35 Burst results for "Ebola"

Africa detecting just 1 in 7 COVID-19 cases, says WHO study

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

Africa detecting just 1 in 7 COVID-19 cases, says WHO study

"A World Health Organization study finds only one in seven cobit nineteen infections in Africa are being detected since the start of the outbreak Africa has reported more than seven million cases of code that nineteen and over two hundred thousand deaths a new WHO's study found that only one in seven infections are being detected end of your travel could bring a surge in cases Dr masterpiece of already is that world health organization's Africa regional director she says more accurate numbers of infections are needed to better curb transmission she says the U. N. plans to increase rapid diagnostic testing in eight African countries the initiative would test people who might be a symptomatic based on a ring strategy that was used against smallpox and Ebola you will target people living within a one hundred metre radius around new confirmed cases I'm Jennifer king

Africa World Health Organization Ebola Smallpox Jennifer King
"ebola" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

04:01 min | Last month

"ebola" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"It the way i did it. And yeah now we go for for for the for the last flight on wednesday. I hope that there will be more possible. Then on ebola enjoy provision acting from the site But that's a nice. I'm really looking forward to it and looking forward to the new things that will come so i'm really curious. Hold a second part of my life would be. When did you make the decision. A gradual thing or was there any particular moment you mentioned crashes and you've terrible crashes.

ebola
Liz Wheeler Suggests the Fear Porn Over Coronavirus Is out of Control

The Dan Bongino Show

01:37 min | Last month

Liz Wheeler Suggests the Fear Porn Over Coronavirus Is out of Control

"So, Mr. Let's start first on the coronavirus Fear porn, which has gotten quite grotesque. You know, I've been doing cable commentary for a while, and I remember again or in Ebola and H one n one. You know, the whole thing was Don't panic. We'll figure it out. Science will get us through it. And if we don't come up with some vaccine will learn to live with it. The whole thing was don't panic, and then Donald Trump came into office. The left figured out it could use coronavirus as a political weapon, and they did. And that is real consequences, Liz. I mean, we're seeing this now in this Atlantic story that upwards of 50% of people who are hospitalized were hospitalized for mild or asymptomatic cases, which means some of them probably thought they were going to die because the media told them they were going to die, even though they were mild or asymptomatic. Yeah, it's horrifying. I mean, the primary difference between how the political establishment has handled covid versus h one N one or Ebola, As we were told in no uncertain terms during each one and one and Ebola that we are Americans and we keep going. We keep living our normal lives. Do not stop. Do not do not fear. And now we're being told the opposite. We're being told. You know that you're basically a virus. You're not a person. You're a pathogen, and you have to wear a mask it to dehumanize yourself, because that's more important than anything else. It's really I mean, it's not the politics. This is a Marxist tactic as a marketing tactic. These radical leftists have been wanting for a long time to undermine our institutions here in our country and impose Marxism on the American people. They realize that if they declare an emergency, whether or not it truly is, if they declare an emergency people will fear and in their fear it will be willing to turn over their rights and liberties for the government. And so since the American people unfortunately have done so in the past year and a half the government certainly not going to stop. They're going to keep pushing the American people until One of these days, the American people hopefully you're going to say Enough is enough. We're giving, you know more power, and we're taking back. All right.

Ebola Mr. Let Donald Trump LIZ Atlantic
The Fear Mongering Seen Today by Biden and the Media Over COVID

The Dan Bongino Show

01:56 min | Last month

The Fear Mongering Seen Today by Biden and the Media Over COVID

"With Fox and I went on a network and I'm going to say where. But I remember doing a segment on He bother Ebola virus. Remember Ebola when we had a case that was in Texas, right, Jim that the Ebola case was, Yeah, I was in Texas. And I specifically remember one of the bookers at the network saying, Hey, listen, You know it was if I needed to be told this, but they were like, you know, let's stay calm. Let's see if I was going to go on the air. Everyone's gonna die like I don't do. That's not my bag of donuts, you know? But I remember that that was, but they even scolded and chastised Joe Biden when Joe Biden remember was at the outbreak of Was it H one n one. Or remember that where Joe Biden went and said, Don't fly on planes. It's recycled there And then, Um, Obama's press secretary, Jay Carney, comes out here. Then they actually made him look like it is there like, please don't listen to the vice president. He's a moron, all right. They didn't say that. Exactly. But trust me, that's exactly what they were saying. No, I'm serious. I know this is hard to digest now, because you're like, Wait. Now it's completely different. Biden and everybody else Where a mask. Fauci panic all the time. The media we gotta panic. Everybody is dying, right? You can't even remember a time with Ebola and H one n one and even HIV back in the eighties, I was alive for that. So it's Jim. So it was Mike. I remember that was a virus with a 100% fatality rate back then. One of everybody who got it essentially died. Coronavirus for healthy young people has like a 1 to 2% tops for younger folks. Fatality rate HIV had a 100% fatality rate. And in the beginning, nobody knew how it was spread. It took a while for them to figure it out. It was sexually transmitted And folks even back then the panic wasn't like it is now. Think about that at 100% fatality rate. I remember

Ebola Joe Biden Texas JIM Jay Carney FOX Fauci Biden Barack Obama HIV Mike
Guinea Reports West Africa's First Known Marburg Virus Death

BBC Newsday

01:49 min | 2 months ago

Guinea Reports West Africa's First Known Marburg Virus Death

"Authorities in Guinea have confirmed death from the Marburg virus, the first case ever found in West Africa. It's a fever with very, very high fatality rates, which causes sufferers to bleed to death. The person's contacts have been traced to being monitored, and we can speak to Dr Patrick, a bulk of the World Health Organization who joins us down the line from Brazzaville. Something a surprise in the sense it's the first time this has been found in West Africa. What do we know about this specific? Case and somewhere near Gueckedou in Guinea, I believe Okay. Thank you. Thank you so much. And thank you for having me. As you clearly say, This is the first time Guinea we were seeing a case of mobile in West Africa. The kids in points and index gets well. Was reported on some of the patient who is for the six years old who reported with the high grade fever, bleeding of the gums, cheeks. And Unfortunately, the patient died two days after attending being attended to in the hospital. Samples were taken from this location confirmed for mobile in within the simple security in southern Kettle. Further secondary confirmation of that the country is not sure every name Conakry but also in the car yesterday. So these kids to pastor is that right? That's right, at least in that the kids with one probable case that is the wife so far we are following up the boat, so one for the six contact And, uh, Essentially happening in the same location where we just concluded containing the Ebola, um, right visit two months

West Africa Guinea Dr Patrick Gueckedou Marburg Fever Brazzaville World Health Organization Conakry Ebola
CDC Warns That 'War Has Changed' With Variant Now Infecting Vaccinated People

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 3 months ago

CDC Warns That 'War Has Changed' With Variant Now Infecting Vaccinated People

"Highly infectious is the answer in internal documents from the C D. C documents obtained by The Washington Post appear to be talking points for the CDC to use and explaining the variance. Danger, including the line acknowledge of the war has changed. Note. The delta variant causes infections more contagious than the flu, small parks and Ebola and as infectious as chickenpox, the documents say. Since January, people who were infected after vaccination had made up an increasing portion of hospitalizations and in hospital deaths among those with Covid 19. While emphasizing the vaccines are still highly effective, and that breakthrough infections are uncommon. Soccer Megane Washington and we'll talk more about this in

The Washington Post CDC Ebola Chickenpox Covid FLU Soccer Washington
COVID-19 Pandemic Was 'A Preventable Disaster,' WHO-Ordered Report Says

AM

00:32 sec | 5 months ago

COVID-19 Pandemic Was 'A Preventable Disaster,' WHO-Ordered Report Says

"An independent review panel established by the World Health Organization has sounded. The Corona virus pandemic was preventable. The group has placed some of the blame on the W Hy chou it saying it should have declared a global emergency earlier than it did. Dr. Joanne Liu is one of the 13 panel members who contributed to the report. She says the world was not prepared for the pandemic. Would basically fail to learn from all the other warning. We got from Saurus off H one n one of from Zika or Ebola in the last few years.

