are going to school with Laura. Good luck and thanks for speaking with us but the important work that you're doing. Thank you so much Laura. Lansink IS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR. Foodbanks British Columbia. We reached her in Surrey. Bbc coming up in about ninety seconds. Consider your cell phone. It knows exactly where you are at any given time and that information could be useful in tracking this pandemic could be a huge privacy breach as well. We'll try and discuss both of those issues and see whether there is common grounds to be found and how that data could be used. I'm Ed Galloway. This is the current policy radio. One stick around..

BBC Laura Lansink Ed Galloway Surrey British Columbia EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"Fresh into the studio straight through the door Tom. Power HOST OF Q. Can also make a plea for kids right. Yeah okay. I need to write in. Not because they need their fears to be laid. That's certainly something sure but they're willing to ask the dumb questions that I'm too insecure to add. I have all kinds of questions about this right you know and I I. I need to feel like an authority or I need to feel good around my cat. I need the kids to write in so that I can ask these kinds of questions that I can get answers and that can tell the people of course I know the answer. There are no dumb questions we just want to hear them and Yes kids will ask just about anything which is great You've been talking to musicians trying to figure out ways to cope with the fact that their shows have been canceled. Such an amazing time creativity right now and it really shows. That musicians are really stepping up in this moment and not just to give you something to be at as we'd say back home but also to try and do some good at the same time. Alan Doyle lead singer of the greatest party band in history the Elvis of Newfoundland and Labrador the true premier of Newfoundland. Sorry Dwight Ball. He is of course a great big sea greatest party. Or what do you do when you can't party at all? What do you do when you're solo tour where you're going to have packed audiences? We can't have any audiences you go on facebook live. You raise money for kids. Help phone which needs some cash. We were hearing that. They're they're being inundated with calls earlier this week Allen doing really amazing work with his foundation. A dollar a day and yeah. He's been helping kids help. Phone raise pretty impressive amount of money for them so far. I talked about that. I really talked to him just about how my mom is doing. Back in Newfoundland. Here's our conversation. Helen how are you at? I'm doing good. I'll things considered in this strange and wonderful time that we find ourselves in Making the most of the time we got I guess. How are you holding up? Oh I'm disappointed in that beyond the road you know The tour was to start This week of course the restart up in their upside outdoor and we were going to be doing all the big markets in southern Ontario and trump. Don't you know in Ottawa and Kitchener in London? And all that stuff. So it's a it's tricky business. These days in the touring world isn't it But we keep postponing it and moving stuff down the road and People have been kind enough to hold onto their tickets and win. The green light goes on. We'll be ready and we'll have some great nights when it's safe to do so. Tell me a little bit about this. Facebook live concert. You've been doing. I started on Friday I mean there's been a lot of stuff from people you know. Put just randomly posted songs. And that's all great and encourage people to do that of course But I wanted to do it with a bit of focus and a bit of a purpose and For the last couple of years myself and a couple of friends have been running The A dollar a day foundation for helping people with mental health and addictions. And we're doing a big bunch of stuff that along with my tour and all that but I just there's been a great increase in the number of calls to the kids help phone line and As a dollar a day loves to support mental health and addictions programs and facilities across the country We thought we jump up and help them this week and I said well that's a good focus for me to go on on facebook live and so I started at at five. Pm Eastern time. On Friday I do a half hour every night and sometimes I do a little theme like last. You know whatever I did All traditional land songs. And then you know another night. I might do old great big sea songs and then I'm like do some covers or whatever but it's all leading up every night this week until Friday and we got a big finale show for it on Friday and I got a bunch of special guests who gonNa join me Virtually of course and the little broadcast that we're doing and Just on fun for people and they can text to give by their phone. You know text Share five or share Tanno whatever the number two zero two two And that goes to a directly to the setting up at a dollar a day for kids help phone or you can go on the website and directly directly. Join US there and we're all that money is going to a a great 'cause this week. I think I saw already special guest. Maybe one that lives in your house is that right. Yeah my son did Join me for a song already. He was the only guy I could get. Of course my wife and then the dogs. That's IT and My Wife Dogs. Don't think so. Henry had to scrape. I'm glad you're doing Off on another topic I think about a song writers to be that our home right now. People that are home with Qatar always dreamed of writing songs. Found a little bit of time to do it. Now what's your advice to them? Oh sing about what you're seeing what you'd say that's what I always tell. People to do is see. If you're if you're looking for something to sing about. Well Sing about something that you talk about. You know and and if you don't if you don't say it then don't sing it. That's what Alvis say. That's a good start and bowling. No shortage of things to be saying or singing these days anyway. Now and it's you know there's a lot of time and there's you know there's there's benefits to this time as well. It's a shocking time and all that stuff and we're all going feel for the rest of our lives probably certainly in the dorm business. We are but there's lots of ways to make the most of it to you know and So just encourage people to stay positive and When we come up the end of it we'll all we'll all get together again and finally. I'M UP HERE UP IN TORONTO. I gotta I gotTa say that. I'm a little sad to be missing missing back home. Even though I in the house with mom but you know I think about the I think about the storm that Newfoundland Labrador just went through. You know I think about you know the sort of you know rocky past couple of months and now with this. Just how're things back Home Allen? Tell me Oh you know it's It's great in one way to have people you know. I walk in and and up and down the roads and CNN people from two meters away and all that And as you say joined the join the big snowstorm state of emergency. We already had. I was joking that myself. And you and mark were the only three people on earth trying to fly into a state of emergency but it is weird. This one's weird Tom. Because I feel like you know whenever there's dark time newfoundlanders are you. Can you know convinced that? Can we just get together and make a good time out of it? You know what makes something good of it but of course it's almost like our Kryptonite. His showed up not allowed to get together. So you got to have a good time getting together. It's like what's the point in that now. Everyone's hanging in there are things. I think lots of people are helping charters all kinds of stuff going on here Alan before we go. Give me one more plug for what time you're concert is and all that and how people can see it Allen page. I suppose her. Facebook live at five. Pm Eastern time every night this week till the big finale on Friday perfect. We'll see then Allen. Thanks for doing this. And you're GONNA do jam or not Jammie this week. I love it was Allen. Doyle joins us from Saint. John's Newfoundland and Labrador as Allan mentioned. You can find him on facebook. You Can Watch. The performance is there and you can donate to kids. Help phone there as well. Let's Tom Power. Speaking with Alan Doyle and that will do it for this extended version of the current. Today will leave you with a little bit a great big sea. This is ordinary day. I'm Ed Galloway. Thanks for listening to the current daycares off and just this all goes The corner died for more see podcasts. Goto CBC DOT CA slash podcasts..

