17 Burst results for "Ed Bloomberg"

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:27 min | 2 months ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is a Bloomberg business Black. Let's get you caught up on the market action right now. In Asia Mixed trading. We have markets in Tokyo and in Seoul, moving higher But in Australia, the market in Sydney ASX 200 down about 7/10 of 1%. Australian fourth quarter consumer prices up 9/10 of 1% quarter on quarter that was a bit better than the street was looking for in terms of a gain there, a guessing slight pick up in the level of retail inflation down under Also looking in the soul session at LG Display. It's kind of interesting because the stock right now is trading off about 2.5%, even though fourth quarter operating profit beat estimates. Highest quarterly profit in over three years. It seems that LG display has returned to black for a second quarter in the row with help from increased shipments of the new iPhones, But nonetheless, we're seeing a little bit of pull back, I guess question is how money much of this good news was already discounted by the market. In Seoul. Right now, the cost be higher by about 4/10 of 1%. If you look at the market in Tokyo Nikkei being led higher by material shares the industrials getting a bid along with consumer staple stocks, the Nikkei's up about 6/10 of 1%, although in Sydney after a holiday yesterday market coming back with a little bit of weakness. SX 200 down about 7/10 of 1% some earnings news after the bell here in the states, Microsoft's numbers were above projections thanks to robust demand for cloud services. Stock is up nearly 4% right now, and it's helping to send The NASDAQ 100 a many futures contract higher by a half of 1% so we could see some text strength here in the states tomorrow. Now in many contract up about 10th of 1% similar gain for the S and P 580 many futures contract right now in the Tokyo session. US 10 YEAR Treasury with the yield of 1.4% that is market action. We move to global news next at Baxter's covering it all from the Bloomberg 9 16 years ago in San Francisco, Eddie All right, Douglas. Thank you. New Zealand is to keep its borders closed to the world through the rest of the year. EU plans to shut the doors the travelers from Japan due to the surge, Hong Kong is implemented a second neighborhood locked down another part of the Cologne area. UK becomes the first European country with 100,000 covert debts. President Joe Biden says he's increased the order of Fizer and Madonna vaccines by 50% enough to fully protect 300 million people by the end of summer, Fizer CEO tells Bloomberg US orders have moved the timeline closer. He says the Trump Administration's refuses offers to be able to buy more and just in the past hour on this, maybe well, this is interesting Wording. AP says California seizes control over Struggling vaccine delivery It is going to set up basically, according to the governor on new delivery system by centralizing the hodgepodge of county systems into one along with third party providers. Republicans vote unanimously not to have an impeachment trial. The signals that will be very hard to get the number needed for conviction and Google targets North Korean hackers who says In turn are targeting corporate targets in the U. S in San Francisco. I'm Ed Baxter. This is lumber guys. Thanks. Ed Bloomberg. Daybreak Asia brought to you by New Jersey Institute of Technology ranked in the top 2% nationally for alumni, immediate career earnings and number one for student upward. Economic mobility. You can learn more in J t dot E. D u It's getting out to Timothy O'Brien Bloomberg opinion columnist. He's here to discuss president Bodies plan to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour on whether or not Congress should support higher wages. As an outside of Timothy. I have to say, always a find it baffling when we're talking about minimum wages in the USA are incredibly low, whether or not you take tips into it or not, As you're pointing out here, we should be seeking a living wage, not a minimum. Yeah, 100%. Juliet's incredible to me that the country's country that, uh, economic history and dynamism has been A from the idea of an expanding and robots middle class. Isn't taking the steps it needs in either the private sector or the public sector to make sure that there's the kind of wage that creates a consumer class or above spenders who will buy company's products. Will make markets more resilient and we'll keep the economy moving forward. The reason the government in the United States is stepping into this boy is because there is a void. Private sector just isn't Nothing up to deal with this issue, And it's not because the money isn't there. We've seen some smaller jurisdictions, cities in particular that have been enacted $15 an hour minimum. What do we know about the success that were perhaps failure of those initiatives? Well, I mean, I think Seattle is famously one of the ones Jurisdictions that did that Doug and I think for a long time there was, um And economic bias that said, if you raise the minimum wage is actually anti job growth, But it will. It will convince employers to hire fewer people, and it has a negative impact. The reality is this has been looked at now. In a very robust way by economists, and that's simply not the case. In a lot of situations. There are certainly targeted employers in different parts of the economy, particularly Very small business owners business visitors that are recession battered or businesses and very, very poor areas. But for the most part most large corporation Large company can afford to do this and the track record of companies like that doing. It has been very good. It has not caused the job market to tighten. And it is it has Created new class of consumers and you know, there's there's some history here. Remember, Henry Ford was famous for paying $5 a day wage. Back in the 19 twenties that is plant in Detroit and his other competitors said You're crazy for doing this, and his response was Those people are going to become my customers. They're going to be able to buy more of my cars. I think that's a truism that we shouldn't forget it. It's a valid today as it was back then. You make an interesting point about despite whether or not cos can afford to pay this minimum wage, not paying. It can lead to greater stress and greater economic ramifications, too. So where do you think we stand here on Congress coming to support at this minimum wage? Well, it's tricky because the binding the $1.9 trillion coded response plan that the by administrations put on the table has a lot of pieces to it. The minimum wage is part of that, and I think Republicans Have raised good questions about whether parts of the plan has been thought through an upset. Some Republican senators have raised the issue of whether or not people making $300,000 a year or in that range need to be actually getting a supplemental payment from the government to tide them through the cove In 19 crisis, I would argue they don't and I think questions like that are healthy. Um are healthy questions? Uh, There's a lot in here that I think most Republicans aren't going to stand up for And so the part of the issue here is do you pair the package down in order to get it through or do they do? Democrats Try toe force it through. There's something like a A budget reconciliation, which is possible. Yeah, It's not clear to me whether or not this would meet the criteria because it's not directly linked to spending and I don't know much about the parliamentary procedures that happened in the Senate in the rules. Where is corporate America? When it comes to the notion of $15 an hour we've talked on this program about a few chief executives that aren't necessarily negative on the idea. Well, and I think you know the business Roundtable for one who has Said that it supports the goals of a higher minimum wage..

