35 Burst results for "Economic Development"

Interview With Mayor Aja Brown, Mayor of Compton

Skimm'd from The Couch

02:22 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Mayor Aja Brown, Mayor of Compton

"Today may are asia. Brown joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the mayor of the city of compton. California she made history back in two thousand thirteen when she became the youngest mayor ever elected in the city at the age of thirty one now mayer brown is almost done with her second term leading the city and is credited for lowering. The city's unemployment rate reducing crime and creating economic development in the area mayer brown. Thank you for joining us. Welcome to skin from the couch. Thank you for having me. It's a pleasure where we're thrilled to have you. So we're gonna champ and their first shane. Which is obviously your politics. You become a public figure but what is something that we don't know about you because we can't google it. I'm known to be really funny amongst my of ones. A my husband calls me the person that he knows we. This is like some high expectations now for this interview. Are you funny like up comedian. Funny i don't have this really sharp. One liners i like it and also did. I heard that you guys are high school sweethearts we are. We actually connected my senior year in high school so he actually thinks funny then. Because he's been with you for a long time so we are gonna go way back. We'd like to start in the beginning so talk to us about how you grew up. Our people surprise up with you that you went into politics. Our backwards. I think people bet i grew up with or that have known me the majority of my life. They knew i would do something in a leadership role. I never had an affinity for politics. I think that i came into the political. Realm was surprising for some people. But i had worked in city government for a decade and so it was kind of a natural projection to some perspectives. But as i was younger and growing up. I was raised by a single mom. I have a twin brother had a lot eleven. My home my mom. She worked really hard to take care of us. A we struggled a lot financially but growing up. I really didn't know. I was poor because i'm not make a big deal out of it and so as got to high school when i started learning about poverty figures and i'm like mom you actually do not earn a lot of money. I don't know how we were able to survive but i'm almost is such a strong leader and really imparted the power of vision for my brother. Nine we bought in and we just worked as a team my whole life so i had a really beautiful upbringing

Mayer Brown Compton Asia Shane Brown California Google
Foxconn, Wisconsin Reach New Deal on Scaled Back Facility

John Williams

00:25 sec | 3 weeks ago

Foxconn, Wisconsin Reach New Deal on Scaled Back Facility

"Technology Group, the world's largest electronics manufacturer, has reached a new deal with reduced tax breaks for its scale back project in southeast Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers and the company said that today. Details of the new deal were not immediately released. It was scheduled to be approved at a Tuesday meeting. Of the Wisconsin Economic Development Corp. The new deal will reduce the potential tax breaks by billions of dollars and still have potential tax breaks worth more than 10 million for Fox con

Technology Group Governor Tony Evers Wisconsin Economic Development Wisconsin FOX
South Korean Battery Makers Reach Settlement in US Trade Dispute

WBUR Programming

01:01 min | Last month

South Korean Battery Makers Reach Settlement in US Trade Dispute

"South Korean battery makers say they've reached an agreement to settle a trade secrets dispute over electric vehicle battery technologies. Johnny Kauffman from member station W. A. B reports. The announcement comes just hours before President Biden's deadline today to decide whether to reverse a U. S. International Trade Commission decision. The South Korean company SK Innovation is building an electric vehicle battery factory in northeast Georgia. But the U. S International Trade Commission ruled against SK Innovation in a trade secrets case, blocking the company from doing new battery business for a decade, although President Biden could overturn that ruling. That Wilson is Georgia's economic development commissioner were absolutely excited about what s K is going to bring to Northeast Georgia, and we are hopeful that the bite administration is going to recognize that an overturned the NTC decision. The Biden administration has said Little about the case publicly for NPR news. I'm Johnny Kauffman in Atlanta.

President Biden Sk Innovation Johnny Kauffman W. A. B U. S. International Trade Comm U. S International Trade Commi Georgia Northeast Georgia Wilson Biden Administration NTC Npr News Atlanta
Tacoma Approves New Sales Tax for Affordable Housing

News, Traffic and Weather

00:47 sec | Last month

Tacoma Approves New Sales Tax for Affordable Housing

"Combos. Charlie Harder tells us how much it'll be. The city starts collecting the extra 1/10 of 1% tax on July 1st that brings the total sales tax into coma to 10.3%. Council member Chris Beall says the money will help people who are struggling to find a place to live really comfort. We're doing this. I I just think it's kind of a landmark moment here. That really can't be underscored that we have not had a sustainable source of funding like this for Housing Trust fund or economic development, Harvard or anything like that The money will be used to buy or build affordable housing, as well as getting people mental and behavioral health treatment. It's expected to bring in an extra $5 million a year in revenue. The Tacoma sales tax will be among the highest in the state. Charlie Harder Come Oni Skagit Valley Tulip Festival

Charlie Harder Chris Beall Coma Housing Trust Fund Harvard Tacoma
Fed's Powell Says Public Should Understand Risks of Bitcoin

America's First News

02:48 min | Last month

Fed's Powell Says Public Should Understand Risks of Bitcoin

"Fed Reserve chair Jerome Powell said on Monday that the US public needs to understand the risks behind Bitcoin and other crypto currencies even as the central bank itself studies the potential costs and benefits of a digital dollar of Powell said the Fed is conducting research through an in house technology lab and collaborating with M I T to study if the public wants or needs a digital currency, but the risk to individuals That is significant, according to pal. Or work on CBD sees is not primarily motivated, Aided by the appearance on the scene of crypto currencies and stable coins, it really is fundamentally technology has made it possible for us to offer a new form of trusted money and that sovereign anchor that has been so important for economic development for a very long time. And we're looking carefully at whether to do that. So turning your question crypto assets which we call him, Chris Crypto assets, You know, they're they're highly volatile. See Bitcoin. And therefore not really useful is a store of value and they're not backed by anything. They're more of an asset for speculation, so they're also not particularly in use as a means of payment. It's more a speculative asset that Z essentially a substitute for gold rather than for the dollar. And I think with crypto assets of the Publicly still understand the risks. The principal thing is there's the volatility is also the outsized energy requirements requirement for for mining on the fact that they're not backed by anything which I which I mentioned. Turning to stable coins so to the extent of stable corners back by sovereign currencies of leading nations. That's certainly an improvement over crypto assets, I would say, but nonetheless. Where is the credibility Come from? It comes from that sovereign currency that is the backstop. You know, the thing is existing sovereign currencies are issued with the benefit of the public in mind that potentially fast and wide adoption of a global stable coin. Potentially a global currency, governed only by the incentives or private company is something that will deserve and will receive. Highest level of regulatory expectations. Um so and his regulation where it needs to be on global stable coins yet it's not, but we're making progress. Nonetheless, stable coins may have a role to play with appropriate regulation, but that role will not be to form the basis of a new global monetary system. Um, private, stable coins. They're not gonna be inappropriate Substitute for a sound monetary system based in central bank money, Bitcoin has soared nearly tenfold and value compared with a year ago, hovering around 57,000 on Monday. Meanwhile, Tesla has said that it was buying 1.5 billion worth of Bitcoin and with soon start accepting Bitcoin payments of four cars.

Jerome Powell Chris Crypto Fed Reserve CBD Powell FED United States Bitcoin Tesla
Indoor Farming With Jackie Roberts Of Appharvest

