17 Burst results for "Ebony Fashion Fair"

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

08:06 min | 5 months ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Planet Money

"Doing that with McDonalds a lot of the other big American blue chip brands came running to American Airlines Toyota, procter, and gamble general meals, sears, and his slogan that black people aren't dark skin white people became. Kinda. Gospel in the advertising world but not just related to African Americans that the principal was one size doesn't fit all in each group needs to be taken into account. What Burrell did opened the door for the kind of ethnic micro targeting that we see today Robert Clara is contributing editor at ad. Week and the way that he did that was by making mainstream brands not just aware of the black community as a very viable. Community of consumers, but he also furnished them with a means to reach them that was new and effective, and then once that in and of itself became a mainstream thing the the natural evolution of that trend was then for advertisers to say, Oh, well, then there must be other groups that we can reach out to and the idea of specialized advertising targeted demographic advertising grows out of that. But you wouldn't have had that if you didn't have the initial awareness of the broader demographic group that Burrell helped to create temporal is basically retired. Now though he does some consulting certa trying to help major brands, understand how to use or not use hip hop. After all this time, he still has to teach the same lessons. He was teaching fifty years ago unit marketing if you're not targeting. And so This whole business about one size fits all I mean. There's still a kind of a movement on the part of wishful thinking clients to say, Hey. Can't we just? Talked to one group of people went. So much easier, but the whole thing is it is that. We now have the. The ability to really get in and talk to people and more individual basis. Now, marketers realize it would be ridiculous to just try to sell to the black guy or the white guy. It's about selling to the young black gay guy who lives in West Hollywood plays golf listens to Frank Sinatra and likes public radio. Wait you play golf. Yeah of course. The idea Robert is that more and more you won't be thinking who is this ad really four Now supposed to think. This ad is especially for me. The. Great Scenario Glint episode from two thousand. Fifteen. Coming up, we talked to an economic historian about how advertising fits into our understanding of economics and how it has a different resonance with black consumers. This message comes from NPR sponsor Microsoft. The world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft Dot com slash teams here at life kit. We know that getting your financial house in order can feel pain fault. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic to deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's life get. Some summer schoolers, let's put on economics cap now and think about how advertising works. It does not make products better doesn't make workers more productive if anything advertising actually mixed products more expensive. But it does act as this little Greece in the gears of the market by solving what's known as an information problem as consumers we don't know everything that's for sale. We don't know all the features. We don't know how much things cost thing of how long it would take to search for all that information advertising in theory anyway makes that a little easier but there are other more subtle signals from advertising and to discuss that let's bring in our economic expert today. Trevan Logan who teaches economics At, the Ohio State University hey professor. Hi How are you? I'm pretty great after that episode professor, one of your areas of research is the time period right before the Tom, Burrell era and one of the interesting things you found is that this information problem that we talked about that all consumers face was even more of a problem for black consumers. Many people don't realize that the end discriminatory businesses came with the Civil Rights Act of nineteen sixty four which banned racial discrimination in places of public. Accommodation, which would include almost all businesses that are open to the public and so before this point, you could be a business that simply did not solicit at all or in fact, would not serve African American consumers or consumers of any particular group. If she would like, it could be completely discriminatory and so this created a very significant information problems especially for African Americans who would travel say over the roads in the nineteen forties and nineteen fifties and it gave rise to a Victor Greens green books which. Were Travel Guides for African Americans to navigate through particularly places in the United States and it was not just in the south to find places that they could, for example, gas stations where they could use the restroom where they could find a local pharmacies that would serve African American customers were they could have go to restaurants. They will be seated in served and not barred a from entering due to their race and so those travel guide solve the information problem because you know what businesses were there. Part of what's interesting about what Tom Arale is doing he's taking these really large firms and really they're making a blanket statement to the public via this targeted advertising to African Americans that clearly there non discriminatory and that's solves this information problem a much larger scale but it does. So in the context of the Post Civil Rights Act era, which is fascinating because if you you have to think about what happens before the civil. Rights Act. The mindset of black customers to know how effective advertising is in the sixties and seventies that actually acknowledges their existence and says. Want you to be our customer. Yes, it's a big deal in two dimensions when they talk about the advertisements in Ebony magazine. Are. Two different types of firms that are advertising there right. So what example would be Ebony, Fashion Fair which is a cosmetic company, which is for African Americans their advertising and Ebony magazine. So they have a captive audience there and it's an African American Business Advertising African American consumers at the other end of the spectrum. You now see in these magazines really big mainstream products you know proctor and Gamble Johnson and Johnson products, crest, and other sorts of things that everyone uses being targeted using African Americans. In the advertisement themselves sends a very strong signal to black consumers that this market is valued by this particular. Firm. One of the economic theories about why advertising exists is it does provide an advantage to companies by providing a barrier to entry. So if you take coke and Pepsi and McDonald's and Burger Kings, they spent so much money on advertising that it makes it difficult for he went to move into that field and challenge them. How does end up being part of the? Calculus when it comes to advertising to two different groups different demographics. Yes and I think certainly if you're appealing to the masses, you're certainly not going to ignore the large white demographic. But the question is how much of that black demographic can you ignore and this is a competitive marketplace comes into play what if your competitor starts paying attention to them now you have this problem because you may not necessarily want to do racially targeted advertising but certainly, if your competitor does.

Burrell Robert Clara NPR Ebony magazine Microsoft McDonalds Tom Arale Frank Sinatra American Airlines Toyota contributing editor principal professor pain Ohio State University procter Trevan Logan Greece
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

