22 Burst results for "Ebony Magazine"

"ebony magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

Monocle 24: The Stack

03:36 min | 3 months ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Stack

"Love and family is music our art so it covered everything hence ebony covering black america so yes. Ebony is more than a magazine said Was our facebook our instagram. This is where we got our information from and not just the famous people that you should know about people doctors People have high rankings in the military people in medicine teachers educators stories about you know the plight of not just black america but our educational system. What's happening with us. So ebony covered. Everything in evans continues to cover everything well about continuing to cover everything. Effing because of the historical importance babbling. You've been having quite a busy week. I mean you're you're in washington d. c. Tell us a bit more about the events celebrating around the release of the book as well. And of course we have to add. It's been great news as well with george floyd. I just looked at your website. Of course there's plenty of coverage as well right so i'm here in washington. Dc our nation's capital celebrating the book celebrating seventy five years of ebony with the congressional black caucus we partnered ebony magazine publishing our division. We partnered with the national urban league and a few corporations to launch kick off the book in our nation's capital but also looking at the importance of this book some of our legislators got involved because they were ebony is been there everything you know speaking with elected officials and congressmen. They were just so happy. Our turnout we had all of the leadership. And then some at our kickoff celebration on yesterday i just a few feet away from the capitol. And so what we're doing is we are embarking on a what started out to be a tent city tool that. Looks like it might be a twenty city tour Where we're not just coming into a city and talking about the book we actually have sponsors. That are making the book available. They're buying the book they're donating the book to public school systems to public libraries and to community centers and so in dc. Were just over the moon that amplify education and the launer johnson foundation join us in purchasing these books and making sure through the urban league that they are getting in the hands of our youth and so part of our mission with his tour is to connect connect gaps. Right connect generations right. You know this is history and so we want our young people to know that to understand that that they are standing on the shoulders of giants that as black americans. We accomplished a great deal. We've we've had our fights. We still continue to fight for equal justice and to be treated equally for all people not just black america white america all from all walks of life basically and so with this tour..

george floyd washington washington d. c. yesterday facebook seventy five years instagram Ebony twenty city congressional america ebony johnson Effing urban black evans white americans
Interview With Elaine Welteroth

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:13 min | 8 months ago

Interview With Elaine Welteroth

"Hey everyone it's carly today elaine. While trough joins me unscheduled skimmed from the catch. She's a new york times bestselling author in award winning journalist and a judge on the new project. Runway elaine is also known for her groundbreaking work while she was the editor in chief of team vogue magazine. At the time she was appointed. She was the youngest ever editor in chief at conde nast title. Elaine bake fan over here. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skim from the catch They keep her having the excited. So get you our first question. Everyone gets it better. Skin your estimate for us. Ooh okay. how far do you want to go back. This is your your resume your skin. You tell me oh my gosh okay. Well i'm going to start where it all started back at home town. Buffet in newark california. Where i was dancing. I was the the the host like in the be costume. That be is still like my spirit animal. I feel like i got like my best. Dance moves from being in that hot huge costume. Because all my inhibitions went away and i just had the time of my life and i got paid to just stand there and dance around in fun little kid. I had lots of jobs. I've been working. Ever since. I could get my work permit. Lots of jobs at the mall. And that kind of thing. And then. When i when i was in college i worked two jobs anyway. Flash like my professional career post college. I essentially stopped a woman named harry cole who was the editor in chief of ebony and she eventually conceded and let me be her intern. My very first job in be industry was as an intern at ebony magazine and i sort of worked my way up to beauty and style editor there than i jumped over to conde nast and i worked as the beauty writer and editor at glamour magazine than i was promoted to senior beauty editor. And that's when. I got the big call. That sort of changed my life i from ebay chan who was then the beauty and health director at team vogue and so when she called me about this coveted position that she was leaving and thought i would be a great fit for it. I freaked out. And i just thought i am not worthy. I'm not wearing the god. I don't know if i'm ready. And you know to be the director of a department. I was only twenty five years old. And i had just been promoted where i was so i told her like you know i just you call me six months from now a year from now i would feel better about going after this job but like at this in this climate and the recession. I just got promoted. I don't wanna be labeled this. Ungrateful millennial entitled brad and then they find out that the job and i don't get the job that i'm like blacklisted. So i just was too afraid. And i said i said no. And then lo and behold even worked her magic and next thing you know. I got the call to interview properly or her position. In by that point my boss had given her blessing so there was just sort of a clear path and i got that job. I became the beauty and health director at teen vogue at twenty five and then at twenty nine became the editor of team folks. So amy ashley was the founding editor of teen vogue. She moved on and i was promoted. And then i decided to take a leap of faith in. I think two thousand eighteen. I took a leap of faith. After i felt like i had accomplished everything on my bucket list and more at teen vogue i just i had my heart set on new goals and i started my own business and i wrote a book called more than enough which came out in june of two thousand eighteen just last year. I can't believe it's been a year and the sky's the limit all the things that now. I'm just doing so many things that i feel like. Now i am essentially the editor in chief of my own life.

Conde Nast Team Vogue Magazine Elaine Bake Elaine Harry Cole Ebony Magazine Glamour Magazine New York Times Newark California Chan Teen Vogue Ebay Amy Ashley Brad
Airbus Looks to End Trade Dispute With U.S. by Forgoing Some Government Support

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Airbus Looks to End Trade Dispute With U.S. by Forgoing Some Government Support

"With the US over financial support agreements it has with European governments. The Wall Street Journal says it's agreeing to change its deals with Spain and France. Airbus says it believes the changes will put it in compliance with World Trade Organization guidelines and could lead to Removing US tariffs Ebony magazine's creditors air

United States The Wall Street Journal Ebony Magazine Airbus World Trade Organization Spain France
A Moment in Time, with Shari Belafonte