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:40 min | 2 months ago

Indoor Farming With Jackie Roberts Of Appharvest

"Okay. So we've all seen greenhouses interviewed domino olen for example who runs the greenhouse at george mason university in virginia about how her facilities providing food and even spices to the university's food service and see greenhouses with just flowers like it were states and other properties and now we see cannabis plants being grown in greenhouses. But what about greenhouses on a commercial scale and ones that recycle water do not use toxic. Fertilizers or get more out of the acreage than tenting and outdoor farm would right. Well that's what my guest today says there novel. Indoor farm will actually do so. Let's find out how it works. I'd like you to meet jackie. Roberts chief sustainability officer at ap harvest. Jackie has been in the sustainability spaces. I said for probably twenty five years including in the same role chief sustainability officer at the carlisle group which is investment company and as senior director of the environmental defense fund. Or where. I first met her probably about ten years ago. I think it was right. She earned all her degrees from yale. Smart cookie that she is including a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering and to help them manage degrees one from the yale. School of management and the other from the school of the environment without further ado welcomed green captions radio jackie. And thank you for joining us. I'm so excited. Thank you down. It's great to be here. Oh you're welcome. you're welcome. Congratulations on your new role at app harvest. Give us an overview of the indoor farms. How does app harvest actually work. Where they you know. where is it located. I chance in appalachia but give us a little more details. You know kind of what you're growing give us give us the proverbial thirty thousand foot view app harvest. I think is a really unique company in that are core product which is healthy vegetables is combined with a very sustainable climate. Resilient way of growing those vegetables and we're doing it in appalachia where the opportunity for job growth and economic development is really appreciate The the core product is a chemical pesticide free In in our first large greenhouse which you can see a picture of in my background but at sixty acres for those who can't see it Is a growing tomatoes and chemical pesticide free. Gmo free because the way we can grow in a closed system enables us to use biological pest approaches to control pests and disease and also a lot of trained workers and other interventions that can prevent outbreak. So we you know as a mother with three children knowing that what's coming out of our greenhouses is zero. Residue is a real attribute that i value. But how we grow it in your introduction spoke to it is we are very climate resilient in their storms that the that recently hit we had some employees that had trouble getting to work other people had to pitch in. We had one employee show up on their tractor to make sure they could get to work But you know we really did incredibly well in terms of being resilient. We had all the things we needed. We were harvesting on time stuff was getting out to the markets and it was a real testament to this strategy as an important part of the mix of different types of agriculture and When when we're growing We are able to use one hundred percent rainwater. We have a system of irrigation. That is set up where the rainwater is captured on the top of our sixty roofs it stored in a retention pond. And then we bring it into the greenhouse with a little bit of filtration through sand and you'd be late and that water re circulates. We don't ever a released anything into the atmosphere. The nutrients are put into the water and stay in the water until we need to add more. We can measure very precisely. It's a space where a has really enabled us to do very precise measurements and the plants. Exactly what they need. We do Nanotechnology with the water. Because bringing more oxygen into the water enables the plans to absorb the nutrients even better but all of that is is a closed system. And you know when when. I started in chemical engineering. The reason i went into chemical engineering is a wonderful professor. Who said if you care about environmental problems you should study chemical engineering because you learn how system works and where all the pollution comes from and how it's released to the environment

Domino Olen Carlisle Group Environmental Defense Fund Jackie Appalachia George Mason University School Of Management Roberts AP Virginia
How the YWCA Handles the Childcare Crisis and Other Challenges for Women

Made By Women

06:07 min | 2 months ago

How the YWCA Handles the Childcare Crisis and Other Challenges for Women

"Alejandro. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you for having me so tell us a little bit about the work of the ywca. Sure the ywca as you may know. Kim is one of the oldest and largest women's organization in the country. We've been around for a hundred and sixty two years and it was such a pleasure to be able to lead that organization because through our two hundred and two items as across the country serving twelve hundred communities. We really say that we have our finger on the pulse to be able to look communities large and small in urban suburban and rural areas to be able to witness what's happening but most importantly to able to respond to the needs of communities across the country. It's an amazing pleasure. And why did we say you know has stood at the forefront of some of the most critical issues defining lives of women from Marching for the eight hour workday to creating the first women employment center the first childcare center in the country becoming the first fully racially integrated organization in our nation. You know we have a lot of i. But in this moment i'm ywca continues to be that voice advocating for women and girls and communities of color as we go through covert but more importantly as we go through this recession which is being called the session so you have led this organization for the last several years and recently step down as ceo. But you have let it. During one of the hardest periods in our recent history. These last fourteen months during kobe have been really really difficult. What is leadership like during crisis. What a great question you know. Leadership is most tested in moments of crises. And for me. It was a blessing to be at the helm of ywca. Because i just went into work mode at hyper speed. And what does that mean. That meant that day in and day out it was my mind. Might team My colleagues were all working around the clock thinking about what are the solutions. How do we solve for these problems and being innovative in our approaches because we knew for example that we had to keep our emergency Domestic violence shelters open so across the country wide. Abc's were being very innovative. Some of them had Rv vs or hotel rooms to be able to solve the those Those challenging moments. So as well as i say you know. Leadership is not for the faint of heart. It really requires. it's nasty. It requires boldness but above all. It requires that urgency on. Because i knew that it was a you know this organization was not going to off fail under my watch but it wasn't. It was something that was also very organic We have two hundred and two leaders across the country that lead their respective. ywca's anime to rose to the asian And made sure that they had solutions available to them to their communities. I wanna follow up on what you had said about being in a she session. Can you tell us a little bit about what that term means. Choice of that term really showed up on back sometime in september through the new york times. And what that really meant and ended his. It has been adopted because it's really It really hits the nail on the head. It is the first time in our nation's history that women are at the core of this recession and what that means is that women are bearing the disproportionate impact of the economic wake of covert and. They're bearing the brunt in terms of loss of jobs because there are in those areas that are overly indexed on like restaurant. Hospitality travel retail. They're also having to bear the brunt in terms of the childcare situation there is no there's the lack of childcare. Kids are now at home instead of school kids. Are you know. Childcare centers had to close because of social distancing another areas too they. They are at the moment where they have nowhere to go when it comes to caring of their family And then we're seeing how also how communities of color and women of color are also brand the brunt with the high rate of cova cases and cova deaths. So let's break that down to important issues. You just mentioned the first. His child care what is going on for working women right now and wii childcare so crucial. Well i'll tell you one of the first things you notice was And you continue to see what the job report is that were most of the the losses jobs have been women. Women are leaving the workforce not because they want to but because they have to they either have to care for their children to care for their parents their sandwiched in the middle and unfortunately as a nation we have put childcare shoulders of women. Talk your has to be an issue that really is about families but also as of national importance the organization of economic development they always c. d. tracks how countries deal with childcare and to no surprise the united states is at the bottom of that ranking. So we have to really make childcare at a critical imperative for us and unfortunately women are the ones who bear the brunt in terms of the high cost but also we need to talk about quality and we also need to make sure that it's a you know accessible to everyone so again if we going to bring back women to the workplace and bring back jobs. We have to look at childcare as well as workers in the childcare space. How do we pay them. How are they how do we not only compensate them for a very hard job. I'm so childcare has many many facets and at this point we are at crises and we have to make sure that the funding is there that we're designing child care for twenty-first-century immunity and that we're making it accessible affordable and quality

Ywca Alejandro KIM ABC New York Times Cova United States
Walsh’s former economic development chief enters Boston mayor’s race

WBZ Midday News

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

Walsh’s former economic development chief enters Boston mayor’s race

"Day for those running for mayor of Boston with NBC's Mike Macklin with more on the latest to throw their hat into the race, a former school committee member who was until last week Mayor Walsh is chief of economic development Today, John Barrows joined an already crowded field of candidates to be Boston's next mayor as me Would work to make sure that we continue to engage our community continue continue to particularly engage our young people continue to engage those who feel left out. In our economy continue to engage those who feel most vulnerable, protect those who fail most gonna revive for by by taking us through this covert pandemic safely. Re opening our society in a more just and equitable way. Bustin born and raised. Barrows is the sort of Cape Verdean immigrants, said one of five minority candidates in the race for mayor

Mike Macklin Mayor Walsh John Barrows Boston NBC Bustin Barrows
Gov. Cuomo Says He Will Not Resign Amid Sexual Harassment Allegations

This Morning with Gordon Deal

01:01 min | 2 months ago

Gov. Cuomo Says He Will Not Resign Amid Sexual Harassment Allegations

"Andrew Cuomo Apologized over sexual harassment accusations made against him by three women but says he won't bow to calls even by some of his own party to resign to former female aides to Mr Cuomo have alleged sexual harassment and have called for other women to come forward. Additionally, a third woman told The New York Times that he touched her inappropriately at a wedding reception in 2019. I'm sorry. I'm sorry for whatever pain I caused anyone. I never intended it. Mm hmm. And I will be the better for this experience. Lindsay Boylan, who formerly worked for the state's economic development Authority, and in Mr Cuomo's office, said last week that Mr Cuomo suggested That they play strip poker during a 2017 airplane ride. Nearly 30, Democratic and Republican New York lawmakers have stated that Mr Cuomo should either resign or face impeachment in the wake of the allegations and the scandal surrounding nursing home deaths during the pandemic. It's

Mr Cuomo Andrew Cuomo Lindsay Boylan Economic Development Authority The New York Times New York
New economic plan seeks input, investment from Washington DC's Ward 8 residents in the future of their neighborhoods