11:54 min | 11 months ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"To rush into old uniform army pants and Victoria and since it is not a designer dictated style anyone can gather at pieces from her closet or the neighborhood thrift shops and small New York boutiques like San Francisco and Jazz. Abell in the same article. Morley discuss how she morally inspired to create and he's look but according to what he allen and his ninety three autobiography he said if anyone deserves credit for the look it is Diane Keaton Annie. Hollick was the exact way Keaton dressed in real life. I use it on screen because she was a great natural stylist. Morley was often very much against Keaton's choices and wanted me to tell her not to wear such out there fashions. I opted to let Keane where what she wanted. But it is key in April. I think we can. Let's set the record straight once and for all because she wrote in her memoirs would he's direction was the same. Where what you want to wear. That was the first so I did. What what he said or rather. I stole what I wanted to wear it from the cool of women on the streets in Soho Annie's khaki pants vest and tie came from them and we cannot talk about fashion film. In the nineteen seventies without talking about blaxploitation new genre films that emerged during this time to champion black characters and communities as the heroes in their own stories and this was often done in action and fashion packed productions that remained icon it to this day. What are the biggest stars of the blaxploitation genre was actor? Richard Roundtree who happens to have begun his career as a model in the Ebony Fashion Fair which we did an episode on last. Season's you can check that out. But rountree is most famous for his role as a private detective. John Shaft in the seventies shaft trilogy we have nineteen seventy-one Shaft was followed in seventy two by shaft's big score and in seventy three shaft in Africa so John Shaft was the epitome of street chic. He had these impeccably tailored leather coats. Mohair TURTLENECKS TIGHT FITTING PANTS. And these were all custom made for roundtree and in a two thousand nineteen interview with New York. Post the costume designer. Joe revealed that despite the attention paid to clothing. They never set out to make a particularly fashionable film. He says the James Bond Movies had just started a few years earlier. So shaft was supposed to look great as that but more of the world that he comes from that shaft remains an iconic fashion to this day is perhaps not surprising when we consider the first shaft. Film's director the ever Dapper Gordon Parks and again we have already done an episode on Mr Parks and his prolific career. He was truly a renaissance man to the nth degree he was a bestselling novelist a memoir ist a gifted pianist a composer of Admiral journalist photographer and film director and he also had an eye for the CY to`real detail and elegance that he embodied in his own personal style and according to a Lisi. It has really parks who was responsible for shafts trademark leather jackets. Because he knew that they would you know? Just look fantastic on camera. And they do. And they do Roberts costumes in the films are still being referenced to this day for their influence on fashion the movies subsequent remakes which there have been many have put great pains in carrying on this legacy with careful attention to maintaining shafts signature style. So for the two thousand remake. For instance starring Samuel Jackson. There was a special partnership with Armani that gave costume designer with Carter Carte Blanche of the luxury brands offerings and caste. If we're GONNA talk about fashion and relation to blaxploitation films we have to talk about Diana Ross and one thousand nine hundred seventy five hit. Mahogany is not only Diana Ross Star in this rags to riches story of a struggling fashion designer. Tracy Chambers Ross herself was the film's costume designer. Which is incredible was just blew my mind. I know I literally text April and was like okay if I have to talk about one or if I have to see one blaxploitation film for the fashion. What should it be? She wrote back immediately. Mahogany and you're not lying. This was wrong. Only Ross's second ever film. The first being her critically acclaimed film. Debut actually has billie holiday in lady sings the Blues for which she received a best actress nomination by both the Oscars and the Golden Globe. She won the ladder. Mahogany is actually directed by Berry Gordy the third founder of Motown and the man who actually signed the supremes but Diana had gone solo in seventy a beef and bedecked. Ross was the cover star of Ebony. Magazine's October nineteen seventy five issue. Which ran a feature on the spectacular new film and Ross's role in the design process which included designing fifty outfits for the film quote ranging from Sportswear to Kapoor and personally supervised all operations from purchase of the special fabrics to coordination of colors to beating and all the other finishing techniques. And and we should mention here cast that while Cross Design. Many of the caution to the film she did not design them all My guess would be that the rest of the film's costumes of which there were. Many were left up her right hand. Susan Gertz men who is actually credited as the film's wardrobe supervisor and according to the same ebony article apparently Diana dreamed of being a fashion designer before she ever dreamed of being a singer but fate had different plan. She tells the magazine quote. The only opportunity I ever had in this direction was in my own personal style. When I was with the supremes I used to talk to the guys who designed our clothes and I tell them exactly what I thought. We should wear after reading the script for the film. She says Chea- when it'd be something if I could design the clothes and meeting. This was not an easy. Sell to Gordy. Who apparently was her ex lover. So but he eventually conceded so maybe that has something to do with power female persuasion. Yes the costumes. In the film really ranged from the outlandish to the spectacular Ross admittedly took a lot of Japanese inspiration For her designs. Sometimes they were not exactly the most successful translation they can sometimes feel a little exaggerated a tad garish. For instance at one point she prays down a runway where a Bright Orange Kimono inspired gown emblazoned. Down the front with a Jain Ormuz Blue Dragon. Yeah it's not very subtle but at their successful hurt. Her gowns can be quite stunning and they feel instantly modern fusing contemporary fashion with Hollywood glamour. I'm thinking particularly of this rich. Purple ones lead body skimming floor links Jersey number. That's paired with a giant matching muff. And it's actually what she's wearing when Shaam pushes her into the foul enduring. That fashion shoot montage. Which if you have to watch one aspect of the film it is this fashion shoot montage. She's absolutely studying. Do you have a favorite costume from April? You know one of the things that always comes to my mind immediately when I think about. Mahogany is her fabulous hats. She wears hats in the film. And they're very like seventies groovy. Yeah and you can actually now that I've seen the movie I can see where dreamgirls took a lot of inspiration from this movie. Like with the shots and like how she looks. It was really Kinda cool to make those connections so check it out guys so many fabulous fashion and film movies now so little time to watch them. All my suggestion is to start now. And don't stop. I actually got a Netflix. Dvd subscription. Just so. I could start watching these movies and stop paying a lot of money. Renting them on itunes. So it's been really fun. Actually April Mahogany is a perfect way to wrap up our coverage of one thousand nine hundred seventy s but this is the part in my writing of this quote unquote two part episode. That I realized that we still have four decades of fashion and film left to cover. I started writing about the nineteen eighties to discover to have continued this episode. All the way into the present day as was my which Lynton while we would have been here for at least another hour yes with some forty years of momentous events films and partnerships still to cover fashion and film has now officially become a three part episode very first three part episode in the history of address so that being said dresses nurse. This was a necessary but unexpected development and with so many fascinating topics and interviews already lined up for this season. We're going to wait for a bit to air part three because we have some episodes coming up that need to air at a certain time. Exactly so apologies for that. But it's actually just fine for me because honestly I've ended up like I said watching a ton of movies and preparations for these episodes. And this gives me a little more time to revisit the fascinating films and fashions that helped define my own personal sense of style growing up and in the meantime dressed listeners. This gives you all a chance to write to us and tell us about what you consider some of the best fashion film moments from the past forty years. I think that does it for us today. Dress listeners in preparation for part three may you all consider the legacy of fashion and film in your closet. Next time you get dressed. We are very excited for you to end Thursday for our first ever edition of fashion history. Now which is our new mini series. It's going to be alternating weekly with our fashion history mysteries so being an article. We think you should read or an exhibition. We think you should see each episode. We'll catch you up on the latest news happening in fashion history today as you have any fashion history now news. We love hearing from you. So if you would like to email us you can do so addressed iheartmedia dot com. You can also direct messages on instagram at dressed underscore podcast where you will find images accompanying each week at this is also our twitter handle dressed underscore podcast and you can follow us on facebook address. Podcast without the underscore for additional readings for each week's episode. Check out our show notes in episode description of your podcast platform and as always special thanks to our producers Casey peak. I'm holly fry and everyone else iheartradio. Who makes this show possible? Each and every week more address Thursday dress. The history of fashion is a production of I heart radio for podcasts from iheartmedia visit the iheartradio. App Apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows this is Danny Shapiro host of the hit. Podcast family's secrets. I hope you'll join us for some incredible conversations about family identity and what happens to both when the secrets that have been kept from us and the secrets we keep finally come to light? Listen and subscribe on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts available now from Iheart a new series presented by t mobile for business. The restless ones join me. Jonathan Strickland as I explore the coming technological revolution with the restless business leaders who stand right on the cutting edge. They know there is a better way to get things done and they are ready. Curious excited for the next technological innovation to unlock their vision of the future in each episode. We'll learn more from the restless ones themselves and dive deep into how the five G. Revolution could enable their teams to thrive. The restless ones is now available on the iheartradio APP. Or wherever you listen to podcasts..

Tracy Chambers Ross Diana Ross Mahogany Ebony Fashion Fair Diane Keaton Annie John Shaft New York supremes Berry Gordy Morley Soho Annie Richard Roundtree Abell Keane Hollick director Apple Samuel Jackson Victoria allen
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"So what memories came to your mind then. I saw the Whiz when I was about nine or ten years old and and he'll go into the movies then was it was a big deal It didn't happen that often and so it was always just an exciting thing just to go to to the show as what you call it and the black community in Chicago you're going to the show so I remember sitting sitting in that theater and just being completely overwhelmed with really everything that I saw. I mean is. It's a big movie right in that sense dance. You know ambitious ambitious. It was expensive and time. I didn't realize that as a ten year old but right exactly exactly like wow the budget for that But I do remember big songs. Big Emotions big stars. Michael Jackson of all things I was and I have to say the I remember the colors more than anything just these vivid splashes of gold the red and green. You know there's even that scene which I remember so well where there in the Emerald City L. Yeah and It's like Does does this always this magazine In Our Home Ebony magazine right was like the toll. The story of the African American community there was one in every home and that always had a fashion section called fashion fair. And I think that the Wiz and that scene and emerald city like leapt off the pages ages of Ebony fashion fair onto the screen. I mean the Lemay jumpsuits right the big Afros the scarves and the heels and it was just glorious so that that's really what comes to mind what I remember whereas New New York bar three three prospect place. Four three three. You want to play more than one number today. Honey I got freedom special. Three numbers plan numbers. I just WanNa get home all well. Now that all ever means is numbers up the odds. Only the wiz could cypher. How to get you back? which is in that place? Where is what is what's is is the ultimate so Numa who knows? Where is this number honey? Sweet thing let me tell you the world and the way piggies up you come from a different place non no you travel now that shoot you watching it for the first time I mean I was struck first of all with how perfect it begins right. It begins with a Thanksgiving dinner where everyone's coming together and one of beautiful wonderful way to introduce this whole story in a lot of ways it felt a lot more Familiar to me than the way the wizard of Oz actually begins with Dorothy Old version version. Yeah just felt like home it feels like you're establishing who this person is who this Dorothy is and you really get a sense of her You know in this Diana Ross Ross character and the other thing that really just blew me away was blackness I mean every is black and it's amazing peak blackness and I know people say that these days in the era of Black Panther You know it's hard to remember that there we've been here before four and you know. I was tense. I wasn't going to go see shaft or super but I could go see the Wiz. And you know it's Motown town. It's Berry Gordy. It's Michael Jackson Diana Ross. Every actor as you said in that movie is black and you know when I was a kid and and even as I've seen the movie over the years it really is so much about fat Thanksgiving dinner that the movie begins with because it just does feel comfortable so It does feel like home. You know and it was so much of what life was like then. That's what our Thanksgiving dinners. Were like every family members represented in there. You know this like the young kids the new baby. The old folks plan checkers and arguing with each other. You know. Now that's the that's the black experience that I remember and that you know I would never see on TV or in the movies and so to go to the movies and just to see yourself in your life reflected on screen. I just think It happens to rarely in particularly than it happened to rarely for black folks and so so when it happened it was big. Yeah and it's multifaceted. I think one of the kind of negative stereotypes. I think they're actually wrong about this movie is that it's kind of a disaster. This is what I reading reviews about. It and I don't know what movie they were watching. Because you know from the very beginning were introduced dorothy actually as a really lonely schoolteacher all teacher who's really searching for her identity. You get a real sense of that in the opening sequence when Diana Ross things that song by herself and her kitchen that she feels different from everyone else in her family. And I gotta say that struck me in a way that it never did watching. The original. Judy Garland version. I didn't get a sense of her as just kind of fragile.