Bloomberg LG Timothy O'Brien Bloomberg Seoul Ed Baxter Asia United States San Francisco Congress Ed Bloomberg Tokyo Nikkei Bloomberg US President Joe Biden New Zealand Tokyo Sydney ASX Microsoft Fizer
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:21 min | 6 months ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Presidents say that the health and safety of students and staff come first and with covert concerns, many students will not be returning to campuses until early next year. They're still working on planning. Or some kind of a possible spring and competition authorities in Michigan announcing charges against 13 people today and what they say was a plot to kidnap the state's governor. Authorities say they first learned of the plot through social media and then through confidential sources and undercover agents infiltrated the group as it planned to kidnap Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer and her vacation home members of this conspiracy on two occasions. Conducted coordinator coordinated surveillance. On the governor's vacation home. U. S Attorney for the Western District of Michigan. Andrew Birch says the men had called for the violent overthrow of state governments they believe for violating the U. S. Constitution. Marker Malard ABC news while the pandemic goes on, Lot of things haven't been going on, but you know what has been going on. People have been eating pizza a lot all across the country. Domino's pizza reported a more than 17% sales gain in the third quarter, well above market expectations, with sales stronger in the U S than its overseas markets. The Ann Arbor, Michigan based chain is causing some wincing, however, with investors After its margins for impacted my higher costs in the quarter, including covert related protocols. Dominoes also did something few other companies have been doing. It expanded in the third quarter. Opening 44 new locations in the U. S and 39 in international markets at CBS is Jason Brooks. Let's head off the Wall Street Now, shall we? Joan Donna Glory's Ed Bloomberg Keeping An eye on the numbers were racing toward the closing bell. Looks like me might stick the landing today. Yeah, we might. Then you know, Wall Street doesn't like when things are uncertain. So analysts think the polls indicating that there may be a more decisive election coming up, maybe helping boost the stock averages that and further talks on a Corona virus a deal so the Dow is up 113. NASDAQ 51, the S and P. 26 2. Former eBay security workers have pleaded guilty in federal court in Boston that to charges that they took part in this bizarre harassment campaign against a suburban blogger who had angered eBay execs by being critical of the company. You know that's that case that involved packages of live cockroaches, a bloody pig mask in a funeral wreath being sent to the victim's home. I'm Joan Doniger Bloomberg Business on W. B Z Boston's news radio. Who.

Michigan eBay Boston Gretchen Whitmer Andrew Birch Joan Doniger Joan Donna Glory coordinator Ann Arbor Domino Ed Bloomberg Jason Brooks harassment U. S CBS Attorney
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | 7 months ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

"Ed Bloomberg Dot. com on the Bloomberg business APP and Bloomberg take. This is Bloomberg radio. These Bloomberg Daybreak Asia other than. The US China relations. Big Out there. People's Bank of China doesn't appear to have been MAC aggressive in terms of its monetary policy, cody and the risk of drawdown are high risk matters. Investors are looking to twenty twenty one because it seems clearer than what we're going for the rest of the twenty twenty s. Daybreak. Asia. Live from Hong Kong and your on Bloomberg radio. And Good morning to our audience in Hong Kong and across the Asia Pacific I'm Juliet Solly in Singapore Bloomberg Daybreak Asia is presented by interactive brokers. They charge margin loan rates from as low as one point five, nine percent rates subject to change. You can learn more at IB K. R., dot com slash compare them. We are looking ahead to the Fed. Let's see how markets are reacting what they did on Wall Street and get over to Bloomberg's Doug Krizner who's in New York Doug. We positively in tech shares today helping to send the Nasdaq composite higher by one point, two percent computer gaming stocks were one of the standouts activision blizzard was up more than three percent today take two interactive. By more than two and a half percent in the broader market though we had some late day weakness in tech stocks are rather in financial shares that helped take the S. and p. five hundred from the best levels of the day we did end higher though by about a half of one percent where the Dow was concerned and essentially flat reading we had some news after the bell we'll talk about Fedex. Momentarily, Adobe reported revenue above estimates after the bell this is kind of a sign of robust..

Bloomberg Singapore Bloomberg Daybreak A Daybreak Asia Ed Bloomberg Dot. Hong Kong Bank of China Fed activision Juliet Solly Fedex Doug Krizner Adobe interactive brokers cody New York K. R.
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:39 min | 8 months ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Each things up because there's a lot more to say. And I should know because my grandfather was a firefighter, and one of the things he taught me is that the people that love the outdoors, the most are often the ones accidentally starting wildfires, which means Always be y o b know. Bring your own bucket to the campfire. And be extra careful with things like burning yard trimmings. Don't just walk away. Our chances are you might be starting a wildfire. So for the love of the outdoors, go to smokey bear dot com to learn more about wildfire prevention brought to you Hey, Ed Bloomberg dot com on the Bloomberg business APP and Bloomberg Quick Take Thiss is Bloomberg Radio. This is Bloomberg. Daybreak. Europe. Thie Ideas. Three. Hold the economy in suspended animation until we get to throw this virus we are wanting a picture of Montree. Dominant will get so gross. I mean, let's not get confused about that. We are in a national crisis. I think policies to pull together your area is facing an economy contraction off a magnitude and speed that are unprecedented in peacetime. Bloomberg daybreak. Bluebird Radio. Good morning from London. I'm Anna Edwards. And I'm Caroline have careful mark into the program. I'm in for Matt Miller. This week's lesson today. Break your life on one day. Be dish, Eladio. And he'll panic re markets. Then Caroline making.

Bloomberg Bloomberg Radio Ed Bloomberg Caroline Matt Miller Anna Edwards Europe Eladio Montree London
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"All day, long, tap, tap, tap, tap, bloop, bloop. She can't put it down there. It is. Oh and get this. She even talks to it last week. She has to for Chinese and guess what eggrolls showed up like magic. Humans have cool toys. A person is the best thing to happen to a shelter pet. Be that person. Adopt. Brought to you by the Ad Council and the shelterpetproject dot org. From the Bloomberg interactive brokers studio, this is Bloomberg best. European automakers faced two major unknowns of Brexit that could reshape their operations in sales in the UK and the possible levying of import tariffs by the US and Ed Bloomberg's Matt Miller spoke with Herbert d CEO of Volkswagen at the Geneva motor show. They discuss licensing the platform technology of electric vehicles. The possibility of an IPO for some of the brands tariffs imposed by the US, and how his company will be impacted by Brexit. We're standing first off in front of this. So I can't avoid a question about it. And really, I think it's interesting because this represents not just a concept for folks. But also really a new business model, you're going to license the platform technology. Tell me how that will work. Yeah. We we are really fast in getting up to wall. You're. We'd be already fifty million cars booked, and you know, this new technology, the drive trades will be white similar. No. It's not as today, and you just mentioned deviate engine engines differentiation between the drive trains in the electric age will be much more limited. Bank one for on you had to pick size a chocolate bar battery in between two Motors, and then we electric converter. So it does make sense to share this technology to make it just cheaper more affordable and to do better cost to the warriors emotional caused. We are. Now, we are really making good progress. Fifty million 'cause already that we have considered. And I think makes sense to offer this platform also dead parties have our margin there and make electricity really comes through. And and give you the brakes. Well, it's also a new revenue stream and car makers are experimenting with a number of different ways to bring in more money. You're gonna need it because you're investing fifty billion.

