35 Burst results for "Ebola"

Trevor Noah condemns Trump's COVID-19 Response

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

06:05 min | Last week

Trevor Noah condemns Trump's COVID-19 Response

"Back to the daily social distancing show and yes, we are still social distancing pretty soon the top of my head is going to be six feet away from my forehead. That's the plan. That's how I'm going to measure my distance from people hey, what's going on becks they s see you know the reason we still social distancing is because the coronavirus is still spreading, and this is thanks partly to people not taking it seriously. So let's catch up in another installment of our ongoing segments the pandemic. I our pandemic coverage, Hicks off in Utah State in desperate need of the l shaped tetris piece. We now know that one of the easiest ways to stop the spread of coronavirus is just to have everybody where a mosque unfortunately telling everyone to wear a mosque is also one of the easiest ways to spread idiocy after more than one weeks in schools have reopened in Washington County Liberty, action coalition hosted a rally in front of the school district building. This morning up to a thousand people showed up saying the children being forced to wear masks in classrooms is illegal and even unconstitutional. Now have gathered here in front of the Washington County. Administration building calling for. The end of a mouse mandate. If we want to wear a mask, that's fine we can take care of ourselves when George Floyd was saying I can't breathe and then he died and We're wearing a mask and we say I can't breathe but we're for story anyway I'll tell you another reason I'd hate mass most child molesters love them God. Damn. These people were crazy. In fact, you know what they should have. Let them storm the school building because maybe they would have accidentally learn something like I'm still trying to process everything that was going on at that rally no matter how many times I watched that video i. still find new things to process. Like that video is the closest thing I've seen to facebook comments happening in real life I like individual freedom wipe people are the real George Floyd. Happy. Birthday Martha Mask wearing was invented by Jeffrey Epstein. Oh and here's another reason it's hard for Americans. To get the pandemic under control even places do have rules for social distancing. This is how some people follow them growing concerns over Cova clusters especially on college campuses in Ohio police cited several people in a house near Miami University during the Labor Day weekend body camera footage captured a stunning exchange between an officer and a student or there's So, you probably know where I wanNA talk to too many people but you know the the ordinances ten people. Yeah. How many people are in the house? Twenty twenty people inside. You Might WanNa start clearing off the I've never seen this before there's an input on the computer that you tested positive for covid. When was this was? A week ago are you supposed to be quarantining? That's why I'm on my house do you have other people here and you? You're positive for Kovin? We WanNA, keep the site open. That's why. We're so screwed. The main part of quarantine isn't about being at your house, my friend. It's about being away from other people so that you don't spread the disease I'm scheduled. Know where this guy puts a condom on his buddy at this point I'm glad it's just corona virus. Can you imagine this dude handling Ebola wait so I'm not supposed to eat a monkey. Because I got to tell you there was some confusion there. Oh and just by the way. Watching this police officers body cam footage was like virtual reality game called white privilege because this kid was clearly breaking the law but the cups tone of voice sounds like he was telling him today specials Hieaux could I interest you and not breaking the law today? Get a few minutes to think it over and I'll come back so. Some people are misinformed some people a crazy and some people are both. People. Like Donald jaundiced trump president of the United States and one man super spreader overnight at a packed indoor rally president trump breaking Nevada's covid restrictions to court voters. In the key battleground state, we're going to win to that speaking to a throng of mostly mask Liz supporters, his first indoor rally nearly three months. The state prohibits gatherings of more than fifty people but trump defiant of the governor comes after you which you shouldn't be doing. I'll be with you all the while those behind the president and in front of the cameras wore masks, most of the crowd did not. But that didn't bother supporters like meal. Christianson who camped out overnight I'm not wearing a mask that's a shows that I trust my president. Okay look. I. Get why trump fan would have trusted trump before. But how do you still trust this off the he admitted that he's been downplaying the coronavirus this whole time I don't get it. I really don't get what do you mean you trust and this is like believing the Nigerian e mail scam off the he tells you that he's a Nigerian email scam although I'm a small time criminal pretending to be a wealthy prince. Will Send me some money. You know what? I liked this guy's honesty I will send him fifty thousand dollars and as for trump. How you call yourself the presence of law and order when you openly flouting the law and not even for a noble reason. No, it's just so that he can spend nineteen minutes ranting about how vegetables invented by the deep state and Hillary. Clinton and this isn't just about breaking the law. What Donald Trump is doing here is actually dangerous. The last time trump held an indoor rally. He lost twenty five percent of his black friends. So there you have it. Everyone from college students to grandma's to the president himself is helping this virus continue spreading. But I guess. That's the genius of America's Corona Virus Response. Unlike other countries that are preparing for the second wave America realized you don't have to deal with the second wave. If you never get over the first.

Donald Trump President Trump Washington County George Floyd Martha Mask America Facebook Hicks Utah State Jeffrey Epstein Miami University Ohio United States LIZ Christianson Hillary Nevada
Oxford vaccine trial pause isn’t bad news – it’s the process working

Hidden Wealth

01:20 min | Last week

Oxford vaccine trial pause isn’t bad news – it’s the process working

"What do we know about this specific vaccine for a master's Annika and Oxford University? Because I know that some of the front runners they're developing different types. Some they're using our M Rene and different other platforms for the vaccine. What do we know about this one specifically So this vaccine you this on a dental virus that carries a gene for one of the proteins in the virus that causes co 19 into. The idea is that Theodore virus will induce the immune system to generate a protective response against the virus. And this is a platform that hasn't been used in an approved vaccine. So there's nothing on the market using this platform, but it has been tested in experimental vaccines against other viruses such as Ebola. Well, I mean, it's interesting to know that at least we were able to catch something put the brakes on In all of the early reporting that we had out of this vaccine candidate was slightly positive. There was other side effects, fever, headaches, minor things they were deemed mild or moderate, and everything kind of went away over the course of the study. So hopefully what happened with this one could be an outlier and that they can get back to it and see the larger part of the trial through Yes, I think everyone's hoping for Ah vaccine that safe and effective And I think, while there were certainly some concern in response to this news, it can be very reasonably seen, as is the system working the way it's supposed to.

Headaches Oxford University M Rene Theodore
The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

WSJ The Future of Everything

05:35 min | 3 weeks ago

The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

"Okay I'm assuming people just didn't start thinking about making lab producer artificial blood during this pandemic. How long has research in this field been going on scientists have been experimenting with lab, Produce Blood for decades but due to issues of funding or skill ability or just now seeing the start of clinical trials. and. Even though we're all really thinking about corona virus right now, what really accelerated our work blood substitutes was actually another virus. That was the HIV AIDS epidemic in the Nineteen Eighty S. The evidence was that the cause was not only something new. But something transmitted by blood Thousands of people were infected with HIV, through blood transfusions. This was before the blood supply could be tested for HIV in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five. So it made people really scared there was panic going on I remember my grandparents being fearful about the blood supply people before they had surgery would have their own blood extracted so they could use during surgery. There were all these fears about whether the blood supply was safe yeah, and that's when A. Lot of my sources told me we started shifting our national attention to looking at the blood supply. We realized it had to be tested. It had to be controlled, and we had to dump a lot of blood during that time because it was contaminated I spoke to one of the researchers who's been studying blood since the late nineteen eighties, his name is Dr George Daily. He's now the Dean of Harvard Medical School and he runs a lab there that studies this. Ultimately through various public health measures and very aggressive testing, very sensitive and specific testing. For HIV, the blood supply was made extremely safe. But as we've seen in recent years with the emergence of new pathogens whether it's Zeka war Ebola or. Recently coverted. There's always a worry about new infections that can contaminate the blood again, raising the value and importance of being able to more carefully controlled manufacturer and presentation of blood through a different system. That different system, he's alluding to is one where blood could be made in a lab. Okay and we're going to break down those new developments in just a bit but first Nora can you explain what do you need to make blood? Well just a refresher from probably what we learned in high school biology blood is made up of different parts. You've got the red blood cells, they carry oxygen. You've got white blood cells, they fight infection. Then there's plasma that carries nutrients, salts, proteins, and then there are platelets they make your blood clot when you get a cut. All of these parts are important because they all serve different functions so far no one has come up with a complete replacement, one total package for all of these functions. Instead different research groups are focusing on trying to produce the individual parts of blood. There's been some early testing of red blood cell substitutes including. Jehovah's Witnesses because most don't accept blood transfusions as part of their religion. But. Most of the momentum that I saw in my reporting was with labs trying to grow their own platelets. One of the top researchers doing this is Dr. Cedric of art and he's a consultant hematologist who leads a research group in transfusion medicine at Cambridge University? Rather important seven will be the small cell in the body, but equally if you don't have enough lateness. The bleeding symptom saw a really horrendous. Can I just stop right here and say I am shocked the platelets or the smallest cell in the body there's a lot of small cells in the body I know I know I was shocked when he said that too I had to go back and double check but it's true they are and even though platelets are so small they're really powerful. They're really important for patients undergoing chemotherapy or people who sustain traumatic injuries because they often receive platelet transfusions, but they're also quite finicky. They can only be stored for about five days and they have to be sort of stirred around to keep them from going bad. Leaving Jam Joel, Rubin on New Kitchen surface for five days zero. Gross stuff. So part of the reason he's trying to figure out how to manufacture them in the lab in vitro is because platelets are usually in the shortest supply because they have that shorter shelf life and when you say in vitro, you mean basically in a petri dish. Yep, that's right. That's in vitro. Got It. All right. So this makes sense I mean it's kind of like how you have to buy milk every week while if you drink milk which I don't. But flower can last a month or so yup. Yeah. Exactly. Right. So I get why platelets need a bit more backup but I'm still trying to figure out my head how they actually make more of them in a lab. You know what I mean. Now platelets don't just reproduce own you need stem cells to make them.