Michael Jackson Diana Ross Dorothy magazine In Our Home Ebony mag Diana Ross Ross Berry Gordy Judy Garland Chicago New York Motown Oz
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Your siren affects so Belbo shut down right now between lake shore drive in Columbus in both directions get traffic and weather together on the aids over ten minutes on newsradio seven eighty one of five point nine FM back to weather forecast for today clouds breaking for some sunshine at times brisk and cold today with a couple of flurries in a high today of thirty nine tonight partly cloudy a low twenty eight and then tomorrow breezy chilly with clouds in a couple of breaks of sunshine and a high of forty five right now we have thirty six degrees at o'hare under cloudy skies wind chill up twenty eight thirty six at midway thirty six at the lake front and in Glenview cloudy thirty eight degrees feels like thirty three hi today of thirty nine could see the sun but a couple of flurries along the way to WBBM news time eight fifty live in Logan the only station covering the news as it happens all day and all night news radio seven eighty and one oh five point nine FM going up for auction soon the last pieces of some fashion history the ebony fashion fair was created in Chicago at Johnson publishing company in nineteen fifty eight by the company's co founder Eunice Walker Johnson it became the world's largest traveling fashion show before came to an end in twenty oh nine throughout its fifty one year history pieces by designers including Pierre Cardin Vivienne Westwood and Christiane the qual were presented in one hundred eighty seven venues and raised over fifty million dollars for African American charities property from ebony fashion fair the final show will headline humans looks holiday auction on December sixth you can visit Hinman options dot com slash auctions for more information Jennifer Kuiper news radio one oh five point nine FM WBBM news time eight fifty one this portion sponsored by Minard so little advance planning and you can have amaryllis in bloom for the holidays I'm Lisa Helgenberger of Chicago botanic garden with your gardening tips for the week priced for the mid winter blooms amaryllis bulbs send up dramatic to foot stocks blossoming in to exotic trumpet shaped flowers referred to as Barbados lily the balls can be found in garden centers now a big bald means a big blossom select the largest bald available making sure it's farm and mildew free amaryllis are winter flowering bulbs originating in South America they will flower indoors here when conditions approximate the warm winter of their homeland amaryllis like to be pot bound so plant in a deep pot that's only one inch larger than the bald filled with soil leaving the top one third of the Bob exposed above the surface water well after planting and then only sparingly until the new but emerges grow in a warm spot in bright indirect light more tips are online at WBBM newsradio dot com slash audio I'm Lisa Helgenberger newsradio seven eighty and one oh five per nine of them feels you look amazing what's the secret are you sick number three sixty smart he chooses the comfort on his side I choose mine we feel great can help keep you sleep senses are movements and automatically adjusts to keep us both comfortable all night to get this secret anymore now during our veterans day sales the one thousand dollars on the new street number three sixty special editions mark now we seventeen ninety nine only for a limited time to find your local sleep number store go to sleep number dot com at metro the best deal in wireless is on switch to metro and give one full Amazon prime membership included every month plus get two free phones from top brands like Samsung LG with huge HD screens all with two lines for just ninety Bucks that's the best deal in wireless only at metro was still stuck in activation fee records portability will never occur the active on T. mobile network rectify metropass thirty days for for account were hustled offers of exchange offer valid.

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Six a midway thirty seven in Lansing thirty six in Morris and we'll get to high today of just thirty nine couple flurries and look at the sun WB news top five fifty live in local the only station covering the news as it happens all day and all night news radio seven eighty and one oh five point nine FM is it is once continues Google getting back into the wearable market Google's parent company alphabet is buying Fitbit for about two point one billion dollars Fitbit is a pioneer in wearable technology but it has been shredded by the competition the deal allows Google to return to the hotly contested market for smart watches and health and fitness trackers a market in which Google has struggled the deal is expected to close next year if it's approved by regulators in fifty eight shareholders federal antitrust enforcers and Congress have been investigating the market dominance of Google and other major tech companies hi my company it'll cost you a bit but you'll soon have a chance to grab a piece of history ebony fashion fair became the world's largest traveling fashion show making stops across the US Canada and the Caribbean after fifty one years a closed in twenty oh nine and now the last of iconic and rare designed by he Celeron Christian Dior Bob Mackie and more are hitting the auction block property from ebony fashion fair the final show will headline Hinman's looks holiday auction on December sixth Jennifer Kuiper news radio one oh five point nine FM Colorado man had to have his legs amputated below his knees after suffering frostbite while climbing a mountain Colorado springs resident Nick Nolan mistakenly one off the main trail while descending mount Shavano Nolan says he reached the summit of the fourteen thousand foot peak on Tuesday but didn't make it back down until one say after his feet want non and froze forty say search teams were sent out but could not find until he got into a cell phone range and finally got.

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"West in the end it's a bit slow both directions between on the in the Indiana troll rotel rob partly the Indiana toll road it's slow both ways because road work between Kelly medic Klein get traffic and weather together on the aids every ten minutes on newsradio seven eighty and one oh five point nine FM dot leave the DM accu weather forecast flood warnings remain in effect for many area rivers early this morning cloudy with areas of rain and snow becoming just snow in some places however there will be little or no accumulation a low of thirty three later today clouds and breaks of sun breezy and cold with a few flurries a high of only thirty nine the average high is fifty six tonight partly cloudy a low of twenty eight and tomorrow for turning back the clock mostly cloudy breezy and chilly a high of forty four right now what here thirty six along the lake front thirty eight degrees WBBM news time to ten going up for auction soon the last pieces of some fashion history the ebony fashion fair was created in Chicago at Johnson publishing company in nineteen fifty eight by the company's co founder Eunice Walker Johnson it became the world's largest traveling fashion show before came to an end in twenty oh nine throughout its fifty one year history pieces by designers including Pierre Cardin Vivienne Westwood and Christiane the qual were presented in one hundred eighty seven venues and raised over fifty million dollars for African American charities property from ebony fashion fair the final show will headline humans looks holiday auction on December sixth you can visit Hinman options dot com slash auctions for more information Jennifer Kuiper news radio one oh five point nine FM the news is sponsored by Illinois secretary of state real ID a former do page county probation officer yesterday was sentenced to one year of periodic imprisonment and thirty months probation for inappropriate sexual contact with a woman on probation do page county state's attorney Robert Berlin says Christian noon yes of Oswego went to the woman's home in.

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

13:00 min | 1 year ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Battle for size. We've already done episode on the nineteen seventy-three quote battle that put American fashion on the international national map but I'm hoping you can tell us a little bit more what that experience was like free you anything others in doing a benefit but it turns out to we some kind of what they call to battle and it seems like you know the American designers had really been on the stage in Paris when it came meantime was royal event and the Americans just shined you know we had all of those girls who could walk in in the music was so American in modern lighting and it just was something so new and the French embraced us so they call it a battle but I think they just fell in love with us because you know I had already been towers working so it's like going home for me but for a whole bunch of girls it was their first first time touching down there and then they went back and had that opportunity again so I think you know you get certain opportunities and you go off to Versailles and you dine unto the Chandeliers in the cherubs in new you made the Duchess of Windsor new you drink champagne in with her and princess grace. You meet all of these wonderful people in fashion because everybody dresses so beautifully because they feel that interesting makes them happy it. Does I mean living a life in fashion. Is I think a gift in many ways and you've done it so beautifully. I've been very blessed because people around me have all loved each other sincerely out of respect and you just adoring each other's style and it's like they're just different flowers that song and can you tell tell us a little bit about how your signature walk developed. I kind of say walk in quotation marks because it's so much more than that and it's just this incredible performance that you give us each every time that is so all your own and so Platt Cleveland and can toss a little bit about you know the role that dance played in its development but also the people who helped you develop it. When I was a child I used to dance with a wonderful African American Lady Catherine author done. I danced as a child. Cathryn Damon and I was her her little mascot and all of these wonderful people would be in the class like Marlon Marlon Brando and Ursa kid and oh wonderful ladies and I would hang off the monkey bars make fun they laugh and they play the drums. I wanted to be dancer but I was too tall at that time so I always felt that something that moves your heart like that can move your clothes too. You know I I just consider myself a flagpole. Jake Paul moving the fabric but she bring dance and movement even your first cover of Ebony Fashion Fair in nineteen sixty six year. You're you're already moving. You're making the clothes move you know already thunder early point in your career and then you bring that to the stage in such a wonderful way that really shares so you know with the audience your joy fashion you know how it feels when you put in a new dress she philo twinkly one is start showing showing off. Your goodies like this is how I feel. It stressed me sneak feel really beautiful. Even if you get something ugly on it's just it it has its own beauty to like. The spirit of the close is just somebody believed in that look and you're going to go along with their fantasy and enjoy their ride with them. Kosei had VICI- a vision. You know like Sushi think what is this then. You put put it on in new become part of their world like how they see things you. It's like more about wearing the designer than even wearing the garment haven't what you've brought specifically to think that is so incredible credibly special. I'm a happy person idle at one minute getaway for me that I didn't see something beautiful and deadly or something you know when when you think of all those people who so every stitch is like a minute of your life and I just basically do it because I I think that the people who make the clothes a part of the dress to you know I see them. I've been in so many ways and watch the ladies stitching I really. I think they're wonderful. Did just so wonderful to pardon me. I feel like they're part of the dress. Yes absolutely and so are you. I've been watching a lot of Pat Cleveland runway moments over the past couple of weeks in anticipation of this this AH Terry Mugabe's. I think were particularly fun. I saw you as the flower blossom awesome and as a kitty cat I mean you just bring so much joy to the runway and you have so much fun with it and I just I really appreciate that. Yeah we are you can have fun in everything. Put an a glove since what puff it I'll put in a sock you hand. It's a puppet you know you turn those close around but I just know Muga has such a fantastic imagination that he just infuses you with his his vision and they just want to be the ball of energy that brings it to live from because you know he's one of the first ones to put on those big shows where it's for entertainment as as well you know he kin so and I mean I remember those shows in the seventies. They were so magnificent saliva. You know it's not like when I first began you walk with a number in silent right staging and music in La People People shearing do it because you want what he insult to feel bored. You know it's nothing like a you know wet dressed dressed in a hangar but just in a hangar dripping exact he didn't want it looks like steamed staying. He had that for chase away the blues in fact you're still modeling. I just saw you and your daughter walking and singing your way down the runway this last fashion week. It was absolutely wonderful. Hello I'm telling you that was just spontaneous at in the bathroom five minutes before and she do it on the runway just singing into ANA. We always seem to channel and they put it on the runway believing so we get out there and we winged it. We just faked it too and we you know we like to do and stuff and for her she and I to be together. She's always travelling so that was just a special moment. We never you get to work together really very often. you know she just came off the follies. She was the star of the follies Ashir that and it was so wonderful to see her doing Josephine Baker because yes you know my my great aunt Josephine Baker's safety schoolteacher until Josephine get an gala the trading get out of town girl. You need to work it. You got it. She told her to play the piano and it's always been sort of in my family to have this wonderful full showgirl. Josephine in our lives. I am so special that you met her at the battle of her side right before that. Oh you day ah I knew her before that and I danced stage with her once Arnie all in another place in I was going to go up and be in her show but she died the week before I got there. I was going to try to be one of those cavalry. Yes Sir Yeah I love the Way Josephine Kinda comes in and out of your life to you because you've yourself of course have portrayed her many times on stage wonderful footage of you. I'm Patrick Kelly runway. He is Josephine Baker and we all orchids. She's the the number one showgirl for Black Society because she escapes such danger and she was able to live beautiful life. Yes and that's what we look for. We want to have a beautiful life all everybody. Yes yes absolutely as magazine just inaugurated their best in black fashion awards and you're the first person to ever receive the icon award in in there fritzy issue per se yard in parks and Susan Taylor and Oh my God there was so many wonderful the people and it was just like okay. We got to believe we gotta believe let's keep marching it forward and they were so advanced. They were already vegetarians using natural fabrics cushing international flavor into the black community. It was just enlightening to be with them and now they did a music awards and it just developed isn't it and beautiful editors. They have now and it's just beautiful. I'm so proud thank you and I just I'm curious because you've been a model now for fifty plus years and I'm just what does it mean to receive an award like this does kind of cause you to look back over your career and it just it brings everything into the present like you see the work and you see the development and you think this is a good thing you know when you're at the beginning of things most of the time. I'm at the beginning of things before they develop I duNno. It's just my path that then you see there's a room platform for many more people and you think. Oh Wow look at all these new people and you think okay that was good. It's good. We made that little walking path. which is now a highway or runway at an airport? I don't know it just opened doors. You think how wonderful hm this at things develop you know Nathan with having been able to enjoy fashion for so many years in work quin new designers and it's just amazing how people can take their imagination and make a life you know and that's kind of what I did. Use My Lai match nation and I make life for myself and I paint and I draw John. I ride and make music and every day I do something that makes me happy and I think modeling makes me happy because I get to be with these wonderful people that thank you so much for being with us today. In sharing with us you know the art magic enjoy of fashion and yourself really thank you so much inch stitching thinking painting. Keep saying the things that make you happy and have bliss consciousness. Thank you pat and we're sending you lots of love and light your way as well. Thank you for that prayer and have a good to hate you know April. Originally I had title eldest episode. A life lived in fashion but after interviewing pat I changed immediately to the joy of fashion isn't her joy infectious. Yes and she is one strong super. Inspiring woman cast as black fashion awards was one of her very first public appearances this year after being diagnosed knows with cancer this year but at the awards she revealed that she feels like a Phoenix rising from the ashes in large part and thanks to the fashion communities communities outpouring of support so pat you are so loved and we are sending you loads and loads of even more love on your road to recovery..