Hy Chou Dr. Joanne Liu World Health Organization Ebola
Carl Zimmer on Defining Life

The Book Review

02:50 min | 7 months ago

Carl Zimmer on Defining Life

"Carl. Zimmer joins us now. He is a columnist for the new york times and he is the author of many books. He was last on the podcast for his book. She has her mother's laugh. His new book is called. Life's edge the search for what it means to be alive. Carl thanks for being here. Thanks for having me all right so right now. You're kinda busy. You've been reporting on corona virus for the times. What is that leg. It's kind of overwhelming You know i am kind of startled that you know the whole world wants to read what we at. The scientists have to write about. You know this virus. But i will remember this experience of the past year for the rest of my life really. It's been exceptional as a as a moment in science journalism as a science journalist. Is this an area that you had been looking at for years and years. Were you especially interested in epidemiology or was this sort of switching gears for you. I've had a obsession with viruses for a long time. I'm actually wrote a book called the planet of viruses a few years ago. So you know. I've reported on ebola and influenza over the years of have done the virus thing. And so you know i i felt like well i can bring my experience to bear on this and and so basically it just started doing the same kind of reporting about this virus but now of course this is a virus that was causing a kind of pandemic that we have not seen for one hundred years. You're not the only journalist covering this pandemic obviously not even the only journalists covering this pandemic on the scientists at the times. How do you all kind of divide it up. Do you have an area in particular that you are looking at specifically yet. None of us can do this alone absolutely and we have to really roll with the punches. You know i was focusing a lot on vaccines for example in the fall overseeing our tracker and then we started to to see these variants were popping up. Then we're of serious concern so i basically had to carve out some time to work on variants but mental really. My colleague has also been writing about various. Like crazy and ben muller and we actually have several people who who just try to keep up with the variants. You know and and there are other people who are handling the store. All the stories of vaccine distribution geopolitics and long cova. There be other people handling that. It's it's such an enormous story. What about it most interest you personally. Well i'm most interested in in The pandemic ending besides that that and not being sick. Yes yeah is unsettling jim how this pandemic has played out exactly. As scientists had warned it would

Zimmer The New York Times Carl Ebola Influenza Ben Muller JIM
"ebola" Discussed on Shock Wave News

Shock Wave News

03:02 min | 7 months ago

"ebola" Discussed on Shock Wave News

"Com more than sixty. Travelers are being monitored for ebola and three states. So i hope that's gonna wake you up here. Let's go more than sixty. Travelers in three states are certainly being monitored for possible infection with the ebola virus twenty three individuals from washington state or under survey ship for the pathogen alongside forty five people in ohio and four people in the state of oregon. Despite ongoing observation of these people health authorities have insisted that the risk of ebola entering the country or excuse me Yeah entering the country is extremely low on march twenty fifth department of state or d. o. h. r. washington department of state health Said that the twenty three Low risk individuals came from new guinea and The democratic republic of congo some regions in two counties located in our country's skews me located in west africa there currently experiencing ebola outbreaks. It was added that local public health officials in the state have been in contact with the twenty three people who will be observed for twenty one days following their arrival in the country meanwhile the columbus dispatch reported march. Twenty six that just a couple of days ago. That forty-five people in ohio are currently being observed for the ebola symptoms. According to the respective spokespersons columbus public health is helping monitor forty two individuals while franklin county public health is keeping tabs on three people. Franklin county health spokes were spokeswoman. Mitzi klein told the outlet that through an email that monitoring people who have traveled Through outbreak stricken areas common practice. She added this is. This isn't the first time we monitor people like this. In this case it is a public health Prevention matt messenger and we assure to prevent local cases also on march twenty fifth oregon health authority or c. h. a. said four people in the state are being monitored for the disease the local nbc affiliate k. g. w. eight reported that the state's health agency did not say where the individuals are located the oh. Ha chief medical officer. Richard leman said we wanna make sure these individuals have the support. They need to monitor health to stay in contact with public health officials and get help with medical services if it comes to that.

Richard leman ohio Mitzi klein washington forty five people four people twenty one days twenty three people three states forty two individuals twenty three individuals three people west africa twenty three march forty-five people more than sixty new guinea Franklin two counties
Man's Ebola Relapse Spawned Dozens of New Cases in Africa

The Dan Proft Show

00:41 sec | 7 months ago

Man's Ebola Relapse Spawned Dozens of New Cases in Africa

"Vans. Ebola's relapse spawned dozens of new cases in Africa a 25 year old motorcycle taxi driver and the Democratic Republic of Congo who developed Ebola's despite receiving a vaccine recovered but had a relapse nearly six months later, leading to 91 new cases before he died, The New England Journal of Medicine published to details of the case Wednesday. The report is new evidence that Ebola can lurk in the body long after symptoms are no longer evident gene tests in the man showed Virus from his new illness was nearly identical to his original infection, meaning he experienced a relapse. Not a new infection. Tests showed he spread the virus to 29 others, and they spread it to 62 more

Ebola The New England Journal Of Med Democratic Republic Of Congo Africa
Man's Ebola relapse spawned dozens of new cases in Africa

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 7 months ago

Man's Ebola relapse spawned dozens of new cases in Africa

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting a man's Ebola relapse spawned dozens of new cases in Africa a twenty five year old motorcycle taxi driver in the Democratic Republic of Congo who developed Ebola despite receiving a vaccine recovered but had a relapse nearly six months later leading to ninety one new cases before he died the New England journal of medicine published the details of the case Wednesday the report is new evidence that Ebola can lurk in the body long after symptoms are no longer evident gene tests in the man showed the virus from his new illness was nearly identical to his original infection meeting he experienced a relapse not a new infection tests showed he spread the virus to twenty nine others and they spread it to sixty two more people hi Mike Rossio

Ebola Mike Rossi Democratic Republic Of Congo New England Journal Of Medicin Africa Mike Rossio
Washington state officials monitoring 23 people for Ebola following travel to countries with outbreaks

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:37 sec | 7 months ago

Washington state officials monitoring 23 people for Ebola following travel to countries with outbreaks

"23 people who recently traveled to Guinea and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Como's Frank Lindsay tells us why regions of these countries are currently experiencing rebel a outbreaks. But the Washington State Department of Health Says there is a low risk for people of our state health officials have been in contact with the individuals who will be monitored for 21. Days after their arrival in Washington, the Department of Health says the risk of getting Ebola's virus here in the U. S is very low. People can get Ebola's through direct contact with a person or animal infected with the virus. Oregon health officials are monitoring at least four people who recently visited those same regions. Frank

Frank Lindsay Washington State Department Of Democratic Republic Of Congo Como Guinea Ebola's Virus Department Of Health Ebola U. Washington Oregon Frank
Washington state officials monitoring 23 people for Ebola

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:37 sec | 7 months ago

Washington state officials monitoring 23 people for Ebola

"Washington health officials are monitoring 23 people who recently traveled to Guinea and Democratic Republic of the Congo call most Franklin's. He tells us why regions of these countries are currently experiencing a bolo outbreaks. But the Washington State Department of Health Says there is a low risk for people of our state health officials have been in contact with the individuals who will be monitored for 21. Days after their arrival in Washington, the Department of Health says the risk of getting Ebola's virus here in the U. S is very low. People can get Ebola's through direct contact with a person or animal infected with the virus. Oregon health officials are monitoring at least four people who recently visited those same regions.

Washington State Department Of Democratic Republic Washington Guinea Congo Franklin Ebola's Virus Department Of Health Ebola U. Oregon
Oregon health officials monitoring 4 people for Ebola

Buck Sexton

00:33 sec | 7 months ago

Oregon health officials monitoring 4 people for Ebola

"For people who may have been exposed to the Ebola virus. Public health officials are considering the individuals as persons under monitoring while they assess the potential health risk before recently visited the West African countries of Guinea and the Democratic Republic of the Congo regions in both of those countries have earned level three travel warnings from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention because of Ebola outbreaks. While stating there is a low risk for people in Oregon. The O H A will continue to monitor the individuals to ensure their safety as well as the safety of their families, and the community at large to 17 year olds

Ebola Democratic Republic Of The Con Guinea Center For Disease Control And Oregon
2021 Ford F-150 Police Responder Pickup Claims 120-MPH Top Speed

Cronin Agency

00:41 sec | 7 months ago

2021 Ford F-150 Police Responder Pickup Claims 120-MPH Top Speed

"F 1 50 police responded today. The only pursuit pickup truck available in addition to a top speed of 120, the new F 1 50 pursuit pickup can ID let a crime scene without fear of a criminal driving it away? Greg Ebola's the Ford Police brand manager and calls it police engine idle, and this allows officers to remove the key from ignition. Exit the vehicle securely in locket but still allow the vehicle to remain running the power lights, radios onboard equipment. Some of that stuff that you know officers need if they're on the scene of a crime. It also has an optional 360 degree camera package that provides a bird's eye view all around the police responder.