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

New economic plan seeks input, investment from Washington DC's Ward 8 residents in the future of their neighborhoods

"Are being asked to sign on to help chart the future of their community. The Ward eight Community Economic development planning process has launched with the goal of getting residents to come together and help create a comprehensive economic development plan for the area. The solutions are in the community come up with the solutions that we need to have. Organization facilitator, Mustafa Abdel Salam says He believes these kind of local models are vital to really show there is capacity at the community level to do this that we don't need to wait for people outside the community. Says to create. The plan will include mapping the area social, cultural and economic assets and taking note of the challenges, then set goals and build a master plan to reach those goals. Right now they're looking for members of Ward eight to get involved in the process. Michelle Morello w T

Mustafa Abdel Salam Michelle Morello
Leadership academy to teach Phoenix residents how to reduce urban heat

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 months ago

Leadership academy to teach Phoenix residents how to reduce urban heat

"The temperature and phoenix arizona often exceeds one hundred and ten degrees fahrenheit and as the climate warms. The number of hot days is on the rise. It not only impacts our health our safety but also our comfort and our economic development in the phoenix metro area. That's diana bermudez. The nature conservancy in arizona. She says that at times certain phoenix neighborhoods are up to thirteen degrees hotter than others these neighborhoods hotter neighborhoods are also the ones that have the highest child poverty and they have the lowest percentage of tree canopy cover planting trees and vegetation can reduce the heat but bermudez says residents are often unaware of these solutions or how to advocate for them so this spring the nature conservancy is helping launch an online urban heat leadership academy the classes will be taught in both english and spanish participants will learn about strategies for community organizing and reducing urban heat things like advocacy facilitation communication storytelling. The goal is to prepare people to launch tree plantings and other green projects in their own communities so their neighborhood stay cooler as the climate warms.

Phoenix Diana Bermudez Arizona Bermudez
Panel agrees: Racial equity in Washington DC requires more work

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Panel agrees: Racial equity in Washington DC requires more work

"Government and business leaders recently took part in a panel discussion about improving racial equity in the biz. Drinks during an event hosted by the deputy mayor for planning and economic developments. Panelists like Corey Griffin, with the Greater Washington Black Chamber of Commerce, laid out the continued objective, bringing the black business community together to help facilitate engagement with each other and with other opportunities in the private sector and in the government sector. Others like Dr Andre Perry, senior fellow the Brookings Institution brought up matters like better ways to invest specifically. And the utilities and tech industries targeted to businesses that will employ more people that will serve government and private industry. Griffin Notes. Eight out of 10 Black businesses fail within 18 months Ken Duffy

Corey Griffin Greater Washington Black Chamb Dr Andre Perry Brookings Institution Griffin Ken Duffy
Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion  in international finance Impact

Science Magazine Podcast

11:48 min | 3 months ago

Africa's Great Green Wall to combat desertification secures $16.8 billion in international finance Impact

"Now we have science writer. Rachel danske with an update on africa's great green wall project which will soon see an infusion of billions of dollars from the world bank and others this project. The great green wall is intended to serve as a bulwark against desertification of the land south of the sahara desert while at the same time supporting communities that live in this region. Okay rachel how're you doing. I'm doing well. Thanks for having me sure. This is a rape big wall. This is a big project. It's basically supposed to be this green band that spans about seven thousand kilometers across the whole hop of africa. It launched back in two thousand seven. Rachel what would you say. The progress has been since two thousand seven now to two thousand twenty one almost non-existent which is why they launched this new round of funding last month. There was an assessment that found that a fraction of the goal had been achieved so far and the goal is for twenty thirty so they realized that time was running out right throughout this piece. You make this really important distinction between planting a tree and growing a tree. Why is that so important to think about when you know thinking about restoring lands or planting trees to help prevent desertification. The first time. I heard it. I just thought well. That's a really good way to put it. And then when racer after another would phrase it that way that we don't plant trees we grow them because that's been one of the missing pieces in restoration. Efforts globally not even specific to the great green wall but just in restoration landscape and forest restoration. Generally there has been this focus on planting trees but little focus really on looking at what gets planted in the first place in paying attention to the species diversity in the planting material and making sure that it's the right tree for the right place. There's also last follow plus maintenance of the tree then there needs to be talked to someone in west africa who was saying that. He's traveled to so many countries throughout the continental. Seen so many trees planted. But where the forests. Yeah that's a really interesting way of thinking about it. Basically tree planting mania that's been happening has come from all these different projects foundations quotas. That are saying oh. It costs a dollar to put a tree in the ground and we're going to offset our carbon. We're going to green the world but no one's looking after these trees and making sure that they live beyond that for sheer gas so now that we know that. That's not a good way to go about this. There's actually a lot of research. That's found some of the best practices for restoration projects. What are some of the recommendations have come out from research. In the past ten years when paper published last year talked about ten golden rules for reforestation. And they think those summed up a lot of the recommendations really well in addition to just protecting existing forests which probably sounds obvious. But there's a lot of research on the new. I don't have the same benefits that existing ones do and it's hard to replace that beyond that involving local communities has been just incredibly important component that researchers are saying was not really part of the focus before because the restoration ecologists are focused on the physical research and they aren't trained to think about how people play into the picture and it's just so important to the survival of the trees because it's people who are planting trees and it's people who are maintaining the trees and if you don't have community by an investment in rye these trees there and interested keeping them there. The trees aren't going to last and the trees only have their benefits when they last going back to trees here for a minute you mentioned keeping old us in place for protecting them. What else is being looked at. So that's when using a diversity of species so that there can start to be restored. Biodiversity rather than just monoculture of trees. They're starting to be focused now. Also on the quality of the seeds. And what you're actually planting. And how do we build. The systems and infrastructure for collecting and improving. Seeds is going to be the most resilient seed for that species but then it's also about the genetic diversity because there can be inbreeding with plants. If you're not collecting from wide enough geographic area than you can start to sort of limit. The gene pool and that can be problematic. You talk about this example in ethiopia of a seat initiative a network that is supposed to improve the quality of seats. Can you talk about how that would work. And how it would involve the community. The provision of adequate trees deep portfolio or pets. Bo is a project in ethiopia that they're calling it a functional trees seed system. It's a multi-pronged effort. They're trying to develop standards for seed collection and sharing that. There's high quality seed that will ensure that the trees that are planted can be their most resilient they're developing maps for how to source those seeds they're trying to strengthen the research system the infrastructure and the the research system to improve seed quality and they're linking all of that to the people who will use the seeds seeds there's technical training for farmers and the local language and there are diagrams of how to store different types of seeds. They're really trying to get that knowledge to the community to farmers and local nurseries to scale up the capacity of local decentralized infrastructure. Is there another model project that people might be looking at to expand as the money comes in. Are there other areas. That are doing good things. Yeah there was one of their project that i came across the one billion trees for africa project. And it's led by this man from cameroon tabby jota. He talked about how he grew up in this thriving economy system and he went off to university and when he came back the lands that he new as a forest with no longer for us. He started planting marina cheese and cola nut trees and mingo trees and all these different trees that would restore some of the soil health that he thought had been lost but also produce food and income generating opportunities for people so that they would be invested in keeping the trees there. He called his approach. The contagion approach. Because it's just sort of caught on. He got a bunch of men and women in this one community to be involved in the tree planting the neighboring communities saw what was happening and he was very clear that it's not like a drastic change where their community sedley rich where they weren't before but the small benefits were noticeable and so the neighboring community wanted to do something similar. And so it's just been a word of mouth approach so as he developed this very grassroots success he's gotten funding from more international sources than use it to do the work on the ground in these different communities mostly in west africa. And he's starting to do more and more with the great great wall which seems very exciting so there are a couple of different findings that we talked about that suggests the way forward for this type of restoration project involving the community diversity of. They're planting making sure that they're not just putting stuff in the ground but they're actually supporting plant growth and the communities around it but another thing that comes up a lot in your story is now we kind of what should happen. Researchers have come to a lot of conclusions that are very useful. But then there's the practice what's actually happening on the ground and maybe even what will happen on the ground. What are some of the biggest impediments to implementing the results of this research. One interesting comment. That i heard was that the implementing partners people with the money don't have scientist on their teams. They don't realize how complicated it is to plant a tree into get it right and to make sure that grows the lack of knowledge in the right places and the lack of communication between the people with the money and the people with the knowledge and also the community who is going to be involved. Those conversations aren't being had something else that a here is the expectations that donors have. They want fast results. And that's not. How trees in general work. But it's especially not how effective restoration works because all of these things need to happen and they take time getting communities involved. There's a lot of upfront investment. That needs to happen. In developing all of this infrastructure and research systems with a lot faster to just go and say just plant a bunch of eucalyptus trees. Because that's what they have the seeds and planting materials for. There's a disconnect between the speed that donors want to see results and the reality of what needs to happen. I've seen that you've written about this project for years now. What do you think you're going to see if you check back in two years. I hope to see that things. Like the pats project and this other effort the one billion trees for africa a hope that they have scaled and and that they inspire or serve as models for other projects. I don't know where. I'm placing bets. It feels like there is enough of a resounding message coming from the research community about the importance of this and the importance for the effective ecosystem function restoration and the community development but also for the climate benefits and if the global fenders governments who want to plant trees for the climate benefits if they are serious than they will start listening to these researchers. This is like thousands of miles. Four thousand miles. That's like the us plus another third right east west a huge huge area to cover an across countries. And all these different people's. How is this. possible. Rachel i mean this is a global scale. This is a huge project. it's huge. It's huge and that's probably why it sounded like the great idea when they announced it. And why didn't go anywhere for ten years but it's the partner agencies that i've spoken with involved in this project. The great queen wall are really clear that it's an environmental program but it's also the social alliance when that's meant to economic development but also really impart some resilience. See into these communities. Who are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. That's why they're really ramping. Up this funding now because they see the value for the planet from a climate change perspective but also for the millions of people across this gigantic area. Pinks rachel thanks for having me. Sure rachel Danske is a science writer based in denver. You can find a link to story on the episode page for the podcasts. At science mag dot org slash podcast.