Bloomberg interactive brokers Bloomberg US Ed Bloomberg Ad Council Volkswagen CEO UK Geneva Matt Miller Herbert d
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:20 min | 2 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And Ed. Bloomberg's Alix steel and David Westin spoke with Chevron CEO, Michael worth about the strategy and its potential impact on the global oil market. We've got the largest position in the Permian basin with two point two million acres about one point seven or that in the Midland in Delaware basins. So really we have a tremendous starting point with land. We've held this land for decades. So we don't have a big cost basis in it. And it doesn't have a royalty override on most of it. And so we actually keep all of the revenue that we generate as opposed to paying a royalty owner we've operated in factory drilling type operations for decades in the San Joaquin valley in Thailand, and Indonesia and so doing. Running operation where you drill the same types of wells, many many times with a large fleet of rigs is something we've done for a long time and something we're very good at two things that wind up coming out with the independent producers one is that take takeaway capacity has been issue pretty much across the board in the Permian and two were there you go with the oil price when they're cash crunches. They have to shutdown operation. How does that change the conversation for you as a major well as a company with a very large and transparent production profile are? Shipping is something transportation is something that many of the midstream providers compete for. So they would like to see us underwrite new pipeline capacity. We've got a strong balance sheet, and we'll get a clear commitment to growing our production. So we actually don't invest in mature infrastructure ourselves that we find that. Those were building pipelines are willing to offer us attractive shipping rates and terms. So we really haven't been impacted by the takeaway capacity on your second question as an integrated oil come with a large downstream business. Petrochemicals business were somewhat hedged against some of the quantity price cycles in oil that can hit somebody who's only an upstream furnace or particularly someone who's only one basin from out are you less vulnerable to price shocks and the downside because your balance sheet can sustain you. And because you have these other businesses to offset purchasing independent that's going to have to send him production. We get like thirty. Well, that's a very good point yesterday. At our investor day. We talked about the fact that we have the strongest balance sheet. Amongst our major competitors. The lowest net debt ratio. And we've got the lowest break-even so price downturn. We're actually able to cover our capital spending in our dividend at a lower price than our competitors. And because we've got the strongest balance sheet, we also conservative and a longer creative low oil prices than than many of our competitors. What about the short medium long term? I mean to what extent are you taking the money? That's readily available off the table next three or five years and not investing as much as maybe some others are in the longer term opportunities for the nice thing about the shale is it cycles so fast. And so you put cash into it. But within two years that caches flying right back. So seventy percent of our investments today is in short cycle projects that return cash within just two years. So we've got plenty of cash flow coming. In fact, last year was the strongest free cash flow in the history of our company that play of cash to invest in the longer term projects and return to our shareholders. We've got a global portfolio of what I would call medium and longer term projects that are underdeveloped. And what's happened with shale is all of those projects have to get more economically competitive because we've got such an attractive option to invest in the shale deep water projects, for instance, in the Gulf of Mexico several years ago took a very high oil price to deliver the kinds of returns that would warrant investments are engineers have found ways to approach design equipment standardization and execution in different ways. Now, which brought the break even costs down in the economics are much stronger on those projects today as you say you get to pay back in jail faster, but you have to keep putting money in also does that really entail an on going commitment to further capital investment? Well, any individual shell? Well has a production profile where it will pick quickly. And then it has a kind of a long tail as you grow hundreds. And then thousands of those wells those long tails accumulate and become quite a large wedge of production. That actually throws off good cash flow at little or no investments for a long time. The other thing that is is really different about the. Shale is the stacked pays or the stack layers in which you can drill and produced from in the Permian are there many more of them than we see in other shale plays. It's one of the reasons why there's a lot of drilling to be done is because there's a lot of resource there. And so this will last for very long time. Today, David point. I mean, if you wind up having say a longer cycle project you've done a lot of money off the bat, but then over time, you just have your outback's snits. Nice free cash flow cow, right? But for sale you may have a good sort of initial production rate. But that decline rate is also really steep. So the constant cash burn isn't that you have to wonder if contending with very different. I think for for a small company where that's all they have that becomes a very real issue. And particularly some who have just ramped up and ramped up. We've come to a point where we got twenty rigs working more holding flat at those twenty rigs are production with twenty rigs. We'll go from three hundred thousand barrels a day last year to six hundred thousand barrels a day in two thousand twenty two nine hundred thousand barrels a day in twenty twenty three at basically, the same capital spin. So you can see this growing production at a level is capital. Spend which really allows the cash flow to begin.

David Westin Permian basin Bloomberg Chevron Ed Delaware CEO San Joaquin valley Michael Mexico Thailand Indonesia two years two thousand twenty two nine h three hundred thousand barrels six hundred thousand barrels
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"I'm Ed Corry on KFI K in Sacramento. I'm reporting Apple's expected to wait until twenty twenty before it releases a five G version of the I votes. I'm Courtney Donohoe on KTAR h in Houston, Chevron will increase capital spending to as much as twenty two billion dollars a year. I'm Steve Podesta on KYW in Philadelphia and WTI in Hartford. We're talking about anthem accusing cygnus boss for playing a role in their failed merger. I'm Alisa Parenti on WBZ 'em in Chicago. I'm reporting on Wisconsin based Kohl's providing an upbeat outlook for the year. Thanks, lisa. European automakers faced two major unknowns of Brexit that could reshape their operations and sales in the UK and the possible levying of import tariffs by the US and Ed Bloomberg's Matt Miller spoke with Herbert DC L Volkswagen at the Geneva motor show, they discuss licensing the platform technology of electric vehicles. The possibility of an IPO for some of the brands tariffs imposed by the US, and how his company will be impacted by Brexit. We're standing first off in front of this buggy. So I can't avoid a question about it. And really, I think it's interesting because this represents not just a concept for folks volume, but also really a new business model, you're going to license the platform technology. Tell me how that will work. Yeah. We we are really fast in getting up to wall. You'll be already fifty million cars, and you know, this new technology. The drive trains will be quite similar. No, it's not as today, and you just mentioned deviate engine v. Eight diesel engines the differentiation between the drive trades in the electric age will be much more limited. The Bank one the big size chocolate bar battery in between two Motors, and then the electric converter. So it does make sense to share this technology to make it just a more affordable to do better cost to do more emotional cars, and we are now we are really making good progress. Fifty million cars already booked that we have considered and I can make sense to offer this lead from. Also, the dead parties have margin there and make electricity really comes through and and get a break. So well, it's also a new revenue stream and car makers are experimenting with a number of different ways to bring in more money. You're gonna need it because you're investing.