Greg Ebola Ford Police
For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

Part Time Genius

08:48 min | 7 months ago

For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

"Healthcare reporter at The Wall Street Journal. X for joining us, Peter Thanks for having me on Lot is being made right now about the vaccines were obviously going through the rollout. Things are ramping up. But, you know, I really have found very fascinating. The story of how these vaccines have come to be in the new technologies that were using. Obviously, the Fizer and Moderna vaccines are using this M or in a technology. We've never had a vaccine that has been approved before. And Johnson and Johnson, the new one that just got approved. They also are using new technology. There's is a little different. It's called viral vector technology. You know, these brand new things are showing a lot of promise and big hopes for Writing, you know, infections in the future, other pandemics, just other diseases. There's a lot of potential with all of these. So, Peter, tell us a little bit about your reporting on this. You know, Vaccines have been around for a couple 100 years, and for most of that time they used sort of tried and true method of making them and a lot of cases. That meant Taking part of the virus of the pathogen that you want to try to protect against. And using it in the vaccine itself to deliver that into the body to induce an immune response. And so those air still in use, But there have been efforts over the past few decades. Find new ways to make vaccines and the pandemic has really brought that out in the sense that, you know, even though some of these technologies were years in the making this pandemic has sort of been there moment to actually deliver, if not for the very first time, then In the biggest way possible for that. Vaccine technology and so As you mentioned the first couple vaccines used this messenger RNA technology and this Johnson and Johnson, one uses a viral vector technology and they're both Newer ways of making vaccines, and they both involved. Essentially delivering the genetic code and genetic instructions that tell the body to do certain things to induce the an immune response rather than deliver. The actual virus into the body that you're trying to fight against. We've talked about the M R D vaccines for a bit now only because they were approved first from Fizer, Moderna, Johnson and Johnson, as I mentioned recently approved They're using this viral vector technology. Tell us a little bit more about that. It's different from the old ways as you were describing, but they still use a virus that they kind of readjust to help do this. So how does the viral vector stuff work? There. That's a good point, because I don't want to mislead people to think that there's no viral material in these viral vector event vaccines, But the difference is that you're using a virus that has Essentially nothing to do with the disease You're trying to combat and the general concept for these viral vector vaccines is to take one harmless virus and to use it against more deadly virus. And so in the case of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine A couple others. They're out there for cove is like the one from AstraZeneca and University of Oxford is to take something called it in a dental virus, which is Relatively harmless virus that can cause common colds or conjunctivitis. And to tweak it in such a way so that if it's injected into your body, it's not going to cause disease is not going to cause the coldest fellow certainly not going to cause coverted. It serves as sort of a carrier, and it's modified in a way so that it actually then carries Edna that tells the body's cells. Make this spike protein that found on the surface of the coronavirus finding that right virus of such an interesting part of this story, Johnson and Johnson decided they were going to go this route. Viral vector technology, and they had to be on the hunt or the right virus because there was also concerns. You know you're using viral material. What if you build up an immunity to that specific virus, then could you build up an immunity to the vaccine itself? So they were on the hunt for a very specific one to use as well. That question of whether this viral vector or this sort of carrier that makes up the vaccine is going toe compose an issue and so in the past there have been in is where that's been a problem. And I think it's not been entirely solved. And so in the past, the problem was that when they tried using one of these dental viruses to be the sort of carrier in the vaccine in people who had pre existing immunity to that identify Iris that this common cold virus it's sort of interfered with The effectiveness of the vaccine against various diseases. And so what Johnson and Johnson had to do was sort of figure out. Okay, Well, we need to pick the right carrier that the right dental virus and you know, ideally one that is just not that common out in the world so that not as many people have pre existing immunity to it. But even the people who do have preexisting immunity to it. Maybe it's not going to be such a strong immune response against the carrier that would interfere with the underlying vaccine is trying to do Tell me a little bit more about Johnson and Johnson and the company. You know how they got into this because my understanding I'm obviously we know Johnson and Johnson for a myriad of products, but they're fairly new to the vaccine game. And they didn't achieve a little bit of success with an Ebola vaccine using this viral vector technology also, so you know how did that work out for them? And then obviously they transition into working on the covert virus. He's got the world well known brands that you alluded to band aid baby powder, and they've long had a very strong prescription drug business. So drugs like Remedy Cade that that treat people who are already sick and then there are major player but they've not been a major player in vaccines. And so about 10 years ago, they decided they wanted to get into vaccines. More so they bought this Such a biotechnology company called Crew Cell, and that's really where this viral vector technology came from that JJ is using, and so they kind of spent. Several years just designing vaccines against various infectious diseases and then running them through the regular series of tests, So this would be things like Ebola. Enrica. Then they were able to start testing they rebel a vaccine using this sector technology in Africa after I think first after that, the really big outbreak in West Africa five or six years ago and then more recently In the Congo, where there was another outbreak, and so they went through the whole series of studies for that vaccine, and then eventually got European Commission approval for it in the middle of last year. So now they do have this sort of platform that Could work not only against over 19 but also against Ebola's and then potentially additional infectious diseases the night in fact, they even have the vaccine and development for HIV, which is sort of been this Notoriously difficult virus to target in the form of a vaccine. I mean, it's so interesting how far we've come. How much we've learned about the human body so much so that you know we're hacking the genetic software. You know of the body to produce these things. You know all these insights into the immune system that we've gained have led us to this stuff. So what's the promise for these things Like, you know, what can we expect? I know they're working on Vaccines for other diseases. Gene therapies, There's a lot of promise with us Yeah, And it's in a way. It's sort of the convergence of a couple different strains that have been going on in pharmaceutical research and academic research. And that is The genetic revolution on the one hand, but also immunology, and that's immunology is kind of feeding into both. Vaccines to prevent disease but also ah, whole new class of drugs to treat disease by in some way affecting the immune system. And so I mean, there are people that Infectious disease experts who say that this is really the golden Age of vaccine ology that these advances kind of signal that and think that it really shows that there's promised to really target a lot of Other infectious diseases. And in the case of Ah, big emerging outbreak like we've seen To do it in a way that is really quick and can actually Have in effect in actually stemming of pandemic. While it's under way, you know, rather than just developed paintings and the normal timeline of many years that the pharmaceutical industry is used to Yeah, And in the

Johnson Moderna Peter Thanks Fizer The Wall Street Journal Ebola Astrazeneca University Of Oxford Conjunctivitis Colds Crew Cell Edna Peter Enrica Ebola's Cade West Africa Congo European Commission Africa
1,600 vaccinated in Guinea

UN News

01:18 min | 8 months ago

1,600 vaccinated in Guinea

"More than sixteen hundred people have received ebola virus vaccinations in guinea where four have died in a new outbreak but more life saving jobs are needed to contain it the u. n. health agency has said to date eighteen. Ebola cases have been reported in the west african nation. Fourteen confirmed and four deaths according to the world health organization. Who only thirty thousand ebola. Vaccines are available out of a global stock of half a million a ring. Vaccination strategy has been employed to inhibit these spread of disease by vaccinating. Only those most likely to be infected but there are concerns that if ebola spreads outside guinea which shares a border with six other countries. they're only limited stocks of vaccines to respond his doctor. Ibrahima four assistant director general of. Who's emergency response. Unit millions that you're letting the context of cases the context of context context so this saturday. You are able to control the stables outbreak but in the future really more sis guineas last. Ebola outbreak started in two thousand fourteen and quickly spread to liberia sierra leone. It was the deadliest ebola outbreak since the virus was first detected in nineteen seventy six with twenty eight thousand cases and eleven thousand deaths

Ebola Guinea Ibrahima World Health Organization Liberia Sierra Leone
U.S. to implement Ebola monitoring program at airports

Steve Sanchez

00:55 sec | 8 months ago

U.S. to implement Ebola monitoring program at airports

"For enhanced airport screenings for Ebola's Okay. Yes, Hear me. For a moment. The bite administration is moving forward right now, with plans to screen airline passengers from two African countries. Okay, arriving in the United States for Ebola. Okay, They're doing this now. The Department of Homeland Security is saying under the plan passengers were going to come in from, you know, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Guinea and and and literally They're going to be screaming because what's happened is they have and this was on February 17. The WHO, where we're now part of again. Reported a cluster of Ebola's cases. Okay, breaking out out of the seven reported cases, Five people died and two are in isolation right now in health care facilities. Okay. Follow me for a moment. The on

Ebola Department Of Homeland Securit Democratic Republic Of The Con Ebola's Guinea United States
New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

UN News

00:50 sec | 8 months ago

New Ebola Outbreak Declared in Guinea

"The un world health organization. Who thursday that. There's a very high risk of the ebola virus spreading in guinea after. An outbreak was announced last sunday in an update. Whol said that its concern was based on the unknown size duration and origin of the outbreak. It has led to five deaths so far in the southern region of missouri corey which borders sierra leone liberia and cote d'ivoire the first confirmed victim was a nurse from rural health center. He was initially diagnosed with typhoid and malaria. While her known contacts include a traditional healer and their family are potentially a large number of others and limited capacity to respond cautioned the agency guinea was one of the three most affected countries in the two thousand fourteen to two thousand sixteen west africa ebola outbreak which was the largest since the virus was first discovered in nineteen seventy six

Whol Missouri Corey Ebola Rural Health Center Guinea UN Sierra Leone Cote Liberia Typhoid Malaria West Africa
Guinea declares Ebola epidemic, neighboring countries act

The World

00:16 sec | 8 months ago

Guinea declares Ebola epidemic, neighboring countries act

"A free for nearly five years, the government of Guinea in West Africa has announced a nebula epidemic you'll recall the Guinea was one of the country's worst affected by the Ebola's epidemic that lasted from 2014 to 2016. That epidemic killed more than 11,000 people. Now