HIV Dr George Daily Nineteen Eighty Dr. Cedric Producer Rubin Aids Harvard Medical School Nora Cambridge University Joel
The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

WSJ The Future of Everything

05:04 min | 3 weeks ago

The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab

"I'm assuming people just didn't start thinking about making lab producer artificial blood during this pandemic. How long has research in this field been going on scientists have been experimenting with lab, Produce Blood for decades but due to issues of funding or skill ability or just now seeing the start of clinical trials. and. Even though we're all really thinking about corona virus right now, what really accelerated our work blood substitutes was actually another virus. That was the HIV AIDS epidemic in the Nineteen Eighty S. The evidence was that the cause was not only something new. But something transmitted by blood Thousands of people were infected with HIV, through blood transfusions. This was before the blood supply could be tested for HIV in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, five. So it made people really scared there was panic going on I remember my grandparents being fearful about the blood supply people before they had surgery would have their own blood extracted so they could use during surgery. There were all these fears about whether the blood supply was safe yeah, and that's when A. Lot of my sources told me we started shifting our national attention to looking at the blood supply. We realized it had to be tested. It had to be controlled, and we had to dump a lot of blood during that time because it was contaminated I spoke to one of the researchers who's been studying blood since the late nineteen eighties, his name is Dr George Daily. He's now the Dean of Harvard Medical School and he runs a lab there that studies this. Ultimately through various public health measures and very aggressive testing, very sensitive and specific testing. For HIV, the blood supply was made extremely safe. But as we've seen in recent years with the emergence of new pathogens whether it's Zeka war Ebola or. Recently coverted. There's always a worry about new infections that can contaminate the blood again, raising the value and importance of being able to more carefully controlled manufacturer and presentation of blood through a different system. That different system, he's alluding to is one where blood could be made in a lab. Okay and we're going to break down those new developments in just a bit but first Nora can you explain what do you need to make blood? Well just a refresher from probably what we learned in high school biology blood is made up of different parts. You've got the red blood cells, they carry oxygen. You've got white blood cells, they fight infection. Then there's plasma that carries nutrients, salts, proteins, and then there are platelets they make your blood clot when you get a cut. All of these parts are important because they all serve different functions so far no one has come up with a complete replacement, one total package for all of these functions. Instead different research groups are focusing on trying to produce the individual parts of blood. There's been some early testing of red blood cell substitutes including. Jehovah's Witnesses because most don't accept blood transfusions as part of their religion. But. Most of the momentum that I saw in my reporting was with labs trying to grow their own platelets. One of the top researchers doing this is Dr. Cedric of art and he's a consultant hematologist who leads a research group in transfusion medicine at Cambridge University? Rather important seven will be the small cell in the body, but equally if you don't have enough lateness. The bleeding symptom saw a really horrendous. Can I just stop right here and say I am shocked the platelets or the smallest cell in the body there's a lot of small cells in the body I know I know I was shocked when he said that too I had to go back and double check but it's true they are and even though platelets are so small they're really powerful. They're really important for patients undergoing chemotherapy or people who sustain traumatic injuries because they often receive platelet transfusions, but they're also quite finicky. They can only be stored for about five days and they have to be sort of stirred around to keep them from going bad. Leaving Jam Joel, Rubin on New Kitchen surface for five days zero. Gross stuff. So part of the reason he's trying to figure out how to manufacture them in the lab in vitro is because platelets are usually in the shortest supply because they have that shorter shelf life and when you say in vitro, you mean basically in a petri dish. Yep, that's right. That's in vitro. Got It.

HIV Dr George Daily Nineteen Eighty Producer Dr. Cedric Aids Harvard Medical School Nora Rubin Cambridge University Joel
US FDA announces emergency authorization for convalescent plasma to treat Covid-19

This Morning With Gordon Deal

01:01 min | Last month

US FDA announces emergency authorization for convalescent plasma to treat Covid-19

"And Drug Administration is giving its approval of convalescent plasma for the treatment of serious Corona virus cases. Convalescent plasma is the blood component full of anti bodies taken from recovered Cove. It 19 patients. It was given emergency use authorization that opens up the possibility for faster and easier access to a promising treatment. But the FDA said more clinical studies so necessary for definitive proof off the therapies Effectiveness. President Trump made the announcement yesterday based on the science and the data. The FDA has made the independent determination that the treatment is safe. And very effective. The FDA says hospitalized patients who received the plasma within three days of diagnosis are younger than 80, and not on a ventilator benefited the most with a 35% improvement in survival. There's a history of using convalescent plasma during viral outbreaks, such as the 1918 flu pandemic and the 2014 Ebola outbreak.

FDA Recovered Cove President Trump Drug Administration Ebola
Companies Test Antibody Drugs to Treat, Prevent COVID-19

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | Last month

Companies Test Antibody Drugs to Treat, Prevent COVID-19

"The number of covert deaths in the United States now tops 164,000. Dr Anthony Fauci says he's cautiously optimistic about several drugs under development that would deliver antibodies to fight the virus. I'm Harkin heartened. Heartened by the experience that we had with Ebola, in which in a randomized controlled trial We had clear cut indication of efficacy with two monoclonal antibodies. Valdez comments come with a Corona virus vaccine still months off. Companies are rushing to test what may be the next best thing, the drugs that deliver antibodies to fight the virus right away.

Dr Anthony Fauci Harkin United States Ebola Valdez
Companies test antibody drugs to treat, prevent COVID-19

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:43 sec | Last month

Companies test antibody drugs to treat, prevent COVID-19

"Companies rushing to test drugs that can deliver antibodies to fight Corona virus until we get that vaccine, Dr Anthony Fauci says he is cautiously optimistic about several drugs being developed. I'm Harkin heartened. Heartened by the experience that we had with Ebola. In which in a randomized controlled trial We had clear cut indication of efficacy with two monoclonal antibodies and bodies are proteins that the body makes when the infection occurs, then attached to a virus and help destroy it. Vaccines work by tricking the body into thinking there's an infection, so it makes antibodies, but it could take a month or two after vaccination for effective antibodies to form the new experimental drugs can shortcut that process

Dr Anthony Fauci Harkin Tricking Ebola
COVID-19 Impact and Recovery

This Week in Photo

06:15 min | Last month

COVID-19 Impact and Recovery

"All right gentlemen welcome to the show. This has been a long time in the making this particular episode as you both know, we've been dialoguing over the the you know through email after the first covid type production I put together, which was in a Web webinar format. We decided to do this when Moore's a prerecorded livestream instead of doing the Webinar format because. There's a ton of things that we need to talk about and I just think this format makes more sense to get the information out. So I would think both you guys for coming on the show and covering this with me from the standpoint of having much more knowledge about it than I do. So which is which is important. Marcucci when it started just with some some introductions, obviously I did the brief introduction in the open there. But just a more personal introduction mark. Let's start with you who is Mark Fujio, and Why are you on the show today? Let's talk about that and then we'll go to you vincent. Okay. So I. Talk about how we've been friends for a decade if you want. Okay. Yeah. So Yeah I. was going to lead into that the I've been involved in all sorts of different You're leading edge technologies. I've lived in Santa Clara in the Silicon Valley for twenty nine years Known Frederick for about ten years and helped get him out of adobe and into a startup storage company named Robo and You know along at That's when I started listening to the this week in barrage podcast hosted by Vincent. So I've been listening to that show for man. Over over ten years, I think even longer than I've known you Frederick. So. I've had quite an interest in urology Personally last November and a dark Moon it you new moon you know night had an accident coming home where I ran into an Amazon. and. Which I wasn't expecting to be there and shorts long story short. You know I tour the complete tear their quadriceps tendon on my left leg. So I spent basically three months into brace. And then than three months sheltering in place. So, during some of your initial cooeperation obviously had a lot more time to pay attention to things and I remember seeing in sort of late November early December, a little bit of a blurb of news about in new virus coming out of China. So Fast forward So the whole incident about the Chinese doctor who had was fighting it. Got Suppressed and who ultimately died, and then you know what we turned into January. This year just exploded as a story and the US and I don't think anybody can go anywhere and a gathering you know A. Virtual. With the friends or family without covy becoming a major topic of discussion. So I very much enjoyed the the seminar you did you know a couple months ago Frederick and. Be Able to put you in Vincent together to Have a follow up. Survey and that is that is that. That's perfect and that that that. Discussion on Cova we did that you mentioned back in the day that will link to that in the description for this episode, but that was designed to be I think the title of it was. Something around demystifying covid nineteen hundred photographers, but it was turns out photographers are actually human so it doesn't does. It back then it. Doesn't really matter but I wanted to definitely follow up on that since we've done that. So much stuff since we did that. Webinar. So much stuff. Vincent that you're intimate with. In the rest of the world obviously is to a degree intimate with has happened both on the understanding of the virus side of things all the way through to disinformation and the politicization of. The whole mask wearing thing and you're not American if you wear a mask and now you are American if you wear a mask and you know all all this stuff has been happening. So I don't want to make this political but I do want to touch on the politics of that before we before we dive in then can you tell us a little bit about yourself and the podcast this week in virology? Well I am a Professor Virology at Columbia University, which is in New, York. I've been working on viruses for over forty years. I've been doing research on them. I wrote a textbook. I have taught many virology courses and twelve years ago I started a podcast. Decided to call it this week. Envir- Allergy I was inspired by Leo LaPorte. Chipper. Who probably inspired you as well I would guess, absolutely. Father. We have done this for twelve years and at the beginning of this year we noticed this outbreak in China we started covering it and I think almost every episode from the beginning of Twenty twenty now has been about the virus and the disease SARS covy to in Covid nineteen. And you know we have always talked about the threats of new viruses emerging. but they weren't taken seriously enough and we've had big outbreaks. You know we've had big ebola outbreaks. We've had Sika outbreaks, influenza outbreaks, many other viruses, but. I hate to say we were not ready for this. This all could have been avoided quite sadly. So now I am full on in educating people trying to counter the misinformation our listeners have gone way way up. It's just great. We're getting mentioned by Malcolm. Glad. Well, we got in USA Today The New York Times this week. But I think more people need to listen because we really tell it like it is and so that's the story.

Vincent Frederick China Moore Professor Virology Edge Technologies New York Times Mark Fujio Santa Clara Leo Laporte United States Covid Cova Adobe Malcolm Silicon Valley Columbia University Robo York
Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

Untangle

04:32 min | Last month

Siyabulela Mandela - Personal Lessons from History

"This week I have a special guest, sea. Ebola Mandela. WHO's the great grandson of Nelson. Mandela. Lilla is a PhD in peace and conflict. Studies, in continues his grandfather's legacy of advocating for human rights and shares his perspective on the stomach nature of racism with us. He recently wrote a chapter in the book for the sake. Of Peace. African perspectives, on. Racism? Justice. And peace in America. Sibylla will also share with us his perspective on what we can each do to decolonize our own minds and the lessons that he learned from his grandfather's character. He speaks to us today from south, Sudan where he works. Welcome Siebel Villa. Thank, you very much. Ariana family me and thank you. For joining us, it is my sincere pleasure and honor. I would love to begin with you telling us a little bit about your own story and the inspiration for your current work. Thank. You very much. Really. I grew up in effeminate that was highly politicized and our shaved. By the history of the Feminine so-fi as its involvement in the struggle against apartheid resume colonialism in south, Africa, and in Africa in general and in the fight for the. Liberation of the black masses AFA people against the shuttle's off. Appreciate up on. Racism and all forms of injustice that degeneration of Mandela waged against our shaped by that kind of history and our shaped by those material condition, and it is the involvement of my family and my involvement of my great grandfather, Nelson Mandela that has inspired me to anti into the food dolf intensive relations particularly focusing on issues that were made peace confluence, Aleutian and human rights in South Africa. Andy. Africa's when the world more generally, and at the moment, my final stages of my doctorate studies which averages stepped on that Nelson Mandela University in Africa and partly, half of my research was done in the United States at George Mason invested to scorn of conflict, resolution and analysis. Dot Potential Training has opened opportunities for me. I'm currently based in Juba South Sudan where I work as a team, lead the country director for the Subsidy Program for an organization whole geneticist for human rights. So that is the way that I'm currently doing in south, Sudan. Patent puzzle supporting the Peace End. Development Agenda since the end of the civil war in this part of the was. So that's the kind of work that I'm doing, and that's what I'm engaged in at the moment. I'm sure people are curious about a little bit of your direct experience with your great grandfather. What is a memory that you might have and a piece of wisdom that you've learned from him that you'd like to pass along? A very few memories of. Microsoft. Grandfather Nelson, and among those memories was always division that instilled to all of us and something that we all learned from him and even the past generation the past it to him that. Occurred to importance to treat people quantity godless of their social status in society when you begin with rich people. Equally. You begin to understand and begin to know who people are for people would be willing to talk to. And people will be willing to listen to. That Nessin did. If you look at the entire store, you would have conversation with his prison. And he was highly regarded and respected by his prison for he treated that particular individual symptoms spent that they will lead to the president of Salafi, Cadet and. Someone that comes from. Hubble, begins. And when you begin to imagine from the kind of a background is individual new, get to recognize that we are only important it regardless of social status in society,