US Ed Corry Courtney Donohoe Alisa Parenti Apple Sacramento Chevron Houston Kohl Wisconsin cygnus Ed Bloomberg Steve Podesta lisa Volkswagen Chicago UK Matt Miller Geneva
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"More than two million people came out to line the mardi gras parade routes and celebrate fat Tuesday across greater New Orleans. We grew up as kids coming out here. We're letting our kids grow coming out here. Eight during be Mary watch forty of us out here. So we come here for years. These families have been going to the same parades the same spot for generation some families for centuries have their place where they watch the fat Tuesday parade gave going for CBS news, New Orleans. Former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg says, he will not be running for president in thousand twenty the CBS news correspondent, Alison keys tells us that he explains why in a long op-ed Bloomberg rights that he's never made any secret of his belief that Donald Trump is a threat to our country. And while Bloomberg thinks he would beat the president in a general election. He thinks rather than risking losing the democratic nomination in such a crowded field. It would be better to finish the work. He's already doing. He says he's launching a new campaign called beyond carbon to start moving the nation toward a one hundred percent clean energy economy, explosive packages are mailed to Heathrow airport London City airport in Waterloo station, a major train hub in London BBC. Correspondent Robert Hall is on scene at the tube station alert came in it, but an office block near Heathrow the package in that case identical to the other two was in a white plastic envelope. Crudely addressed to that office block and inside 'specially say was a viable device capable of starting a small within the package, and.

Michael Bloomberg New Orleans Donald Trump CBS Bloomberg president New York City Waterloo station Heathrow Robert Hall London Alison keys Mary BBC one hundred percent
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:30 min | 2 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A toll. I'm Joan Doniger telling WBZ and listeners the dish ACOG, oh, candy maker is stepping in to fill the void left by the disappearance of those conversation. Valentine's Day hearts. I'm Andrew O'day on WBZ in Boston. Reporting on the closure of Panera breads last pay what you want location. I'm Ed Corry on W O A in San Antonio. I'm reporting BP smashed earnings estimates and showed veterans, Michelle. Thank you, Andrew pay pal president. And CEO, Dan, Schulman was one of the youngest senior executives at AT and T helping to launch virgin mobile USA with Richard Branson moving to American Express and finally being named the CEO of pay pal in two thousand fourteen following it split from EBay, so Ed. Bloomberg's David Westin. Spoke with the CEO about pay pals mission, then MO and the democratization of financial services. Most people think of payback some button on a website that you can click and simply and securely buy something from any commerce site. Paypal really is much more than that. It's a digital payments platform that enables consumers to manage a move their money in the digital age and for merchants it's basically an operating system that allows them to move from traditional retail, which is really in store. And with the advent of mobile phones, right now, everybody is moving towards mobile commerce, which is a blurring of online and offline and we provide a suite of capabilities and services on that platform to help retailers move into the mobile commerce sage. What does pay pal want to be? So our vision as a company is related democratize financial services so large it's an expensive vision. And basically, it's a fancy way of saying that managing and moving money should be a right. For everybody and not just. A benefit for the affluent. So for us. This is really about. How do we provide access to basic capabilities for people who are outside the financial system? And they're over one point seven billion people around the world that live outside the financial system. And so for us democratizing. Those capabilities is really our mission you partner with the big banks. And yet in some ways you compete with him. Don't you? Yeah. So that's a really interesting question and probably the biggest strategic move. We made it pay bell was deciding to open our platform up provide consumers choice on every single transaction. That would make before we would steer consumers to lower cost items in their wallet which helped us, but confuse consumers. And so we said ourselves if we're going to be a customer champion, we need to make sure that customers can make a choice on how they wanna pay every single time. They make a transaction. And so we opened up our system, and when we opened up our system and stopped steering people. It enabled us to also partner with the industry who it considered us. Previously more frenemy, a friend because we drove tremendous digital volume each financial institution. But an enemy because we were steering people away from maybe. More profitable things for the industry. And so when we basically said to the industry all were going to do is provide alternate choice for consumers. It opened up the ability for us to be the largest digital distribution platform for financial institutions, and we've done a thirty five big major strategic partnerships since we made that change. In fact, the whole competitive dynamic force has changed fundamentally from it's actually more benign than it was where we were four years ago because we're partnering with financial institutions sort of on the war on cash think with me about the social media world to what extent do the Facebooks of this world. Goodness knows the Amazons this world increasingly offer the sort of service that you do. Yeah. So in many cases, those platforms, not necessarily Amazon, but Facebook, Google, Microsoft Alibaba, most of the major tech companies Guber Airbnb are using the pay pal platform to move into payments payments is a really complicated industry. I mean, it's not just managing and moving money. But you've got privacy concerns. You've got regulatory you've got compliance. You've got enterprise risk. You've got gotta worry about fraud. It's you've got all of that regulatory environment in every single country that we operate in over two hundred countries. So once we opened the platform as opposed to again competing, and basically said look here is you can tied into our platform. You can use our services both on a branded and unbranded basis. And just leverage this capabilities. We went from being potential competitors actually being partners and that again. Like just announcing numerous things with face very close partners with I'm very close partners with Google pay pal is more than just pay pal. It's also then MO. Yeah. Talk about where it is. And how it works. So I think that was really one of the crown jewels of pay pal. Today is already at a seventy billion dollar run rate in terms of processing that's goes over that platform, it grew last quarter at seventy eight percent hero for year growth and for three quarters in a row the number of net new actives coming onto then Mel has hit a record inch every time. And so we're really pleased with with them. But what them really is is it's a value proposition oriented to the millennial generation, and the reason that it's so successful. There is that it basically takes every payment and turns it into an experience when you do a payment in a tag that payment with either an emoji, or what it was for you share it with your friends, you can split transactions with your friends, and it really ties into this whole social. Network. Experience that the millennial generation grew up in. So it's magic is that it's not so much a payment application as it is sort of an experience application, and and it just grows by leaps and bounds right now. Is it as successful financially? How do you make money off of it the potential there? So the best way to think about van mill is the think about pay pal pal started off as a free service peer to peer service, then most started off as a free peer to peer service. Now what we're doing is we're adding more and more capabilities than now. That are what we call monetize symbol. So then MO user can shop and buy from over from any papal merchant here in the US, and they take that out of their counter in the merchant pays us transaction fee for that. We've put a card debit card so somebody can use their vendor bouncing account at offline merchants right now, we earn money off of that. If you want to take money. Immediately out of your remote count to your Bank account, which are small fee for that. So we're basically very slowly. But surely building capabilities and benefits to the user base. That added more value to them, but also start to create a financial model for us that was pay pal president and CEO, Dan Shulman, and that's all for this edition of Bloomberg best. You can see all of our best work at best. Go on the Bloomberg.

partner Bloomberg CEO president and CEO Ed Corry WBZ Dan Shulman Andrew O'day Google BP San Antonio Michelle Joan Doniger Valentine US Richard Branson
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