B&H Photography Podcast

11:27 min | 1 year ago

A Moment in Time, with Shari Belafonte

"Today. We're GONNA be talking sheriff about photography. So let's get into it Sherry. Welcome to our show. It's so great having Jose here so you have grown up around cameras now as a little kid all my life cameras aimed at you most again. Your Dad was Trenton Center. He was big deal. Back in the fifties sixties seventies. He broke down a lot of walls. Again everybody's familiar with his music and his acting and everything else. So you're smiling laughing about so. I was very hyperactive. Attention deficit as a child. I still lamb a little curtail with certain things now making native American blood you know wearing a bright orange camp right now you WanNa talk about it. Yeah Orange there you go. There's fast on. Go ahead I'm sorry. My Grandmother gave me my first Brownie camera. Now that's how far back I with the fan flash that you put the light bulb shit so I had that one. I was four years old. How many megapixel was and you would get this little tiny roll of film that you would put inside that Yummy and That was my first foray into being behind the camera and then instamatic semantic when I was I think I had a funny little polaroid camera that we had them all And my first legitimate camera was a pentax when I was eleven years old. Okay I was in boarding school by Matic or h three the it was. You know I can't remember I just. It was a thirty five millimeter Pentax Camera. That was dad's I know. Dad had a SPA top. Any passed it down to me so my entire high school was spent in the dark room. I smell like smoke. That was really attractive. Smell coming out of the yellow fingernails sitting in the dark. You Know Rolling and Rolling Rolling Rolling and then you know praying that you could put it in the CAN. It would come out and it wasn't all crumpled and you know so. Yeah I spent a good part of my earlier years behind the camera. And then of course like you said being Harry's daughter you know when we when he was on tour somewhere and there's Paparazzi or people taking pictures of us all the time and then Harry took pictures of us all the time that we never saw and it was the biggest joke because he was he always got get over there. Get OVER THERE. Get over there. Stop Stop Standards There. Hundreds and hundreds of pictures that were taken by. Harry and we've never seen a single one single. And why do you think that's the case? He just too busy to Kinda know if he ever developed and I don't know if there was even filmed the camera I think he had these Lycos and he just you know he just kept shooting once in a while. We saw him because he would. When he was a touring he would have these The program with this and it was always the big color program that would come with new. Buy A ticket and there would be pictures of us you know in there and we go to dad. Shoot that picture around. The house was photography kind of a respected medium. Was it an art to be an art. He did have a darkroom which he never went into. He just had it in the back next his recording studio but he did use a recording studio. Did use the recording. But Yeah we always have been shutterbugs. I think the whole definitely me more so than I think my siblings but Harry was definitely behind the camera. He was into like us us a very like a like like like scandal. And what about the Paparazzi and stuff? Maybe it wasn't. I can't even say that it wasn't like it is now because Paparazzi but was it A pain in the bud. Was it something that you guys so I was so used to? You know because what happened is my hair Harry. In Marguerite. My mom was marguerite. She passed away a few years go but they divorced. When I was very young actually separated woman was pregnant with me so there was always that kind of people trying to take pictures of that that was going on but there was a little more of a sense of decency for lack of better words with authorizing I mean. Now it's like Oh goes the there were lines. That were not crossed back then. I mean chances and stuff like that and they they definitely probably got onto your skin right probably worse today and usually think it was more of a magazine would come in. Ebony magazine would come in and say you know. Can we shoot you at home or and you know there was a story that was behind it and maybe the attorneys would go yet. It's good idea. Let's let's push that you know. Yeah we've always been around cameras for yourself. It's often family. What kind of things interested you would sort of you know? In the days I was in boarding school in Massachusetts so I I've always been a fan of black and white. I never learned how to process color and of course slides for the first things. You sort of learned. I never learned how to process but I was always into the dynamic of black and white so with the snow in Massachusetts. There was always the lights and shadows and you can stream you know falling through the ice no save. The camera saved the camera. Shot landscapes mostly landscapes. And then I shot everything and then as I got older and could start a fording stuff. I actually stopped shooting for a while and then when Sam. I got married thirty five years ago. Sam gave me my first Yoeskamnoer. I had by then already onto Canon cameras. But you know hey a one and the that great but then Sam gave me my first Kammer after maybe not shooting for ten years and we went on our honeymoon to Italy and I just shot like crazy like bags and bags film was carrying at the time. Kodak made what was called recording fill in the recording. Four seventy five four and as soon as you develop it would turn into a corkscrew that you can never hold flat that I didn't know because by then I wasn't processing okay but Three hundred you could you. Could you could set the The whatever you wanted I mean you couldn't with any film but this was if you decided to shoot at or if you wanted to shoot one hundred thirty two hundred or sixty four hundred. Just remember what you shot that at and you'd process it like if I shot four hundred three sixty I process it at four hundred by shoot at three sixty and I mean the detail was. It's crazy it's like mega pixels eight thousand and I just fell in love with that and then when Kodak stopped making it because they said well you know nobody's buying it because it was twelve dollars a roll and I know buying it. No please keep making and then shortly after you know film just kind of went by the wayside and now it's coming back. Is it coming back to us? Sales were up twenty percent last year. So you now actually have to try and find a film camera. I still actually have a rebel. Okay okay isn't it rebel? Originally rebels were killed. What was called the digital rebel? No megapixel but I did have for the Canon thirty and I was started shooting movies of Friends of mine. Who were directors said? Would you shoot stills movie and I remember get going into get a sound blimp made for my digital camera and the guys in you and Steven Spielberg's guy or the only people that have blimps for you. These eight thirty eight sixty. Whatever I add albertson blimp. Right Jacobsen Jacobsen recently closed down. There's no need for any other. No ex- exactly. I've got this this whole box downstairs in the garage is because like don't need the blimp. Next time lenses by the I worked on a movie as recently as Twenty fifteen and with a digital camera and they recorded a blimp ahead to go rent one. I mean even even that little clique. If you're onset now we have an issue thousand frames so that one was especially digital you shoot so fast. The first movie I did shoot I had asked me me. Leaders a friend of mine and she also is the executive producer and director of the morning. Show but at the time going back. You know fifteen twenty years. Whenever it was that I was shooting this I said to her. You know this is the first time shooting for a movie. What she's just keeps shooting shoot. Shoot shoot shoot shoot shoot shoot so I did. I shot eight thousand seven hundred and seventy eight frames and thought okay. You know. I'm their mom. Put them all and give them. And then oh no we just need your best hundred. It took me like three weeks to go through every single one of those because I really looked like I was shooting movie. Everything was so slightly different. They know what would you take away from that experience? Really get an editor back to that five role mentality you know. They'll have a budget for three to five roles. And that's what you did shooting digital change anything when you when you shoot because obviously it did change a lot for a lot of people in this idea of shooting maybe too much or a lot or just the freedom they can give you. Some really changed a lot of people's now you know everything is it cyclical now. I've barely picked up my camera now. Also have a Sony seven hours and shooting with my Samsung Galaxy's the galaxy the first galaxy thing. I had a four note for one of the earlier. Ones the best pictures I've ever seen. I went on my God. Look at these pictures that I'm getting on my phone and now I have a lot of my family's mostly apple. Nothing you know not against apple but galaxies have much better pictures you know the Samsung just really has the better technology shooting with your phone and I know friends of mine even say your pictures are so much better than mine. Why is that slow data Samsung if Samsung only made and take get another phone? Get Your Samsung Stolz. But I still like I still like the weight of having a camera and shooting the cameras a different different animal. But now you know. There's a difference for photographers. I never was would call professional photography gallery shows and stuff but I'm not like Greg Gorman. Who was a friend of mine? I didn't shoot and I'm not making money like that as a photographer. And right now so many you can take so many pictures. I mean anybody can get good picture with their phone. You know you can. It's easier to get good pictures now than it used to be. You know you'd have to have a professional photographer do that. Well now I you know people take headshots their phones movies with your eyes. You can do anything. Us forces us to kind of rethink what I should be taking pictures of. And how many pictures should be taking reassessed kind of the nature of it and that's happening. I think you know this return to film. We're seeing people kind of wanting to slow back down a little bit trying to figure out what what's the basis of it. That's really what it is. It's it's a medium. It's like if you're an oil painter if you're into acrylics or if you're doing you know pencil drawings if you're into sculpture it's a it's all worthy it's just a matter of what your taste isn't what it is that you're shooting at that