facebook Allen Alan Doyle Tom Power Newfoundland Dwight Ball CBC Helen TORONTO CNN Ottawa Ontario Ed Galloway Qatar Alvis US Henry John
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

13:10 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"In the fall of nineteen ninety eight an elderly woman known as the Cat Lady went missing. She had a very Very Distinctive Silhouette and very recognizable. When you're walking into town a handkerchief on her hair long overcoat like somebody that lived on the street. All police could find were thirty. Cats shot dead. I always knew something happened to her disadvantage like that. Uncover the cat lady case from CBC. Podcasts this is a CBC PODCAST. Hello. I'm Ed Galloway. This is a podcast from the February. Twenty.

CBC Ed Galloway
"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

The Current

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The Current

"This is a CBC podcast. Well everyone always tell me. I didn't look like that family. I've been poor muttered at raiders. Said my son. I don't unaware got you for two years so much. Different interests them Craig. Avery never looked much like his brothers and sisters. They all had dark hair and dark is he was tall blonde and fair skinned going by never time rarely talk mounting about it to me. Just I don't know probably a look like the the other side of the family or somebody down lawing but didn't really didn't fizzle made them and it might have stayed that way if Craig and his wife Tracy hadn't started working together on a construction project in bull arm Newfoundland pretty much my first day there I had saw clearance and when I seen him. I couldn't get over to resemblance he had with Craig's brother. I'm Ed Galloway and this is the current weekly weekly. We're starting this episode talking to men Craig. Avery and Clarence hines and the story that changed their lives forever. My God Craig said if somebody hair looks so much like Clifford and that's always out of it until you know I got to know after a while I like to know Clarence then. Once I got to know him he told told me a few stories. On how over the years people at mistaken for Clifford so it. Just stay with me Clarence. Fines did look like Craig's brother Clifford. They both had thick dark hair and thick dark. Mustaches throwing up I was different. Din My siblings. That's Clarence but but I look like my mother's side. Her sister's children was also dark complexion. Mice is growing up for me was just looking like my.