Josephine Baker Ebony Fashion Fair Marlon Marlon Brando Platt Cleveland Cathryn Damon Lady Catherine Paris Muga Pat Cleveland Versailles pat I Windsor VICI Susan Taylor Jake Paul Black Society John Terry Mugabe Phoenix Arnie
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

10:31 min | 1 year ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"I'm Samantha Bari the Editor in Chief of Glamour in our new podcast she makes money moves. Yulia women from across the country sharing their personal stories about their salaries financial struggles successes and the lessons. They've learned along the way I made about thirty thousand dollars for not going to be able to afford to keep the house. Eventually my credit cards just got DOC maxed out. She makes money moves production of glamour an iheartradio listen and subscribe at Apple Podcast iheartradio APP or wherever you listen to podcasts just the history of fashion as a production iheartradio with over seven billion people in the world. We all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed. Welcome to address the History Korea fashion podcast that explores who what when why we wear we are fashion historians and your host April Callaghan and Cassidy Zachary well today dress listeners. We bring you a very special interview with one very special woman. The GROUNDBREAKING FASHION ICON MODEL PAT CLEVELAND JOINS US today today to talk about her fifty plus year career as a model I notice Oh exciting and actually we have the universe and thanks for making this happen April. You and I have had on our list since day. One of this podcast yes literally you and I were talking about her memoir. Walking with amuses earlier this year and I'm not kidding the very next day we got an email from the publicist and dress listener. Mark Rose proposing that pat it come on the podcast so it was fate. It was Qismat. Thank you so much mark for making this happen. Yes thank you universe and mark for answering in all of our fashion history prayers. I'm glad you mentioned pats memoir April because you and I have both read it and it is wonderful. Keep recommending it people people yes. It's so we highly recommend it to you. Our listeners because pat really provides us behind the scenes insider access into a world. Many of us can only dream of it is really this beautiful testament her life and career but also those many many left ones that helped her make it all possible so go out and get yourself a copy S. and M. available on kindle so I read mine on the train which was kind of cool but we spent a lot of time talking about fashion history on the show. Obviously that's what the show is entirely about but very rarely do we get to meet and talk to one of fashion histories creators so pat. Thank you so much for being here. Pat Welcome to address. It is such a pleasure to have you with us here today. I'm here and have with you too and our listeners are not already aware of your legacy. They are certainly now because April and I have talked about you on multiple occasions throughout the last two seasons of our show and and you've been on our wish list since day one so I just want to give a special thank you to our mutual friend Mark Rhodes who made this all possible yeah very special for me to talk to you so thank you for being here today and I I really just want to start at the beginning and kind of hear about a very young Patricia Cleveland. I'm curious if you have avenue first memory of being inspired by clothing and if you can tell us about how you were first inspired to your early fashion I think it all comes the world world of art you know I'd in music and movies and impressions of people who had like kind of bright spirit with dress up up in my mom who trust up in her own clothes she made in they were pretty spectacular shoes. Leo So really good show and as she would go to parties dressed up and win costume Balsam make clothes at home and you know the dancers would wear them in the singers who came to visit you know like Earth a kid and she may dress for Marion Anderson my godmother and she makes some close your friends I thought you know having those fabrics in the house and boa feathers since sequence think his sparkled my mind ringed and having those dancers in the living room you know from all these wonderful places my aunt was a dancer mother painter so so I was kind of grown up in between disturbed watercolor and fabric and dancing music the and I read your memoir. I'm were actually a couple of times now and I just loved reading about these these early years growing up with your mom and your aunt. I think you said something like these early years. In New York with your mom was was a time time of enchantment so magical experience of your childhood very much so because you know when somebody has a certain spirit of liveliness no matter what you to get infected by. That's what you got and I think it was your mom right. He decided cited. You should try your hand at modelling. I'm hoping he can tell us a little bit about your modeling career your early modelling career start to it and you know your first experiences with the Ebony Fashion Fair well. I never thought I model or anything. It wasn't something that people did really. I mean you sort of face in magazine covering you thought Oh it's not real or you know you just look in the magazines but we always had vogue and Ebony seen glamour and all the things that were there in fifty s in the sixties and we looked in remade the close to look kind of like the ones they had or we'd make up something and so you you know modeling was not like I didn't think ever. I just thought I'd like maybe be an artist paint which do now but I i. I never saw myself like that. My Mom said well. You know you could do it. You can do this look at them. You look good but nobody looked like me. I was like a baby giraffe. I didn't know maybe animals have some kind of glamour. I don't know maybe it was dior's but other than that she she's so something in May and she sent some pictures out to Ebony in Vogue and Glamour and do a lot of rejections and the pictures were taken it data Carnegie Hall by famous photographer that my mom knew because when she was always hanging out in the jazz places places you know she met this wonderful carve in Beckton people like that who would photograph all the Duke Ellington's people in the Harlem Renaissance Insensitive when it was time to be photographed so we have to have pictures taken in them while they made the pictures and they made the context sheets which is is really old fashioned and she cut them up like little squares put them in envelopes and send them off to the magazines and that's what she did find the again again an answer it was not that I was waiting for it. I had no idea but it came some months later that Mrs Johnson from Ebony had sin into request to see me and my mother and I was like fifteen years old. I had no idea went to the world of his story and I was dressed like the virgin virgin sacrifice. My Mom Kris me that day I had white tights white dresses white Straw hat white gloves white pat lead. I just didn't know what to think. I was like a nun walking in Waldorf going up to the presidential suite. Like what are we doing here. I had no idea dear and we get in. We see Mrs Johnson Standing Behind this regal desk in asking to walk. Now is so terrified because I I was just like a sprout in every other girl looked like fully blossomed and I thought wouldn't make doing but she liked me and I and she liked your lawn and you she asked if I could be in her fashion show which traveled around America and was a benefit to raise money for colleges. It was the Ebony Fashion Fair Miss Johnson Woodcutter Europe and by all the clothes I think she was the only editor for her who would buy Mike Elections because after she would sell them to raise money for the black society so that young people could go to college so it was all very worthwhile because besides the fact that I got to travel with all of these beautiful clothes for three months ahead to leave my school whoa and my mother came along as a chaperone in town we went around America and did his show every night. Wow I just remembered. I was doing my homework in the bus my American history homework looking out the window seeking America. They always say no your own backyard before you travel and nuts. I got to do Natalie did that. I got to wear the clothes that I loved. It was von. Sheen she and her own to you madam put to Navan in Qadam and baby clothes from is salon not like babies they would choose not even known Halston hats and things that people didn't even these designers not even they Miss Shannon. Mrs Johnson was buying their clothes and I I know that were one point house was in Chicago and saw me in the Ebony Fashion Fair. It just never know who's sitting audience but he was kind of unknown at the time too so it's kind of like everybody was starting. Cardi near careers nineteen sixties. You know the early sixty three sixty four sixty five his actually I had started thirteen thirteen really being in pictures but just being photographed. Hey it's cassidy and April all and we're excited to tell.