Samsung Harry Canon SAM Massachusetts Sherry Apple Kodak Trenton Center Director Ebony Magazine Jose Lycos Greg Gorman United States Matic Jacobsen Jacobsen Steven Spielberg
Lack of media diversity an effect of slavery, BuzzFeed beauty director

UN News

11:01 min | 2 years ago

Lack of media diversity an effect of slavery, BuzzFeed beauty director

"As the beauty director of digital media, giant BuzzFeed, essence, can't make sure it's content is inclusive and sensitive helping to balanced representation and reflect diversity growing up in the southern US state of Georgia. She recalls that she was surrounded by people who always validating, her as a black woman, but it was only later, she said, in an interview with you a news that she realized how underrepresented people of color were in the media, highlighting lack of diversity, as a direct result of the effects of slavery, that we're still dealing with MS Gant told Anacom, what media needs to do to change. The narrative my main message was around representation because I work in media, and I think the lack of representation and diversity as we see it in media, whether it's like, TV magazines movies, whatever it is, is that wrecked result of, you know, the effects of slavery, that we're still dealing with just a lack of representation the lack of diversity at every level. Well, in media from people behind the cameras that people on the camera to people writing stories, and telling narratives, and so my main message was that, you know, that matters in the media landscape because media such an important tool for education and for helping to change narratives and so change norms, and to help redistribute power. So we were speaking about the facts of slavery today. What do you think it's the importance of still learning about that period of history in the present days, I think it's something that we always have to educate ourselves about it just can't be lost as such a huge part of our history. And you can't ignore it. And you can't act like it didn't happen because it did. And people are still suffering here in the US and all around the world as a result of it. I think that it does a disservice to people who were victims of slavery when you act like that part of our history doesn't exist. So in order to honor them in order to make sure that they're. Our lives were not lost in vain, and that their suffering was not in vain. We have to keep talking about it, and we have to be realistic and acknowledging that we're still paying the price for it even today. And I think that it's important also because we have to do better and it, how it reminds us of mistakes that we've made so that we can hopefully, correct them so he worked for BuzzFeed, can you tell me a little bit about your work, and what specifically do do in order to change the stereotypes that you feel that are still into society, and especially in the fashion world, for sure? So I work at BuzzFeed, I've been there about four years, and I am the beauty director there now. And I guess a short bulletin list of what I do is really helped to shape the tone and language around content, especially as it relates to women's lifestyle and diversity. So I try to make sure that the content is inclusive and sensitive, my role in helping to change their you'll type. It's just by normalizing. Representation and diversity. I think that those things become a thing quote unquote when we don't see them often. And that's why you know, it's such a big deal when there's an all black cast for movie because it's not something that, you see, so often, even though you see all white casts for movies or it's a big deal. When you see a black woman on the cover of a magazine, because traditionally, we have not been on the cover of magazines. We've not been heralded as the standards of beauty. And I think that through my work in acknowledging that and trying to do my part to combat that I try to just normalize that and normalize black people's place in media to normalize our seat at the table, without always a disclaimer, without always saying, you know, here's this beautiful black transgender woman, and here's her story is just like, no, here's this beautiful amazing, awesome human being. And here's her story. Sorry, because I've never opens a magazine or watched TV and saw disclaimer, when it came to white people, it's just what it is. It's the norm. It's the standard. And I'm just trying to make you know, other people apart of that Norman standard just as readily do feel that it's changing somehow or do still feel like it's a lot of just covert. I do. I, I don't know if I believe it's changing for my own sanity and wanting to believe that, you know, we are progressing that humanity is progressing, but I do see small changes. I think that beliefs in how we feel about people, and how we judge people is so ingrained in that own, we're so conditioned to, to judge and make assumptions and treat people, a certain way and there has to be a conscious on learning and desire to unlearn those things. But and I think that is like the part that takes the longest because it's really, really hard to unlearn what she's been taught for so long, but I do see changes in just the up the uprising of black people in the space in media, particularly and the arts and just the unapologetic nece and the creation of their own opportunities to create their own narrative. So we're no longer depending on white. Filmmakers in Hollywood were no long. Depending on white women's lifestyle publications we're creating our own as we've seen with, you know, people like Ryan Kugler overdue for nay, and shonda rhimes and people at a much more micro level like myself, and Julie Wilson essence magazine. We're seeing it at every single level. So in that regard, I will say that I think it's, you know, getting better because we're at a point now where we are empowered enough to start creating some of those changes that we wanna see do you have any personal story that you would like to share that you felt that inspired you throughout your life, or that made you follow this path, or this passion of yours for sure. I don't know if it's like much of a story, but I think just my own experience. I'm from Georgia. I'm from the south and I grew up and black church in the south, and I will say that a black church, especially in the south every Sunday is where you will see some of the best beauty. And fashion that you've ever seen in your lives from the makeup to the hair to the big church hats. And so I've just always been around that representation, and I can honestly say that, that impacted me in such a positive way and made me feel so confident about myself, because the woman that I was surrounded by who looks like me were very confident, and they invested in what they looked like and how they carry themselves and so it gave me this confidence and to a point that I was somewhat unaware of all the bias until I got a little bit older because I was just so rounded, so heavily by people who were affirming invalidated me and my existence as a black woman, and then, you know, my grandmother was a hairdresser. She had a shop attached to the back of her house. My oldest sister is now a hairdresser and owns her own salon in Augusta Georgia, and my parents were very good about keeping media and publications around the house that reflected us as a family. So we watch TV shows that had black. Families appearance always had essence and ebony magazines and the house. So I was always constantly seeing reflections of who I was that significantly impacted the way that I navigate throughout the world. I don't walk with my head down. I wasn't afraid to go after opportunities. I wasn't afraid to have big dreams because that's what I saw people doing around me, who looks exactly like me. And now that I'm older. I'm so grateful for those opportunities and just that experience that I had because I see the benefit, and I and I'm reaping the reward of that. And so now it's become such an intentional part of my own career, you know, talks about it a little bit earlier, but even getting into media and women's lifestyle from a far it can seem very shallow or superficial, but is so much deeper than that for me. It's not about cosmetics. Although I love those things. It's not about fashion. It's about having a seat at the table and being able to be in a position of power to change the narrative, and to change the converse. Station and to expand it and to call people out when they get it wrong and says show, you know, girls who are dark skin, whether they're in the US, whether they're in Africa, whether they're in India that they are beautiful, even though they are left out of the beauty standard and they're left out of the narrative, and that they don't need to bleach their skin. It's, you know, being physical representations also allows me just by simply being there in existing. I'm able to show other girls who look like me that you don't have to straighten your hair if you want to you can because you're the authority on your own body and what you look like. But if you want to keep your hair in its natural state, no matter how tight the curls are or how kinky they are you can do that, and it should just as beautiful, and you don't need to change. There's nothing wrong with how you are physically made up. I think all of those things have definitely played a role into just my conviction and making sure that I get those messages across you were speaking to the use if you could just give them one. Advice to go through life and feel secure and confident of what they are, what would that be? I think that if I had to give the students advice or any young person advice is that your enough, and I know that, you know, we hear that so many in so many different ways all the time. But it's so true you're enough. You have everything you were born with everything that you need in this world to survive and make it through, and I'm not talking about material things. I'm just talking about your components as a human being you're intelligent. You're beautiful. And you know, your perspective and your experience is what makes you special. So when we talk about intelligence and smarts, it's not always like book, smart like you need to do what you have to do in order to get through school. And that's very important. But are you socially aware? How smart are you about your own self and your own abilities? And your own bias sees how, you know, do you talk to other people who don't look like you do you firm those relationships? So you figure out are do you talk to other people and ask about their experiences. Those are the things that make you smart and that make you sensitive and conscious. And so, I would just say, as long as you have the as long as you are able to do those things, then you, you'll have everything that you need to navigate through the world. So don't ever feel like just because you're not reflected in on TV are in a magazine that you're that you're not worthy. Are that you don't have what you need that you don't have the essential tools that you need to make it throughout the world because you definitely do.