Government Of Guinea West Africa Guinea Ebola
"ebola" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"ebola" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Suspect demanded the keys to the car at gunpoint, got inside but could not drive it. He then fired one shot in the air before running across the expressway, where he was captured by officers. The man and woman were not injured during the incident. Vaccine maker Pfizer says it's already in regular communication with President elect Joe Biden's transition team as part of ongoing efforts to keep all interested parties updated on its corona virus vaccine and its distribution. Spokeswoman Sharon Castillo says there's no room for politics in this process. She says they maintain ongoing communication with the Trump administration governors and leading lawmakers of both political parties in Congress. The biting team is part of that effort. This morning, Fizer announced more interim results from its ongoing Corona virus vaccine study suggesting that the shots are 95% effective. That the vaccine protects older people most at risk of dying from Cove in 19, the company is preparing within days to formally ask US regulators to allow emergency use of the vaccine. And the rebel A outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is over. The country's minister of health issued a statement with the World Health Organization announcing an end to the two year outbreak. The country had been battling its 11th. Ebola's epidemic at the same time is the Corona virus pandemic. During that time, there were 119 confirmed cases of Ebola. 75 recoveries and 55 deaths, The release said. No new cases have been reported in the past 48 hours, and now they hope to keep Pebble. A case is at zero WGN Sports The Cleveland Browns, replacing three players, including former Bears kicker Cody Parky on the cove in 19 list. The Browns have had to close their facility twice in the past six days to do contact tracing after receiving results of a positive test. And tonight is the first night of the NBA draft. Bulls have the fourth pick. Things.

Cleveland Browns Sharon Castillo Cove Ebola Joe Biden US Pfizer World Health Organization Congo Fizer Bulls NBA Congress WGN President Pebble Cody Parky Bears
"ebola" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

13:31 min | 1 year ago

"ebola" Discussed on Short Wave

"At the beginning of an epidemic, it's essential to discover the source of the disease. For scientists who do that work, it's extremely challenging and without risk to their own health. But the scientists who played an essential role in discovering bulla way back in nineteen, seventy six doesn't always get the credit he deserves in today's episode. We explore the history of a bowl and the consequences of scientific exploitation. It's part of our week of episodes here on the show celebrating and recognizing the contributions of black scientists enjoy. You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. Safai here with none other than NPR East Africa correspondent Ater, Peralta Hey there ater. Hey, Mattie, thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled. But I want to open with a quick question. Who discovered Ebola and do not Google it. First of all. How dare you asked me a question? I should definitely know the answer to, and don't and yeah I already, Google Bet. Came up was. A Belgian microbiologist, but I think you're about to tell me. There's more to this there. Absolutely, there always is right so. Cheated. What you probably saw is a bunch of white westerners like. Dr John Jack. Yembeh does not yeah. He was not one of the people that came up. Yes, so, he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo, but back in nineteen, seventy six, we embed. First doctor to. COLLECT ANY BOLA sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote, a lot of the history of people. Has Been Written? Without your name. Yes but. You know this <hes>. Yes it. Did Not quite. Today on the show correcting the record on a Bola, the story of Dr, John Jack Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing it's. To some in the medical community, it's a controversial move. Okay Ater, so we're talking about a Congolese Dr John, Shaq. And his role in discovering a bola. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa. He said we should start in. Hundred seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD microbiology at the Riga Institute in Belgium, and he could have stayed in Europe, but he decided to come back to Congo, but when I arrive via. The condition of work were not I had no lab have no. Mice for experimentation, so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah, it's tough to do lab work without a lab, you know. Without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen seventy-six. was sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak. <music>, it's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola, but no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever, and he goes to this local hospital, and he says he finds it completely empty. Why was nobody there? Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and people had died there. But in the morning when they heard Giambi was sent from the capital, the thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital, and we started seeing patients. So so, what's he seeing? When the patients come in, he was seeing. People who were very weak fever? They had headaches I started to <hes> to make the physical time. But at that time will have no gloves. And, of course he had to draw blood, but when I removed. They're the sit inch. Both continue to spread out. What I am to see these phenomenal. And also my fingers or with a bow. Wow. Yeah, so he says he he would wash his hands a lot, but really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah, definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's no gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on, and he was able to not get it in at this point. We MP he was startled. But then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village, also got sick with fever. All the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point me MBA was like. Oh, it's probably not those things. Yeah! I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different, so he. He convinced one none took back to Kinshasa with him. So what happens next? She died at a hospital a couple of days later, but he took blood samples, and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end that was Peter Piot. Who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium, the guy who turned up from Google search. Yeah. That's right, and so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit. The CDC in the US gets involved and the realize. This is a new virus that caused hemorragic. Call it Ebola. They name it after a river by the village where it was discovered. So, what you saw out in the field, the blood samples guide all of this plays a crucial role in the history of right. It was huge, but it's PR who gets the bulk of the credit for discovering all up and you can tell this bothers John Jock membe. If you don't recognize the work done in the field, I, it is not correct. <hes>, it is a team. You know it is a team. Pr Actually wrote a memoir no time to lose and he does mention. But just in passing as a bright scientist, whose constantly pestering him for more resources. Has talked about this well. Peter Pyatt, facetime video, so I got on the phone. He's now the director of the prestigious London, School of Hygiene and tropical medicine and I asked him if he felt at all responsible for writing. Out of his history of Ebola I think that's a comment, but my book less not an attempt to write than that's history of Boll and sold more. My personal experience is more biographies that sense. Was this kind of like an awkward conversation to have ater. Yeah I mean especially because he's Belgian and Belgium was the colonial power in Congo. Ultimately, he looks at it with a little bit of distant. That at the time African scientists they were simply excluded and white scientists parachuted in they took samples, wrote papers that were published in the West and they took all the credit he so he actually said he did. In that actually surprised me and I think. Part of the reason. I feel that he so comfortable. Talking about this is because he's in an academic setting. I think in universities across the world. Students are talking about privilege, so he seems like he is very comfortable having this conversation right now. I mean there's there's something very weird kind of about that coming from him right as a person who has admitted to taking part in exploitative science, absolutely and one of the good things is that he says that things are changing. We mbappe for example has received several international awards just recently for pioneering. The first effective treatment for Ebola reflects our stinky you. Say the politicians in global health in science, General. So okay. I want to ask you about the treatment in a minute, but to put it very bluntly. Have there actually been any concrete steps to try to change this power dynamic in the global health field? Because this is certainly not one of you know two stories. This is one of many many stories. There is I mean look. NBA has made a decision that many thought unthinkable leaving just a few years ago, he decided that all of the blood samples collected during this most recent Ebola. Epidemic will stay in Congo, so if anyone wants to study this outbreak, they will have to come to his institute. I bet that has ruffled some feathers though. I have I've heard from some American scientists. Who have privately expressed frustrations in the are really the ones who have led the way in studying Ebola, but peanut understands that decision when you think about how African scientists have been historically treated, and he says that Western scientists should just get over it. We have to wake up key things one. The world is changing too much endless Nah it's so weird to hear him say a matter of fairness, ater matter of fairness. Okay, so before we move on, tell me about the treatment that Mugabe worked on. So this is the thing that makes him smile right. We embiid calls it the most important achievement of his life, and it goes back to one thousand, nine, hundred, five during another equal outbreak in Congo. Eighty one percent of people infected with Ebola in this village were dying, and he wondered if antibodies developed bipolar survivors could be siphoned from their blood and used to treat new cases, so he gave sick patients transfusions of blood from a bowl of survivors. Too He injected Ebola patients with the blood of survivors. It vision. And seven survive, he says the medical establishment brought him off because he didn't have a control group. That's what they told him. But if this idea was accepted by scientists. We see a lot of life. Okay I mean to be fair. That is a really small group with no control among some other stuff. But on the other hand, it doesn't mean that he was wrong. You know that it should be totally dismissed, and maybe if more scientists looked into, it collaborated with him, maybe tried to replicate that data in some way, they could have learned something with him right because we now know that he was in fact correct about the antibodies. Yeah, I mean that's right in the context is important because I think what really eat set him. Is that maybe lots and lots of people could have been saved during the West. West Africa outbreak, which happened from two thousand, thirteen to two, thousand sixteen, and look just this year that science became the foundation of what is now proven to be the first effective treatment against the Bulla that is saving seventy percent of the people who are treated with amazing. Is He getting credit for that? At this point, he is yeah, absolutely okay, so how does look back on all of this week? What's what's his view on this is so he's he seventy seven, so he's obviously thinking about his legacy. One of the things that he told me is that he's always dreamed that big science could come out of Congo, and partly because of him, that's more likely happen. He got a commitment from Japan to build a state of the art research facility in Kinshasa and in the lab, just a few feet from his office where we talked US scientists were using advanced machines to sequence DNA of the Bulla samples <hes> that have to stay here in Congo Okay so moon bay, doctor and scientists who started in the Congo with no lab has a lab and is soon getting an even better one to do his work. Yeah, exactly, yeah, now I have my share. In. So I have my I have. A good subculture will bring joy. But he also has vice rate with micro biologist without Nice, I, asked myself that every day. And, so you know what he says, his biggest legacy won't be that. He helped to discovery or cure for it. It'll be if another young Congolese. Scientist finds himself with an interesting blood sample. He'll be able to investigate it