Craig Clarence hines Clifford Avery Tracy Ed Galloway Newfoundland
"ed galloway" Discussed on The RV Podcast

The RV Podcast

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"ed galloway" Discussed on The RV Podcast

"Up your motor home and then enjoy Florida a little bit sunshine state. RV'S DOT com. That is where you WanNa go all time now for off the beaten path. I suggest to you. Here's my time onto check in with our off the beaten path regular correspondents Tom and Patty Burkett. Hey Jennifer and Mike Ed. Galloway was born in Wisconsin but his story really begins in Oklahoma as a young man. Skilled in woodworking and blacksmith. He got a job at sand springs home outside Tulsa. The home was founded by Charles Page as a refuge for orphans and children whose parents couldn't take care of them and the home itself is a story for another episode but ED came here to teach skilled trade to the young men living here at the age of fifty seven. He retired to property he owned. Just outside the small town of Foil and settled into what many would call his. Life's work work he. I built an impressive crossman home then a smoke house and a shop building. He tried his hand at Violin making he turned out to be a good luthier author and his instruments were widely sold in this part of the country. Eventually he built the Fiddle House to showcase his product. You can see many of his creations in the house. Today as his reputation grew he expanded into furniture and some home decorations but during this time he began to develop a fascination with native Americans and their distinctive art in nineteen thirty seven he began work on his first totem pole. When it was complete eleven years later it was ninety feet tall and covered with carvings of animals and native American symbols? The poll is hollow on the inside are painted landscapes and more totem poles. The entire poll rests on a turtle all symbolic of the Turtle Island Stories in native mythology. All the carvings are painted in. Bright colors interestingly. Galloway got most of inspiration and many of his ideas from national geographic magazines and picture postcards there are many other creations. On Galloway's patch including his beautiful house and smokehouse gates with a fish motif. Several more smaller Pote Totem Poles and whimsically made picnic tables. If you're a woodworker or musician you'll appreciate the variety and skill shown in the many many fiddles at the fiddle house outsider art also called Folk Art and visionary art is defined as work created by untrained practitioners. The roadways of the USA are rich in it. And if you get off the highways and wander the back rows. You're sure to see some. A few of our favorites are Howard. Howard Finishers Paradise Garden Georgia Dick and Jane spot in Washington the Garden of Eden and Kansas and saw Salvation Mountain in California and and Lincoln and land in Michigan? Come join us on the hunt for new ones out here off the beaten path. All right thank you guys so much. That is Tom Tom Petty Burkett. I'm looking forward to see them. And maybe we'll sit him down for and make them an interview the week when we run into them next week up at our winter camp out they always joins join us up there and that is always so much fun so we're looking forward to that. Hey next week on the podcast we are going to talk about Bucket lists and we want to know what your what is on your bucket list. Bo is in the background barking. I don't know if you can even hear him back there talking but Bo is out there and he wants to know what is on your bucket list so Let us know and we will put that in the next episode. assode of the of the podcast and I'm really looking forward to hearing that. It's always fun to string a whole bunch of those together. The best way to let us know is to call our voicemail number which which is five eight six three seven to sixty nine ninety five eight six three seven two six nine nine.

Tom Tom Petty Burkett Mike Ed Galloway Fiddle House Pote Totem Bo Florida Patty Burkett Bucket Turtle Island RV Howard Finishers Paradise Gard Charles Page Tulsa crossman sand springs USA Oklahoma Wisconsin