United States Buzzfeed Director Georgia Ms Gant Shonda Rhimes Anacom Hollywood Julie Wilson Norman Ryan Kugler Augusta Georgia Africa India Four Years
Game of Thrones spinoff shows in the works

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

06:17 min | 2 years ago

Game of Thrones spinoff shows in the works

"Two. This episode of studio. Three sixty is brought to you by the relentless, which is a new podcast from slate studios and century twenty one real estate. The relentless is about extrordinary people and mindsets. And behaviors that drive them to achieve inspiring things. Join host and doctor of clinical psychology, Julie Gerner she talks to business leaders across industries about what sets them apart and how they view success differently. You'll hear about what they've learned from their successes and failures and how they're continuing to evolve. Listen and subscribe to the relentless today wherever you get your podcasts. This is new three sixteen. I'm courteous. I'm Josh Allen Gonzalez from studio. Three sixty. We're back with another installment of this woman's work. A series of stories from classic Elba, Sundays and studio. Three. Sixty classic album. Sundays is a program of community listening events, founded by Coline, Cosmo Murphy, where fans listened to essential albums uninterrupted on state of the art sound systems for this woman's work were highlighting classic albums by female artists women who have made a lasting impact on music and pop culture. This time lady sings the blues by jazz singer, Billie holiday. It was released in nineteen fifty six to coincide with her autobiography of the same name by this point in her career when she was just in her early forties. Holiday's voice was sounding fragile and warn the toll of a life marked by hardship and addiction. Although the more energetic sound of her earlier records is muted here, holiday still delivers wise and moving performances in this collection of emotional, jazz tunes, many of the songs here became synonymous with her unique sound and persona. Here's colleen. Billie holiday remains one of the greatest jazz, voices of all time and is still easily recognizable to music fans from all generations. She's got them. The musicians and clubs of New York City were integral to the development of jazz in the nineteen forties. Bebop was born in the Big Apple with artists like Charlie Parker bologna, smoke and Dizzy, Gillespie. The nineteen fifties saw the development of hard bop with Sonny Rollins and our Blakey the cool jazz of miles Davis and later, the free jazz of Ornette Coleman, and later John Coltrane explored in downtown, Manhattan venues, like the five spot. But vocal innovator and world-famous Billie holiday with unable to perform these notable. Jaaz clubs in the nineteen fifties as her cabaret card had been revoked due to narcotics charges. So instead, she brought jazz to the mainstream by performing it a major concert venue Carnegie Hall in nineteen fifty six. Nothing. On nothing. She wants said of her style. If I'm going to sing like someone else, then I don't need to sing at all in nineteen fifty eight Frank Sinatra told ebony magazine with few exceptions, every major pop singer in the US during her generation has been touched in some way by her genius. It is Billie holiday who was and still remains the greatest single musical influence on me. She also had a profound impact on contemporary artists, including Jose James, a singer, who is beautifully bridge, the world of jazz, and hip hop for over a decade since the release of his debut album, the dreamer. Ver- dream. Series. In two thousand fifteen chamber quarter tribute album to Billie holiday covering his favorite songs on the album yesterday. I had the blues the music of Billie holiday for the legendary blue note records. When I phoned Billie holiday, it really matched. My teenage angst in a deep way, not in a superficial way. You know, not in like, I'm a loner and against the world. But she showed me that there was a way to feel pain and to transform it into art. You don't have to know anything about our life to feel the kind of pain and tragedy that embodies her music. Holy likewise, British singer. Actress and former cabaret act. Paloma faith rates lady day as one of the most influential artists in her own upbringing on always dry bridge, and this will work out, but lately Acton, just no go. Maybe we'll Noel. Maybe we're not. We got us to relate. How Billy was a unifying force at one of my classic album. Sunday's events might mother and father is taste was always really convicting just the hell relationship, but. But. But this is the one person I listen to in both households. I would say that for me that she was the holy grail of how I wanted to be able to sing. I didn't realize as the young person so of trying to copies the econ- thing that entail sim batches happy. The show mother spray. Track to love. Nah.