Giambi Kinshasa Google Ebola fever NPR Dr John Jack Congo Mattie typhoid Ater Yembeh Belgium Dr John Peralta Peter Piot Kenya Riga Institute in Belgium Bolla Institute for Tropical Medicin
"ebola" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"ebola" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"To treat Ebola didn't work so well against Ebola but in a lab it showed good antiviral activity against the other coronaviruses sars and mers also showing good activity in animals against those two viruses right now multiple countries huge international trials on going for a run death severe against covert nineteen and according to Dr Anthony Fauci the study released preliminary data from the NIH trial revealed that it has shown that it can block cove at nineteen right so we heard from Dr Fauci giving that good news but he also said there were some caveats they're always have the odds in science and me and it is so important to understand as we interpret and analyze and review data it's not a black or white situation so the theory as of right now are that yes run death severe has shown in these preliminary trials that it is safe and well tolerated in critically ill patients with COPD nineteen that's very important yes it absolutely needs more formal study and it may show different effects when it is combined with other medications or therapeutic options for these patients so all of that we still don't have a good grasp on at this point all right so what we need to learn well look as these continue because just as the good news from the NIH study came out there was opposing news out of China which actually showed Renda severe showed no significant benefits so ongoing we need to look deeper at this and I H. data that is very important we need to see if they can be given to less sick patients because remember this is given to patients in ICU settings so we want to see how it behaves if we give it to patients earlier in their disease and we need to see is there a clear survival benefit.

Ebola Dr Anthony Fauci COPD China Renda NIH
"ebola" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"ebola" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"On. We appreciate that on behalf of my colleague. I'll say that You know so far. We've seen the virus attack mostly countries that have fairly advanced health systems. But we're now seeing the virus spread to countries with weaker health systems including sub Saharan Africa. Where your organization? The one campaign focuses are there policies in place right now in in the developed world that might help these nations mitigate the damage of covert nineteen? There are But many of them are not as strong as they need to be. And I think the way to think about this as we see in our own communities and in our own country it is the most vulnerable people in any community country that are the hardest hit by this virus in. That's true globally so low countries. The African comment are going to be hit very very very hard now. There couple of things on the upside one is that Africa has over the last twenty years recorded. Most countries have recorded terrific gains in global health. Generally that's been manifest in three ways. Better results Better systems but also political leaders who pay attention to health. So they've got that. There is now an African Center for Disease Control that was established in twenty sixteen up and running in two thousand seventeen. Didn't exist when we had a Bulla. And there's the experience of the Abol epidemic. Now none of those are enough to withstand the kind of impact. We're likely to see if we based on what we've seen elsewhere so I think even while there are strong foundations to build on this is going to have a huge impact and particularly on the poorest people in countries. What steps do you think we should take to prepare for the next pandemic? What lessons should we take away from from this pandemic? Even though we're still in the middle of it are the thin grass should be learning. It's a great question because we gotta able to walk and Chew Gum at the same time. One of the things that came out of the Ebola epidemic in lessons learned was our launching. Something called the Global Health Security Agenda which still exists in the basic premise. If you imagine a global pandemic we need a net around the globe and if it's got holes in it were facing big problems. So how do you fill those holes by building? The capacity of countries everywhere to prevent detect and respond to global health threats. We were able to respond to the bullet epidemic in Liberia for example at the same time as we were building the capacity for laboratory testing because we needed for the emergency but they need it for the long term. So we're going to need to be making investments now even as we fight the virus in real time investing in that thing called global health security. The good part of this story is it's a lot cheaper than being unprepared for future epidemic Sir Pandemics So it's something you're you're absolutely right to ask. It's an investment. We need to be making now and we have done the analysis. We that's a bit Expanded for me to say. Experts have done the analysis on what exactly is needed in over one hundred countries to fill those gaps so it's a knowable thing to know what gaps. We need to fill well. The one campaign is preparing to launch a global health focused campaign to fight this current pandemic future ones. Can you tell us more about it? In how people can get involved with interested. Yeah going to go live later this week and we want to focus on a couple of things. The first is standing in solidarity with our community sets every one of us. That's being Washington that's you in Chicago. That's people wherever they may live around the world but the second part is we are advocates. And that's what we do. We mobilize and organize people to try to shape and influence decision-makers so big at the good decisions we need. We're going to be focused on the emergency response in its effect on people particularly in Africa on the economic impact. And what needs to happen to burn fat and last to focus on the item that we just talked about security so join us. We are one dot org and we'll go live later in the week and we'd to have because we all gotta fight win this together. That's Gal Smith. She's president and CEO of the One Campaign. She also served as the head of us. Aig was a member of the National Security Council. She joins us to discuss. The lessons. Learned from helping the Obama Administration deal with the two thousand fourteen if bowl outbreak. And how those lessons can help fight the covert nineteen pandemic Gal. Thanks so much for speaking with us. We appreciate it. Thank you so much. And that's Today's reset.

One Campaign Saharan Africa president and CEO Global Health Security Agenda Aig Liberia Chew Gum African Center for Disease Con Gal Smith Obama Administration Washington Chicago National Security Council
"ebola" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