Grandfather Nelson Juba South Sudan Nelson Mandela Mandela South Africa Africa Nelson Mandela University Nessin Lilla Sibylla George Mason Siebel Villa Ariana America Microsoft Andy United States President Trump
Coronavirus and consumer spending

John Batchelor

03:43 min | 2 months ago

Coronavirus and consumer spending

"To concentrate on 11 paragraph here and then explicate from the point of view of living in Manhattan. The decline in GDP in the second quarter. This is the Wall Street Journal reflected the deep hit to consumer and business spending from lock down social distancing and other initiatives aimed at containing the virus. Consumer spending fellow 34.6% annual rate amid sharp decreases in spending on services like healthcare, recreation and food. Monica Monica, We were locked out We didn't make a decision not to spend our our own health care. Or go to the restaurant or recreation. We were prevented by orders of governors, no matter what. This is not about the economy. This is not about what we conduce. This is about a mandate and I want to underline this. I I cut myself with a pickaxe early on in the crisis, and I was reluctant to ask for help. Because the hospital's at this point we're expecting to be overwhelmed. This is March April. And I decided, given the swelling that it was wrongheaded of me and that their tetanus shot was necessary. So I called up the clinic where I usually go and they were very kind and they brought me in. Monica. I was the only person they saw that day. Other than being tested for the cove. It Now it easily could have been that There were hundreds of stupid people like me have cut themselves with the pickaxe and didn't go to the clinic and delayed spending on there. On their own health care, and we're paying the price for it. So the puzzle here is who's to blame? The blame is that they shut us down inarticulately. They made orders that didn't have any basis They were. They were panicky orders. There was no reason to keep people who'd cut themselves with the pickaxe from going to the clinic. But the the the two nurse practitioners who cared for me were very generous. However, they did underline that they were seeing me extraordinarily because their services were only for covert 19. That was the state of affairs in New York State in March of 2020 20. And from there, Monica we can only say never again. Never again. Will I vouchsafe the shutting down of the economy. You know, it was a government mandate mandated lock down of the kind we had never seen before, with an unprecedented situation, and I would remind everybody I think we sort of lost sight of this, John that in the early days of this, nobody knew how the virus was going to behave. We were getting information out of China, which you know, people thought with highly unreliable. About how this virus actually behaved in human beings. It was a novel virus. Nobody knew was that the Ebola where you're essentially dead in 72 hours, or with amore extreme flew. No one knew. So when the government mandated the whole sale lock down of the U. S economy, it was for public health reasons based on the worst case scenario. So when you say who is to blame every western country was doing, uh, China was during it, so there really was no alternative. Therefore, the government then also knew it had to step in and fill the economic avoid it because it was asking people to shut down their businesses shut down their livelihood. And you know, in the layout that that you just put out there that is sort of like an incentive based question. Like all of the American consumer to spend, we had no one Just to spend because there was no way to spend apart from the occasional Amazon delivery or some takeout food and groceries,

Monica Monica China Wall Street Journal Manhattan Tetanus Amazon New York John
Michelle Lujan Grisham on U.S. covid-19 response

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:06 min | 2 months ago

Michelle Lujan Grisham on U.S. covid-19 response

"Jonathan, Kaye part, and this is Cape Up. My guest has been her states. Secretary of Health sees represented her State in Congress today. She is said to be on Joe. Biden's vice presidential shortlist in chose it. She would be the first lat next American on a presidential ticket. She is New Mexico Governor Michelle Luhan Grisham. Hear what she has to say about that and her states response to Corona virus in this special case up live episode right now. Governor Welcome! You know I'm delighted to be on your show. Nice to meet you spend a little time with you Jonathan. Likewise. Thank you very much for being here now. I mentioned that you were the health secretary. You are a member of Congress because they gave you incredible insight, I think and how to deal with the corona virus early on you declared a statewide health emergency on March eleventh when there were only four cases in your state. What did you see that pushed? The pushed you to move so quickly. Well two things that you know that this virus is moving, and so it comes with travelers we've got commuters were movie Hijab I was still dealing with folks who were trapped on a cruise and California and I've dealt with the pandemic before and the. You Start and the more aggressively you start, the better control and management efforts you have in. This is the problem because you can't see the pandemic everyone I think falsely assumes it won't come here. The it'll be easy, and we'll wait until we see what's happening because I think for too many leaders. It's easier to explain you have to move immediately. Otherwise it rages out of control and we're seeing that all across the country now. What we follow up, you said you've been through a pandemic before. which are you talking Ebola or something else? Blue so we had two issues. We had a flu epidemic I said pandemic epidemic in two, thousand, seven, two, thousand eight, and then in two, thousand and five. We had a flu vaccine shortage so when you are in a state where you've got higher. Per Capita. Issues related to chronic issues for children and adults, and that you have a higher death rate then from influenza we'd have a third of the capacity of healthcare providers and hospitalizations I literally had to join with illiinois to. Import flu vaccine from Canada Rich. You really couldn't do then and we found A. Soft, can I say loophole and brought it in and I protected Mexica residents then we took. Out of flu vaccine, so I took all the mercury out of it to further protect new Mexicans. I wouldn't buy anything that had. Mirasol in it, and then when the epidemic was coming in the same thing, he didn't have sufficient investments in public health, so getting to people getting them vaccinated partnering with limited. A. Private Provider Group was really challenging so probably answering this too long Jonathan but in December I knew this was coming. I asked my teams to start planning in early January, so we began to have round tables and start looking about where we was secure. And testing supplies. That's really interesting. You started focusing this on in December. And then moving with your staff in January, so you anticipated what could happen, but didn't you anticipate the inaction from the federal government in terms of having a national strategy? No in my wildest dreams I would not be spending my known specific time finding supplies testing supplies, and the right manufacturers, trying to figure out which instruments right the FDA was going to authorize in an emergency use environment, then test for the for the virus, so not every instrument was available. Not every then re agent is available every testing because they're not all. They weren't at the time universal, getting swabs and then chasing. And, then, in my wildest dreams I wouldn't be dealing with the federal government who would literally then take the things that you secured and redistributes them for the country while you want it to be a country focus. Because it wasn't it meant that you were fighting? Frankly with other governors and FEMA to get the adequate supplies into your state, and now we're seeing it occur again because there was without any federal strategies, still now that you have these outbreaks, governors are in the same situation chasing down supplies and P P and trying to adequately cover their first responders is the most outrageous environment I've ever worked on worked in in my entire career.

Governor Michelle Luhan Grisha Flu Vaccine Jonathan Secretary Congress Influenza Cape Up JOE California FDA Kaye Canada Fema New Mexico A. Soft A. Private Provider Group P P
Interview With Former Deputy Director of the CDC Dr. Judy Monroe on COVID-19

Voice of San Diego

04:46 min | 2 months ago

Interview With Former Deputy Director of the CDC Dr. Judy Monroe on COVID-19

"Now by Dr Judy Monroe, former deputy director of the CDC, current president and CEO of the CDC Foundation. And an advisor to the pandemic Action Network, Dr Monroe. Thank you for taking some time to tell us about the work your organization is doing and to update us on the Corona virus outbreak happening across the US Let's begin with some background on the CDC Foundation. The work you d'oh why the organization was created and the difference between the foundation and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sure So. The CDC Foundation is an independent nonprofit that was actually created by Congress to support the Centers for Disease Control. You know, the CDC is obviously a federal agency with scientists in public health experts that put out guidance to the United States to protect the health and then the foundation. Being an independent nonprofit. What we do is we unleash really the power public private partnerships. We bring philanthropy in private sector and individual support public health issues. We do this across a broad variety of programs now support CDC and their work and the field on we do that, with speed flexibility that government Ah is challenged by sometimes so we're able to get out really quick and do work that is really vital to the health of people. So when and how did the foundation begin getting involved in the response to the cova 19 pandemic? We activated our emergency Response fund in January, just a few days after the CDC activated their emergency operation Center, So we were the first actually in the country to have Ah Covad 19 Emergency Response fund. We started spreading the word going to our donors. Ah and asking people to. Ah begin to contribute because we were not an endowed foundation, so we need to raise the funds and we started. Turning to CDC for their needs, as well as out to the health department's been out in the field to see where that philanthropic support was needed. And we've had a long list of requests over the last several months that we've been able to step in and help with And I'm assuming this is an undertaking. Unlike anything the foundation is that to deal with before This is the largest. Now we have supported things like the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. Zika hurricane recovery, But I will tell you of pandemic. Of course, this is one of the you know the largest public health emergencies that any of us have seen. Ah, and it has has really been the largest emergency response in the history of the CDC Foundation. I'm joined by Dr Judy Monroe, former deputy director of the CDC and current president and CEO of the CDC Foundation. She's also an adviser to the Pandemic Action Network. What are some of the more specific ways the CDC foundations currently helping with the US response to the Corona virus outbreak? Yes. So early on, we ramps to help with personal protective equipment. All of us were really concerned about our front line health care workers and frontline public health workers. So we've done ah, across the country. We had been able to supply personal protective equipment. We're very concerned about the disparities on the vulnerable populations, and we've been able to answer the call. Ah, in the number of our city's rule communities, Onda big cities as well around some of the vulnerable populations that have been impacted greatly by this all the way from helping them with Basic needs a spokes have lost jobs, toe holding medications, those types of things we've done large communication efforts. Ah, Right now. We're really concerned about people wearing masks. That's ah. Kind of a current focus of hours to try to help the public realised that we can't really reopen the economy Folks aren't taking seriously. The precautions against spreading the virus and protecting themselves. And that's of course, the physical distancing in the mouth. Ah, we also are hiring staff. We've been ableto hire hundreds of staff. Help support health departments across the country with their needs, you know, basis all over the country. We're seeing these epicenters emerging, and that means more staff needs to be on the ground. Mental health is an area that we've helped with on then, even like data systems and laboratory as well as the much needed research, So we're really been ableto help in very broad ways.

Cdc Foundation CDC Dr Judy Monroe Pandemic Action Network President And Ceo United States Deputy Director Advisor Hurricane Cova Congress Ebola West Africa
White House denies Trump authorized anti-Fauci op-ed

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

White House denies Trump authorized anti-Fauci op-ed

"In a USA Today op Ed White House Trade advisor Peter Navarro attacked Dr Anthony Fauci of N I H, saying the nation's leading infectious disease expert has a good bedside manner with the public. But quote has been wrong about everything. I have interaction with him on. The White House has since told CBS News Navarro had gone rogue. Douchey himself was later asked about the mixed messages coming from the federal government amid this deadly pandemic here, CBS News chief Washington correspondent Major Garrett along with Fauci's response, the most part you can trust respected medical authorities. I believe I'm one of them. So I think you can trust me. Previous presidents have doctor found she advised President Obama during the Ebola crisis, President George W. Bush awarded him the Medal of Freedom. Fauci has called attempt to discredit him. Arun counterproductive.