Billie Holiday Blakey Slate Studios Julie Gerner Josh Allen Gonzalez New York City Carnegie Hall Elba Frank Sinatra Jose James Ebony Magazine Sonny Rollins Cosmo Murphy Coline Pain United States Ornette Coleman
"ebony magazine" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

"For this week's episode, I spoke to Kenya and Dennis. She has criminologist researcher in community advocate specializing in suicide mental health race and reproductive rights. Here's our conversation, Kenya. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you for having me on the show. So in recent years, we've seen this increase in suicide rates of black children and black youth. What can you tell us about the current state of mental wellbeing among young black Americans? As you know, this is a very important topic, and it's a very silenced topic and not only silenced in black munity and black institutions such as family and church, but also silenced for most mental health organizations. This includes this falsehood that suicide is a white people problem. That's very common sentiment when we do community events. So there's some recent data and. Have the numbers on top of my head right now. But there's recent data that showing that black us have more of an increase in suicide than white youth. But this is also not really a new concept. If you look at old subscriptions of magazines such as ebony magazine from the nineteen seventies there, at least six of those that had mentions of black Seuss at increasing and black youth suicide soft point that out. Because when we talk about the different factors that influence suicide, we want people understand, this isn't a new concept. It was in the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies that more African American started doing research on the topic, but that research was oftentimes still silence within our communities and especially silenced in health organizations because health.

Kenya ebony magazine researcher Seuss
"ebony magazine" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Can be available friend which shows a nineteen eightyfour dishes ebony magazine predicted i think how jackson would look in the two thousand so go through the catholic i was struck by those images in how emotional it can be at times i don't know how it's affected you as a personal how you've changed your view of him not just as an icon but as a person i mean do you think you've checked your perceptions changed yeah i don't claim to know michael jackson personable i don't know anything special about him i don't have any kind of inside knowledge and i still feel even to doing the show he's an but again the show is not really about his life about biography it's about what his image symbolized many different people but there is there are often works or rooms in the exhibition which i think are quite moving an indecent has quite political there is about identity in about him as an african american figure so one of some of those rooms hell they split up well the exhibition is structured broadly chronologically according to his life for the simple reason that if you did it chronologically according to win the work was made it would be very fragmented and piecemeal so broadly you kind of survey his life in it begins with his early life i mean actually begins with works that would made more recent including kindy wiley which was the last commission portrait by michael just before he died then we moved through his life but this the matic rooms within that as well it says not it's not trying to narrate the story of his life but to give people a sense of maybe what he accomplished and how that inspired or impacted on other people in specially artist so am which were opens the show which is there a blockbuster piece that's going to draw people immediately so one of the works that opens the exhibition i mean we begin with our cuts off about and then we actually have an extraordinary keith haring from nine hundred eighty four which hasn't been seen for thirty years but in a way the i work you see down the vista is can you eilly portion of michael jackson there was the final commission portrait by michael in his lifetime only if you months before he died bikindi happened because michael was doing a photo shoots in the brooklyn museum and in doing that photo shoot he said he wants to do it in the brooklyn museum and a place where art lives on forever he saw one of kennedy's lodge gala question portas of young black man riding a horse across the outside presume in the guys of napoleon crossing the herbs and he said i have to meet the artist and so they began a conversation and the big mission poetry is the results and so we thought rather than literally beginning beginning ends of the ending in might be nice to somehow reverse that and then equally the work that we finished with is candice bryant's two thousand five video portrait of michael jackson through sixteen of his german fans who sing every song from thriller i last wyant on that is that a very affectionate work in in a way yeah it's joyful and occasionally most somber but i suppose if felt good way to end because it's ending with a reflection of michael jackson through other people not with just an image of him and in a way that's what the exhibition is about it's about michael jackson but it's also about the way that he impacted lots of us and our thoughts and memories and feelings about him and how that might change over time today artists most the loan the works directly i'm just curious no where they came from i can't imagine there many museum collections on my mistaken there's a few museum in the wall museum lent heavily lend to the sills green paintings about michael jackson but also photographs and then the time captials where it will collect the huge amount of material around him there's other lots of other museum loans to including the national poacher gary in dc but a lot of the work came from the directly from the themselves from their studios i mean you think the exhibition makes new ground flash poultry gallery in in any way yet no i think it definitely breaks new ground i didn't set out to do that and i.

ebony magazine jackson thirty years
"ebony magazine" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