Ebony Fashion Fair Mrs Johnson PAT CLEVELAND Ebony Cassidy Zachary America Chief of Glamour Yulia Samantha Bari Apple Mark Rose April Callaghan Qismat Mark Rhodes New York kindle Editor History Korea Marion Anderson
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

03:39 min | 1 year ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Fashion it's a charity event on the twenty seventh of July the California African American museum and here to talk with us about it is fake clerk mostly phase of former Emily fashion flair model who model domestically and abroad and she is the founder chair and president of flair fashion legacy association for industry recognition how you doing Faye I am doing fantastic Pat good morning Los Angeles and California and the world I think it is so great that you're bringing back a taste of ebony fashion fair we have so many great memories connected with this as I said institution absolutely Pat I in five hundred plus of us that were part of that traveling back you joke really feel that it's important to keep this legacy alive because it broke down barriers between African Americans the runway fashion and I don't know that there is an opportunity out there we're told to leave when you're interjecting about Johnson publishing company based on one in the room does not know someone that was impacted by ebony fashion fair in one aspect or another it really is a cultural institution there's no question about it and you know a lot of those those designers and models that I've mentioned have gone on to become famous in the world of general fashion you know internationally known now and now what may seem odd to young people who are hearing this right now the fact that there was a time when African because we're really shot out of the world of fashion you're absolutely was I mean back in the day we would not have had fashion influencers right beyond Faye in Brianna they would not have been allowed to even enter the fashion houses that are now fighting over the chance to express them were it not for the trail Blazers by units John French and editing fashion fair I mean there were contributions made by black designers and models that gave an alternative perspective to fashion if we really do make it more creative and inclusive in an art form and industry we have some amazing black designers that launched their careers because of their exposure in editing fashion fair we're honoring an iconic designer at player twenty nineteen Stephen borrow Angela dean we honored Kevin hall we honor the more Amir we have other designers that have appeared in ebony fashion fair that iconic like a P. Michael Patrick Kelly Willie Smith Tracy Reese we are paying homage to Rufus Barkley posthumously I can go on and on and what you have Johnson did was to insure that that was an inclusive industry where she put those black designers alongside the European contort designers and ensure that the world gave them an opportunity to have that exposure it was absolutely magnificent Pat we're talking this morning if a clerk mostly she's a former M. any fashion flair model and she also is the founder chairman president of flair fashion legacy association for industry recognition they're putting on the event that we're talking about Saturday July twenty seventh at the California African American museum the jazz age of fashion paying tribute to some of the people she mentioned and of course there will be fashions models it's going to be an all out fashion show and here's the thing just like the ebony fashion fair this event has a significant economic impact on the African American community because just like fashion fair did you are supporting charitable efforts fashion fair provided thousands of educational scholarships for young people to go to college in addition to entertaining us in the community absolutely did.

California African American mu
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

11:31 min | 1 year ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Now choi how did you and virginia go about picking the fashions do we featured in you're exhibition i mean you just referenced this archive that have i think thousands of pieces in it how could you even begin to choose what to include well i think condition was a great separate or of the the women from the girls why right so 'em we we were looking for things that wouldn't require a grand amount of conservation although we did have a couple of pieces that were key that 'em they need it's a work because as i mentioned they were traveling into like a hundred and fifty hundred and sixty city so be saying had been worn many times in often hack the house a modification just so people could get the models could get in and out of them quickly and then get back on stage that magazine itself was very helpful the programs from the ebony fashioned fair were very helpful you know those things what what are the recurring thing color was the probably the most recurrent theme in any fashion fair a title or the the scene for particular season we were looking for those designers designers that you know did have a significant death within that collection of one of my favorite sections of the expedition really had to do with that complete look that put together woman where the the jewelry that accessories all of that was we we want it to make a statement about that as well we want it to make a statement about the international nature of the fashion that was being displayed right and those those key pieces that we knew so there's a lot of garro there's a number of some of the pieces in the show that over tour comes up over and over again within the the fashion fair history there was also a in the early eighties there would be edition of the plus size model so we were trying to do a couple of different things right look at the arc of the show itself historically but then also look at the ways in which these garnett spoke to the things that were important to mrs johnson right so there's one section just about kind of luxury n n b firmer an end sequins as i mentioned 'em but also have some pieces in it that you're not gonna see anywhere else because she she bought it so and i've heard stories i can't i don't know if i could confirmed it that you know some of the house's knew that she had teases and they have their own color you know they have their own kind of archives and they come they came to see if they could a gay back or archive you know what i'm saying yeah and i just think in terms of what she was able to do which is creating a fashion fantasy for people who often who at one point were locked out because of raise an in many ways you know most of us are are just not going to these houses to buy anything you know other were not which is going to look 'em so or or young people who maybe had an interest in design an ain't got a chance to see these things on on stage for the first time in their real democratization happening on the ebony fashion fair stage and i also think the ability to make these very beautiful things you know kind of milk them for everything there were right in terms of providing a place for black models and not just women that have a platform to show their so in terms of all the behind the scenes people who got a chance to you know prepare these garment prepare the the men and women for the stage is both a fashion extravaganza but it's just a really interesting castle for thinking about history virginia at is the fashion expert i had an interest in what this magazine what that company did in terms of really elevating african americans to see themselves in ways that they were not being projected at the time that the magazine start it and then to create this platform for all this you know ultimately black excellent and those garment became an extension of that and i just think if if it's fascinating is phenomenal it still gives me chills till the day to think that you know we did that show it was it was really also i mean incredibly groundbreaking show 'em in in one that celebrates as you just said this and credibly important legacy carried on on by mr and mrs johnson end john johnson died in two thousand five at the age of eighty seven mrs johnson died in two thousand ten at the age of ninety three in that was actually just one year after the very last fashion fair ended its run so after traveling for fifty fifty years so why do you think the fashioned fair ended and can you speak a little bit endurance of mr mss johnson's legacy in its wake sure i think the fascist their end it for a couple reasons one put it on a show of that magnitude is incredibly expensive publishing houses for the last several you know last couple of decades have been struggling in i i'm not sure that that was remained main priority of johnson publishing company i can't say that but that's really for them to speak to but it was a really expensive venture you know the nature of fashion also change whereas mr mrs johnson was able to developed these relationships where certain houses and and you know on the strength of her relationship by these things in many of those how the then became part of larger conglomerate 'em so purchasing in the ways in which they had earlier just wasn't as easy as it had been right and also mr mrs johnson really was the spearheading she end declining health that someone is so forth so i think there are multiple reasons the fair end it some of them have to do cost some of them have to do with the changing nature of the fashion industry and then some of them have to do without the decline of the magazine me quite frankly those are my my hypotheses you will end despite the fashion fair not during taken you speak about mr and mrs johnson's legacy today and today's fashion industry but also today an american culture will see i don't think many people know about you know johnson in terms of her contribution to the fashion industry as should write the fashion fair because it was is put on by ebony magazine in primarily seen in by african american is not as well known now i will say that folks who were in the know and love fashion always knew about the fascist fair and go regardless of what color they were but these were disciplined and a show bad primarily support it you know black organizations and it's only so far so they're still those divisions within our society that keep us i'm being as knowledgeable about people of other cultures and race that we shouldn't be so unfortunately i feel like it's not as well known as i would hope it would be but we're in a culture a the african american culture and the the way in have on the johnson legacy i mean it is kind of hard to overstate it because they created a blueprint ultimately for how to tap into under served audiences so what mr johnson did you know witness the court and in backing of mrs units jonathan i have voice see an opportunity to build something really you know quite spectacular and it was like i said we meet round digesting ebony which jet in tandem q is ebony junior it would have any africa for short while ebony south africa ebony man you know they really kind of created a ten play a platform for celebrating the best and black culture sir and did so in in really through these kind of visual a mess but you know the picture this black celebrities so and so forth so they what they gave to american culture and really what they reflective of african american life is really 'em without parallel and so i think despite a lot of the changes that are happening even without the company eight right now you you can't really overstate the importance of ebony magazine northey importance of the ebony fashioned fair right because they provide an opportunity for people who had been maligned and so it'll treat it represented the see when they knew about themselves and then also seeing him so beyond what they thought they could accomplish so that is fantastic yeah charlie as and try this is a real pleasure thank you so much for being here today and sharing the joy that is mrs johnson's attorney fashion fair with us today well thanks for listening it talk about it again thank you for being here the importance of johnson's life and work come truly not be overstated enough mister johnson was awarded the presidential medal of freedom in nineteen ninety six and when he died at the age of eighty seven in two thousand five two thousand people people attended his funeral costs in the reverend jesse jackson set of johnson that quote he gave us a first mirror to see ourselves as people have dignity people with intelligence and beauty put april as we know it said time and again on the show but every great man license even greater woman i mean of course i'm joking but not really i mean you niece was forced to be reckoned with the woman who not only gates ebony magazine its name like millions of black women around the world glamorous operational vision.

virginia choi fifty fifty years one year milk
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