Dr Anthony Fauci Peter Navarro Ed White House President George W. Bush White House President Obama Cbs News CBS Major Garrett Advisor USA
Leaving the World Health Organization

Second Opinion

03:41 min | 2 months ago

Leaving the World Health Organization

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with. The pinion over the past few years. Our President has made some incredibly ill informed policy decisions even in the face of clear evidence to the contrary, these decisions have negatively impacted people's lives through policies around covid climate change, immigration health care women's rights, lgbt rights education, and of course, our relationship with foreign countries, but the president's recent decision to leave the sixty year. Old World Health Organization is among the very most irresponsible decision will. Will hurt the US every bit as much as it will hurt the rest of the world the W. H.. O. Is not a perfect organization. It is plagued by politics and infighting and a low budget, but it's still serves a super important function. The whol plays a key role in many decisions that directly or indirectly affect our lives more than ever before our global interconnected world create great risks particularly with regard to the spreading. Spreading of diseases, it is the WHO that is. Our First Line of defense the WHO. I alerted the world to the infection that came to be called covid in early January, and it advised healthcare workers how to protect themselves from the spread. Perhaps it could have been more aggressive with its policies, but if there is a problem, conduct an audit help improve the organization. Don't be a baby and take your toys and walk away. Away and it's not just covid were who plays a vital role. It coordinates the global response to diseases like polio Ebola Malaria HIV TB and yellow fever. The near nation of diseases like polio has saved the US tens of billions of dollars in treatment costs, and the WHO isn't the only Health Organization the US refuses to work with as the US decided to focus inwardly. We have already stopped funding the pan. American Health Organization. Pan. America is the area that is currently home to half of the top ten countries with co Vid. Now aside from helping ourselves, we also have a social responsibility to help resource poor countries by helping to provide education laboratory training tools like p. p. e. and clinical trials drugs to treat emerging and reemerging diseases. When we step back from these responsibilities, China steps in, and they're now in our backyard, working with countries that will old them a big favor. The WHO also directly benefits the US for example each year influenza virus mutates resulting in new variants around the world. It is the W. H. O. that leads the. The flu vaccine development process each year which includes several American researchers and organizations like our FDA and CDC. The US depends on data from the WHO to predict which strain of the flu will spread to the US so that we can make ineffective vaccination in the end the total US funding for the WHO is equivalent to the overhead of about one ass hospital about three hundred seventy million dollars. It would be very hard to get better value for that

United States World Health Organization WHO Covid Dr Michael Wilks President Trump American Health Organization Flu Vaccine Polio Health Organization Malaria FDA W. H. O. America CDC China TB
"ebola" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

13:31 min | 2 months ago

"ebola" Discussed on Short Wave

"At the beginning of an epidemic, it's essential to discover the source of the disease. For scientists who do that work, it's extremely challenging and without risk to their own health. But the scientists who played an essential role in discovering bulla way back in nineteen, seventy six doesn't always get the credit he deserves in today's episode. We explore the history of a bowl and the consequences of scientific exploitation. It's part of our week of episodes here on the show celebrating and recognizing the contributions of black scientists enjoy. You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. Safai here with none other than NPR East Africa correspondent Ater, Peralta Hey there ater. Hey, Mattie, thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled. But I want to open with a quick question. Who discovered Ebola and do not Google it. First of all. How dare you asked me a question? I should definitely know the answer to, and don't and yeah I already, Google Bet. Came up was. A Belgian microbiologist, but I think you're about to tell me. There's more to this there. Absolutely, there always is right so. Cheated. What you probably saw is a bunch of white westerners like. Dr John Jack. Yembeh does not yeah. He was not one of the people that came up. Yes, so, he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo, but back in nineteen, seventy six, we embed. First doctor to. COLLECT ANY BOLA sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote, a lot of the history of people. Has Been Written? Without your name. Yes but. You know this <hes>. Yes it. Did Not quite. Today on the show correcting the record on a Bola, the story of Dr, John Jack Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing it's. To some in the medical community, it's a controversial move. Okay Ater, so we're talking about a Congolese Dr John, Shaq. And his role in discovering a bola. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa. He said we should start in. Hundred seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD microbiology at the Riga Institute in Belgium, and he could have stayed in Europe, but he decided to come back to Congo, but when I arrive via. The condition of work were not I had no lab have no. Mice for experimentation, so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah, it's tough to do lab work without a lab, you know. Without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen seventy-six. was sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak. <music>, it's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola, but no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever, and he goes to this local hospital, and he says he finds it completely empty. Why was nobody there? Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and people had died there. But in the morning when they heard Giambi was sent from the capital, the thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital, and we started seeing patients. So so, what's he seeing? When the patients come in, he was seeing. People who were very weak fever? They had headaches I started to <hes> to make the physical time. But at that time will have no gloves. And, of course he had to draw blood, but when I removed. They're the sit inch. Both continue to spread out. What I am to see these phenomenal. And also my fingers or with a bow. Wow. Yeah, so he says he he would wash his hands a lot, but really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah, definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's no gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on, and he was able to not get it in at this point. We MP he was startled. But then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village, also got sick with fever. All the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point me MBA was like. Oh, it's probably not those things. Yeah! I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different, so he. He convinced one none took back to Kinshasa with him. So what happens next? She died at a hospital a couple of days later, but he took blood samples, and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end that was Peter Piot. Who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium, the guy who turned up from Google search. Yeah. That's right, and so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit. The CDC in the US gets involved and the realize. This is a new virus that caused hemorragic. Call it Ebola. They name it after a river by the village where it was discovered. So, what you saw out in the field, the blood samples guide all of this plays a crucial role in the history of right. It was huge, but it's PR who gets the bulk of the credit for discovering all up and you can tell this bothers John Jock membe. If you don't recognize the work done in the field, I, it is not correct. <hes>, it is a team. You know it is a team. Pr Actually wrote a memoir no time to lose and he does mention. But just in passing as a bright scientist, whose constantly pestering him for more resources. Has talked about this well. Peter Pyatt, facetime video, so I got on the phone. He's now the director of the prestigious London, School of Hygiene and tropical medicine and I asked him if he felt at all responsible for writing. Out of his history of Ebola I think that's a comment, but my book less not an attempt to write than that's history of Boll and sold more. My personal experience is more biographies that sense. Was this kind of like an awkward conversation to have ater. Yeah I mean especially because he's Belgian and Belgium was the colonial power in Congo. Ultimately, he looks at it with a little bit of distant. That at the time African scientists they were simply excluded and white scientists parachuted in they took samples, wrote papers that were published in the West and they took all the credit he so he actually said he did. In that actually surprised me and I think. Part of the reason. I feel that he so comfortable. Talking about this is because he's in an academic setting. I think in universities across the world. Students are talking about privilege, so he seems like he is very comfortable having this conversation right now. I mean there's there's something very weird kind of about that coming from him right as a person who has admitted to taking part in exploitative science, absolutely and one of the good things is that he says that things are changing. We mbappe for example has received several international awards just recently for pioneering. The first effective treatment for Ebola reflects our stinky you. Say the politicians in global health in science, General. So okay. I want to ask you about the treatment in a minute, but to put it very bluntly. Have there actually been any concrete steps to try to change this power dynamic in the global health field? Because this is certainly not one of you know two stories. This is one of many many stories. There is I mean look. NBA has made a decision that many thought unthinkable leaving just a few years ago, he decided that all of the blood samples collected during this most recent Ebola. Epidemic will stay in Congo, so if anyone wants to study this outbreak, they will have to come to his institute. I bet that has ruffled some feathers though. I have I've heard from some American scientists. Who have privately expressed frustrations in the are really the ones who have led the way in studying Ebola, but peanut understands that decision when you think about how African scientists have been historically treated, and he says that Western scientists should just get over it. We have to wake up key things one. The world is changing too much endless Nah it's so weird to hear him say a matter of fairness, ater matter of fairness. Okay, so before we move on, tell me about the treatment that Mugabe worked on. So this is the thing that makes him smile right. We embiid calls it the most important achievement of his life, and it goes back to one thousand, nine, hundred, five during another equal outbreak in Congo. Eighty one percent of people infected with Ebola in this village were dying, and he wondered if antibodies developed bipolar survivors could be siphoned from their blood and used to treat new cases, so he gave sick patients transfusions of blood from a bowl of survivors. Too He injected Ebola patients with the blood of survivors. It vision. And seven survive, he says the medical establishment brought him off because he didn't have a control group. That's what they told him. But if this idea was accepted by scientists. We see a lot of life. Okay I mean to be fair. That is a really small group with no control among some other stuff. But on the other hand, it doesn't mean that he was wrong. You know that it should be totally dismissed, and maybe if more scientists looked into, it collaborated with him, maybe tried to replicate that data in some way, they could have learned something with him right because we now know that he was in fact correct about the antibodies. Yeah, I mean that's right in the context is important because I think what really eat set him. Is that maybe lots and lots of people could have been saved during the West. West Africa outbreak, which happened from two thousand, thirteen to two, thousand sixteen, and look just this year that science became the foundation of what is now proven to be the first effective treatment against the Bulla that is saving seventy percent of the people who are treated with amazing. Is He getting credit for that? At this point, he is yeah, absolutely okay, so how does look back on all of this week? What's what's his view on this is so he's he seventy seven, so he's obviously thinking about his legacy. One of the things that he told me is that he's always dreamed that big science could come out of Congo, and partly because of him, that's more likely happen. He got a commitment from Japan to build a state of the art research facility in Kinshasa and in the lab, just a few feet from his office where we talked US scientists were using advanced machines to sequence DNA of the Bulla samples <hes> that have to stay here in Congo Okay so moon bay, doctor and scientists who started in the Congo with no lab has a lab and is soon getting an even better one to do his work. Yeah, exactly, yeah, now I have my share. In. So I have my I have. A good subculture will bring joy. But he also has vice rate with micro biologist without Nice, I, asked myself that every day. And, so you know what he says, his biggest legacy won't be that. He helped to discovery or cure for it. It'll be if another young Congolese. Scientist finds himself with an interesting blood sample. He'll be able to investigate it

Giambi Kinshasa Google Ebola fever NPR Dr John Jack Congo Mattie typhoid Ater Yembeh Belgium Dr John Peralta Peter Piot Kenya Riga Institute in Belgium Bolla Institute for Tropical Medicin
The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