12:58 min | 1 year ago

"ebola" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"The virus spreads through contact with fatherly fluids and is fatal in up to ninety percent of cases that was from a two thousand fourteen BBC report on the Abullah outbreak. In West Africa. It killed over eleven thousand people at the time. Gil Smith headed the US Agency for International Development or USA ID. Today Smith is president and CEO of the one campaign. It was co founded by Youtube Singer. Bono the NGOs stated mission is to end extreme poverty and preventable disease by twenty thirty Gal. Smith joins US now to discuss how the lessons learned from. The Ebola. Outbreak can help us in the fight against covert Nineteen Gal. Welcome to reset. Thanks so much for having me so first detail the origins and history of that Ebola outbreak. Well I was actually in the White House at the time. And we got word through Cdc IN USA ID that. There were cases of Ebola emerging in west Africa in what was then an outbreak. We also had some very effective NGOs on the ground that brought a lot of it to the world's attention and what we saw was that what certainly is an outbreak quickly. Escalated into an epidemic because the virus was highly contagious We didn't have all the systems. These are three countries in western Africa. That were hit headed just emerged for more So it spreads very quickly including when it went to urban centers then we had an epidemic on our hands and mounted a massive campaign an effort to get under control we importantly inclusive of hundreds and hundreds of African healthcare workers and others in the entire international community. What is it like to work at the White House when a global health crisis is happening? Or when you're forced into the center of it all helping the emergency response. The advantage we have uncertainly had been is that we've got agencies across the federal government filled with people who know a lot about these crises and bat. How To respond? So we were able to rely on obviously. Cdc The Department of Health and Human Services on USA ID on a host of experts across the government who knew both how you undertake emergency operations but also how you do it when you're dealing with lethal and highly contagious virus. So we're hearing twenty twenty We are in the midst of a pandemic now and when tru thoughts about the similarities. You see between the Ebola outbreak in twenty fourteen and what we're seeing now with Cova. Nineteen well I think there are a few differences. Obviously covert nineteen and the current virus have moved around the world and we can literally watch its progression from Asia through Europe North America parts of Latin America and coming soon. I think we're afraid in significant numbers in scope in Africa. So it's it's geographically. A much more far-reaching there for much more difficult problem. I think the ingredients of how we respond however are pretty much. The same we need led by science and facts. And that's actually an advantage. We've got epidemiologists working across borders all over the world that are new we need to think of Missouri Disease Detectives. They can tell what's going. Help inform what we need to do next so you need that you need a supply chain that can help make sure that health workers in frontline responders have everything they need to move quickly in West Africa. We actually did build a supply chain to provide p. p. e. which is now a term for protective gear. That's well known. I'm afraid we don't have that. Supply chain fully up and operating in many countries or globally. At this point the third thing you really need this community participation and I think we're seeing extraordinary things on that front with people standing up and following the guidance and last we need leadership and leadership which tells people the Truce Exude. Some confidence and again makes decisions based on the science of the facts. Those things pertain to any of these kinds of crises. What were some of the major lessons you learned from the Ebola response? The thing I keep thinking about and fought every day. Then is that if the viruses moving faster than we are then it's winning and we don't WanNa do anything that's a win for the virus right. We do everything we say. Every policy we should we consider should be with an eye towards. How can we defeat the virus? So I think that's number one. The second is that it really takes. Everybody globally everybody at the national level in our own country from the federal level to the states to locals and the fact is did we can't solve it in one place if we don't solve it every place and we've seen this. This virus moves around like crazy so I think another lesson and again we learned it. In West Africa's part of our aim was to prevent its spread out of those three countries to others. We did have some cases outside those borders but they were very very quickly contained. We've got to work globally. I think is the other key lesson I know it's hard because every country is focused on what's going on in that country now but we're going to need a global strategy to defeat global pandemic when you look at the response to the nineteen At the Federal Level. How individual states are responding? How well those lessons being heated? Well I think we're seeing some positive things I think the the lessons about communities being involved I think a lot of governors are stepping up in important ways. I don't think we yet have a national strategy that takes into account that governors and local officials have a lot of authorities need to use them to govern those areas that their elected to govern. But we've got knitted all together because again the virus doesn't pay attention to borders The supply chain needs to be managed with some regular order so that we can deploy resources where they're needed but also tracked the epidemiology track. The viruses were doing that so I think those things are quite knit together yet and it's my fervent hope that they will be very quickly handyman. So deeply involved with the ABOL outbreak. What is it like to now be on the outside of this pandemic looking and does that distance give you any new perspectives? Well this gives me new perspective but I will tell you it also. I'm kind of chocolate the bit. Sometimes I think working on the Ebola response was an extraordinary experience. I was able to do it with a team of extraordinary people and it was hard and it was different. It was exhausting but we were in a fight to win it. We're in it together. In that that mobilizes in west she thinks to being on the outside what I'm trying to do and what we're trying to. The one campaign is to fight the virus and fight for humidity. We need to get out there and make the case that all of us in were seeing so much of this need to support our communities. But we've also got to think globally and make sure that those parts of the world that are the most vulnerable to these kinds of external shocks are part of our global solutions. So that's what I'm trying to do. Take any less than I've learned injected into the mix where it can be helpful but to try to do my part as a citizen as an activist to knit this together. So that ultimately we've got a global response to what the global pandemic we'll speaking of lessons learned. I should mention you also served on the National Security Council and we leave the trump administration dismantled the NFC team charged with pandemic preparation. We we also learned from reports that the trump team ignore the NFC's pandemic playbook and that document provided some step by step priorities and protocols. What are some of your thoughts on on the decision to dismantle a team? That was actually designed to deal with just precisely this event. I can't speak to why they made that decision. I think it's unfortunate and I hope that one of the outcomes of this will be that both had sort of playbook and a crack team like that will be rebuilt. Both of those things were the product of a lot of experience of literally hundreds of people from hundreds of angles on this. Because again the response like this. You need all sorts of experts to come together and when we created that office. Part of it was the big fundamental lesson. We learned not just from a bullet but there is also Zeka. There was merged there is h one n one is these kinds of global health. Threats are going to continue throughout the future the US government needs to be ready to go and prepare to turn on Don and that doesn't matter whether it's democratic administration or a Republican Administration as the government does a nation. We need to be ready so I hope that those things will be restored because the intent there was just to ensure that all future administrations would be ready and could build on what we learned. You know when I take a step back and look at the global response to Cova at nineteen it. It occurs to me so many epidemiologists public health officials. I've spoken to over the years. Have said it's not an if it's a win right. We face a global pandemic and yet so many nations are caught scrambling to respond to this event. There seems to be a lack of global cooperation to address it. Do you have any insight into what the barrier is in thinking that if you hit something right on the head? Is that slack of global cooperation. I think one of the things we've seen over the last few years is the notion of global cooperation of multi-lateralism the UN all of these things. Either being sort of under assault or ignored and we've seen a lot of countries focused rightly on their own interest but wrongly exclusively on their own interest because we all exist in this world and so I think one of the things that has brought us to where we are now is that we have not been exercising the muscles of those institutions for some years now and we need to do that very quickly and I think that's a very very big part of it the second thing and this is you know this is something I think we all feel as individuals and all feel as citizens of particular countries. Everybody in the world is facing this emergency right at home. So it's hard sometimes to say we'll let me pause and look outside my borders and see what's going on elsewhere. I strongly believe we should do that as a matter of solidarity principle but we also need to do it as a matter of science and fact because again if we resolve this in the United States of other countries do and it's not resolved elsewhere. We're not done but I think your percent right that the global cooperation is just not where it needs to be guilt. You spent many years in Africa as a journalist before Regan working in in advocacy journalism and one of the crises for report has been getting accurate timely information about what's happening on the ground we've seen reporters expelled from China. What concerns do you have about some of the obstacles the press is facing when it comes to informing the public? Well I think there's some real challenges there and one of the key ingredients of a successful response is that you in the media have access and information can be part of sharing factual information with citizens all over the world. People urgently need that. They need to know what the facts are. And it's also it's reassuring to be hearing that sometimes people are not getting it from their governments. And so they're extra reliant upon the media and quite frankly it's also comforting oftentimes because you're also the ones that can tell stories about the acts of heroism. We so often see in these cases. I think it's a real problem. I think it part of any global strategy needs to include that. The world's media needs unfettered access to information and analysis. So that you can help tell the story because people people really need you right now by the way. We're all very grateful that you're up and running from your basements in your.

Ebola US West Africa Outbreak Africa Gil Smith White House Youtube Department of Health and Human president and CEO US Agency for International De BBC Cova Missouri Disease Detectives NFC
"ebola" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"ebola" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Ebola crisis well and that gave them a blueprint for dealing with corona virus Steve casting down your limited leading is getting drenched this morning and it's a wet weekend ahead for the northeast expect rain heavy at times in Washington New York and Philadelphia the storm will move north to Boston this afternoon snow and freezing rain possible in the interior of the northeast on Christopher crews are you paying too much for term life insurance there's a tremendous price war among the major term life companies rates have dropped dramatically in the past few years for example a man H. forty five non tobacco user one million dollars of coverage seventy five dollars per month level rate for the next ten years or a man H. fifty non tobacco can obtain five hundred thousand dollars of coverage for a monthly premium of only one hundred ten dollars per month guaranteed not to change for the next twenty years that's right level rate guaranteed not to change for the next twenty years if you're a smoker we have great rates available for you as well at turn busters we specialize in policies of five hundred thousand dollars and above if you're looking for new or replacement term life insurance call today for a quote at one eight hundred five six nine fifty four forty that's one eight hundred five six nine fifty four forty you're probably paying more than you should call term busters one eight hundred five six nine fifty four forty or visit our website at term busters dot net remember one eight hundred five six nine fifty four forty rates and availability may vary by state sample rate quotes based on preferred non tobacco underwriting exam required to qualify ABC traffic in transit good morning I'm Steve Michael seventy seven WABC traffic just got the all clear from the NYPD or the first stay here if you're on seventy seven WABC the Grand Central all lanes open little lake parkway out to be cross selling the traffic is still very.

Washington New York Boston Steve Michael NYPD Ebola Philadelphia WABC
"ebola" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:12 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ago the president of the Democratic Republic of Congo made a triumph in production the Ebola outbreak in Congo would be over by the end of this year then unidentified gunmen launched a series of attacks on health workers and now new infections are up to as high as twenty four a week and person read Eisenman reports doctor merry bustling Billy's there has been on the front lines of this outbreak for the World Health Organization as a field coordinator meeting some of the ground teams at identifying cases technique a contact is found herself in a lot of dangerous situations but she says none were as scary as the attacks that began on November twenty eighth it was about midnight we heard some gunshots armed men were storming her team's offices near the town of making a these were fighting them off Billy's there got a phone call from a colleague an outpost two hours away he told her we're also under attack and the gunmen have broken into our dormitories I was telling them these are stay where you are they own the the bad then he tells Belize air one of the Ebola respond hers a Congolese woman she's been shot while Bailey's there is on the phone with him this woman dies in his arms he starts sobbing was I mean tell you before because I did not do anything for him by morning a policeman and two more Congolese in boulder sponsors had been killed all Ebola responded for that area have been evacuated many to the city of Benny that's two hours drive from the closest place where Ebola is spreading to reach the furthest hot spot they are ferrying staff in by helicopter for a few hours at a time so they're still reaching the hot spots but not every day and it's been like this for more than three weeks there says this is unprecedented it has never been as difficult to because the before even though we have suffered some I thank but we didn't need it would be that it back with you our team she says the United Nations and its member states should be doing more to protect health workers the hostile twenty three out the U. N. has a peacekeeping force in the area and last may after an earlier spate of attacks on health workers the U. an appointed and emergency Ebola response coordinator to oversee all aspects of the response including security his name is David Grassley he says he's not working with Congress government to uncover who's behind the November attacks grisly says it's very possible the gunmen were hired or somehow in collaboration with individuals who are trying to undermine the Ebola response for economic gain there's a lot of money to be made off of this response I think it's more important to look at all of this is sort of criminal conspiracies rather than armed conflict in the meantime Chris he says it's clear Congo and the U. N. need to step up security measures Steve Morrison directs the global health policy arm of the Washington DC think tank center for strategic and International Studies we haven't had the kind of high level attention that's required Morrison says the larger reason this outbreak is still percolating is the continued in security and chaos in Congo and so it's really up to the U. N.'s member states to come up with an aggressive plan for restoring peace because this effort to stop Ebola we are really at the edge of collapse here and if that happens he says it will be a public health catastrophe you read Eisenman NPR news it is Friday morning which is when we hear from our series story corn and today we have the story of true Lana grew up on a farm in South Carolina fascinated by birds he became an engineer I lost track of his love for birds then story Cory told his friend John lane how we found its way back my grandfather began to build the farm in the nineteen twenties and my father saw it is the responsibility to stay on the home place he didn't leave the soil and I saw the land as my father's heart my grandmother she would stand on her front porch and she could holler literally from across the pastor across the holler that's what I always thought that holler men I felt as though it was the geographical playing going back and forth between my grandmother's house in my parents house I would stop to investigate whirligig Beatles and bobwhite quail were usually in some thick it somewhere along the way it might take me a couple of hours to walk that it seemed like a thousand miles how far literally was it less than a quarter of a mile once I left for college everybody said you're good at math and science to be an engineer make money drew so I tried that but hated every last moment of it dad was fifty two when he died there were arguments about what would happen on the land and I can remember coming back home all of these wonderful forests but I'd grown up in had been clear cut and losing that land was like losing my father all over again I remember leaving that day in driving up this dirt road then there's this prairie warbler that singing ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ ZZ three and it was the most hopeful thing for me I never believe that I should be an engineer I said I can't do this anymore went back to my apartment dark night of the soul we got a big bowl of Froot loops and thought about the next steps I remember first going out to study these eastern bluebirds them the work was often hot and long hours but there were these moments when I would look up and there would be flocks of bobolink swore the songs of meadow larks and taking the moment to realize that I was doing what I had always dreamed from a very early age I believe that I would be someone who who studied birds who somehow found a way to fly and so I would like to.