15:36 min | 1 year ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Welcome back dress listeners so one cleveland's very first modeling jobs where the traveling fashion fair she was just sixteen years old when she joined the tour and that was in nineteen sixty six and i i'm currently reading her memoir walking with amuses which is wonderful i highly suggest are listeners check it out and she really recalls excitement of the fashion fair experience on this time when she met muhammad ali lots exciting things and experiences happening for this young woman and but she also talks about the fear that was involved when she in the tour and went to be american south and at this time this is the sixties and it's a place deeply entrenched racism at something that's most recently captured in the oscar winning film green book so not only were these models groundbreaking in their display of fashion they and the the credit they traveled with were incredibly brave and quite resilient in the face of much adversity and even dangerous she writes about this running in what the kkk france so can you speak a little bit more into the early road blocks of the show mrs johnson and it's participants initially encountered and were able to overcome so that cleveland of course you know giant was in the fashion industry she's spoken pretty plainly about on some of the encounters that they had in the south as they traveled and she's traveling much later than some of those those earlier you're model sanded when they were traveling this out they traveled in a greyhound bus so accustomed bus everybody on the bus the clothes on the bus they go you know they're traveling through the south end particularly peculiarly in the early sixties you know during the time of the freedom rides it was there could have been some confusion between their mission and the mission of those activists were so brave but some of the models also speak about about not being able to answer the front door to order food 'em they also traveled with a models who were fair enough the past as sometimes we go into these stablishment and do what they need to do for the rest of the crew so again while were talking about the fascist there in in bringing fashion and really equalizing ability in see andy ability to experience tour were also moda and so on and so forth a front end in person often they were going to places that had not yet been desegregated and in the shows if there were folks who were not who were black and white you know they had to be separated so and it's so far so it's existing with in the context of what's happening in the the rest of the united states so wasn't always easy to make you make your way down south to show these fashion but in many instances that's where the you know they have the grandest audiences or the the biggest outpouring of support because it was really an opportunity to see something in places that were outright style to african american right and you're right also about mr and mrs johnson's initial struggles with even gaining access to oh couture fashion in europe during this period i mean oko cheer at this time is you know is really exclusive and exclusionary to african american clients and mrs johnson shows up there and really just breaks down all these barriers and becomes really incredibly important crutcher client can you talk about how she was able to do that a little bit we know that the in mr john says autobiography there definitely is a section where he discusses a trying to get access to some of these fashion houses and they're not just off they're not all in europe some in the united states as well an end being denied and a really threatening having to threatening legal action against some of these companies if they are not granted access so while there are within the dominant culture there are prejudices and biases against african americans there those exist within the fashion industry where people were not necessarily sara lee taking them seriously as buyers right core they to come in right these checks in at macy's you know ultimately grand financial statement when that's not necessarily how people were encountering african american and so a lot of what they did in terms of breaking down those barriers was with their checkbooks that's what mrs johnson did right she's coming to see her work and she's gonna buy most of europe collection you're gonna take her very seriously and i think that into what happened in developing these relationships is that when you're gonna spend that she was spending so much money that she demanded at a level of respect that a happy build but because it would expect it as as she continued to calm year after year then she could do what she wanted ultimately within these circle right and she herself as you mentioned earlier was really important oh catcher clinton herself she wore a culture fashion as well and she's incredibly fashionable glamorous woman so i don't think it would take much convincing and i know you said by you know as as the fashion show progressive progressive the relationship that she bills with these designers is really really interesting and we'll talk a little bit about that in a minute but i wanna talk about the show itself because you've you've mentioned it a little bit and and and how by the mid seventies show is traveling a hundred eighty venues i mean this has really turned into this extravaganza is incredibly exciting and you know event to look forward to so if i wasn't audience member of the audience member during this period what would you have expected to see from a typical how okay so at the height of the show they had about between a hundred and fifty two hundred eighty access so ultimately that means that you're singing that many garment within the span of the show amish show would be between an hour and a half to two hours there would be a musical interlude an you would see it broken into the category of the of the type of fashion right so day where swimwear the evening where sonus so for later in the show these kind of a interpreted or acted out skits became very popular a men and women in maxine ensemble if you will is also very popular witham thumb audiences of course it ended with the bridal a scene so it kind of took a while to get through the show and you had the hat entertainment value to it there was a moderator or commentator who described the fashion described the scene so it really it was it was in entertainment in bed with fashion if you will right and it's important not to i felt like these comments that were first how they were literally purchase she display in the magazine added a fashion show for this performance but they only absolutely it was a performance many of the models had other talent you know they song and dance roller skate it whatever they brought with them they also brought to the display of the fashion you know there are folks who would talk about a model who could turn as if she were on a you know a rotating pedestal or something like that so there was there there is a lot of weighing in on going on at these shows that had to do with the garment but also has to do with the ways in which the models inhabited and how they performed at you just didn't walk in show what you had oh my you know you had to make it come alive for the audience how wonderful and as mentioned the fashions on display or not just any off the rack fashion but oh coach here i mean we're talking about the crandall a criminal fashion and he talked about she often went for the muller auburn guard more you know expressive pieces at the designers offered so these are not inexpensive by any means and you're coal curator of the museum exhibition virginia heavens called mrs johnson a curator because of the thought and care that went into the selection selection of each and every garment for the show can you tell us a little bit about how she picked the fashions to be displayed on what she was looking for well 'em she wasn't looking thing that popped right so she was looking for things that spoke look on luxury an ex then when you see no you don't have to try to figure it out there with a lot of color there were a lot tougher there is a lot of sequence a lot of leather so things that really boat to kind of the the actual value of the government because these what they're supposed to be aspiration all right that's the thing they choose you hope to be able to a where one day for you might not you you might wonder how who aware of that ad where would i wear that because there was also a again speaking to the fantasy of fashion and not just the utilitarian nature of wearing something that's very smart although there was you know the complete look that we display within the exhibition where you you had the hair was done the makeup was ripe accessories were on point point the garment with great the shoes everything was just so but there was also a lot of fantasy with in the show so many things that were chosen a like a lot of you know high fashion wasn't necessarily you know wearable it was really about dealing with the ideas in the design in the fantasy of of of what the designer was trying to bring polite and she really wanted her audience the enter that world so a lot of what you saw on the fashioned fair stage was it was sharp and it was smart and so on but there was also things that were just kind of crazy in out there as well she was trying to create something for the audience is enjoy but also for them to understand what was going on within fashion at a particular time and he talked a little bit about mrs johnson's relationship to these you know precision crutcher designers are high fashion designers and many of him like a manual on garro for instance she really supportive from the beginning of their careers she's incredibly important client to the industry can you talk a little bit about this relationship there is a wonderful photograph in the catalog of her and he found their own for instance right so you solar on bill blass emmanuel and garro the the thing about putting the show together was that we had access to thousands of government that were purchased over several decades for the emmy fashioned fair if some of these designers she pretty much had a full catalog so garro from the late sixties all the way until the end of the run of ebony fashioned fair so she each seller on same thing there were pieces was in that collection that you can't really find anywhere because she she just took all of it m a n patrick kelly tally in things that were made specifically for the ebony fashion fair because of the relationship she had with the designers 'em i think it was really again that becomes because she wasn't around when we were doing the show to talk to us about that we did have access to her assistant producer who did it by the end of her life with doing most of the vying for the show but it's really in kind of the physical wrecker on the garment where do you see those relationships you know you could see that more now in terms of who is who is representing in that collection in what was representing them that collection and there was something they missing that you would think would be in that collection and so you kind of you know there were questions that that developed over the period of kind of interacting with windows garment but definitely you saw it you know bill blass you sound the ron emanuel in garro just some phenomenal phenomenal garment which in the span of her collecting history so she had her coat she had her own collection to so we had the you have the fashion collection but then that was what she herself purchase which we didn't get into but you know there was a a great recor within her own government archive as well and you mentioned patrick kelly she was of course in a valuable mature clammed patron but she really wasn't important supporter black fashion designers from the very beginning can you tell us about some of these designers that featured an exhibition one in particular that stand well there couple 'em there's no such barkley who you know is you may or may not have heard his name before there is patrick kelly somebody who is iconic being michael who made a very wonderful evening gown era dean designers that she worked without all the time and then there's those history early on which we don't really cover because there's not a lot of documentation where when the fashion fair we're going a certain cities in the early days they would find out who the designer who is the same stress or the taylor in that town who is doing really great work and they would feature it along with all this other fantastic fashion that they were playing as well but black designers actually spent in they're designed to mrs johnson at the johnson publishing building an issue like if she would include it in the show so if you are someone who didn't have that you know high name recognition is mrs johnson was a fan of your work your designs could be in the same show as a eastbound the raw 'em so it really was both the high end and then is kind of graphic design work that or grassroots work that was going on as well too i mean she is just an incredibly important patron it sounds like from this period for over fifty years years of that any fashion fair so it's really incredible.

cleveland sixteen years fifty years two hours one day
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