Rachel Danske Africa West Africa Sahara Desert Ethiopia Marina Cheese Rachel BO Cameroon Cola East West United States Pinks Rachel Denver
Gratta Market And Wines

Voices of the Community

05:00 min | 3 months ago

Gratta Market And Wines

"This episode is part of our series exploring covid nineteen impact on nonprofits and small businesses in the san francisco bay area back in april of twenty twenty when we decided to create this ongoing series on covid nineteen impact i or nonprofits and then on small businesses in the san francisco bay area. We like you had no idea how long the pandemic would go on. And what the health and economic impact would be in our community going into twenty twenty one. The pandemic is now killing more people shutting down more nonprofits and small businesses on with wiping out the livelihoods of families neighborhoods and communities. We will continue to shine a spotlight on the nonprofits and small businesses that make up the fabric of our community along with the founders and staff who are struggling to deal with the impact of the covid nineteen pandemic on their operations services is an ability until we can all get to the other side of the pandemic along the way we will also share with you all the amazing solutions that are nonprofits. Small businesses foundations and government leaders are working on to help us all get to the other side of the pandemic and come together to rebuild our communities with more economic social and environmental equality really opened up the tasting room back in twenty fifteen it sort of evolved into this community hub provided a safe place for people of all backgrounds to gather in need and actually friends. We've become friends with water. Our customer base here in the community. And it's sort of looked on as as a community hub people gather here and that's one thing that i'm not seen as a result of covert not being able to see people in the way that we could get together prior and i think there's a lot of our customers that are also missing that ability to just get together casually with people in the community. This is winemaker and entrepreneur barbara grata of grat or winery and market in the bayview district of san francisco. We've been sharing stories about economic development and small business incubation in the bayview hunters point communities since two thousand fifteen for more context to our interview with barbara grata. Please go to our archive section and take a listen to our two part series doing business in the bayview in part two of that series. We introduce you to barbara. And she shares more about her background and her love of making wine along with her efforts to work with the community. In the neighborhood. I'm joined remotely via zoom by barbara grata. The owner of grata market and ryan ori. Thanks for being here barbara. Thank you thanks for having me church. Barbara and i had talked many years ago on voices of the community when she first started the broader winery. And i'm here today to just touch base with her and have her bring us up to speed and she's been and how she's expanded her business and how she's surviving with covid nineteen so or provide us a little update on where you've been and where you're going. Thank you well. We are the garage. Winery here in bayview and we started that back in two thousand six. We opened up a tasting room on the third street merchant corridor here in bay view in twenty fifteen and that business is still in existence. Were still working with the winery. But unfortunately during the whole cova things or closed down in march and we inverted that space to a mini market. Because we had a plan to expand the last several years we took over another retail space in the same building. Where chasing remez. And we've been building that out since two thousand eighteen so the pandemic actually fortunately did not close us down but it offered us an opportunity to introduce some of the market items that we plan to have in the new comedy. So we did that. Conversion back in april may june july kind of kept that going to the summer providing essentials for the community and also some of the italian specialty items that we plan to carry in the now current market september we shifted and participated on these shared spaces program with the city of san francisco and opened up outdoor seating on the back side of our business on lane street and that was going pretty good and catching on a little bit worse until this current shut down a couple of weeks ago with everyone in the city is experiencing a shutdown of outdoor dining throughout the city. And it has been this Roller coaster from the get our march and constant transitions shifts and changes and adjustments. And how we run our business but we feel fortunate that we've not had to close down. We've been working throughout the so. That's a little background right there.

Barbara Grata San Francisco Bay Grat Or Winery Bayview Grata Market Ryan Ori Barbara Remez San Francisco
Work on Keystone XL pipeline suspended ahead of Biden action

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

Work on Keystone XL pipeline suspended ahead of Biden action

"The Canadian company behind the keystone XL oil pipeline says it suspended work in anticipation of incoming president Joe Biden revoking its permit the seventeen hundred mile pipeline would carry roughly eight hundred thousand barrels of oil a day from Alberta to the Texas Gulf coast first proposed in two thousand eight the pipeline has become a symbol of the tensions between economic development and curbing the fossil fuel emissions that are causing climate change the Obama administration rejected it but president Donald Trump revived it now Joe Biden plans to reverse that presidential permit the project is meant to expand critical oil exports for Canada which has the third largest oil reserves in the world I'm showing up there

Texas Gulf Coast Joe Biden Obama Administration Alberta Donald Trump Canada
Chicago COVID vaccine: City sets tentative dates for Phases 1A, 1B, 1C and 2 of vaccination plan

The Takeaway

04:47 min | 3 months ago

Chicago COVID vaccine: City sets tentative dates for Phases 1A, 1B, 1C and 2 of vaccination plan

"We've been checking in with local leaders nationwide. About all this, and today we go to Chicago, where vaccine eligibility has been expanded beyond healthcare workers and long term care residents. Anyone over 65 who lives or works in the city. But at the moment, Chicago's rollout has been so slow that the city's mayor, Lori Lightfoot, says it will take a year and a half to vaccinate the entire city unless the process is dramatically sped up. Get a better sense of what's causing Chicago's delays and how the city is planning to improve its vaccination process. Going forward. I got mayor life foot on the line. This is just a very basic issue off supply. We do not have enough vaccine from the federal government were dependent upon them. Not surprisingly, To get the vaccine in every week that we've been up and had our infrastructure clicking into gear. We've got less first doses instead of more focused oceans. That is fundamentally a problem. I've been very outspoken about this issue. I will continue to be as the change of administration. Comes into into play, but we simply don't have enough first those vaccines and it's holding us back and our ability to get vaccines out to those people who are ready, willing, enabled, enthusiastic about getting the vaccine. Your life that you mentioned vaccine skepticism as being another hurdle that the city is facing in terms of getting people vaccinated, and we know that particularly for black and Latino populations. That history of racism within the medical community has also spurred concerns. Is there anything the city is doing or can do to combat that skepticism in those communities, particularly Yeah, well, it looks that skepticism, unfortunately, is widespread across the country, but what we started to do before we even got the first dose. What's a really lean into our trusted community stakeholders in the black in letting this community that we've formed partnerships with this entire past year since of Pandemic came to Chicago. We've got a great network of partners at the local level through f U H sees but also other stakeholders, but primarily what we're looking to is black and let next healthcare workers, doctors, nurses, pharmacists. Those folks are really going to be. I think the critical ambassadors as we continue to go hyper local into these communities. If they people see people who look like them speak their language. Getting the vaccine and explaining why it's important. That's going to make a substantial difference. And so we're leaning into those networks and those trusted community partners. Your life. But as you know, one of the biggest tension points during the pandemic has also been the economic development or or lack thereof of communities that have been forced to shut down. Restaurants and bars in Illinois have been closed for indoor dining since October. After an order from the governor. You've been pushing for restaurants and bars to re open. How would that look? How are you going to balance those efforts with the efforts to contain the spread of covert 19 right now? Look, I think you know this. But restaurants and bars or some of the most heavily regulated businesses in any city, and ours is no different. They have taken and invested a significant amount of their dollars to make their businesses safe, not only for patrons but also for their employees and what's become very clear. Is that because the bars and restaurants and other places of entertainment have been shut down, people have covered fatigue, and they're seeking access to entertainment and other higher risk ways. Underground parties using hotel spaces then use that should be closed. So what we're seeing is a lack of compliance. That is placing residents Maurin risk. So I think that there's a public health reason why we should carefully re open our bars and restaurants at limited indoor capacity. But there's also clearly an economic reason to do that. We're always gonna lead with the science and the data, but what we're seeing across Our city is that people having stopped congregating, They're just doing it. Unfortunately and Maura and more risk here unregulated ways. We want to open up these regulated venues that are safer for people to congregate in. And where we can have some oversight over what they're doing, and then also obviously opening up economic opportunities for restaurants and bars and other entertainment venues that have been so hard hit over the course of this last