Short Wave

13:31 min | 2 months ago

The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

"At the beginning of an epidemic, it's essential to discover the source of the disease. For scientists who do that work, it's extremely challenging and without risk to their own health. But the scientists who played an essential role in discovering bulla way back in nineteen, seventy six doesn't always get the credit he deserves in today's episode. We explore the history of a bowl and the consequences of scientific exploitation. It's part of our week of episodes here on the show celebrating and recognizing the contributions of black scientists enjoy. You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. Safai here with none other than NPR East Africa correspondent Ater, Peralta Hey there ater. Hey, Mattie, thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled. But I want to open with a quick question. Who discovered Ebola and do not Google it. First of all. How dare you asked me a question? I should definitely know the answer to, and don't and yeah I already, Google Bet. Came up was. A Belgian microbiologist, but I think you're about to tell me. There's more to this there. Absolutely, there always is right so. Cheated. What you probably saw is a bunch of white westerners like. Dr John Jack. Yembeh does not yeah. He was not one of the people that came up. Yes, so, he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo, but back in nineteen, seventy six, we embed. First doctor to. COLLECT ANY BOLA sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote, a lot of the history of people. Has Been Written? Without your name. Yes but. You know this Yes it. Did Not quite. Today on the show correcting the record on a Bola, the story of Dr, John Jack Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing it's. To some in the medical community, it's a controversial move. Okay Ater, so we're talking about a Congolese Dr John, Shaq. And his role in discovering a bola. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa. He said we should start in. Hundred seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD microbiology at the Riga Institute in Belgium, and he could have stayed in Europe, but he decided to come back to Congo, but when I arrive via. The condition of work were not I had no lab have no. Mice for experimentation, so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah, it's tough to do lab work without a lab, you know. Without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen seventy-six. was sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak. it's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola, but no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever, and he goes to this local hospital, and he says he finds it completely empty. Why was nobody there? Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and people had died there. But in the morning when they heard Giambi was sent from the capital, the thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital, and we started seeing patients. So so, what's he seeing? When the patients come in, he was seeing. People who were very weak fever? They had headaches I started to to make the physical time. But at that time will have no gloves. And, of course he had to draw blood, but when I removed. They're the sit inch. Both continue to spread out. What I am to see these phenomenal. And also my fingers or with a bow. Wow. Yeah, so he says he he would wash his hands a lot, but really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah, definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's no gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on, and he was able to not get it in at this point. We MP he was startled. But then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village, also got sick with fever. All the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point me MBA was like. Oh, it's probably not those things. Yeah! I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different, so he. He convinced one none took back to Kinshasa with him. So what happens next? She died at a hospital a couple of days later, but he took blood samples, and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end that was Peter Piot. Who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium, the guy who turned up from Google search. Yeah. That's right, and so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit. The CDC in the US gets involved and the realize. This is a new virus that caused hemorragic. Call it Ebola. They name it after a river by the village where it was discovered. So, what you saw out in the field, the blood samples guide all of this plays a crucial role in the history of right. It was huge, but it's PR who gets the bulk of the credit for discovering all up and you can tell this bothers John Jock membe. If you don't recognize the work done in the field, I, it is not correct. it is a team. You know it is a team. Pr Actually wrote a memoir no time to lose and he does mention. But just in passing as a bright scientist, whose constantly pestering him for more resources. Has talked about this well. Peter Pyatt, facetime video, so I got on the phone. He's now the director of the prestigious London, School of Hygiene and tropical medicine and I asked him if he felt at all responsible for writing. Out of his history of Ebola I think that's a comment, but my book less not an attempt to write than that's history of Boll and sold more. My personal experience is more biographies that sense. Was this kind of like an awkward conversation to have ater. Yeah I mean especially because he's Belgian and Belgium was the colonial power in Congo. Ultimately, he looks at it with a little bit of distant. That at the time African scientists they were simply excluded and white scientists parachuted in they took samples, wrote papers that were published in the West and they took all the credit he so he actually said he did. In that actually surprised me and I think. Part of the reason. I feel that he so comfortable. Talking about this is because he's in an academic setting. I think in universities across the world. Students are talking about privilege, so he seems like he is very comfortable having this conversation right now. I mean there's there's something very weird kind of about that coming from him right as a person who has admitted to taking part in exploitative science, absolutely and one of the good things is that he says that things are changing. We mbappe for example has received several international awards just recently for pioneering. The first effective treatment for Ebola reflects our stinky you. Say the politicians in global health in science, General. So okay. I want to ask you about the treatment in a minute, but to put it very bluntly. Have there actually been any concrete steps to try to change this power dynamic in the global health field? Because this is certainly not one of you know two stories. This is one of many many stories. There is I mean look. NBA has made a decision that many thought unthinkable leaving just a few years ago, he decided that all of the blood samples collected during this most recent Ebola. Epidemic will stay in Congo, so if anyone wants to study this outbreak, they will have to come to his institute. I bet that has ruffled some feathers though. I have I've heard from some American scientists. Who have privately expressed frustrations in the are really the ones who have led the way in studying Ebola, but peanut understands that decision when you think about how African scientists have been historically treated, and he says that Western scientists should just get over it. We have to wake up key things one. The world is changing too much endless Nah it's so weird to hear him say a matter of fairness, ater matter of fairness. Okay, so before we move on, tell me about the treatment that Mugabe worked on. So this is the thing that makes him smile right. We embiid calls it the most important achievement of his life, and it goes back to one thousand, nine, hundred, five during another equal outbreak in Congo. Eighty one percent of people infected with Ebola in this village were dying, and he wondered if antibodies developed bipolar survivors could be siphoned from their blood and used to treat new cases, so he gave sick patients transfusions of blood from a bowl of survivors. Too He injected Ebola patients with the blood of survivors. It vision. And seven survive, he says the medical establishment brought him off because he didn't have a control group. That's what they told him. But if this idea was accepted by scientists. We see a lot of life. Okay I mean to be fair. That is a really small group with no control among some other stuff. But on the other hand, it doesn't mean that he was wrong. You know that it should be totally dismissed, and maybe if more scientists looked into, it collaborated with him, maybe tried to replicate that data in some way, they could have learned something with him right because we now know that he was in fact correct about the antibodies. Yeah, I mean that's right in the context is important because I think what really eat set him. Is that maybe lots and lots of people could have been saved during the West. West Africa outbreak, which happened from two thousand, thirteen to two, thousand sixteen, and look just this year that science became the foundation of what is now proven to be the first effective treatment against the Bulla that is saving seventy percent of the people who are treated with amazing. Is He getting credit for that? At this point, he is yeah, absolutely okay, so how does look back on all of this week? What's what's his view on this is so he's he seventy seven, so he's obviously thinking about his legacy. One of the things that he told me is that he's always dreamed that big science could come out of Congo, and partly because of him, that's more likely happen. He got a commitment from Japan to build a state of the art research facility in Kinshasa and in the lab, just a few feet from his office where we talked US scientists were using advanced machines to sequence DNA of the Bulla samples that have to stay here in Congo Okay so moon bay, doctor and scientists who started in the Congo with no lab has a lab and is soon getting an even better one to do his work. Yeah, exactly, yeah, now I have my share. In. So I have my I have. A good subculture will bring joy. But he also has vice rate with micro biologist without Nice, I, asked myself that every day. And, so you know what he says, his biggest legacy won't be that. He helped to discovery or cure for it. It'll be if another young Congolese. Scientist finds himself with an interesting blood sample. He'll be able to investigate it

Ebola Congo Kinshasa Scientist Google Belgium John Jack Mugabe Fever Epidemic NPR Typhoid United States Dr John Jack Ater Kenya Mattie Dr John Africa Peralta
Seattle police clear 'occupied' area, make arrests

Morning Edition

03:45 min | 3 months ago

Seattle police clear 'occupied' area, make arrests

"Police in Seattle spent weeks responding to protest with patients. During the height of the George Floyd protests. People took over a small part of the city. They call that the Capitol Hill organized protest or chop. They called for changes in policing and the local police gave them space until the mood soured, and police moved in yesterday, NPR's Martin case reports from Seattle. The chops started when police here made a tactical decision to abandon the local precinct building in the face of huge nightly protests three weeks ago, But early yesterday morning they were back and enforce. Everybody was ordered to leave the streets and park. Those who didn't were arrested, where, by 10 a.m. The remaining protesters have been pushed to a perimeter, closely guarded by police returns, is one of the elder statesman of the shop. A man with a little force and little force came back to him. But we already Bay history. The city came in with more than just cops. They brought in social services for the homeless people who joined the camp as well as heavy machinery to remove the barriers, tents and other debris from the streets and the adjoining park. They say they'll have to keep the area off limits to non residents for 10 days as crews assess damage and clean things up. I was just done by the amount of graffiti, garbage and property destruction. That's the police chief Carmen Best. Weeks ago, she said that abandoning the precinct was not her decision. And now she seems gratified that the police are back. If anybody wants to protest and do so peacefully and exercise their right, we certainly encouraged that. What we can't have that we saw there where people were entrenched where crimes and lawlessness were occurring where people were being assaulted. Rape robbery on as you know, two murders. It was those murders, part of a recent rash of shooting incidents in and around the chopped that seemed to have pushed the city tow Act. The defenders of the chops say they're not to blame for those shootings was all gang violence. Every single shooting was gang related. This is James Madison, or at least that's the name he goes by here. He's well known as having been part of chops, Volunteer security effort, a photo of him holding a semiautomatic rifle of the entrance. The chop was picked up by websites around the world. But yesterday he was ambling around the new perimeter, making small talk with the police and lamenting the difficulty that he and his colleagues had had keeping this neighborhood safe. So towards the end when the shooting started to happen. At that point, we decided we're gonna start pulling out because he saw what we refer to as a power vacuum that power vacuum has also felt by some local business owners. They sued the city last week, accusing it of abandoning them. Residents also felt the strain to hear Has Ebola and his wife have an apartment inside the chop, he says. While he supports the protester's aims, Toward the end, he started to feel as if he was being held hostage. We were watching fights happen almost everyday daily. So like I was jockeying for position and giving orders and authority and somebody's waving a gun and saying I'm in charge of some gestures of with the band says No. I'm in charge and give us a taste of what being a lawless World would look like even some of the most dedicated supporters of the protest here have come around to the idea that the occupation camping out was a mistake. Asia Morgan is a young African American woman from Tacoma. I'm a believer that if we are going to protest, we should keep it moving, be like water. Guerrilla warfare. This isn't this isn't something that you just sit and fight like this is a constant battle, and city officials say they welcome that the police chief repeated her support for lawful protests and a continuing conversation about reimagining police. Well, the mayor said she's already planning to cut tens of millions of dollars from the Police Department budget.