10:35 min | 1 year ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Travel to the fashion features a really did teach her things like captain swimwear in how the how the dress for certain occasions and so on and so forth and it also was a place where black models got a chance to have sunshine if you will because there just wasn't a space for them in these other publications so one of the reasons we really want us to kind of look at the ebony fascist fair because yes there's this fantastic fashion in as little as lavish and it's luxurious and it is beautiful and all of that but it's connected to this this larger social history that the magazine it's helping to kind of explore innings edited and i also think thought it was a really important how you wrote in the catalog about how the ebony especially instrumental in projecting these images of glamorous and elegant black women that were really yet projected within mainstream cultures have basically saying you know i think he wrote black women could be everybody's glamorous sister white counterparts because in the mainstream culture and the images that were being projected 'em in society that wasn't an image that you austin saw during that time you you didn't see the dapper gentleman he didn't see the glamorous lady so within ebony magazine you not only end not even within the fascist fair column but the covering of some of these w taught ball and there was you know every year for many years there were the feature about the best dressed women in america so the best dress black women so you really gotta see that you know african american women african american men were really out here doing something extravaganza extrordinary that you weren't gonna find that in the pages of bogor harper's bazaar but the beauty beauty of black women the beauty of black men would mean celebrated within the magazine and what the fashion fair the traveling show did was really give people a chance to see that kind of in a dimensional space race so not just look at the picture but see the people inhabit the government right in nineteen fifty eight was the first year that up and he's fashion fair went from being a feature in the magazine to her tour exhibition of fashion fashion can you tell us a little bit about the impetus behind this transition the more i thought about it you know you write something and then you time path is the first installation or the first kind of pilot of the fashion and fair was in nineteen fifty states where john johnson really brought these garments end his models to dealer university as a way to raise money for that university of oregon has a 'em the president's wife the president of that campuses wife and they put on a show they raised my money for the institution but when you purchase a ticket for the show you also get a subscription friction to the magazine so you either got a year subscription to ebony or six months subscription to jet magazine which with another publication of jonathan of the johnson empire media empire so the impetus to take the fashion on the road one it was to get people to see or to allow people see these beautiful garments in person it will wait a fundraiser certain organizations whether that'd be the the links or the alex or what have you in a particular city and then it was also a way to make sure that these subscriptions to the magazines were being you know attached to the fashion show so it's kind of like this whole situation where you have the fashion you had the business of the magazine and then you had the philanthropic arm on the traveling show as well so it it really all work together so so you've got to see what you would see fashion that you would see in the magazine closing in person so fashion editor free tonight oversaw the fashions are traveling show from its beginnings until nineteen sixty three when she passed away and it was after that that the fair came under the direction of the glamorous visionary you niece johnson and johnson's wife and how do you need to transform the fashion fair into this internationally celebrated display of not just fashion but oh coulter fashion and why is this important well on mrs johnson was very instrumental in the founding of the company in the founding of any she gave magazine i mean it's the same she herself was a person who was highly educated but always had an interest in kind of art and culture i think are minor in college was was art she as a child you know she may closed her her her dad so and so forth so she brought with her on an interest in fashion and also kind of keen eye on what what's hot and what we're gonna who wasn't going to be the best and the brightest among these designers 'em ban the thing that unit did or i i never call her units alec color mrs johnson 'cause if i met her i wouldn't call it a first name i does see what what she did an end you know this is part of the history of the show is well is that they did it wasn't like they were going to borrow garments they purchased everything things for the show as she really created a vision of glamour and luxury that took it to the next level and she developed relationships with designers she maintain those relationships to the point where you know by the seventy new mrs johnson was you knew she wasn't coming to just you know look if she always fought things that were just kind of different a little bit of extra becomes her audience expected a bit more they expected flare an end drama so she always purchase things that were kind of the at the far end of of of miners were creating so so she she did a great deal not only you know she carried on the tradition started by frigid tonight but she also just she grew it right she grew the fashioned fair when the fascist they're starting at fifty eight in went to about twenty four cities by the middle of nineteen seventy six they have the divide the show in the kind of two season so the winter in the spring because they had grown to more than a hundred cities in the eighties i think they did a hundred and eighty you know at the height nineteen eighty seven they did like a hundred and eighty three city tour so they she is really kind of this is hard thing she's taken over the editorial vision within the magazine and she's really you know out here making a name for eunice johnson because she wasn't couture buyer as well but also you know really making a statement win this fashioned fair this traveling show so in terms of her power with in that industry a within the fashion industry and really her kind of vision for the fashion fair she really needed it she took it to the next level yeah you mentioned it a little bit earlier but when the fashions fares and mrs johnson most significant legacies can be found in the showcasing and promotion a black models so how significant was fashion fair and changing the way black black women were depicted in the media but maybe also happy sopping south well you know when we were doing research for the show and we went and talked to some of the early fashion sarah models like there were some there is some women who were in that first show so that we spoke to an ebony magazine really was the only game in town for them even though they were 'em you know professionals if they want it to be a plant that wiz where they were gonna be seen ebony jet fan you all of these publications that were put out by the johnson company in terms of the models but they chose they were trying to create a sense of showing the diversity of hughes within the african american community you know they weren't necessarily picking from people who were already connected to the industry so we've also an offer an opportunity for those who were not in the industry to really kind of try their hand at the craft and really practice it you know because they were moving so quickly and also going to so many cities you really had to create create some personality when you were walking's runways and so on and so forth so in terms of what they did for creating space for black models you know they're really at the vanguard because it's not until so the late sixties early seventies and really not you know with any kind of regularity the eighties that you start to see a black models in mainstream publications so publications like ebony in china parts were really the place that blast model got a chance shine and we're gonna hear about one of these models specifically pot cleveland when we get back from eight brief sponsor break hi it's cassidy an april an whenever i'm ready to shift gears from podcast church jim warrior you better bet i'm wearing fab lennox flip on my favorite pair of leopard print leggings and wallah transformation complete that isn't only for the gym they create clothing that's me to inspire physical.

six months
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

13:35 min | 1 year ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Billion people in the world we all have one thing in common everyday we all get dressed welcome to dressed the history of fashion a podcast where we explore the who what when of why we where we are fashion historians enter host april callaghan an cassidy zachary april i have to say that i had today's guest on my radar since day one of this podcast i am very pleased to announce today's guest is joy that ends one of the curator's behind the landmark exhibition inspiring beauty fifty years of of any fashion fair kosher ended by virginia you're heavens exhibition is the first ever to celebrate the pioneering traveling fashion show in dubuque at the chicago history museum in twenty thirteen before travelling onto several other locations just as a fashion bear did for over fifty years and while the exhibition may have only traveled to a few different locations at its height the fashion fair with two hundred pieces of the most extravagant exciting pieces of high fashion intoe traveled to over one hundred and eighty cities cities and this is just in one season so just what is the fashion fair you might ask why is it arguably one of the most important contributions to fashion in the twentieth century to answer all things fashion fair we are pleased to welcome joined them instead the judge today welcome joy joy welcome to the show today is such a pleasure to have you here with us it's really awesome semi talking with you today so you the chief curator of the international african american museum in charleston south carolina and so before we dive into the of any fashion far i was hoping you could talk a little bit about the muse m asmar work there shore on me international african american museum is an institution that is slated to open in late two thousand twentyone it's been in the works for nearly two decades here in charleston south carolina in art museum is a scheduled to open or the side of art museum will be gaskins war which is right on charleston harbor in captains war if is really critical fight in the history of the transatlantic slave trade and really in the development of this part of the world it is a place where many african took their first steps here on the north american continent so it's estimated that more than forty percent of a africans who arrived here in the americas took their first steps on gas in more so art museum is located there and it really is insight that dedicated to telling stories about 'em africans african americans that builds a charleston south carolina but also about those connections to the larger african diaspora to the nation into the larger african diaspora so we have a lot of history and culture to cover at this institution and were working to get that done and in a short time here in charleston so i've been in the city of charleston for nearly a year now in my work is really to develop what that museum experience will be from me exhibitions and then also working without a archie genealogy is who's heading the center for family history which is are place where are visitors will be able to learn about their own personal pass plus a millennial pass as they come to this place where they can learn about african american history an offer the history of the larger african diaspora really credibly important means an end something it sounds like you're building helping to build from the ground floor up which is incredible and actually i i didn't realize at the museum wasn't open yet but there isn't actually a really great archive of a digital archive of photographs online that dress listeners should definitely check fuck out until you get to the music in a in a couple of years will be looking forward to that and we're here today to talk about ebony fashion fair which was the subject of an exhibition you cook traded west virginia heavens if you years ago at the chicago history museum exhibition was entitled inspiring beauty fifty years of be up in any fashion fair and i believe it traveled to north carolina museum of art am i correct yeah so stuck in traffic how did i miss that i really wish i yeah i did not i i found out about it after it closed so i'm a little embarrassed to say but on the garments on display were just incredible i do a copy of the catalog and before we get to the of any fashion fair specifically i won't talk about ebony magazine which was founded over seven years ago in nineteen forty five by john johnson so can you tell us about the magazines creator but also why the magazine what's hot unimportant publication for african american sure so ebony magazine was actually the second publication that the founder john h johnson a created in the nineteen forties the first was called negro digest in nineteen forty two in nineteen forty five he introduced ebony magazine to the world now ebony took a real page from life magazine which wasn't pictorial magazine i detected you know american life and had articles about different parts of the usa culture ebony was an accident a response to that kind of publication it sought to fill that gap within the african american community so the magazine really took on the project of creating a visual in age if you will of the best of african american life the best black life so it is the place where you went to see where where you could see black celebrities and black achievement and fashion and travel and so on and so forth and it really spoke to kind of the lack of that kind of publication that kind of media that would being addressed to an african american audience that was a really hungry just see images of itself that want defined by dominant culture so ultimately biz magazine started in nineteen forty five very quickly became a staple within many african american homes you know with the subscription magazine so it flourished in flourish out of chicago starting on the south side of chicago in the nineteen seventies that johnson publishing company move downtown chicago but it was always kind of moving farther north in the in the trajectory three of its history so the magazine became kind of a staple of african american culture is where you found your best draft women or you could find recipes where you could see who was hot who is not within the large african american culture and so over the decades long existent it really created an archive of african american life and culture here in the united states especially like how you discussed in these catalog how racist society in racial society while they were present in the magazine or certainly discussing the magazine it is no way it's focus who's really like you said focused on highlighting these more positive aspects of african american live you know something that if someone wasn't experiencing as of yet you could some things that you could aspire to and one of the things you could inspire to is to be 'em to follow fashion to be a part of fashion in that kind of leads me to my next question which is i'm hoping you could talk a little bit about what it was like to be an african american during the nineteen forties this is of course the world war two era segregated military's segregated everything and i know as a black woman during this period you could not just walk into a department store try something on you would have to purchase it and therefore own at to even give it a try and see if it even fit so incredibly polarizing a period to what wall for black people in the nineteen forties and obviously before a an well into the late nineteen sixties united states was a segregated racially segregated society so there were just avenues of american life that were close to you andy while we could really frame it as there are places where black people were capped out of what it did was it also created opportunities for black people to be entrepreneurial in terms terms of creating businesses that cater specifically to black consumers right so john johnson through ebony magazine is is not only showing these images of black people at the festival and and created and so and so forth he's also showing that there are black consumers who are looking to spend their money they use these products to an in many ways it's an untapped market and what he does is create some visual image of this market that dominant society in all of these companies that from which black people purchase are not they're not targeting them right so what's in the pages of the magazine you get a chance to see how african american actually living what they actually aspire to and aspire to be so which then you're right the nineteen forties the magazine zayn comes out after the war a world war two is completed 'em after the victory is want an you know many african americans were radicalized politicized by the second world war because they understood understood that they were fighting for their freedom of others but did not enjoy that free no at home john johnson understood that there was a market that was a just really waiting to see themselves in ways that a dominant media just did not show them and so there is a kind of like a perfect marriage and you see how civil rights through the history of the magazine becomes more and more important and it's on bigger and bigger stories more stories about it as the magazine which shores so wildlife yeah there were so many avenues in american society that were closed the african americans in the nineteen forties african americans were creating opportunities for themselves so you've had with in black neighborhoods all throughout the nation you know you're military shops milliner shop where you could purchase your hat that you know there was a seamstress and the designer and so and so forth where you purchase closed that she couldn't try on at maybe marshall fields for other stores throughout the nation so there was kind of like the there's this is very interesting tension and i think happening where the greater american society was closed but that engender kind of a greater creation of opportunity among african americans to do for themselves and like you said one of the ways in which they did that was in the closed they created for themselves and their communities and we are here to talk about clothing and specifically fashion fashioned fair which is incredible feature an ebony magazine i mean that became this traveling fashion extravaganza but before it was this a traveling show it was a future in the magazine and i'm hoping tell us about these early fashion features an they're important and not just sharing fashionable clothing with readership by really changing their relationship to change in relationship to the garment but there's also the magazine as a place to again expressed something that was already happening within the culture right so 'em african american which which in the larger culture dressing up being dressed being shaar being put together was part of a larger cultural expression and so while their new fashions that are being shown within the fascist within ebony and within the fascist feature specifically it's also a reflection of something that is happening within the community right so again when you talk about this particular publication the reason that it sticks is because there's a desire and there's already something happening within the larger culture that people can can connect to it within the magazine until those early facetime feature which were you know edited in kind of spearheaded by free tonight who is the home services director so she kinda cover everything from your recipes you.