Chicago Lori Lightfoot Federal Government Pandemic Maurin Illinois Maura
Trump Administration Auctions Arctic National Wildlife Refuge To Oil Drillers

Environment: NPR

03:59 min | 4 months ago

Trump Administration Auctions Arctic National Wildlife Refuge To Oil Drillers

"And now a story you have missed. During last week's storming of the us capital. The trump administration achieved one of its biggest environmental reversals. It auctioned off leases to drill oil in alaska's arctic national wildlife refuge it's one of the country's most pristine places home to migrating caribou birds and polar bears but the sale was a bust degan hanlin of alaska's energy desk joins us now to explain welcome. Hi thanks for having me on. Thanks for being with us okay. So the trump administration has pushed for the sale for three years. I mean republicans have pushed to allow drilling in this refuge for decades. What exactly happened here. So the sale received a striking lack of interest as a former federal gas official told me it was a dry hole. A bust about half of the area up for leasing got no offers at all. No major oil companies submitted bids instead just two small companies each picked up one lease and the rest of them went to the state of alaska. There's a state owned economic development corporation here the highest bidder on nine leases. But what. I don't get the revenue. The refuge is thought to contain a lot of oil. Right so why wasn't there. More demand. well industry analysts have said there's multiple reasons a major one is the opposition to drilling in this place. There are ongoing lawsuits fighting. The trump administration's leasing program there filed by environmental groups. And the glitch. In which is an indigenous group that hunts the caribou that commonly give birth in the refuge. And they say. The leasing program is rushed legally flawed. There's also just the high cost of doing business in the arctic compared to say texas and there's the uncertainty about future oil demand and the changing presidential administration. Here's how larry personally former federal gas official for alaska put it betting your company and billions of dollars on oil in a high risk environment on the arctic. Besides for all the grief you're going to take from the public from shareholders from investors. That's a big gamble companies. Just don't have the appetite for that anymore and one more point money from this sale was meant to offset president. Trump's tax cuts back in two thousand seventeen but this sale will raise just a small fraction of the amount. The government had hoped okay so the industry didn't really show up. But you said the state of alaska actually stepped up since tapped into buy up leases. Would are they going to do with that. You think right so there's actually quite a bit of political support in alaska for drilling in the refuge. They say it's a way to create more state revenue more jobs so the basic idea. Is that the state buys these leases. Which last for ten years and can be renewed and it could just sit on them and wait for market conditions to improve and then it would have to partner with the oil industry to do that. Actual drilling okay. Well president-elect biden has said. He opposes drilling in the arctic refuge. Can you do anything about the leases. That have already been sold. It's not clear yet what we'll do. We know that. Normally lisa's could take months to finalise. But we expect the trump administration to try to rush them through before biden takes office when option is biting. Try to buy back those leases when he's an office though that's kind of unusual also. Once a company has an oil lease. They still have a lot of permits and approvals so industry analysts say a biden administration could hold up that permitting process and it's also still possible. A federal court could intervene teagan handling of alaska public media thank you.

Alaska Arctic National Wildlife Trump Administration Arctic Elect Biden Larry Arctic Refuge Donald Trump United States Texas Lisa Biden Biden Administration Teagan
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un admits his economic plan has failed

Hugh Hewitt

00:42 sec | 4 months ago

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un admits his economic plan has failed

"His previous economic development plans have failed, Kim Jong until delegates that his economic goals had gone unfulfilled on the country's mistakes had to be boldly admitted. He emphasized the state message of self reliance, but it's unclear how he will overcome one of the country's bleakest years. In decades, North Korea has kept its borders closed to prevent the spread of covert 19. The blockade has caused trade with me and ally and neighbor. China to plummet by around 80% devastating typhoons and floods of damaged homes and crops on the country remains under strict international sanctions. That's the BBC's Laura Beggar European Union said Tuesday would redouble its efforts to

Kim Jong North Korea China Laura Beggar European Union BBC
"economic development" Discussed on Discover Lafayette

Discover Lafayette

04:21 min | 9 months ago

"economic development" Discussed on Discover Lafayette

"Other entities. Is. The opportunity to network and to have mentors. And this nothing better as you pointed out earlier than someone saying. I'm not telling you how to do it, but this is how I do this. How do it? What do you think? and. I think that's really. Big and I think in a K. Diana. It's bigger than any place because here really friendly entrusting usually by nature so. What we've got is an entire ecosystem built around the engine of our economy, which is business. Business comes first in government pops up around businesses, not vice versa, and that business creating those jobs is what we are established to help mostly. The only. Government entity that you know that's dedicated directly to business support or. I didn't know much about leader until I met. Ryan Legrand and you know I'm a big Fan of his Ryan helps people in so many ways. But when I was practicing law full time I had to learn new skills and I had taken on this Upper Lafayette economic development. Job and I didn't know how to do excel didn't know how to do powerpoint presentations and I had a lot to learn about computers and. Just upgrading my skill set. And so I had heard about leader at that point and Ryan helped me tap into money that's available to people I. Think it was up to three thousand dollars a year per employee at small businesses to to help their workforce. If they are employed, you have to be on the payroll, not just a contract worker but I can take all kinds of classes that really helped me do my job better and that's the kind of thing that I looked to lead a four. It's like not only getting a business started bit helping employees kind of. Grow and thrive. So the business can thrive you know and it's just down down home health that you offer. Thanks John. It's it's If you're under fifty employees, you have very little time to look around and see where help is you're trying to keep your head above water and you're working hard to make it to the next level. Well, with that said there or grants out there in we're the leading area the day in terms of. Our businesses getting those grants and.

Ryan Legrand Upper Lafayette Big K. Diana John
"economic development" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"economic development" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"economic development" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