Police Department Carmen Best Seattle James Madison George Floyd Asia Morgan NPR Tacoma Ebola Martin Rape Robbery
Congo’s Deadliest Ebola Outbreak Is Declared Over

Michael Brown

00:15 sec | 3 months ago

Congo’s Deadliest Ebola Outbreak Is Declared Over

"Washington, health officials say the second largest second deadliest Ebola outbreak in history is officially over almost two years after the first case was confirmed. Thie outbreak claimed the lives of nearly 2300 people in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The 10th

Democratic Republic Of Congo Ebola Washington
Congo announces end to 2nd deadliest Ebola outbreak ever

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

Congo announces end to 2nd deadliest Ebola outbreak ever

"It's now official eastern Congo has month and then to the second deadliest the bailout breaking history the virus killed two thousand two hundred and eighty people if in eighty two years some troubles and a lack of trust in the community slowed down the promise of new vaccines the W. H. O. regional director for Africa Dr Majidi similarities says the challenge was a great one at times it seemed like a mission impossible the epidemic presented an unprecedented challenge because it was the first debate epidemic and a complex sign however the milestone was overshadowed by the enormous health challenges still facing conger the world's largest measles epidemic the rising threat of Kevin nineteen and another new episode outbreak in the novels about stocks and I. T. is optimistic about the future together we live in injuring legacy which is lost support in the fight against covert nineteen and the other outbreaks I'm Karen Thomas

Congo Regional Director Kevin Karen Thomas Official W. H. O. Conger
"ebola" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

03:09 min | 4 months ago

"ebola" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"Have been on those at the very top and as a result we see that some people are riding out this crisis As well as they can't while others are in these mind-numbingly long lines we see on. Tv every day waiting in their cars for hours to get a box of food. I mean scenes. We haven't really seen in this country since the Great Depression and And we really need to make sure That we have An economic philosophy that That puts those people I Put Working People Middle Class people? First that's going to be the key to get the economy going again. I really appreciate that perspective and I think you're right there's just gonNa be almost We like you said we all we all hope That we have stabilized and this is largely behind us by then You know the epidemiologist and me Doesn't see that and so you know thinking about almost putting a paddle To to shock the American economy back into existences. Something really big I We always ask our guests. How are you spending these days In in in in this quarantine moment in time a lot of challenge in frustration. Well I mean I'm fortunate to be home with my family My three adult children Have left their homes in her sheltering here with us and knock wood where all healthy and well Know I spend my days like while other people I'm working from home And then also speaking out as I can on this cova crisis in trying to make my voice heard about what I think is going wrong with the response. What I think we need to do. Differently. It's a very very difficult time. I feel like my family's been very fortunate in this difficult time on doing whatever we can to try to help help other people as well. We appreciate your then. We appreciate your leadership now. and we We know what's at stake in November and There's a big responsibility we have to take on so Thank you for your fights and for for the work that you've done the work that you will do look forward to continuing what I know is going to be both a vigorous debate and a Lotta Partnership To to to make this world more just and equitable. So thank you for your time. Today I really appreciate it. Thanks so much. Thanks for having me as always. Here's what I'm watching right now. As some of the world's biggest cities in major lower and middle income countries start to experience major Cova nineteen outbreaks without nearly the resources available in countries like the US or the UK how will their leaders societies cope. Meanwhile over one hundred twenty countries have joined together in a call for an inquiry into the Chinese government's early handling of cove in nineteen. How will this shape? Global politics around covered. Nineteen and how will that shape our ability to respond particularly if there's a second major wave if you'd like to support organizations on the front lines carrying for some of America's most vulnerable donate to crooked Corona Virus Relief Fund at Crooked Dot Com Slash Corona virus?.

Cova America US UK
"ebola" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

09:43 min | 4 months ago

"ebola" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"You would I whatever our political differences inside the progressive. Are you see the world in a certain kind away and I think Donald Trump and his allies see the world in different way? He's always viewed this as pr not really substance. His idea of what? The Corona virus sponsors is. It's a a press conference every day. Not really fighting the disease. I think that's one big difference. Secondly I think their ideological hatred of their disbelief that the people working in the government can really make a difference. A has led to this crazy strategy. Were they just push aside experts and bring in Business consultants to try to start from scratch when there's a lot of this that the government has great expertise. I think that's I think it's ideology. And then there's just the kind of the harsh politics of it. Trump's desire to put his political cronyism in his and his affinity for his political allies ahead of doing the right thing is his bickering with democratic governors. His desire to see You know his his buddies get contracts for different things. All these things have put politics ahead health. Then you know. He just has had always a hostile relationship with science. Whether that's around climate change or his dabbling with the Anti Vaccine Movement Or now it in fighting with the experts at the CDC and with other experts. Here on this so I think I think it's it's a this is really a bunch of things that have already been true about trump that are getting exposed when they're really subjected to this crisis crisis brings out the best and worst all of us. We're seeing as things have always been true about trump and trump's presidency in extreme in extreme situation. Yeah in in the frustrating thing is that you know the the rest of government. Seems like they wanted their job connected to a lot of folks at the. Cdc and you know they're working really hard to try and do the right thing. Put this moment. Really highlights the critical role of leadership. Because without it not only do. Do Poor leaders fail to mount the generative response that you want but they just confused the kind of response that that could occur even if there was no leader there in the first place and you can almost imagine that like there was no trump effect at all and there was no president? that The agencies in government probably could figure out how to coordinate this thing. But it's just that you know there is this interruption Of the need to placate this short term political interests this focus on PR. That is just it just every day. Foils the best goals in the best intentions of the folks who have to working government underneath him. Yeah I agree with that and I think you know I still stay in touch with some of my former colleagues from the abol response or career people score still in these agencies. They're trying very hard. They're doing their best. But I mean in the end Seville like this does require leadership that leadership can either put in the right direction or the wrong one. It can either be helpful empowering of that talent or can be demoralizing and disabling of that talent and I think we've seen obviously too much of the wrong direction not enough of the right direction in coming out of the Ebola response You all didn't just focus on camping down the response. You also wanted to use that experience as a sort of stress test. What did government need to build inside of it to be ready for the next one? Can you talk a little bit about? Institutionally what that looked like and had it all worked as it was supposed to. Maybe what the world would have would have looked like right now. That's a great question. So at the end of the ABOL response we Had reduced cases. I left when we had cases down to five cases a week and my colleague state and we got. They got down to zero. But we all recognized that Whatever our successes had been We had been too late. A lot of people died and if we gotten there sooner we might have been able to prevent more of that and that more importantly what we realized was that Another thing like this would come. New People have now seen on the Internet. The past few weeks a little clip of President Obama giving a speech in the middle of the bull response in December of twenty fourteen at the National Institutes of health. Where he said in that speech you know five years from now we could face some kind of pandemic like a flu like thing would come to the United States and we need to be ready for it and people have seen that clip. And they've said you know this is. He predicted this well. Yeah I mean. We saw that something like this would come. Who wanted to be ready for it so we said what we do is we would create a pandemic response office inside the White House. That would be preparing our country for something like what we're going through. Now when President Obama set that up in early two thousand sixteen he said. We'll try a playbook and leave it for the next administration what to do if something like this happens and we and the people who worked on it did right such playbook and left it behind along with an analysis of what had worked on the ball response and all that was left behind for president trump. Now what's interesting is for the first year he was president. He kept a lot of that place but then in two thousand eighteen John Bolton took over the National Security Council he disbanded the pandemic preparation and response unit. Sent most of the people away from the White House. They obviously pay no attention to the pandemic playbook that we have left them and the consequences that have been enormous. I mean if we'd had a dedicated team inside the White House working away on preparation they would sound the alarms early about what was going on. In China they would begin to order the test kits. We've never had in this country. They would have begun to order the protective gear that are healthcare workers still lack. They would have done all the things that the playbook said they were supposed to do. And instead none of those things happen. And that's a big reason why we're in the mess. We're in right now. The point that you raise really point to the critical role of federal leadership. And can you talk a little bit about what what the next president You know You and I both agree on who that needs to be right now. But can you talk about a little bit of what you know? Joe Biden if he's elected in in in the fall when he's elected in the fall What is he going to face? And what kinds of Leadership are going to need to see both in The direct term to take to take on cove nineteen specifically but then more broadly to take on the the dire economic consequences that it has caused in our society. Yeah so look. I certainly hope that the diseases under control by the time. He becomes President on January twentieth. I certainly hope the economy's in better shape on January twentieth. I am hoping for the best like every American. But there's a lot of reason to believe that that's not what we're gonNA find when he becomes president on January twentieth and so as you said job number one's going to be getting this disease under control. I mean as long as people are afraid reasonably afraid that if they go to stores and restaurants. They're going to get sick as long as workers are afraid that they do. Their jobs are going to get sick. There's going to be an over hang over our economy that all the cheerleading by president trump can't make go away so the health issue is separate from the economic issue. It isn't some choice some. Let's do health or economy one or the other is the central piece of getting this economy fixed because when people are scared they don't shop they don't work they don't do all these thanks. And so we gotta deal with that and that means that if this is still raging in January of twenty twenty one president Biden would Do the kinds of things I've been talking about. Which is you put science and medicine. I heat the full power the federal government behind finishing the job. You're doing what we need to do. He'd make sure we have ubiquitous testing widespread testing not just a few hundred thousand tests a day but millions of tests a week. Whatever needs to happen to get this under control. He'd make sure that we're protecting our doctors or nurses are workers Making sure that their standards for the ways in which people should work to keep them safe on the job to keep consumer safe out the economy and of course he finished the job on doing whatever. We'll need still to be done in terms of getting Therapeutics in place getting New Diagnostics. Place an ultimate getting a vaccine in place widely distributed widely administered. All for free to those who need the vaccine. And so you know. That's I think. The Healthcare Jenner look on the economic agenda. I don't WANNA get too far ahead of the vice-president 'cause he's GonNa have some statements about this in the days ahead but it clearly. I think the biggest change is going to be putting working people in the middle class. I you know we've seen every economic decision. This presence Bateson stay one has been about those at the top and we're seeing the consequences of this right now in this crisis. I mean the the crisis hasn't just Been the trigger of a real economic collapse in our country. It's revealed existing problems that we've had that have come to the forefront and You know those existing problems are that Joe just too much of the focus. These past three years.

president Donald Trump Joe Biden President Obama White House CDC National Institutes of health Seville cronyism ABOL flu vice-president Jenner Bateson United States National Security Council John Bolton China
"ebola" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