08:48 min | 2 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Cates. And I'm Susanna Palmer from Bloomberg world headquarters, Bloomberg has learned PG and E Corp have a California utility giant facing billions of dollars in wildfire liabilities may notify employees as soon as tomorrow, it's preparing potential bankruptcy. Filing misplaced bets on treasuries caused a losses in Bill Gross as bond fund. Bloomberg estimates show the Janice Henderson global unconstrained bond fund suffered about sixty million dollars worth of redemptions in December that along with ten months worth of redemptions has cut assets to nine hundred fifty point four million dollars down from last February's all time high of two point twenty four billion Greece's government has unraveled prompting prime minister, Alexis Cipro's to call a confidence vote that could trigger an early election and end his for years in power Greek defense minister Panos cheminots withdrew his party from the governing Greek coalition today over name dispute. With neighboring Macedonia. The name Republic of north Macedonia doesn't hit cheminots and many like minded Greeks, very, well, they say Macedonia should only refer to their own countries northern region. We're heading into a busy week for earnings with some of the biggest banks reporting. Bloomberg's Karen Moskow has more Citigroup's starts things off on Monday. Investors will also be digesting earnings from J P Morgan Bank of America Wells Fargo, Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs throughout the week. Among the economic reports we'll be watching for the producer price index and empire manufacturing are out on Tuesday. The Federal Reserve releases its beige book Wednesday and industrial production and consumer sentiment around Friday. This newscast was brought to you by sector spider ATF's, why single stock when you can invest in the entire sector, visit sector SPD's dot com or call one eight six six sector ETF global news twenty four hours a day on air and picked up on Twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than one hundred twenty. Countries. I'm Susanna Palmer. This is Bloomberg politics. Pretty interesting fight within the Republican party itself policy. Currently there aren't really federal regulations in place. Power has an issue of saving on the Bill just yet. Beltway news, insight and analysis does seem like an unconventional reality from Bloomberg politics. A kind of radical agenda that breaks with democratic tradition and Bloomberg government to heated rhetoric in Washington and nationwide. Bruschi is politics policy and power on Bloomberg radio. I'm Amy Morris with Peter Barnes coming up in this hour. President Trump wants to increase his unilateral tariff power setting himself up for a fight with congressional Republicans. Plus, the US and China wrapped up trade talks this week on a somewhat optimistic note. But I the Trump administration has directed. The army corps of engineers to examine whether the wall could be funded using money from February two thousand eighteen emergency funding package that included disaster relief for. Rico and other areas, according to a congressional source familiar. Nancy? None of it is senior congressional correspondent at Bloomberg government. He joins us now for more on this by phone, and Nancy how big is this pot of money. Tell us about it. Well, it's billions of dollars, and it would have ended up and spread all over the country and the and Puerto Rico for projects overseen by the army corps of engineers. And it includes projects that were designated in California Kentucky, a lot of places. But when money hasn't been obligated, and it's sitting there, then it becomes attractive to people who are either looking to shift money elsewhere or to cut the budget. You know, that was my question about this. I thought that this was already specifically earmarked for disaster relief. But no, well until it's actually spent is still there and the army corps of engineers has a pot and it takes time to get these projects underway as you can imagine. Takes a lot of work just to get them off the drawing board. And while the money's there, you know, it's vulnerable in some cases, usually congress can count on certain things that they have approved an ago, she with an administration to be honored. But in this case this administration is looking at a lot of different things. And you don't know where it where it will end up. So nancy. I assume that this pot of money would cover the five point seven billion that the president is looking for. Yes. Although the administration is also looking for more money than for a wall or a barrier in recent days, they've been talking about the things that congress has been talking about this year, the the security upgrades, the non physical barriers different personnel different elements of border security, and you don't know how big something could get if a national disaster emergency rather was you know, was declared and the administration thought that it could go into an obligated funny. It's very interesting because this is definitely something that a lot of members of congress in in times gone by not that long ago would have screamed about do you? Remember the line item veto? Struggles and struggles over line items. There's the whole issue of the power of the purse and under the constitution. Congress is supposed to have that authority over spending. And so people who care about the institution would often be very concerned about these types of most let's talk about the institution for a second. I wonder if congress would for for this to happen for the funds that are there for disaster relief to be diverted to build the wall would congress have to support that. And would they? I don't imagine that a lot of members out in the leadership would be supportive of this just when you look down the list, obviously, there's money in there for California that probably wouldn't be very popular with the new speaker or with a Republican leader Kevin McCarthy, but there's also money in there are Kentucky and Mitch McConnell. The Senate later could be enthusiastic about that. I believe that there is a project money in there for Texas, and the Texas senators, I doubt what support a move to take away those funds so going into that pot of money really opens up some troubles. But it's something that is there that could be looked at. So how would all of this work with the administration? Just, you know, make an announcement and say and then by Fiat just say, hey, here's this pot of money. And we've decided to spend it this way. And notify congress. How would it work? Oh, we're all wondering how it would how it would work. It's come out very quickly. And Senator Grassley said that the White House was threatening this emergency action. But he said that even if they were able to go ahead with it at the White House on its own. He said, it's a terrible precedent. That would go to the courts almost immediately. I suppose someone would look to try to block it in court while it was being considered Grassley is one of the people who said that it's a bad precedent because it's a threat to the purview of the legislative branch, and he really advises against it. And there are other members who would also be very opposed and today in the Senate and probably also the house, we're seeing more and more people Republicans here in the Senate coming forward with different. Proposals to try to a show ways that Trump could get border money without going after appropriated funds and one of the other things that's been mentioned besides money under the control of the army corps of engineers is money in the budget for military construction. That's the annual Bill military construction and veterans affairs legislation. That's the money that congress applets aside for construction projects on military bases for housing for military families and other things annually, and there's some attention looking at that pot of money as well by the administration something to watch. Senior congressional correspondent Ed Bloomberg government. Thanks.