fifty years forty percent seven years two decades
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Of the community. Almost one time in the is the brothers every day. Hip. You know, you might not know. I got baby. Boy, I got a DJ JD. He'll donate you fold the bumps them as everyday. I gotta get you. Right. About the. Summertime. You gotta van new out is coming coming guy gonna bump gone to about moving. Riding, arkansas. Bumgarner three times in a row, and she got sick. I mean, I bought a whole thing. Three times in a row now. What what? About four nine two two zero three is my number in the studio with me. A fad from my young, son. Keith lot second you'd be walking around Frederick. The we got different. In a way, this is a native of Philadelphia city of brotherly love, he moved with them about seven years ago to upgrade is career in fashion and entertainment. He started his career as a model back into hometown. And I tell you all about my modeling because I you know, I mean. I mean, you might not be able to now. But a man I used to do that thing home, you know? Stop and look at what I'm doing on radio. But trust me, I'll be stopping and looking man like the real cool. Do the brother name, ebony fashion? Fair about ebony fashion for model on the ebony fashion fair when they come to town. Seek me out. For my model balance. Anyway. Mama. You can't make this stuff up four nine two zero three in the studio with me. Now, his brother who has had a career as a model as well as an actor in films stage plays, but he is rebranding himself in the industry has an entrepreneur and has created MJ, art enterprises talent and management, and he is behind the pitch black fashion weekend of that is coming to the aid in July, ladies and gentlemen, and brothers. Put your hands together for Mike. Rob..

Bumgarner arkansas Philadelphia Keith Mike seven years Frederick
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on The Nod

The Nod

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on The Nod

"Color actually making decisions. And you haven't actually like thought this through of how this would actually affect women of color brands nowadays. They just want to say like, okay, we've checked this box. We've done this. But like we're not actually committed to this. What do you mean by the diversity bandwagon? What is the thing that people have jumped on? Oh, everybody wants to say like, oh, well, you know, we have a few black people working at our company, and it's like okay relations. But you, you know, it's a lot of times. It's like, okay. But who are like this senior staff? Yeah. We're the people in control of making decisions. And that's why I feel like it's such a power struggle. Because it's a lot of times like you may have people of color on staff or you may have people coloring the building. But like every person I talked to you for black, and fashion is like, oh, yeah, we have three black people here in to Asian women in wanting woman, but you know, that's like counting people in the mail room. And that's coming the receptionist. I mean, I've never had a black boss ever. And I probably won't ever. Why not? I don't think it will happen because I think they. Black women and women of color in general, just have a hard time really getting into those senior roles at actually give them the tools in the power to make decisions. A lot of times when I've talked a lot of women of color like, oh man that position such as this magazine would be so great. They go to the interview. And it's like, okay. Yeah. They want a person of color, but they're not actually like interested in investing in the ideas that I wanna put forth, it's like, well, if you're not interested in me, actually doing the work then like why hire me it's not just a box to check. Yeah. Yeah. I've gotten into this. Because my mother has always told me like be which you needed when you were younger, and I always take that with me, I used to have all these high fashion, a tutorial on my walls, and my mom just used to complain that there's no black people, and I'm like, well there there was no like high fashion super editorials, and she was like, no you need to like look all this history. And so she started taking me to ebony fashion fair, they used home invasion show with all these amazing designers. And exposing me to the parts of high fashion that intersected was black culture, and I really got into it. Because I was like this is the kind of work that I wanna make and I want to make more work that speaks to me and makes me feel included and part of it so Lindsey you now have a position of power. Tell us about it. I'm now officially editor in chief of teen vogue if -gratulations thank you. It's the first brand that I interned first brand that I worked at. So it is a huge full circle moment. I was there when I was seventeen learning out. So I I know and I have videos and photos, and they are they're saying, I look a hothead, and it's it's a miracle. They've even hired me. Because look these pictures you like this person does know how what are you wearing? Yeah. But yeah, I mean, it's a little surreal because I just know that this kind of decision means a lot. Yeah. When I wrote black in fashion at the end of it. I was like man, it would be really cool if some of these things change change in my own career happened. And it's it's weird. It's wild I'm excited. But I know that with bigger titles, obviously comes bigger responsibility. But I'm I'm equip, I'm ready. I know that I am. So let's go.

senior staff teen vogue Lindsey editor in chief
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on RuPaul: What's The Tee? with Michelle Visage

"The wonderful entrepreneur visionary younis johnson of ebony fashion fear who created this tour and she collected all the beautiful clothes from all over the world and and she went to the collections in france and lagleyze couldn't go to the collections and they let her in and she was spinning bukku a lot of money on those collections she brought them back put them on us girls i walked for her up there that day and she said miss cleveland we love you can you come to our show well raw of fifteen years old i took my mother along as chaperon and we got in that greyhound bus with all those fabulous close from europe the good tour and to us seven other models and we toured america and that's what happened in between i did the ebony fashion fair and i learned how to walk to jazz my first show is in new jersey newark new jersey and it was on the top of tables i had to walk in the top of these tables and he pushed them together like it was a runway and there was one spotlight and i fell in love god was in the spot uh and i said i i finally have a place where i feel comfortable and i can walk here and we're beautiful clothes and walmart as a girl want to earn you burn moving forward over overseas anat runway of life got okay so let me just go straight okay so the carry donovan's secretary or assistant gave you the court did you go up to vogue after that uh your occurrence know what happened right away so i got back into school and i went to this arts school and i mean why didn't you what what kept you from saying oh i'm gonna go up here and while check this out well what happened was they gave me a call.

younis johnson france cleveland america walmart donovan secretary europe newark fifteen years
"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"ebony fashion fair" Discussed on KCRW

"Arson move turn to south dakota to family friends and the mother whipped coming down oh but she lived with the scot family who were caterers and that was not uncommon all over doing that the period after the civil war has black's moved north and west and it was not uncommon to have stab beal is caterers and to go into two wonderful hotel food and picnic food in reunion food and dinners for church's and she fell in love with all things colin airy i working with the family this filling that she corrupt went the scot did they cater for white families or for other african americans families for white families a farm get in catered and made these amazing dishes just to put this in a time perspective we should say that credo was born in ninety now nine one in nineteen o nine and what does her seminole work still is such an an amazing women but she wrote a couple that was to me and amazing couple called the date with a dish and she about the book and nineteen forty eight i actually went and spent two weeks researching the places should been him going back to find some of the things that might be left behind she was in south dakota she spent time in omaha she spent time all around the midwest in missouri and then moved to harlem and then came to chicago where she became the first food editor for anthony magazine but she also was the person who founded the ebony fashion fair but this but kate with the gestures fascinating to me because as soon as i heard you speak i of course ran home and where to try and bias first edition and and i actually had it for three seconds before somebody stepped in and took away from me why oh yeah they're hard to get and i understand that the subsequent editions.

south dakota civil war beal omaha missouri food editor anthony magazine Arson african americans harlem chicago kate three seconds two weeks