11:20 min | 4 months ago

"ebola" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"Cove Nineteen is the first truly global infectious disease pandemic in over a century already. It is infected. Nearly five million people in taking nearly three hundred twenty thousand lives across two hundred and thirteen countries worldwide. But the last time a disease grip the world's attention it was the west African Ebola epidemic. This is the end game in Liberia. A medical team hunting for the final traces of Ebola from infected Ebola patients in Guinea to some of the world's most advanced laboratories here in Paris. They're trying to find out why this particular break has killed so many like cove in nineteen today. At that time. There was no vaccine or effective treatment for a Bulla between two thousand thirteen in two thousand sixteen. It took eleven thousand three hundred twenty three lives of twenty eight thousand six hundred forty six people infected the vast majority in Sierra Leone Liberia and Guinea. Although in total only spread to ten countries overall both Ebola and covert nineteen captured. The media's undivided attention for weeks but only one of them went on to become a global pandemic why there are a number of key differences between them. I though it's really contagious. Ebola is nowhere near as contagious. As Corona virus he will spread by direct contact with bodily fluids where Cova can travel in tiny little droplets in the air. Epidemiologists measure the transmissibility of an infectious disease using a number called are not it estimates the average number of new cases per individual case. That number is just a bit higher for covert than is for a Bulla but small differences in are not can make big differences in spread. Here's why if are not was too then would give it to people who give it to to people who give it to to people and so on using the are not values for a Bola and covert nineteen. We can calculate how many people would get the disease. After ten generations for Ebola. It would be six hundred thirteen people for cove. Nineteen it's fifteen times higher nine thousand five hundred and thirty seven people second Ebola Cova nineteen have similar incubation periods. Meaning the mean time between when someone is infected and when they develop symptoms but Kovic is far more likely to be symptomatic in fact. It's unclear if Bola is ever a dramatic in symptomatic. Carriers are a big problem when it comes to spreading the disease but he Bolla is way deadlier than cove in nineteen per individual. Ebola kills nearly fifty percent of people who are infected though. We're not exactly sure what. The mortality rate is with Kovin. Because we don't know how many people are asymptomatic. It's far less deadly per person but because of how fast and how far it spreads it's already killed many more people than it did back in two thousand th through twenty sixteen. But here's the biggest difference. Our third and final points. It's not just differences between the two viruses themselves but how we as humans respond. The global response to below was slower in coming than it should have been. Ultimately President Obama deployed the US army to build field hospitals across the affected countries in an army of contact razors were deployed to contain the virus but it was contained and following. Those failures. A number of proactive steps were taken the. Cdc launched the Global Health Security Agenda Network. A forty nine outposts across the world to ascertain respond to emerging pandemic threats. A pandemic playbook was written in response unit was established in the White House to make sure it got executed and everyone knew something like this was coming. Here's Dr Anthony Fauci in two thousand seventeen. There is no question that there will be a challenge. The coming administration in the arena of infectious diseases both chronic infectious diseases in the sense of already ongoing disease and we have certainly a large burden of that but also there will be a surprise outbreak and yet none of those things happen when it came to Kovin. Today I talked to two leaders who lived through a Bola about that experience and what we should have learned from it doctor Craig. Spencer is an emergency room doctor at New York Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. He's emerged as one of the most important voices from the frontlines of the cove. Nineteen response the first time. I heard Dr Spencer's name. Though was when he made headlines during the abol epidemic as one of only four Americans who got the disease for over five weeks. I worked in an Ebola treatment. Center Gecko do the epicenter of the outbreak. During this time I cried as I held children. Who are not strong enough to survive virus but I also experienced a mess joy when patients I treated were cured. Invited me into their family. As a brother upon discharge. He joined me to share his insights about Ebola the American response and covert nineteenth. I I WANNA jump right in. So you're on the front lines in the Ebola epidemic and now on cove nineteen. How do they compare? I spent so much time thinking about this and my conclusion is that they're both incredibly different and really eerily similar when we think back to Bola and what. We remember from five six years ago in that big outbreak in west Africa it was contained. There wasn't a huge risk of a massive global spread. We knew that there was gonna be cases and a bunch of different places because people from all over the world responding but we all knew that this was going to be this global opera at one point think the majority of people in the United States thought that they would know someone in their communities. That would get this. We knew that that wasn't likely in terms of a bull as well. We knew that the mortality for that was unfortunately really high. And we didn't have any therapeutics at that time it was scary. But when you think on Kovic now what I've been telling people in some ways it's so similar but it's also the exact opposite. This corona virus is truly the perfect virus. It works really well. It doesn't kill a lot of people Relative you know maybe you know half for one or two percent of people that infects it's spreads so well By a symtomatic or pre-symptoms people. This is actually what we really worried about for. All the people that worried about Ebola that we were actually worried about kind of the public health and pandemic preparedness world was something like Corona virus. Knew that it was only a matter of time. And you've been on the front lines of this at at near Presbyterian and can you walk us through what a day in the life at the height of this pandemic looked like and then you also were a provider during a Bulla. What was that like in in? Can you compare and contrast them? When we were about a month ago I would say was when things were the worst here and I was at work overnight last night talking to one of my colleagues and we were trying to describe it. Walking into the emergency department was quite frankly like walking into the apocalypse. Remember one day. I walked in and in spots where we normally have eleven patients. We had you know twenty five or thirty half of them. Were intimated on mechanical ventilation. Everyone on three to four. Iv Drip sedation blood pressure support etc was like nothing. I'd ever seen before and I'd seen despair. I'd seen death obviously in west Africa and days long. We'd spend a lot of time in personal protective equipment. Get REALLY DEHYDRATED. Drink a lot of fluid to try to catch up and people who were finding the morning that ended up dying in the afternoon. I think so. Many similarities between what we saw thankfully are big outbreak. Really kind of the peak of this as passed at least for now in West Africa. This was months and months actually over a couple years that we were dealing with a bowl cases people dying at the doors of Treatment Centers. So there's a lot of similarities but really on a daily basis. It's for us. It was not having enough staff worrying about personal protective equipment worrying about ourselves. And what happened if we got infected? We had so many people that were exposed so many people that got sick and we're out. It was both physically exhausting and mentally exhausting. And that's I think really the most profound similarity between what we saw with covert here in New York City and what we experienced every single day in west Africa during a bola this profound in persistent physical exhaustion combined with this mental exhaustion. Which leads you vulnerable to error. Which leaves you vulnerable to infection I remember when you were infected with Ebola. I remember because I had to talk about it on the news and The media's response to that experience was in some ways a harbinger of what has happened here with the Info Derek Both the horrific misinformation that we see and also The denial ISM and the politicisation. You're in the middle of all that and You Know I. I'm sure you spent a lot of time thinking about it and speaking about it Can Can you talk to us? Abou how our public's perspective on Ebola versus Kovic have both differed and maybe how one has set up the other? I have so many concerns with. How responded really as can from the media standpoint as well as from a political standpoint to a Bulla in twenty fourteen not just to illness but even really in west Africa few remember all of the messages that were maligning. West Africans blaming the spread on their culture for things like the fact that they can't stay under quarantine. It can't be that hard to just you know this is the thing that's GonNa stop this virus. Why can't people just stay at home for a bit or maligning? The fact that West Africans can't stop having these huge funerals both of these points of which I think we've seen so much here in the United States in terms of trying to manage the spread of the virus. So I think that's something we maligned in west Africans boat. We've really celebrated here in the United States. That's one thing I think we set up. Also that you know that was a weird time. When I was in the hospital was October. It was right before an election in early. November and politicians were super happy to jump on top of my infection to undermine the authority of the president and other politicians. I remember one headline saying that Isis was thinking about infecting some Isis members with a bullet and pushing them across the Mexican border. Like it was just pure craziness and the unfortunate thing was that. That's what caught on the people with the loudest voices. Were the ones that fan the flames. I'm certainly biased in my perspective because so much of the media in twenty fourteen was about me but I know that it was poor. We spent more time focused on whether a bullock can be transferred by a bowling ball as opposed to talking about what was happening in West Africa and the real public health principles. In contrast to that. I'd actually say that our response at least from a media perspective not a political one but from a media one has probably been significantly better. This time around. What I've noticed is that public health professionals in front line providers have become a little clique of celebrities. Like they're on. Cnn or on Fox News were on so many different programs.

Ebola West Africa west Africa Kovin United States Liberia New York City Guinea Sierra Leone Liberia Kovic Dr Anthony Fauci Bola Cova White House US army Dr Spencer
"ebola" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

04:29 min | 10 months ago

"ebola" Discussed on Short Wave

"So what I saw out in the field. The blood sample seek guide. All of this plays. He's a crucial role in the history of Buller Right. It was huge but it's pr who gets the bulk of the credit for discovering all up and you can tell that this bothers John Jock membe. If you don't recognize the work done in the field is not correct It is a team you. The team actually wrote a memoir. No time to lose and he does mentioned but just in passing as a bright scientist whose constantly pestering him for more resources has talked about this. Well Peter Pyatt facetime Stein bill so I got on the phone. He's now the director of the prestigious London School of Hygiene and tropical medicine and I asked him if he felt at all responsible for writing yelm out of his history of Ebola. I think that's a fair comment. But my book Glenn Not an attempt to write than that's history of colon some bit more. My personal experience is more biography. That sense was this kind of like an awkward conversation to have ater. Yeah I mean. Especially because he's Belgian and Belgium was the colonial power our in Congo ultimately. You know he looks at it with a little bit of distant. He says that at the time African scientists they were simply excluded -cluded in white scientists parachuted in. They took samples wrote papers that were published in the West and they took all the credit he so he actually said and he did and I mean in that actually surprised me and I think part of the reason I feel that he so comfortable talking about this is because he's he's in an academic setting I think in universities across the world students are talking about privilege so he seems like like he is very comfortable having this conversation right now I mean. There's there's something very weird kind of about that coming from him. Right as a person who has admitted to taking taking part in exploitative science absolutely one of the good things is that he says that things are changing we the NBA for example has received several international awards just recently for pioneering. The first effective treatment for Ebola reflects are extinct museum the m the politicians in global health in science in general. So okay I want to ask you about the treatment in a minute but to put. Yeah very bluntly have there actually been any concrete steps to try to change this power dynamic in the global health field because this is certainly not one one of you know two stories. This is one of many many stories there is I mean. Look William Baer has made a decision that many thought unthinkable thinkable even just a few years ago. He decided that all of the blood samples collected turing this. Most recent Ebola epidemic will stay in Congo. So if anyone anyone wants to study this outbreak they will have to come to his institute. I bet that has ruffled some feathers. Though I have I've heard from some some American scientists who have privately expressed frustrations and the are really the ones who have led the way in studying Ebola but PR understands. Understands the decision when you think about how African scientists have been historically treated and he says that Western scientists should just get Over it we have to wake up to one. The world is changing too much endless. Nah It's so weird to hear him say a matter of fairness ater matter furnace okay so before we move on and tell me about the treatment that Mugabe worked on so this is the thing that makes him smile. Rate William big calls it the the most important achievements of his life and it goes back to one thousand nine hundred five during another equal outbreak in Congo. Eighty one percent of people infected with Bolla in this village were dying and he wondered if antibodies developed by Ebola survivors could be siphoned from their blood and used to treat new cases cases so he gave sick patients transfusions of blood.