Bloomberg congress army corps of engineers Nancy Bloomberg world Ed Bloomberg President Trump Senate Susanna Palmer Macedonia Bill Gross north Macedonia California army corps Goldman Sachs Citigroup Federal Reserve Senator Grassley Bill military E Corp
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Trump wants to increase his unilateral tariff power setting himself up for a fight with congressional Republicans. Plus, the US and China wrapped up trade talks this week on a somewhat optimistic note. But I the Trump administration has directed. The army corps of engineers to examine whether the wall could be funded using money from February twenty eighteen emergency funding package that included disaster relief for Puerto Rico and other areas, according to a congressional source familiar. Nancy, none of it is senior congressional correspondent at Bloomberg government. She joins us now for more on this by phone, Nancy. How big is this pot of money? Tell us about it. Well, it's billions of dollars, and it would have been spread all over the country in Puerto Rico for projects overseen by the army corps of engineers. And it includes projects that were designated in. California Kentucky a lot of places. But when money hasn't been obligated, and it sitting there, then it becomes attractive to people who are either looking to shift money elsewhere or to cut the budget. You know, that was my question about this. I thought that this was already specifically earmarked for disaster relief. But no, well until it's actually spent is still there and the army corps of engineers has a pot and it takes time to get these projects underway as you can imagine they takes a lot of work just to get them off the drawing board. And while the money's there. You know, it's foldable in some cases, usually congress can count on certain things that they have approved with an administration to be honored. But in this case this administration is looking at a lot of different things. And you don't know where where it will end up. So Nancy, I assume that this pot of money would cover the five point seven Bill. That the president is looking for. Yes. Yes. Although the administration is also looking for more money than for a wall or a barrier in recent days, they've been talking about the things that congress has been talking about this year the. The security upgrades. The non physical barriers different personnel different elements of border security, and you don't know how big something could get if a national disaster emergency rather was you know, was declared and the administration thought that it could go into an obligated funnies. It's very interesting because this is definitely something that a lot of members of congress in in times gone by not that long ago would have screamed about do you? Remember the line item veto? Struggles and struggles over line items. There's the whole issue of the power of the purse and under the constitution. Congress is supposed to have that authority over spending. And so people who care about the institution would often be very concerned about these types of most let's talk about the institution for a second. I wonder if congress would for for this to happen for the funds that are there for disaster relief to be diverted to build the wall would congress have to support that. And would they? I don't. A lot of members out in the leadership would be supportive of this just when you look down the list, obviously, there's money in there for California that probably wouldn't be very popular with the new speaker or with a Republican leader Kevin McCarthy, but there's also money in there for Kentucky and Mitch McConnell. The Senate leader couldn't be enthusiastic about that. I believe that there's a project money in there for Texas, and the Texas senators, I doubt what support a move to take away those funds so going into that pot of money really opens up some troubles. But it's something you know, that is there that could be looked at. So how would all of this work with the administration? Just, you know, an make an announcement and say, and then by Fiat just say, hey, here's this pot of money, and we've decided to spend it this way and notify congress. Would it work? Well, wondering how it would how it would work. It's come out very quickly. And Senator Grassley said that the White House was threatening this emergency action. But he said that even if they were able to go ahead with it the White House on its own. He said, it's a terrible precedent. That would go to the courts almost immediately. I suppose someone would look to try to block it in court while it was being considered Grassley is one of the people who said that it's a bad precedent because it's a threat to the her view of the legislative branch, and he really advises against it. And there are other members who would also be very opposed and today in the Senate and probably also the house, we're seeing more and more people Republicans here in the Senate coming forward with different proposals to try to. A show ways that Trump could get border money without going after appropriated funds and one of the other things that's been mentioned besides money under the control of the army corps is money in the budget for military construction. That's the annual Bill military construction and veterans affairs legislation. That's the money that congress applets aside for instruction projects on military bases for housing military families and other things annually, and there's some attention looking at that pot of money as well by the administration. Something to watch Nancy a senior congressional correspondent, Ed Bloomberg.

congress Nancy army corps of engineers army corps Trump Puerto Rico Senate Senator Grassley Bloomberg Kentucky California Bill military US White House president Ed Bloomberg Mitch McConnell China Kevin McCarthy Texas
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:40 min | 2 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is a Bloomberg pursuits look at luxury after a quarter century of marriage. Jeff MacKenzie basis are calling it quits MacKenzie Basil's divorce from the Amazon founder could make her the world's richest woman with a fortune of sixty nine billion dollars. If they split assets, fifty fifty even if love isn't forever diamonds still purport to be and Tiffany telling customers where each and every one of them came from a marketing gimmick says Tiffany chief executive officer Andre liangelo despite the jewelry tightened efforts to appeal to younger consumers. The Tiffany CEO says the change was imperative calling it his duty to reveal time ends provenance shoppers will eventually be able to see a diamonds full journey through the supply chain from where it was mined to where it was cut and polished tesla may soon be making a flying car, or at least a floating. And a veil on bus tweets are to be believed. This isn't a bunch of hot air, the questionably street legal idea is to use to SpaceX thrusters in place of the backseats. I'm Andrew O'day, Bloomberg radio from the Bloomberg interactive brokers studio, this is Bloomberg best the Federal Reserve could place interest rates on hold through March or even longer. That's the signal from the minutes of last month's meeting a fed policymakers and Ed Bloomberg's David Rubenstein sat down with the chairman of the Federal Reserve Jerome Powell financial markets, really beginning in the fourth quarter. Got more volatile and seemed to be pricing in a more pessimistic outlook. Which is I mentioned the it seems to be rooted in concerns about slowing growth in a related concern over the ongoing trade negotiations. So if but if you look at the incoming data right through the end of the year and into the beginning of this year. You don't really see any evidence of a slowdown. And so we're we're in a situation where we have factors pointing in different directions. By the way, this is not uncommon. This is this is actually something that happens, not infrequently. And when we when we when we had that what we do is. We we apply sort of risk management principles. In other words, we're not just concerned about the baseline case. We're thinking about what are the risks? And we're we're we're using our tools to address those risks. So in that case, what does it mean? It means I there is no pre-set pass for for race there. Really? Isn't there never is particularly as it now second as I mentioned, it gives us the opportunity to be patient and watch and see what what does evolve. Or are we going to see the more positive view that most forecasters have of this year or are we going to see slowing global growth, and we're going to see that affect you. Because if it does then I can assure you, we a common thing for the economy to behave in ways that are not exactly as we expect. And when it happens, we can flexibly and quickly move policy. We can do soon as insignificantly as well if that's appropriate. So we'll always use or tools to try to sustain this expansion. And keep the labor market, strong and finishing. Currently are the fed is projecting. The US economy is gonna grow in two thousand nine hundred ninety two point three percent. I believe that's your number. It previously was a little bit higher. Two point five percent. I think last year you've lowered correct? And are you going to lower it again because of the government shutdown? A second affect the economy. Do your view. Let me say first there is no official fed projection. With two point three percent was the median of seventeen participants. So they were affable and half below that will during the year, not infrequently. In fact, typically when we submit new projections every quarter the projection for change. I mean, it's very difficult to forecast the economy because that level of precision, and so we'll take into account financial conditions, which we've seen and we'll also lower a rate pass and trying to have monetary policy. Offset weakness before it even happens, the shutdown. What's the impact on the economy and your view in? In the short term shut the government shutdowns don't last very long. They have typically not left much of a Mark on the economy, which isn't to say that there's plenty of personal hardship that people undergo, but if the aggregate level the economy, generally does not reflect much damage from shut down a longer shutdown. Is something we haven't had if we have an extended shutdown than I do think that that would show up in the data. Pretty clearly, and I would always say, particularly from our standpoint one of the agencies that shutdown as commerce, which has the bureau economic analysis in the census bureau, and some of the pretty important data that we did is published by them. It would not be published including retail sales and GDP and a bunch of other things that are coming up this month. So we would we would have a less clear picture into the economy. If it were to go on much longer, you don't gather your information you rely on other agencies to give you information in most cases, we're getting information from the bureau of labor standards, and we do a handful of data series that we collect ourselves. And so today, let's talk about the economy going forward. We were close to the longest periods of expansion since World War Two, and we could break that record new see anything on the rise. And that would make it likely we go into a recession in two thousand nineteen. I don't see anything. That suggests that the possibility of a recession and near-term is it all elevated recessions are are most often caused by two things. One is inflation. That is is high enough that the fed has to hit the bricks. We don't see that more more common recently in the last several cycles. It's really been a matter of mounting financial imbalances by which I mean asset bubbles the housing bubble the dot com bubble or just excessive levers if you saw in in some prime mortgage area were those those things have it. We don't see that either. So we don't see the two most basic recent causes of recessions, we don't see those risks. So I would say the possibility is not elevated at the moment. So you don't see any worry, you're not worrying about anything close to a recession. I don't see a recession. I would say that. If you asked me, what am I worried about? I would say the US economies solid as I mentioned there's good momentum going into this year. The principal worry, I would have is is really global growth. If you look at Asia look at Europe, you're seeing slowing growth. And the question will be how much does that affect us? It's it's a tightly integrated global economy and global financial markets, and we will feel that I'm talking about inflation from one of them Fed's main jobs to worry about inflation. What do you think things flation rate is likely to be for two thousand nineteen? I think it's gonna be right around two percent. We I think sort of a capital asset that we inherited from chairman Volcker in Greenspan is strongly anchored inflation expectations. So what that means is that when the economy's really weak inflation doesn't go down very much, and when you is really strong. It doesn't go up very much. So inflation tends to be rooted.