LA Talk Radio Channel 1

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on LA Talk Radio Channel 1

"But he was he was so shot out to ebony magazine and shout out to joshua he was there doing the same thing as as getting content footage at the experience but he was just such a cupcake such a doll we'd love him he instantly vibe with everyone vies with jew els i mean she just had the best spirit and the best glow but yeah and we got to see him throughout the whole day and it was just awesome so i wanna shout him out and i can't wait till i ran into him again that was great and i mean just a couple of people oh and you know what and i do also want to shout out my girl from power girl let me tell ya everybody they killed my baby but we found rain okay so we got kilt on there you guys are power heads like me makes you guys tune in next week on july the first because the new season will return minus miss and they killed off baby girl but it was so awesome seeing her yesterday as soon as i see i know you're not supposed to call him by the name of the character they play but she going to always be my baby raymond so she don't mind as soon as we've seen her i said and i don't get star struck because you know i'm used to this this what we do but i just feel like she's my child that i didn't have we've seen her the moment i have to love enough killed my baby off her and her mother were real nice and even after everything was over they came over and she instantly gave us a photo wanted to take a photo so that was dope and then i wanna to shut out the cast of the new bobby brown movie that's coming to be et as well they were off we lovely people so that was awesome as well and i'm gonna tell you guys a little bit more about is spirit shortly but right about now i'm gonna get you guys on another record and this one is i'm gonna give you guys a double dose of that be legit action you guys know i love me some bill this next one is called what we've been doing and you guys are gonna see a little similarity in this because they were both produced the last record that i played with him and forty was caught boy but it was produced by the mechanics and this next record is also produced by the mechanics of you feel a little bit of similarity in the wave that's what that's the vibe that you feel so check it out and get into it here's the next record by none other than b b legit the savage frontier this show and i wanna thank you for always blessed me with the exclusive tracks man i get them i man any let me burn a hole in them you know i break records at least i try to anyway so check out this record by be led the savage what we've been doing what you mean this is news knows what we've been jones.

ebony magazine
"ebony magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"When i had no one to discuss it with at home every reason to thank you yeah i was i was an outsider with class and style and i knew that i had style i knew that i had style i knew i had style based on something very strong i remember when i would see ed sullivan and the great talents he would have like a tina turner ike turner james brown those people impacted upon me tina i had a big belt and i wanted a belt just like that i remember he was gonna cover ebony magazine on nine hundred seventy one may and he had this big belt and a red sweater with no sleeves and plaid trousers tucked into bolton i wanted to look like i turner i wanna be like i turn to beating up tina turner but i wanted to have that those looks expired you i wanted to look like a pirate and i dress like a pirate so you talked about how you are afraid to be touched you didn't really want to be touched i'm wondering if the aids epidemic had anything to do not enforcing that feeling the aids epidemic did not i was not afraid of people with aids but i was very aware of aids and i was very where the aids would could take you out and you had to be careful when aid started people were getting sick with sarcoma kaposi sarcoma is that correct and it was very under mystery it was very undo to us and i was reading everything i could about it and people were dying and going away and i thought this is very very heavy so this is another moment to pull back from people and i never really really really got involved with the people ever ever i had great emotional experiences contacts with very strong strong people these people are wonderful i've had more emotional and physical contact with women than with men and i will not name the women but they have been famous swimming so there you are that's all you need to know terry.

ed sullivan tina turner ebony magazine aids terry
"ebony magazine" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on WCPT 820

"But more than that apoliticial in this country don't really want people to vote because if they did they'd have the elections on a weekend and for two days so that it would be easy enough where people wouldn't wouldn't have to figure out ways to get to the polls bringing up the fact that the your it's the employer has to give you time off now i have to admit i'm a union member they wanted me to do extra stuff and i are you tell them they wanted me to work late no sorry it's not happening and i brought the truck back and i loaded but i vote from the alderman all the way up there's there's there's there's several things about what you just said first of all it was always true here in the city of chicago given the democratic machine right that if you had a low turnout that was machine day exactly and they always discouraged voting they always made sure to go to their certain voters that's why they drive people to the polls and that's why they you know they they walk around with their with their list you know hey could tell you who was going to the polls and who wasn't and a heavy turnout was bad for the machine right and and it's always been that way when i moved here in seventy two chicago from dc seventy two and i moved into prairie shores come voting day my vote was challenged fortunately i was working for ebony magazine so i could take take half the day off to go downtown and challenge the challenge yeah because i really wanted to vote against mayor daley at apparently they knew it they tried well they know they know that but but but you know they're they're all kinds of ways we need to get over this voter suppression we need to find ways around it i mean is it is it washington oregon where they're not doing it by mail which one is there's now there's also a one st now that's experimenting with online voting.

chicago ebony magazine daley oregon washington two days
"ebony magazine" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on For the Love with Jen Hatmaker Podcast

"Hi everybody my name is grammy welcome to the for the love podcast with your host jenn hat maker my mom she writes books and speaks to couch but she mostly loves talking to amazing people on this podcast every week things for listening we hope you enjoyed the show hey guys it's jim hat maker welcome to the for the love podcast closer here today cloudy here every week and they hope that you are loving this series as much as i am this is my friend latasha morrison and she is a reconciler and this very compelling voice in the fight for racial justice in fact ebony magazine recognized her as one of their twenty seventeen power one hundred for her work as a community crusader she is just a really special leader in our time so she's at this point taken her message all around the country i mean enormous events if gathering justice conference you specialties catalysts it just goes on and on honestly and when i first saw her speak three or four years ago i was like i need to know you and i want to know you and i'm going to know you that's how i capture friends it's very aggressive so tasha originally from north mina she's got degrees in human development and business leadership but then she started working in churches in atlanta and then here in austin actually and you'll hear the story but this this route of racial reconciliation took hold of her heart in it has since become her entire lives work and so she founded she built his organization called be the bridge to inspire equip people in racial reconciliation all the work that is required which is a lot and it is hard so i am excited for you to hear her story today how she developed what she's doing now and how it's going to impact you because this is work that is useful to you and you can absolutely hook in at the end of this podcast to what she is doing and so i'm so glad to welcome my friend tasha morris into the show cam so happy to welcome to the show my good friend.

latasha morrison ebony magazine austin atlanta tasha morris four years
"ebony magazine" Discussed on Being Boss: Mindset, Habits, Tactics, and Lifestyle for Creative Entrepreneurs