15:01 min | 1 year ago

"economic development" Discussed on The Dave Gram Show on WDEV

"Radio Vermont. It's the Dave Graham Show on W.. DV It's your show about the people places and the issues that matter the most to you. Now here's your host Dave Graham. Good morning it is Friday November the first two thousand and nineteen and a pretty wild and woolly Friday morning. It's been for a lot of Vermont. Is trying to get around this morning. Given the high water fallen trees in some places. It took our buddy here WD Veasley Catella five hours to get to work this morning. A normal forty five minute trip for him Yikes all I can say. I hope people out there staying safe Eh. Being careful Keeping Your eyes on the road and not on your phones and making sure that everybody gets Gets where they need to be without any major mishaps. It's Kind of a mess out there. Roger Hill tells us the weather's GonNa improve slightly during the course of the day and All the were facing some high winds which could mean yet more more trees down in the roadways so again it's going to be required continued care getting around especially the back roads in Vermont In Vermont Today Day on this November first winners common folks and you can sort of feel that weather changing happening Was Seventy degrees in Burlington last evening and this this morning it's nowhere near that out there. I was taken in the code around my belly this morning on the way walk from the car into work here. WD FM and am and well we got a good full show for you this morning. We're going to be talking about to a couple of US military veterans about some upcoming sessions on Sunday Day veterans town halls. Taking place in Colchester Saint John's Berry and Rutland and These are unscripted. Events were veterans can share their stories about their service this about the time after returning back to back to stateside if they went overseas and It's a really I haven't yet made made it to one of these events events but it might have to this Sunday because I understand. It's a very important thing for veterans to get to speak their minds and their souls and for other community members to listen to the general public is invited to listen to what our veterans are having to say and This morning we have two veterans on the show in the first hour. Here I'M GONNA be talking with Marty man and with John Turner they are each heading up to sort of facilitating one of these three events going around the state and John Turner and Mardi Man. I I WANNA thank you for your service to the United States of America and the American people and also so Welcome to the Dave grab show this Friday morning. Thank you for having us and let me start with you. John if I could I see that Let's see you. You're going to be heading. The which of the town halls is yours. The one in Colchester at Saint Michael's College McCarthy Arts Center and that's at one. PM on Sunday. Sunday correct. Yes Sir and if you've been Have you done this in the past I MC one in Burlington last year and then I participated -tated The first year that Kristen Ed put this event together in Vermont And then Kristin Kristin eaten who Actually it was my guest on the day Graham Show last last year. That's where I learned about these kinds of events. She kindly came into the studio and paid us a visit in talked about the upcoming Veterans town halls. Then and of course. This is on November now in November is punctuated by Veterans Day. They're going to be quite a number of events. I've got another veterans related. Show actually coming up Monday with some folks from Norwich orbits university down in Northfield so we're spreading it out a little bit and and You know I really wanted. I really want to give give veterans some notice in some credit credit over the next week or two until you know right leading up in the lead up to Veterans Day which courses November the eleventh and and John Turner you were you said last to you. emceed the event in Burlington I gathered. That's the Jenin County Event and has moved from Burlington. Colchester this this year yes her and and Bigger venue is is because of crowd size or what was available As far as building. I'm not certain We were at constantly auditory on the last two years. which has a pretty high seating capacity Both both events had really great turnouts. And I think it's it might have to do with the fact doubt Saint Michael's colleges is helping to sponsor things And offered this space. But I'm not entirely certain about that. And and McMahon McMahon you are You're going to be with the program in Saint John's we're on Sunday. Is that correct. That's correct and and whereabouts in Saint John's worries that catamounts Arts Center which is right there downtown and all the all the events are going to be at one. PM So one PM and Martin have you done this. Before I've been to last year I went to the one in Burlington the John Beak and a number of other people and some other people I work with in the veteran community were there speaking as well and it was a pretty impressive of that and that I was happy to know that we're going to be expanded over to Saint John's breed to sort of get the northeast kingdom veterans involved. Yeah and and and and that's a that's an important thing to kind of spread it out around the state because obviously there are veterans living in our communities all across Vermont and you want to include as many opportunities as you can and and then there's a third event Down in Rutland trying to look up the location of that and it's also going to be Yet the free of Rutland Public Library rather than Free Library. Okay Yeah The and that's also at one. PM And and so gives a three three locations around the state for folks WHO WANNA turn out to these events and Marty. Tell me in your experience in the last couple of years. Have the events mainly been attended by veterans or or I mean is it been two-thirds members of the general public and one-third veterans or. How's that broken down you no? It's really hard to tell whether some of the people who don't speak our just veterans who don't really want to get up there or whether it's you know people people who have not served It's Kinda hard to get a sense of that For the ones that I've been to I don't know if John has a better sense but we really are pushing to have people who have not served to come because one of the essential elements of this as we sort of know about veterans. We thank them for their service But we never really have that dialogue. We really don't get to hear what their service was about and their service can be you know different all over the place depending on what kind of duty they had I worked as a medic in hospitals And I believe was in combat Kyle. Who's doing the one in Rutland was a combat medic in Iraq? So there are people here who are airplane mechanics and nurses and so I mean the variety of types of service that we all have is important for people to know win also to open up that dialog because it makes it easier for veterans to come back and reintegrate back into their communities. Yeah I I do think that that ability is to share your experiences has got to be just a a really really important Thread in the overall connection. You've got reestablish as you return as you say to your communities after your service and your service was actually Mardi in the air force. Is that correct. It was. I was air force reserve and then active-duty for Probably about nine ten months. That was when Vietnam was winding down. So they were sort of pushing some of us out at the time onto. Yeah were you able to. Did you go to nominee. Did you remain stateside. I was in Nebraska and Texas. Okay okay I see and and and John Turner tell me about your Let's see I have a A little bio here You Oh you serve three deployments with the Marines between two thousand and three and two thousand seven trips to Iraq involved in air yes twice to Iraq and then wants to Haiti in two thousand and four That was after the big earthquake. There is that right no it was it was during from my understanding the american-backed coup to overthrow President Aristide so it was prior to the earthquake Yes I'm a little a little hazy on my Haitian history apparently but And and and and you are tell me about your your experience kind of reintegrating into the community. I mean I know that From WanNa wanted just wasn't what I read in general media reports and so on it could be a tough thing to come back after service and find your way back into You know just a regular family life and working life and community life. Yeah and that's that's extremely difficult and That doesn't just take its toll on the veteran themselves. Yes but also the family member that that reintroduction cycles is. It's kinda crucial to to to kind of harmonizing the circumstances because regardless as to whether or not someone saw combat You know there's definitely a very large Change in behavior and and perspective. They've towards life after being apart of military service and so personally speaking. You know I was nineteen when I came home from my first deployment and you know. Granted granted my first one to Haiti wasn't combat related. You know you're seeing things that that you've never really seen before the amount of poverty that exists how people live and that that definitely takes a toll on the psyche Vike But I think that after the combat deployments that I went on you know being twenty and twenty one returning home you know I. It's it's really easy to fall. Aw into unhealthy habits which is you know what what what happened? for for many of us. And so if you don't have proper support for networks in place and you really don't have the mindset you know kind of finding a healthy flow back into normalcy can be very difficult and so I think that the state of mind and A lot of the veteran organizations here have really made a push in effort over the last decade That I've seen to to kind of really help with this process and make sure that you know veterans. Don't become a statistic. Yeah that's gotTa be I know that a bunch of programs have cropped up a a variety of levels to help veterans reintegrate Do you think that they are working or doing enough now. or Or is there are still large gaps out there for veterans who are not being Well enough serves by these programs. I think that we could always be doing a better job when I when I enrolled in the VA system back in two thousand and seven Needless to say I was kindly escorted to the door A few times Just because it was very frustrating having to deal with with the system in and of itself and since then and some of the initiatives that You know I've had the pleasure of being a part of I think that the organization as a whole is more in a more welcoming to quote unquote alternative therapies apiece That really help and I think that the younger generation of veterans you know many of us don't WanNa receive you know prescriptions for for For Mood stabilisers or for for sleep meds and or pain meds. We really actually want to be able to push through whatever difficulties. We have So that we can live healthy being fruitful lives You know but that's that's just my own personal perspective but I definitely have seen Leaps and bounds in Veterans being engaged with these programs and New programs popping up that have a great amount of integrity. And that's that's definitely warming see the that is a good thing I mean and and as you say it's not a perfect thing is more work to do but I think It sounds like there is some progress being made Martin Marty McMahon Vietnam era veteran veteran. What are you what do you make all this? You know I know. The famous story from the nineteen seventies was that A lot of returning soldiers really got the cold shoulder. Ah when I came home and things seem to be improving from those days certainly And and do you feel like that's that's all a good thing. Do you feel like the Vietnam. Folks are still a little bitter about not not being included as much back then in in these kinds of in this kind of help I. I think it's pretty mixed. I mean I never saw any Negatively towards me I came back I hitchhiked alway from Texas all the way across Chris country through the Midwest Back to Boston in full uniform and people you know hitchhiking and people stopped. Pick me up offered me whether I wanted to join over over beer or a shot of whiskey and a good talk with people who was Quite a bit of dialogue. That was going on. They know other people have talked about. You know getting off the plane in San Diego and you know making sure. They took off their uniform So I think it was kind of mixed but most most of the veterans I know maybe the worst of it was just the silence and I think part of what we're trying to do here break that silence awesome. Try and get a dialogue going. But I also think there's you know some of it I'm not quite sure. The new narrative Howard of is as accurate as people. Make it out to be but I do know. There are some veterans. who were? We're not treated very well or yelled at you know just you know it was really unfortunate you an immediate more recent times no back then but the country was very much Split up and there's a lot of dissension I mean one of my. I guess one of my biggest memories. When I was in was sitting in the barracks windows smoking a cigarette and watching the race riot? Go on at the Airman's Club you there was dissension in in the service. At that time there was dissension all over the country. So it's SORTA mirror a lot so it's hard to like get one particular narrative in one Vietnam veteran..