Federal Reserve Bloomberg US Bloomberg interactive brokers Ed Bloomberg Tiffany CEO Tiffany Jeff MacKenzie Amazon MacKenzie Basil Andrew O'day Andre liangelo Fed chief executive officer chairman of the Federal Reserv
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:37 min | 2 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Charlie Pellett fed chair. Jay Powell says the central Bank can be patient before adjusting interest rates again as it waits to see how global risks impact the domestic economy. His remarks coming during a question and answer session at the economic club of Washington. Sources tell Bloomberg Peter Weinberg is set to become CEO of the firm. He helped found his Perella Weinberg partners, shuffles its leadership and potentially the stakes of its partners in planning for an initial public offering stocks rose with the Dow the s&p and NASDAQ all advancing SNP up eleven gain of five tenths of one percent fourth in a row, by the way for the and the Dow up one hundred twenty two points of five tenths as stack up Twenty-nine of five four tenths of one percents. I'm Charlie Pellett. That's a Bloomberg business flash. Bloomberg best with June Grasso and Ed Baxter can. Continues. From the Bloomberg interactive brokers studio, this is Bloomberg best. The Federal Reserve could place interest rates on hold through March or even longer. That's the signal from the minutes of last month's meeting of fed policymakers and Ed Bloomberg's David Rubenstein sat down with the chairman of the Federal Reserve Jerome Powell financial markets, really beginning in the fourth quarter. Got more volatile and seemed to be pricing in a more pessimistic outlook. Which is I mentioned the seems to be rooted in concerns about slowing growth in a related concern of the ongoing trade negotiations. So, but if you look at the incoming data right through the end of the year and into the beginning of this year. You don't really see any evidence of a slowdown. And so we're we're in a situation where we have factors pointing in different directions, by the way, this is not uncommon. This is this is actually something that happens, not infrequently. And when we when we when we had that we do is we we apply sort of risk management principles. In other words, we're not just concerned about the baseline case. We're thinking about what are the risks? And we're we're we're using our tools to address those risks. So in that case, what does it mean? It means I there is no pre-set pass for for rates there. Really? Isn't there? Never is. Particularly isn't now second as I mentioned, it gives us the opportunity to be patient and watch and see what what are we going to see them more positive view that. Forecasters have of this year or are we going to see slowing global growth in are. We're going to see that affect US because if it does then I can assure you we? It's a common thing for the economy to behave in ways that are not exactly as we expect. And when it happens, we can flexibly and quickly move policy. We can do soon as significantly as well if that's appropriate. So we'll always use our tools to try to sustain this expansion and keep the labor markets strong. And currently of the fed is projecting. The US economy is gonna grow in two thousand nine hundred ninety two point three percent. I believe that's your number. It previously was a little bit higher. Two point five percent. I think last year you've lowered correct? And are you going to lower it again because of the government shutdown is that going to affect the economy your view? Let me say first there is no official fed projection. With with two point three percent was was the median of seventeen participants. So they were half above and half below that. We'll during the year, not infrequently. In fact, typically when we submit new projections that recorder the projection for change. I mean, it's very difficult to forecast the economy to that level of precision. And so we'll take into account tightening financial conditions, which we've seen and we'll also lower rate pass and turn trying to have monetary policy offset. We'd miss before it even happens the shutdown. What's the impact on the economy and your view in in the short term, if shut the government shutdowns don't last very long have typically not left much of a Mark on the economy, which isn't to say that there's plenty of personal hardship that people undergo but at the aggregate level the economy, generally does not reflect much damage from shut down a longer shutdown. Is something we haven't had if we haven't extended shutdown than I do think that that would show up in the data. Pretty clearly, and I would say particularly from our standpoint one of the agencies that shutdown as commerce, which has the bureau of economic analysis in the census bureau, and some of the pretty important data that we get is published by them. It would not be published including retail sales and GDP and a bunch of other things that are coming out this month. So we would we would have a less clear picture into the economy. If it were to go on much longer, you don't gather your information you rely on other agencies to give you information. In most cases, we're getting information from the bureau of labor standards NBA. We do have a handful of data series that we collect ourselves. And so today, let's talk about the economy going forward. We're close to the longest periods of expansion since World War Two, and we could break that record new see anything on the horizon that would make likely we go into a recession in two thousand nineteen. I don't see anything. That suggests that the possibility of a recession near near-term is it all elevated recessions are most often caused by two things. One is inflation that is high enough that the fed has to hit the brakes. We don't see that. More more common recently in the last several cycles. It's really been a matter of mounting financial imbalances by which I mean asset bubbles the housing bubble the dot com. Bubble were just excessive levers if you saw in in some prime mortgage area were those those things happening. We don't see that either. So we don't see the two most basic recent causes of recessions, we don't see those risks. So I would say it's the possibilities. Not elevated at the moment. So you don't see any worry, you're not worrying about anything close to a recession. I don't see a recession. I would say that. If you asked me, what am I worried about? I would say the US economy is solid as I mentioned. There's good momentum going into this year. The principal worry, I would have is is really global growth. If you look at Asia, look at Europe, you're seeing slowing growth in the question will be how much does that affect us? It's a tightly integrated global economy and global financial markets, and we will feel that I'm talking about inflation from one of the Fed's main jobs at the worry about inflation. What do you think the inflation rate is likely to be for two thousand nineteen? I think it's. Going to be right around two percent. We I think sort of a capital asset that we inherited from chairman Volcker in Greenspan is strongly anchored inflation expectations. So what that means is that when the economy's really weak inflation doesn't go down very much is really strong. It doesn't go up very much. So inflation tends to be rooted put.