Being Boss: Mindset, Habits, Tactics, and Lifestyle for Creative Entrepreneurs

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on Being Boss: Mindset, Habits, Tactics, and Lifestyle for Creative Entrepreneurs

"A rehim is a contemporary abstract expressionist painter whose work has been procured by collectors from all around the world most notably by the royal family of abu dhabi amirah has been featured in ebony magazine in the huffington post and the national in addition to painting a mirror runs an online community passion color joy where she guides new and this season artis through branding in establishing their art business online all right eight amira thank you so much for joining us on the show i've been following you on instagram and have been such a fan of european things in your work and just you as a person as you share more of who you are through your social platforms and so i'm really stuck to get to talk to you today yeah yeah fighter could be here bank year all right so you are a fulltime artist and i'm dying to know what a day in the life looks like for yo like what is your day like yeah fulham's are really depends on urgent deadlines and sort of um if i have any big projects but it doesn't include painting all the time which is probably a surprise to some people it certainly was surprised myself as i'd connors got more busy um you know more agus known the more your bran becomes more visible at your attract more customers it seems like the less pain in your doing settled on it's sort of just light that nature of the business by on i would say like on a good day for me i wake up and make myself some breakfasts all hundreds of the studio i love listening to the park house or a leg audio books while him in by painting slow and i'll paint for a few hours and then i usually switch gears an do a lot of adleman task or try to think of other armed creative venture said i'm working on ends on a lot of customer service and hopefully kind of finding some time for myself at the end of the day just the connell melo allow on the us pretty much like a typical day.

abu dhabi amirah ebony magazine huffington post fulham connors us
"ebony magazine" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen

"See after show a navy leagues tomato ab while the bar ian scully are hot exterminator a high a girlfriend in i do of wow game next week you'll get married thank you wow and grant my god so what are you going to lose the way before the way one week we can figure it out by caserta well where are you getting married to mexico us congratulations critics say how long have you been together six years now very good all right there's only so far this conversation is going to go back to the phones caller what's your name in from where you calling me to my name's checky curtis and i'm calling from bohio my question is for marla i'd like oh what type of etiquette big you think you can teach kaley birds when she's one of the most successful health wife of atlanta and what do you think you can learn from candy in order for you to end up on the cover of ebony magazine more to come about as adt shirt to answer your question i always mess we can't i love her to death she's here now so poorly me and the etiquette that i can learn from candy is definitely not to spend so much money on labels and things are not a necessary but doesn't have anything to do with etiquette i'm this and be a little more familiar but i love my candy so.

atlanta ebony magazine ian scully mexico six years one week
"ebony magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Says it the told the sis register annual medicines i race on their union called but there is a ban on uh ebony magazine six legal books of medicine hair scion roy now every individual books of medicine increase has its own unique twelve code on the side of the box and you're a holds the camera of our mobilephone over those numbers and after a few seconds alone is fleshed plus the nonda says mets medicine name an annual on the phone automatically knows limits in is um and incredibly in rosy expiration date said expires in in two years time more than two years to go on that medicine and you say it for the box he's nosed are open chomping active huge tangle then y'all so you're a repeats the process picked each of the box his simple scam of the code number is all that is needed the output does the rest each time without fail it automatically knows what the drug is and when it expires but then does this final books that we scam so so this expires in february so the still a month to go on this route and says he counted because the expiration dates to place less hand each nose well because they don't will take medicines cannot be out of date say and do they right nick timing more about this app it from thing that any greek person who has a smart fine can download yeah etonian greece there is a desktop version of a too but you might have to input the twelve digit code manually okay so if someone didn't have a smart find that could still use the on that young at right okay so we we have this way of creating a central database of mets than people want to tear night yup the next thing is how you get those drugs and redistribute them to the people who who need them now you could publish that register of recycle drugs online and that would allow sick people to see who has the medication they need and where they could then go get it from and.

ebony magazine greece two years twelve digit
"ebony magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And built a mobile phone up and appropriately enough it's called give met it's been up and running since wall just over a year now and allows anyone in greece to register their leftover medicines and it loves that information on a central database and then were further you've got the earth organisers are wantonly of your mind is her wasi you even telling me wet to take the medication exactly as i hear sounds really could in theory but does it work i wanted to see inaction now you remember yoder oh my god i give this sounding we felonies yes she's the woman he's medicine cabinet you took the liberty of rifling three or the start of the program but i timed my visit to coincide with when she was about to use the gift for the first time because shares yookalaylee after your mark offense a small faith and you've just gone through the options and you've got a little why colonial screen says adding another given mandates and says at the top assists register annual messes irish can their union called that there is a aung ebony magazine could of books of medicine hair scion roy now every individual stocks of medicine increase has its own unique twelve code on the side of the box and you're a holds the camera of a mobile phone over those numbers and after a few seconds alone is fleshed plus the non there says his medicine name and you're on the phone both domestically knows limits in is um an incredibly a nurse the expiration date for expires in in two years time more than two years to go on that medicine and.

greece aung ebony magazine two years
"ebony magazine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"We were always badly when i was put on punishment i'll be poor on restrictions of the caller grounded for a month that's a lull open ended so it you didn't have a when i came home you are coming home from school at did not want to go to and then i can't guo side and play 'cause i was what the restrictions men with my friends in in the neighborhood what that means is i'm spending a lot of time with myself yeah and i became very comfortable myself but in terms of my mother oh we battled we battle because she had a say everything that i did so psychologists would call the cut type of parenting that you were raised under as authoritarian and i thought it was it more dictatorship of that data and it sounds like your mother made the rules in your dad was the enforcer yes and so vast the complicated relationship now which brings me to my next question ebony magazine called you at one point one of the most eligible bachelors in america 1999 and there are lots of ways to look at that you know you could say well isn't that great he th you know this is a catch a great catch that the media is talking about or is this somebody you mentioned about being alone with yourself who prefers to be alone and it it was a very it took a long time for you to get married it took a long time for me to get married because i had some bad relationships than i when i say bad relationship some mature enough to recognize my part in that um i had bad really ships in a way that she they were cheating on me and i was the a hole in the relationship as far as i can be very demanding i can be very um unfolding giving in relationships in in for me to get married now in my forties is much more believable than be getting married in my 20s because i was a knuckle hid in.