"economic development" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Change the so called california rule wow it's what an amazing predicament recently there have been a couple of pieces about how great the rest of the country is economically all forty nine states uh you good times wonderful times things are really looking up in especially since the the passage of a tax reform and and the good news there and then accompanying that there are these pieces about how california is on the verge of going into another recession are already is in recession what's your opinion on that all about two months ago i did a story from the ventura county economic development uh uh commission as you know i live in cherry county and that commission could cleared over the summer of two seventeen the county of ventura entered a recession and there are others counties all in recession around the state the only counties that are doing well economically and for the future apparently are going to be silicon valley and the bay area outside of that the city of los angeles is is nearly bankrupt the county is nearly bankrupt uh at your county is already and the declared recession and because of the uh uh what happened yesterday with the minimum wage going up we're going to have more unemployment among those with war excuse me who are less skilled and those individuals who are teenagers i don't know whether you know this but under trump in the first year black unemployment is at historically low levels hispanic unemployment is at historically low levels we treat age unemployment has gone up and that's because cities counties and speech have given an artificial minimum wage increase which causes businesses to hire robots and of course in the central valley story about a month ago there are lots of farms and now uh using robots uh in order to collect the crops uh even in the uh uh vineyards there are robots who are uh uh collecting uh the grapes something we've been following very closely we'll take a breather here we'll come back with the last season's deeds piece that's out today how to reduce the california state budget by forty plus billion and this has to do with us being a sanctuary state which is now a reality and that's what we're going to.

california ventura county cherry county ventura los angeles economic development two months
"economic development" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Come in here about this water were used travel four o'clock in city council chambers on december the seven 415 give her take be therefore clark all right yes right and lentil of either to do the presidential analysts coming on the environment department from lentil who is working on the up okay this is this is also kind of this a turningpoint in in lentils history as well the union new contractor they just got a brand new director who has a long history there and now they're looking at along in a long term contract in nino whether to allow university california to bid or not to bid i guess it's still kind of up in the air a it sounded like they were going to be allowed to bid because of mistakes they've been making the last couple of years now you see says well we have a long history here we should be allowed to bit it's also kind of a pivotal point in their history and how they communicate in how they relate to the people around him ryan and and there is one other really important issue further economic development sharaf this area is that a for the last number of years under this recent contract it has been a poor profit organization paychecks and so they have to pay gross receipts tax and if it goes back to a nonprofit and we lose that money in arden are there in areas as santa fe ally it is gonna be devastating tens of thousands of dollars right yeah intially interns it's really important that whatever whoever has the contract they still contribute and they still pay the gross receipts tax hooker it doesn't change just from nonprofit too prophet right what they are doing up there.

director clark university california ryan economic development santa fe
"economic development" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"I don't understand that economic development matters right south korea japan germany turkey turkey is an interesting one because fifty the i'm not sure honest did now city where turkey was fifty years ago but in recent years they've obviously sled and any of the netherlands sweden poland spain rail lot countries that are from the former soviet bloc so where's the united states here whereas the united states when it comes to our people better off or worse off than they were fifty years ago this is amazing statistic only thirty seven percent of americans say that americans are better off today than they were fifty years ago forty one percent of americans say that they are worse off than they were fifty years ago fifty years ago in nineteen sixty seven in the middle of riots in the united states in the middle of the vietnam war with economic development that having a car was was the a having a nice car was still luxury now where you didn't have the internet didn't have the houses were smaller airconditioning conditioning was still not universal central air central heating raided the there weren't such thing as computers the living standard in the united states is so much higher than it was a nineteen 67 in yet americans believe that this is not the case that they are they were better off then and this is one of the problems i think in american politics right now there's this sort of nostalgia for a better time there was no better time said this before you are living in the best time in history okay this is the better time when people say do when you wish you had lived right now you know why because i can connect with any piece of information on the planet at any time of night or day and i can go to the grocery store and i get any delicacy i want from anywhere on planet earth i can live in a bigger house if i can pay for and i can pay for it right this is one of the beautiful things about living in the united states things have gotten incredibly better but people refused to recognize this and so in.

south korea united states vietnam war economic development japan germany netherlands sweden spain fifty years thirty seven percent forty one percent
"economic development" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"I am a panicked robbins returns about six point six million and checks including the cambridge economic development claim and other monies to the treasury were there seized by law enforcement so that is like the basic outline but you know it is is still interesting through who these people are and how they got involved in this sort of thing i mean new now tricks these just a just a working class guy and you've got you've got this other guy who's who sort of political heavyweight or politically sort of untouchable because he's come in as john malone's guy and he's a pair thrown his weight around and in a big shot and that's what robert fully apparently was according to according to people who talk him in the office he was a big spender big surprise i he flash stick worlds a cash in boasted a pullout good fila's with these guys is yet this is a guy who comes out with that with that wada cash that you sort of envision every time it you think of good fellas that's with this guy had and the reason why he said it was absolutely fine that he had all this money was because you know he di owned a shopping mall and ashland shattuck i don't know if you knew what how good shopping malls were as investments s indeed was was where he was getting all of his money from he this is also a guy who basically conducted all of his private business during public time he he he had other companies that he just worked on while he was supposedly a.

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"economic development" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Present flannel if coming on the environment department from lionel who is working on the up booker this is this is also kind of this a turningpoint in in lentils history as well the new contractor they just got a brand new director who has a long history there and now they're looking at a long in a long term contract in nino whether to allow university california to bid or not to bid i guess is still kind of up in the air a it sounded like they were going to be allowed to bid because of mistakes they'd been making last couple of years now you see says well we have a long history here we should be allowed to bit it's also kind of a pivotal point in their history and how they communicate and how they relate to the people around them right and and there is one that really important issue further economic development schrafft's this area is a for the last number of years under this recent contract it has been a for profit organization paycheck and so they have to pay gross receipts tax and if it goes back to a nonprofit and we lose that money in our northern areas as santa fe ally it is going to be devastated turns your goals right centrally interns it's really important that whatever whoever has the contract they still contribute and they still pay the gross receipts tax hooker it doesn't change just from nonprofit to profit what they are doing up there and so they still need to.

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"economic development" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Birmingham economic development institute you can bit is all about advanced manufacturing m two people that what made a lot what is it advanced manufacturing its using advanced digital technologies we're talking of things like robot takes and dates advanced theta technologies but the key thing here is using these technologies to make british manufacturing more productive and therefore allowing british companies to be more competitive globally export more and create more jobs what will the industrial strategy say about that today how will that be enabled well one of the key enablers that we heard earlier in the pharmaceutical sector is the increased spend on r d to the problem the pass as being that british companies british manufacturers simply went spinning enough money on new technology exactly well both in terms of creating the new technology to create things like robotics and also in adopting them in their manufacturing organizations and by creating more funds to allow small and mediumsized companies to collaborate with large ones and with universities to adopt those technologies better will be a good thing cancer and said will that make a different to how'd you get companies to invest more well the the key way to do is to create what we call ecosystem so they are places where people can go to expect with this technology many small to mediumsized companies in our they don't have the time in their manufacturing activities to experiment with robots so going offline into a centre way you can do some research with some universities and work out how it's going to whip before you that implemented in your factory it's those sorts of things and pull them you look after the.

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"economic development" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was very critical of what he saw the the prevailing view about economic development so he he wrote a very comprehensible cnn economics and it included government policy and on things as well that was immensely critical of the status quo and the role of the government in the economy and that that sharp critical edge has caught attention and made much disgusted with the yen's chris where you should care calls he his name and his name taken in vain in many ways and inasmuch as we kerr degree of accuracy in out the pictures of people than it behoves us to try and that clearer more accurately what smith stood for and cute sonja when if we had to lease ten or twelve names of persons that brought us all into modernity how on earth did we become mode them at some point in time smith would be one of them at also say he was not only a great modernizer he was also possibly the first scientific economies father of economy but he was also the last economies tools genuinely also a philosopher and a historian and we should look backwards salam passion to this combination to the junction of philosophers history and economics law designed magnum let me know of the missed opportunity there was some mingled is competition liked him uninspiring goes on and on the whole group or people.