Federal Reserve Bloomberg US Bloomberg Peter Weinberg Charlie Pellett Bloomberg interactive brokers Jay Powell Ed Bloomberg Washington CEO June Grasso Ed Baxter
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"So we love it we love it we love it we love it not you get the gist talking about tesla stock most hated and most love going to tell you though i love this story tomorrow must read on the bloomberg on this friday david is detroit bureau chief ed bloomberg news joining us right now from our blue from our detroit bureau and it's so true david people who come on and they defend tesla vigorously and then i've come on and they're just either shorting it or just you know like the guy but like the ideas but don't think it's a good and sustainable company to us about this story so this is a yankees versus red sox in the uk celtic versus rangers it it's just a two very divergent schools on one side you have the fan boys are the warriors they not only love the cars but they they have this this affinity for his vision and from an investment standpoint they're not buying stock just because they like cars his cars are cool if that were the case they would have bought a ferrari shares it's really they see a future of clean electric cars that drive themselves i think that tesla has the technology and the talent anyone's vision to get their first and to make a lot of money eventually and they're willing to wait through a lot of cash burn a lot of losses and a lot of miss financial and production targets to get to that payday on the other side are the the shorts the bears they see a company that's burning cash has made money just wants in it's one quarter profit prophets history and they don't see how they're gonna make money anytime soon and they figure yes somebody gets going to get to that vision of clean electric self driving cars.

bloomberg tesla yankees detroit bureau ed bloomberg detroit david uk celtic ferrari one quarter
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Olympics and the very last minute he said you're dunga yeah he says the us is looking proposal it of course it also depends on north of the north's possible actions and this seems to be the first day of the twenty 18 midterm election campaigning in the us and it's on the back of the tax overhaul passage the mood let set it here's a president always a lot of fun when you win if you work hard and lose that's not acceptable now and the democrats well minority leader chuck schumer from the senate today's passage of the partisan tax bill officially cements the republican party as the party of the wealthy and the party of big corporations against the middle class and the working people of this country so boomers kevin surly says this is a rallying call for democrats big win for republicans on reforming the tax plan but the work is only just beginning for them a democrats are very much united in their opposition against this as we look ahead to two thousand eighteen midterm election running japan's lax controls over its domestic stock of ivory encouraging trade in illegal ivory the world wildlife fund says antique dealers are buying large numbers of elephant tusks in japan that are not registered as required by law global news 24 hours a day powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries in san francisco i'm ed baxter this is bloomberg ryan thank you very much ed bloomberg daybreak asia is brought to you by grassy and company if you're a hedge fund ria or broker dealer called grassy in company financial services professionals at two one two.

Olympics us president chuck schumer senate republican party democrats japan elephant tusks san francisco ed baxter asia kevin surly financial services 24 hours
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The only the only people would doesn't affect our ets and mutual funds uh there's there's some complicated rationale behind it but also some easy rationale which is the biggest asset management firms in the us push back hard on this rule so so there that won't apply to them but but pretty much everyone else how the devil kyodo got you got that we don't seconds the weird thing is would only raise two point seven billion dollars over ten years so drop in the bucket traffic swallow drops to make a bucket it's true sure it's if you dare enough of own not in their by accident there have been awesome stuff swan fox for the slovaks men who covers hedge ones force ed bloomberg news cinema markets and bloomberg radio cory johnson had corey tv and twitter she's carolmassar on twitter and this is bloomberg i rather nominees headlines nathan hager in our bloomberg 991 newsroom in the nation's capital heineken arterial president trump is calling it a reflection of reality i have determined that it is time to officially recognize jerusalem as the capital of israel but as bloomberg's amy morris reports saying that and moving the us embassy there could have deep repercussions across the region former us ambassador to iraq and afghanistan ryan crocker tells bloomberg daybreak the state department is already understaffed this move creates more danger for americans overseas now it has been for the increase through a quality shifted frankly make i i do not be what objective gordon who while we re politically uneven even kwy are or poked up region crocker says it could trigger violence in the region derail any chance of a peace plan and infuriate key allies in washington amy morris bloomberg radio massachusetts senator elizabeth warren spoke with minnesota's al franken today and told him it's time to step aside hunts what an aide to warren's telling bloomberg with a growing chorus of democrats calling on franklin to resign over sexual harassment allegations among them number two democrat dick durban i think we were trying to accumulate.

massachusetts dick durban harassment afghanistan iraq president nathan hager ed bloomberg franklin al franken minnesota senator elizabeth warren mutual funds amy morris washington gordon ryan crocker israel bloomberg twitter corey tv cory johnson us seven billion dollars ten years
"ed bloomberg" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"ed bloomberg" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"About last hour with the trump trade presumably because the lie that ties in nevada stocks as well if you wanted a more false send me an email i'll get you the chart the explanation that goes with it and everything i do going forward the email address is d wilson at bloomberg guy net that's d wilson bloomberg guide net i feel like will continue to kind of go back and forth maybe and this growth in value debate depending on canada overall tone in the market dave may very well be the case in we we have seen quite the swings in the last couple of years so it's a matter of you'll have you things because let's space that if the economy does well then you growth all over the place you don't need to focus on those stocks the way that you would if the gross starts to waver next earning season we'll see what happens let's bringing you initially our senior us economists hit bloomberg intelligence inner bloomberg 1130 studios here in new york as well liu economic news today but we have some throughout the week and of course we have affect meeting yes absolutely quiet today but you know things said gonna pique up as the week progresses so let's start with the feds so obviously everybody is expecting a rate hike get the kind of addending gun deal and you know the futures market reflects legal doubt about that but the futures market does not see the next three increase until the first quarter of next year so that is interesting and i think it's really important for the fed and fully chain yelling to basically tell the markets what do you expect so they will releasing news summaries economic projections switching will include economic forecasts as well as the new dot plot so ed bloomberg intelligence economics we expect an additional hike in the third quarter this year and the beginning of the balancesheet them wind in the fourth quarter this year so in for the third it's really these they've done it in the past the deed.

bloomberg new york economic news nevada canada ed bloomberg