ebony magazine america
"ebony magazine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"We were always badly when i was put on punishment i'll be poor on restrictions of the caller grounded for a month that's a lull open ended so it you didn't have a when i came home you are coming home from school at did not want to go to and then i can't guo side and play 'cause i was what the restrictions men with my friends in in the neighborhood what that means is i'm spending a lot of time with myself yeah and i became very comfortable myself but in terms of my mother oh we battled we battle because she had a say everything that i did so psychologists would call the cut type of parenting that you were raised under as authoritarian and i thought it was it more dictatorship of that data and it sounds like your mother made the rules in your dad was the enforcer yes and so vast the complicated relationship now which brings me to my next question ebony magazine called you at one point one of the most eligible bachelors in america 1999 and there are lots of ways to look at that you know you could say well isn't that great he th you know this is a catch a great catch that the media is talking about or is this somebody you mentioned about being alone with yourself who prefers to be alone and it it was a very it took a long time for you to get married it took a long time for me to get married because i had some bad relationships than i when i say bad relationship some mature enough to recognize my part in that um i had bad really ships.

ebony magazine america
"ebony magazine" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Comfortable in relatable to pursue support that you know is going to be there in and be able to truly understand where you're coming from yes that's so funny because my personal therapist shut up to shelly i i doubt she's listening but i would i found her i specifically found her online and she i was looking at her credentials of wishing to school and i saw that she got her i'm degree from howard university here in dc as i thought oh there's a black woman i was so confident i was like vis vis there is a black woman i get their she's very very not a black but she's amazing so exactly i don't i don't want to say that only only a black woman therapist understand my black woman issues but i definitely thought that going in and then when i got there was a black woman a funny to here like prejudicial version of the governor but that warns of further conversation on historically black colleges and universities i wonder if someone was apopka may cream so i get i think you know just to sort of level said on where the black community is of mental health and sort of the the history of it to one of the reasons in addition of things that we were just talking about one of the reasons why there are so many taboos and whacking unity's might stem from slavery according to ebony magazine historically africanamericans have normalised our own suffering during slavery mental illness often resulted in more inhumane styles including frequent beatings and abuse which forced many slaves to hide their issues over time strength became equated with survival and weakness including mental illness met you might not survive and i know that in in my family and in my communities i see i've seen this i know exactly what it looks like people feeling the need to sort of.

howard university dc ebony magazine
"ebony magazine" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

"In that collection all those collections from europe airdie i wonder whatever happened which she hotter with those of the fear and storage somewhere oh my god they're all with the of fashion fear collection they have of a emperado yeah they have a collection is nearly zero jaza traveling show actually thinking goes to atlanta in different places and you know you can sort of hashtag a google it and you can goes actually see the palk abondoned the car johnson all of these wonderful pieces that were in the show you know even with pictures of the girls who did the shows you know and yo is history it was our bible the ebony magazine was of vital i saw you out a hub vr vr vr umno found out about fashion shows that because i they would obviously run a story in ebony magazine about the fashion and all that stuff now you are known for your trademark walk at one point is you did you discover that walk when did you find that one joust like is like for people listening italy flo it's it's tippytoe zeman it's floating on air and it's very animated very illustrator when did you discover that i think you know i think i learned from all the boys ugh her the best teaches the boys you know how to walk yeah and i kinda had that take leeson satian when i was ran them and they would say miss cleveland nisqually you had to put this kind of bend in your hip soho i thought they were teaching me sex in thing because we had that dance called the bum.

google johnson ebony magazine cleveland europe atlanta leeson
"ebony magazine" Discussed on Joblogues

Joblogues

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on Joblogues

"Then the guy's if you don't know ebony magazine was recently bought out from johnson publishing the blackowned company by our private equity firm clear view group llc well jackson from clear view uh their vicechairman he gets a mix when i'm jagger the original writer for common efforts he was silent dhingra backs hair well then time on blows up jackson comes bags is says uh love to chat i hear you're the one of those report is elected tear down black business uh wrote this to this woman look olisa in there have y'all learn nothing from united arab empathy and everybody else how many times do we have to tell ya leg where the pri said take away your phone fa sir this is not how this march for somebody you legally contracted will alkhoi ends is like terrible it's terrible airway it's aa terrible because you are taking advantage of yeah because you know that people like stanford has publication want to preserve its image as you know we we are loyal we grew up on our people don't want to talk about it and taint a legacy but also its exploitative to the freelancers because you know you got people meeting deadline to submit the articles and then and not paying them within the contractual period of time you have agreed to pay them and then to add insult to injury not responded to the emails amend guam baloch block loudest seoul's on twitter at like that's that is so i'm very interested to see where their content is going to rome moving forward with certain avenue love you and i hate to do this but you gotta you know preserve the archives but moving forward i can't do it by adt.

ebony magazine writer jackson stanford seoul twitter johnson publishing guam
"ebony magazine" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"ebony magazine" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"We in the game some may sound money dog be yes it did that does let them go in we have gone the episode is it gives light medium georgia brees three being able after he's made within the neighborhood why is healthy nutrition and everything why they're so important to you that you share his knowledge with i wanna be a doctor's though like nine years old her then uh i was on my grandfather bedridden ebony magazine now her and there is saying that there were on black neurosurgeons at the time and so i am beer nourishes my whole life but when i got the medical school i looked at the lifestyle the different doctors nurses they're just more happy people started going orthopedic surgeon and asked are doing tv in writing towns who time magazine and what happened was people's kept email me questions about weight loss i had no idea but we law that anointing about nutrition right i'm a doctrine i do nothing about because doctors are trained in it um and so i felt like i could not help people i felt so bad it could help people because they're asking about bat burners in this diet plans i decided that my mission was going to be to help people cut through all the nonsense and all the marketing hype you see out there right and give them the real true sometimes it's tough to take the real truth by wanna give them the honest truth and as i got into nutrition weight loss now when you were doing celebrity fake club and not even just celebrity fit fit club how frustrating kenny gate when you're trying.

ebony magazine georgia orthopedic surgeon time magazine nine years