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"economic development" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"With your help this entire region has emerged and it is still emerging as a beautiful constellation of nations each its own bright star satellites to nine and each one eight people a culture a way of life and to home those of you who have lived through these transformations understand better than anyone the value of what you have achieved you also understand that your home is your legacy and you must always protected in the process of your economic development you've sought commerce and trade with other nations and forge partnerships based on mutual respect and directed toward mutual gain today i am here to offer renewed partnership with american to work together to strengthen the bonds of friendship and commerce between all of the nations of the end up aceh fake add to gather to promote our prosper parity and security at the core of this partnership we seek robust trade relationships rooted in the principles of fairness and reciprocity when the united states enters into a trading relationship with other countries were other people's we will from now on expect that our partners will faithfully follow the rules just like we do we expect that markets will be open to an equal degree on both sides and that private industry not government planners will direct investment unfortunately for too long and too many places the opposite has happened for many years the united states systematically opened our economy with few conditions we lowered or end the tariffs reduced trade barriers and allowed foreign goods to flow freely into our country but while we lowered market barriers other countries didn't open their markets to us funny they must have been one of the beneficiaries what country do come from sir countries embraced by the world trade organization even if they did not abide by its stated principles shipley put we have not been treated fairly by the world trade organization is like the wto can only function properly normal members follow the rules and respect the sovereign kgb of every member we can neither markets if we do not ensure fair market access in the end unfair trade undermines us all the.

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"economic development" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"You're wrong you're wrong eric makes me live it i'm not the only about let's talk about the stopped valley if you wanna talk about your ears shannon i know richard income from the south valley area era albuquerque intended in their own context as it so uh uh a minus four am and it it's uh listen i brought up actually actually the counter brought it up the people were using hit the exactly this where's the as mayor vespino the county up and you picked up maya job john that is my job i don't i don't have i'm not supporting one candidate over the other out of six trust me i'm here i'm here not to sugarcoat it i appreciate no i appreciate your call i appreciate at the criticism i really do jon thank you later but thanks judgment right uh i hope i you know i don't want to do that i wanted to frame this as as me against has been y'all or anything else i just wanted kind of get a clear picture where you're talking about in relation to your campaign and that's why i want to get beyond that i wanna i want to focus on my record as a santa fe city council wait so is what i would do as much get back to i and i want to give you time to kind of can allay out kind of the plan the website the facebook page all that how people can donate get in touch with you because you're going to private financed uh but first of all housing economic development what would you would we have a new door a director of economic development matt brown is doing a great job i think he really has truly hit the ground running and he's really taken the the reins in that department which i think needed a lot of leadership and direction in terms of what i've done as a councilman uh we've we had been operating under an antiquated economic development code it wasn't even it wasn't even in conformance with the state's statute the local economic development act and so i sponsored legislation to do several things to to perform an interim update to our economic development plan that was done back in two thousand in two it's quite stale there's been some intermediate updates it but we need a we needed interim update and then a complete update and our code is also being updated as.

albuquerque economic development director matt brown facebook
"economic development" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"You know how to make money over and as opposed to doing it staying in private industry you really choose to do it in terms of economic development because it really fills you yes you have any evidence he ever does anybody ever tell you how you effect that on well you know it's it's you know is a blessing i i just recently had a birthday mom mother just had her ninety th birthday in this know is interesting to hear people talk to her about the fact that she had in their lives and then to receive tax than emails them and cards from friends in np people that have mentored telling me you know that i've helped them in different ways and i i think that's really so howard of you in your mom help the community well you know sometimes it's it's helping people figure out how to get out of debt a main sometimes it's helping you know my mother she would just she there was a widow the live next door to us she would cook meals for this woman n actually she would have my sister and i take her the meals and i asked her one date what are you have us take her the meal you know why don't you take her the meals she said because i i want you to see we're giving me what what do you mean she wanted us to see what it meant to give your time and your resources in your talents to other people is still powerfully enriching it it is transformational and a lot of people underrated with the lady cd when you're broader dinner well sometimes the i mean she i birdied verdy fry with her name she was so sweet sometimes from chicago was this or that was done man was forty years ago you remember her name from which he looked like yeah we go more than what did she say to you she just sometimes you just cried in other types of course you she birdied for she's just think this no other make you feel made me feel rich what are you talking about it it made me feel wealthy inside and made me feel like my life mattered interesting in house that affecting in those days the same thing i feel the same way whenever i give her help you know.

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"economic development" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"What do i know how to do now instead of what can this be and if you just look at what can i do now today that's obviously going to limit eu verses what's the potential for this those are two completely different framing exactly exactly and you know when what i was teaching entrepreneurship to women and they would come in and and and a lot of entrepreneurs do things because they want to change the world and i would look at them and say you know it's easier to change the world if you have money this is this is not about making a profit is not a bad thing it's actually a good thing and one of the other projects that i worked on at the maryland center for entrepreneurship um the head of our economic development there was very passionate about uh bringing nonprofits and four profits closer to align together to help nonprofit you know realize that earned revenue earned income or quote unquote profit is not a bad thing and a nonprofit it just doesn't go to the individuals it goes back into the mission right exactly and then uh breeze was a great segway because i was looking at the um as the edn in economic development administration you're you're divisions um i six program and which seems to have a particular spot if you will for energy and environmental environmentally sustainable businesses are oriented businesses and and i see a lot for college parks and science parks and clusters and things like that but then i also saw something for seed funds.

maryland center economic development
"economic development" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on 1A

"Uh you know this just because the oils flowing the causes us to have great concern of it does win the the ruling does vindicate everything that we have been saying from the very very beginning in that is what impact will this have on our people uh when we talk about the the need for the pipeline we were saying that we needed for economic development will this was the question that i asked was why do you need this pipeline right here and it was because of the corridor but is because it brings economic development it brings energy independence and it brings national security if you look at what has been done to the standing rock seat tribe and the greeks who nation uh we have been paying for economic development of our land the treaty land at the pipeline crosses was taken from us port by congress when you look at energy independence our lands wherever this these dan the sir pick sloan act the dams on the missouri river seven dams it flooded tribal lands when he look at national security are or are origin story where people came from is in the black kills and the the black kills were taken from us for gold so infrastructure projects had had a significant impact on our people on our way of life and that's all the questions we are asking is what impact is gonna be why come here we never said it wasn't a bad idea.

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"economic development" Discussed on The World Transformed

The World Transformed

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on The World Transformed

"And uh yeah have all three of those uh then you got you're going to end up with a society that uh avoids war and at that point each with other key in competes with other nations in different was right he added advances its position via other means have right and at that point it starts to sound the awful lot like the the ideas we came up with for combating terrorism doesn't it yes with us there's there's not a lot in common between the two and in fact we know that terrorism is a form of warfare they call called a symmetrical warfare um and so uh i guess really we were talking about a particular kind last week and now we're talking about the the overall topic here this week but that's okay for were left to relent break it up that way i but i i think you're right i think the that those are the those are the factors the really come into play when i talk about economic development i should um i should broaden that to uh to include the idea that from my standpoint economic development means a growing economy where uh where a markets are more or less free and what follows that or what seems to netflix follow that is that individuals become more or less free and that both of those things have to uh have to be in place and yeah i think people have to be have to be educated um those those things all start falling into place and suddenly you've got of people in the world wanting to interact with other people in the world not necessarily destroy or or change other people in the world that that seems to be the uh the big shift that were that we're looking for in in order to make warfare go away right.

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"economic development" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"economic development" Discussed on WJR 760

"Back it's very important to ultimately the success of the region it's it's up there with education it's up there with public safety and jobs is is transit and it plays a role in each of the things that i just mentioned and we have to realise that have going forward we need to be relevant to the people in outlying areas who felt like they were going to be funding something that was going to get a return on their investment right i think that you know a lot of it you know for my estimation so much import is is as it relates to economic development and i think that it needs to be made relevant someone who lives in the how line part of michigan you know outlying part of makombe county oakland county people that don't use public transit people they may look down on public transit are those take it it needs to be explained to them how public transit drive economic development how those tax dollars help their daytoday lives and i don't know that message was clearly articulated to the voting public role i think there was also a lot of angst in anger about feeling like they already been disenfranchised to some degree in the economy and it's until that get out of its system that they were going to be in a particularly generous mood when it when it came to transit let's look at the four to do that came out of twenty sixteen number one was support the establishment of the american centre for mobility out will a run that is up enrolling we're going to be talking to john maddox a little bit later on this program a around four forty five but that certainly you can check that off your list check really look.

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