president Congo Ebola
"ebola" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Suggests that in some American town somewhere there would be an airborne very infectious form of Ebola and that we would cordon off this area now if you were on a board on a board of decision I very much like there was in an outbreak and you had to decide I mean you had real airborne Ebola and you had to decide whether to kill American citizens or to take your chances at trying to keep it isolated what kind of choice would you make well let me tell you that the US government actually does have contingency plans I can imagine LA tell you what they are please I think that the idea that that the armed forces or anybody would bomb in American town is inconceivable I don't think that's the way it would play out in reality instead I think what would happen is that you would have a Rolex doctors would show up and they would come out of the US military they also would be just practicing physicians who have a mission and they would go into the hot zone they would go into the town the town would be quarantined nobody would be allowed to leave but medical professionals with stream into the town and they would do what they could get the situation under control there might be huge casualties if the thing was highly contagious if a lot of people were infected I mean what we're talking about is the response to either a natural outbreak or a terror event it could be either way and these contingency plans are basically to ended the medical people if there's a large number of casualties then it might be necessary to set up military field hospital in which something known as reverse bio containment is practiced whereby the people who are sick an effective are put into ten or put into the military field hospital and the doctors and nurses would be wearing protective gear would be wearing space suits or breathing filter masks well they were treating patients so they would in effect they would buy a contain themselves away from the patient and I think what would happen is that eventually if the quarantine work that would be a good thing it might not work but remember that back in the nineteenth century when there was no such thing as an antibiotic the only thing that did work with quarantine in those days the United States public health service was actually a branch of the US military as it is today and the US public health service a tremendous power to go in there these officers in work in white uniforms would come and they would literally quarantine a community they would literally shut things down until the disease have passed all right Richard hold on we're at the bottom of the hour.

Ebola US military field hospital Richard
"ebola" Discussed on AP News

AP News

09:44 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on AP News

"The vaccine alliance Gabby was announced he would invest $178000000000 to create a global stockpile of about 0.5000000 Ebola vaccines a decision health officials say could help prevent future outbreaks from spiraling out of control they're similar stockpiles the vaccines against yellow fever meningitis and cholera limited shots all of the above the vaccine would be available to developing countries by W. H. show UNICEF the red cross and doctors without borders after receiving technical advice from others chose to live this month London

Gabby W. H. UNICEF London Ebola $178000000000
"ebola" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The lives of people with Ebola news that's reverberating in the Democratic Republic of Congo which is in the middle of a year long Ebola outbreak Helen brands well as one of our partners at stat the health medicine publication Helen doctors at Regeneron the company that produces this drug told you they knew they were on the right track with their shocked at the success how promising is this it looks really promising and it's obviously really exciting because for decades the world's had to responsible and it breaks without any drugs at all you know the best they could do was doctors could give a patient's fluids and try to to keep them comfortable but there wasn't really any kind of therapy to use and and now the studies suggesting that this drug could really improve people's chances of surviving especially if they start to get it early yeah well you spoke with Anthony Fauci doctor Anthony Fauci the director of the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases a well known name here in the US and he said it means that we do have now it looks like treatments for disease which not too long ago we really had no therapeutic approach to at all and he's crediting the doctor who first proposed using blood from a bowl of survivors right so doctors on truck Mandy who runs who sort of essentially doctor fetches counterpart in the Democratic Republic of the Congo DRC has had ten outbreaks more than any other country and so he has responded time and time again over the decades and back in nineteen ninety five I think there's a big outbreak in a place called Kikwit and he proposed using taking blood from people who had previously survived Ebola entrance for using it into a bowl of patients to see if it would help his theory was that they would contain antibodies that would help people find off the virus it's been who work in progress and and a bunch of different companies of tried to come up with something that would work in this approach and now it really looks like this Regeneron drug that you were mentioning which is kind of a based on that theory it may actually do the trick well and that's wonderful people are as you said no shocked and and excited about this but what are some concerns we know that there's so much distrust for instance in the DRC of aid workers and so how will this work going forward what people really hope is that the word will get out that a bowl is something that can be cured that if you go to a treatment center especially if you go to a treatment center quickly your chances of surviving are quite high because up until now people have associated treatment centers with places that only coffins emerge from if the new narrative can take hold if people start to believe that there is something that can be done for them perhaps they will show up and agree to be treated in which case one could start to see the death rate come down which in turn should really help with the trust problems at the outbreak response workers have been having but it's a big yeah you know it won't happen overnight people have to sort of come to conclude that these places are safe for them to go or to bring their loved ones too yeah well but still staying with the headline this clinical trial has shown that TU therapies from evil antibodies.

Ebola
"ebola" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on AP News

"The Ebola outbreak in Congo is one of the worst in history but is a piece that Donnie reports it's only now been declared an international health emergency declaration by the World Health Organization comes after the bolus spread into the Congo capital city Goma Dr Robert Stephanie's with the WHL this is still a regional emergency and by no way a global threat more than sixteen hundred people have died in Congo since August in the second deadliest Ebola outbreak in history director general doctor Ted draws on a non gap basis hopes the government of Congo doesn't over react closing borders would have disastrous consequences for their lives and livelihoods of the people who cross the border Congo's health minister resisted characterizing the outbreak as the help emergency I'm a Donahue hockey fans and autograph hounds be on the lookout if you've bought a Jersey with the signature of the Edmonton Oilers star Connor McDavid on it there's a good chance of the fake Edmonton police say Chandra nesting who's twenty three has been charged with forging McDavid signature on team jerseys and I'm selling them for big profits investigators say in April of twenty eighteen sing contacted several people on Facebook claiming he was employed by either the Edmonton Oilers entertainment group or program sports and was selling autographed McDavid jerseys it's believed he sold two items bearing bogus signatures to someone for fourteen hundred dollars than defrauded another person of twenty three thousand dollars or lose entertainment group exact him shipped him thanks fans for their support but stressed that this case is a good reminder for fans to always go to trusted sources schools near Notre dumb in Paris will undergo a deep cleaning after the cathedrals lead route melted away in last April's the French investigative site reported that lead levels at many schools were far higher than considered acceptable while Paris's health department denies this he did a particular care would be taken.

Congo Donnie World Health Organization Dr Robert Stephanie WHL Connor McDavid Facebook Paris Ebola director general Ted Donahue Edmonton Oilers Edmonton Chandra twenty three thousand dollars fourteen hundred dollars
"ebola" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Season, you say with Lawrence and shaima on the way, we have the sport. Also, we talk about Venezuela. We talked about the white rhino in Kenya. And whether the African white rhino, conservative and soy reporting on the Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. But also we hope to be speaking to a young protester in ALgeria about. What would satisfy her in the background there? Of course is prison. Ludovico running for yet. Another term in office protests in the street. What would make them go home? That's all coming up here on Tuesday. Let's start in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The country is battling the worst outbreak of Ebola in its history. And the second biggest in the world at least five hundred people have died and more than eight hundred have been infected no country in the world is more experienced in dealing with the disease. But this latest outbreak has proven challenging to control it hit an area that had never had Abela were armed groups operate and suspicious communities have been hostile to health workers in the first of four special reports, the BBC senior Africa correspondent and soy looks at the conditions that made the infection spread that fast. As we enter the hospital gating Benny the soles of shoes sprayed with disinfectant, and we wash our hands in chlorine wall. Nobody shakes hands here anymore. Is spread through.

Democratic Republic of Congo Ebola Venezuela Kenya Ludovico Lawrence ALgeria shaima Benny Abela Africa BBC
"ebola" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:56 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Julia blues you write a lot about this virus. What do we know about it? So we know it was discovered only in nineteen seventy six in the DRC. What was that? No one is I year the virus had started to spread in hospital there unbeknownst to the people who work there, including some nuns from Belgium and health officials thought it might be malaria or yellow fever, but the nuns and the other people infected we're developing really serious symptoms like hemorrhaging so health officials sent these specimens off to lob outside of Congo to ask for further analysis to figure out what what was making people sick. The researchers discovered that they're dealing with something entirely different. And they named the virus for river in the Congo. I mean, I know popular culture would lead us to believe this all has to do with like monkeys or something. But do we have any idea how this virus infects humans? Yes. We know what's zoonotic virus, which means it has an animal reservoir. So an animal that can live with the virus. And that sometimes makes the leap into human. So it spreads from that animal into people, and researchers aren't entirely sure what the animal reservoir for a bull is. But they think it's the fruit bat people in these areas eat fruit bats, and so I'll breaks can start when people eat a fruit bad and once makes the leap into humans. They're all these different ways that people can spread it around. And what do we know that it does the people now? So for most people Ebola strikes like the worst and most humiliating flu can imagine. So you have body aches and sweats people start vomiting and having uncontrollable diarrhea, they experienced dehydration. And when people die of Ebola, they typically die of multi system organ failure. Which means basically, they're organs start to be overtaken by the virus and shut down one by one essentially, the death rate is pretty variable depending on the outbreak. But it's typically I think between fifty and seventy percent how exactly has traveled since it was discovered. I guess in the seventies. I know you said it was it was basically in the DRC, formerly Zaire. And right now, we have an outbreak in the DRC, but has it moved across the region the country a lot since then so before twenty fourteen Bulla was typically showing up in central African countries. And in quite rural. And remote areas. And the thinking was that it didn't spread very far like people became so sick and solar wellm by the virus that they didn't move very far the virus. Outbreaks because they were in these rule remote areas were contained pretty quickly. But what happened in two thousand fourteen was it ended up showing up in this porous border region. The three countries that were most affected minimal boy, and it wasn't detected from any months, and then because you were you know, Africa like the rest of the world is urbanizing people are moving out of these rule in remote areas into cities and very large cities. And when you Bulla was introduced in this new context, that's when it spread like wildfire. And so I think those would be so central African countries. And then the west African countries would be the places where we've seen the most burden of illness from the disease. And then in two thousand fourteen with the major outbreak we saw like hysteria travel internationally right today. I wanna take a few minutes to speak with you directly. And clearly about Golam what we're doing about it. And what you need to know abundance of caution is a phrase that officials and administrators us very often. These days out of such abundance of caution woman was reportedly locked inside an airplane's bathroom after she vomited on a flight from Dallas, there's a serious disease, but we can't give into hysteria or fear. I remember it made it to a bowling alley in Brooklyn that was like two blocks from my apartment, the gutter lanes in Williamsburg Brooklyn is getting a good scrub down. This is where doctor Craig Spencer spent an evening out on Wednesday just hours before he presented with symptoms of the bone virus? Go to that bowling alley after not after. No. So you have your Bulla in an urban area where people. Are traveling to know there are cases in Spain. We had cases here in the US. So you could be sitting next to someone on a plane who has the virus and not know it because they're not showing symptoms yet and contract the virus and and spread it around more. But I have to say that is unlikely unless you're gonna make out with the person on the plane or share food with them and in two thousand fourteen when Abol made it outside of Africa and was hitting western Europe and the United States. There was this outsized reaction, there was hysteria. There was so much attention from the media was it warranted. Yes. And no, so yes, because it was the first time we'd seen any Bulla cases outside of the context of these isolated areas in central Africa. So people weren't used to having someone with Ebola at their bowling alley in Brooklyn, for example, and it's a serious disease. And that's scary on the other hand as we learned in two thousand fourteen it's not. Not as deadly in a context like the US. So things like kidney, dialysis antibiotics Ivy rehydration they help support people to survive the virus and with with our public health infrastructure. There's a very low likelihood we'd ever see anything like what we saw in west Africa. What's happening in DRC? Now.

DRC Ebola Bulla Brooklyn Congo Outbreaks United States hemorrhaging Africa Julia west Africa malaria Belgium vomiting fever Dallas
"ebola" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Remember that big Ebola outbreak in twenty fourteen the biggest outbreak of the virus ever. Well, A Bola is back. And this time it might be even harder to fight. Julia blues has been covering the story for vox since August. The DRC has been battling. What's now? The world's second largest Ebola outbreak in history nearly seven hundred people have been infected in more than four hundred and thirty of died. This is a really big outbreak. Where things stand right now. He Boola spread into twelve health districts in the country, which is the region's by which the break up the health system. And that just means it's really geographically dispersed. But the good news is it hasn't yet hit any major cities. You know, when he Bulla starts to spread in the city. The responsible comes really complicated and difficult, and it's not there yet. But last week there was four cases confirmed in a place called Konya, which is halfway between one hotspot of the outbreak and a major DRC city called Goma with a million people. The way that the WHO expressed to me last week as the outbreak appeared to be heading toward Goma this major city, and if that happens, then it becomes a much more serious situation and potentially what's called a we'll we'll public health emergency, which means it's really grave situation. And I'm quite concerned that it hasn't risen to a higher level of tension. Because as we know these viruses, don't pay attention the borders, and they moved very quickly could kill a whole lot more people. So what's being done to prevent the spread of this responders? Finally, have an effective Ebola vaccine, it's still an experimental vaccine. But it seems to really work to prevent this V Bulla, the WHO has said, they think outbreak would already be much larger if they hadn't vaccinated sixty thousand people who've gotten the vaccine, so far DRC and the other thing that's being done a pillar of any bowler. Ponts is something called contact tracing. Without involves is if you have a case someone to you think has he Bulla or has confirmed Bulla, you go and interview them all their family members people they work with anyone they might have been in contact with. And then you follow them up for twenty one days, and that's the incubation period for a Bulla. And if they start to develop symptoms you quickly isolate them from their family members of the community and treatment center to make sure that they don't spread the virus any further and then the other two digital parts of any bowler sponsor public health. Campaigns the virus spreads through direct contact with bodily fluids. Okay. You can easily prevent this virus by making sure people know not to kiss and hug through neighbors during any bull outbreak to wash their hands things like that. And so that that's happening and so is safer real practices. So in this part of the world, it's not unusual Taft families care for sick family members until they die someone who's died. If he Bulla is filled with the virus. So that's when the most infectious and these burial ceremonies were identified as super spreader events. Where all these members of the community would come to visit the dead kiss and touch the corpse and then fan out and spread the virus everywhere. And so the health responders are educating people about these burial practices. Sensually devastated villages are only given a glimpse of the shrouded buddy. Ruthlessly officiant burial one. Every piece of contaminated clothing thrown in with the corpse and the health responders from the WHO from the they learn some of these practices from the last outbreak. This is I think been like a pillar of any bull response for many many years. Even prior to the last outbreak. You know, we all have customs and ways of doing things, and you have outside is coming in and telling you, you know, what you're doing is right and these are heavily ingrained, cultural spiritual ceremonies people, and it's a very difficult thing to change into interfere. With Croatian remains the safest way to manage the bodies victims villages. It goes against ancient burial traditions which in both touching and washing the date that is what is proving so difficult to stop. The outbreak of Ebola in the rural areas, and so you often have community resistance, and that's happened in this outbreak to sounds like there's a lot being done to keep this virus contained right now. There's a lot being done, but the political. Situation in DRC is making it really hard, and creating a lot of uncertainty about what might happen next.

Bulla DRC Ebola Goma WHO Julia blues Konya Ponts Taft twenty one days
"ebola" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Cool. Who wasn't able backstage with me goes in the neighborhood, and the feel of the album, would you think culture too is more of like a sequel or completely different feel completely different album even building it's like culture to. Newsouth again from central from the first team it was alive. We put a lot of light traveling. Nj into the music take off. Are you guys recognized everywhere in the world y'all go now? Oh, you know, we've been we've been. Ebola way. Have you guys not being that you say man, I can't wait to our music? Take us their music. There. China. Is music. All year hail years there. I go to Japan quite often. Do you know what? And when we do go. We. I wanna show y'all. You know, what that culture is over there as well? It was only right that we all traveled together, y'all round each other all the time me goes, are you guys always around each other? Even when y'all not working or do you? Do you guys sometimes need to exit? We all be together. And then we all go out and work. And we we always make sure we come together at the end. So always we always give you know what I enjoy about every time. I see is that when it comes to the Migo.

Migo Ebola Nj Japan China