Ebola John Jock membe William Baer Congo Buller Right Glenn Peter Pyatt Mugabe Belgium NBA scientist London School of Hygiene
"ebola" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

05:25 min | 10 months ago

"ebola" Discussed on Short Wave

"You're listening to shortwave from NPR. Manny Safai here with none other than NPR east. Africa correspondent eight Peralta to. Hey there ater. Hey mattie thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled but I want to open with a quick question who discovered Ebola and Google. It first of all. How dare you asked me a a question? I should definitely know the answer to and don't and yeah I already. Google bet came up was a Belgian. Microbiologist I but I think you're about to tell me there's more to the story there absolutely there always is right so I mean you cheated. Yeah what you probably saw is a bunch of White Westerners like Dr John Jack. Mugambi does not. Yeah he was not one of the people that came up yes so he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo. But back in nineteen seventy six. We we emberg he was the first doctor to collect any bola sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote. A lot of history has been written without your name. Yes but you on this Yes it is it not correct did not quite so today on the show correcting the record on a bola the story of Dr John Jock Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing its future to some in the medical community. It's a controversial move. Okay ater so we're talking talking about a Congolese Dr Jacques in his role in discovering Abullah. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa south he said we should start in nineteen seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD in microbiology at the Institute in Belgium and and he could have stayed in Europe but he decided to come back to Congo. But when I arrive here The condition of work were not I. I had no lab. I have no mice for experimentation so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah it's tough to do lab work without a lab you now. He said without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen nineteen seventy six we sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak It's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola. But no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever and he goes to this local hospital but he says he finds it completely empty was nobody there. Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and and people had died there but in the morning when they heard was sent from capitol. They thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital and we started seeing patients. So so what's he seeing. When the patients come in he was seeing people who were very weak with fever they had headaches? I started it to him to make the physical time but at that time. have no gloves you know gloves. And of course he had to draw blood but when I removed they're the city which Blood continued to spread out. It was the first time from two CDs momentum and also my fingers so with a bow. Wow Yeah so he says he he would wash his hands a lot but really really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on and he was able to not get it and at this point we MP. He was startled but then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village also got sick with a fever all the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point I was like. Oh it's probably not those things. Thanks yeah I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different. So he convinced one none to go back to Kinshasa with him so what happens next. She died at a hospital a couple of days later but he took blood samples and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end. That was Peter. Piot who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium. Aw The guy who turned up from Google Search. Yeah that's right. And so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit the CDC in the US US gets involved and they realize this is a new virus that caused hemorragic.

fever Kinshasa Google Dr John Jack Congo Blood Peralta NPR typhoid Dr Jacques Manny Safai Belgium Kenya mattie Dr John Jock Mugabe Africa Ebola Mugambi Bolla Institute for Tropical Medicin
"ebola" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

12:06 min | 11 months ago

"ebola" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"Blog I am dead diamond from Philadelphia we grabbed a quiet room today Wednesday to sit down with Dr Nancy night all right she's the director of the division of Global Health Protection at CDC what that means even well you and I were waking up eating breakfast watched Shing TV Dr Knight and her team are grappling with challenges like an outbreak of monkeypox happening rolled away for seeing a deadly outbreak of a disease called the monkey pox whether global threats like HIV for many people led to believe that the AIDS epidemic is starting vanish. That isn't the case Sola the world is fighting the worst epidemic in history CDC in our public health system are in the middle of a fire where local problems like a flood talkers airlifted patients to safety one by one after they were caught in the rising floodwaters. That's what Dr Nights team tackles and you'll hear my conversation with her about her path her current challenges and what she sees in the future that conversation starts now Captain Nancy night welcome to politico pulse check thank you I'm so happy to be here you're director of the Division of Global Health Protection at CDC yes that's right what does that mean that means that it essentially we help to protect you Americans here and people all around the world from global health threats is your division looking at emerging diseases is looking at wildfires in the middle of Africa like define what it means to have a global health threat global health threats are actually quite broad we focus on outbreaks that's maybe the first thing that you or your listeners might think of of when you think of a health threat especially a global health threat and outbreaks are are one of the big things that we do respond to and we all countries to prepare for but it's not exclusively outbreaks and so for example we work on humanitarian crises we work with countries to deal with those crises that occur from man made or naturally occurring events cyclones hurricanes mudslides events that can put the public health system at risk and can put the health of the people at risk so if you're looking at your dashboard of the things that you're focused on how much is pure health like in a bowl outbreak versus the mud side that now has caused catastrophic effect it's it's really a continuum because what we do in the division of Global Health Protection is we take a an all hazards approach so we look at public health system in the countries that we partner with and we we work with them and other partners to identify what are the gaps what are those weaknesses is in the public health system and how do we as CDC best fit into the the ways to address ask those gaps so where do we should we best apply our expertise as a partner as others look at how they might best apply their expertise so since we take more of that systems approach to it it's it's the same kind of public health system that you need whether it's an outbreak of as you said he bola or whether it's the health threats that you need to be aware of that follow a mudslide I can maybe use an example from from my work in West Africa and how some of these systems intersect so I had worked previously in Nigeria I spent three and a half years there and then the abol outbreak in West Africa Happened I was based in another part of the continent when that hit and I was asked to come back to Nigeria to help with the Abullah response there many people may not remember that Nigeria actually had ebola during the two thousand fourteen outbreak we mo mostly think about the countries that were hit really hard we think about Liberia yet right now we think about Liberia we think about Sierra Leone we think about Guinea Nigeria also had an outbreak from an imported case so we were able to work together. CDC The Nigerian government who UNICEF medicines frontiers all of the partner as we're able to work together by using that systems approach we had emergency operations center and we all worked out of that Emergency Operation Center we had investments that had been made previously in that through polio so that expertise came from the northern part of the country on how to operate an EEOC an emergency operation center and it was applied to the Ebola outbreak we had previously invested in building the Capacity for Disease Detectives who are the people who need to investigate and have to trace who's come in contact with me exactly that program in Nigeria started through our collaboration with the Ministry of Health back in two thousand and seven something I've always wondered about disease detectives what sorts of skills you have to have to be a disease detective is like being a normal detective you're just a specialist in healthcare that's a great question so we we train disease detectives at different levels so just like here in the United States we have national level at CDC for all in public health we have state level we have local level at a county or at city the same is true overseas so in Nigeria national level their states and there's local level and we train for these this epidemiology capacity in different ways as for those different levels for the people who are working at a national level many of them have backgrounds as laboratory scientists as physicians as nurses and because they are running and managing these national programmes they're trained for a longer period of time typically our program is to you here's for the next level you don't necessarily have as many people with those higher degrees maybe some other interest within the professions and we typically trained at that level for to be a disease detective for nine months and then at the district level so that closer to the community not level we will often have individuals who have training that's not not like a full fledged nurse but made me more like a nurse's aide and maybe community health workers so we will train people at that level for just a few months so that they haven't enough skills to detect there's something wrong I need to tell somebody there's something wrong and then at the higher levels the individuals that have more trained gene can come in and help them to ask the right questions to determine exactly what's wrong you're in a role where you're thinking constantly about the health threats around the world did you ever expect you would be doing job like this actually no I did not so how did it happen my interest in in medicine goes back to when I was a kid I've always wanted to be a doctor and your family physician and the family physician yes I and I didn't really know back then what kind of doctor I wanted to be but I knew I wanted to be a doctor I knew I wanted to be able to help people fast forward a little bit and I went to college and I decided I wanted to do peace corps before going on to medical school that really gave me the interest in working in the global arena and being able to figure out what how could I apply my interest in medicine and and my interest in international global arena together you know in my in my career in Peace Corps I was a science teacher I didn't have any medical background reassigned in the Peace Corps I was in La- Suto I was in a small village in lieu to in southern Africa and this was really in the early stages of HIV there was there was no testing for HIV in the country at that time I was living in a small village and people even aware of what HIV was and the risks people had heard of HIV back then some of them not all of them the people who had heard of HIV most of them didn't really believe in it they thought it was something that was made up and we're talking nineteen eighty he's nineteen ninety s one thousand nine hundred ninety nine thousand nine hundred nineteen ninety-two so even even thirty years ago less than thirty years ago people thought HIV was manufactured Total pick right so I really realized that the need for understanding at a community level what what people need even when it comes to information so I had really been thinking about what people need in terms of health care which is really important aspect of of keeping people healthy but I also realized what people need in terms of information to to protect themselves and to prevent disease and that hasn't really been something that I've thought as much about prior to that so that was your exposure to global health at least the lengthy you're experiencing in southern Africa but you went into local health in the United States you worked in the Cincinnati Department for instance I did yes And I did that actually as federal employee as a uniform Servicemember I was assigned to work in the city of Cincinnati as a primary take care provider so I worked in one of the underserved clinics in in the inner city and so by primary job was services to my community members in the clinic there secondarily though I because I had this interest in in the public health aspects of health I was also involved in the city's planning the the city health department specifically they're planning the Health Department to interact with all of the other core components of disaster response from the city and from the surrounding counties and the Tri State region one thing I've always wondered about is how applicable is local health delivery to the died when thinking about sub Saharan Africa versus Cincinnati and downtown health issues I think it's a little bit of both certainly there are many of the same challenges that we grapple with at a local level and at a national level and at a multilateral level.

"ebola" Discussed on Important, Not Important

Important, Not Important

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"ebola" Discussed on Important, Not Important

"<hes> but <hes> they cannot just say okay everybody in congo. You're you get vaccinated and then they did this. Probably it would be the best because because you would have you know better you know people would be immunized. The problem is is still an experimental experimental vaccine the we we believe it works quite well experimental actions you give it to everybody right so this isn't i mean right certainly can't added to americans or europeans vaccination schedule if we can't even if we can't even blanket the d._r._c. with it like you said it's been gone away for free and it's as much as it's working. It's still pretty environmental because usually these things take quite a rollout in testing testing to to be phased in the u._s. You would only have you know if it were a risk in the the u._s. Potentially to make sure not to risk i mean yeah and and and that's what i want to move to cause i think during the west africa when there was some worry about people in and and you know we i i can't remember i can't remember if we did shutdown travel from those countries directly to the u._s. or not but there was a lot of worry that it would come in and issues like that so let's be clear here for everyone. There is no ebola outbreak in the u._s. or in europe. It's it's not coming here anytime soon. It's not on a flight today but the the current outbreak is in a bad way and you all are throwing your very best at it and it's complicated how likely considering how long it's gone on what you've learned from west africa and things like that that it travels to greater africa or let's start with out of the d._r._c. to greater africa or beyond <hes> what i think. This is what everybody has been dreading. Since august. I wanted broke you know because because where it is in north kivu at doors a bunch of countries you know it's not far from sudan. It's not too far from south sudan dan. It's not too far from rwanda from burundi. I mean this thing could go. This thing can go very easy to people travel a lot..

west africa africa sudan congo rwanda ebola burundi europe
"ebola" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"ebola" Discussed on American Scandal

"Over a potential Ebola epidemic. Many in the White House, feel it's important Americans. Understand that those successfully treated for Bola. Pose no further threat to underscore. Toward the message President Obama host Nina fam- in the Oval Office and embraces her for the cameras..

Nina fam Ebola White House Oval Office Obama President
"ebola" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

04:17 min | 1 year ago

"ebola" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"It has good claim to be the most successful military lines ever. But his birthday will not be a happy one thirty years after the end of the Cold War. It's being shaken by transatlantic argument over who pays the Bill and questions about what it should really be. The president of the Philippines. Rodriguez Tessie wants to rename the country. But his suggestion for new name could be unintentionally smutty. I up. It's been five years since abo- epidemic swept across west Africa. Wherever it is discovered. That would be quarantined completely what gets out the mixing exit medical eleven thousand people in west Africa died. The response was said to be too slow last August afresh outbreak of the virus hit the Democratic Republic of Congo DRC. This was the first time that the Mola had struck in an active war zone. It's now going to be the second largest Birla epidemic. Star still from the scrub village in North Kivu and now spread to other villages and other times. Notably in these two big times. Bending boot Tembu live your Akron reports for the economist from the and as extremely hot control and to regulate because it's such an insecure area. This is a region that's been terrorized by different militia for over two decades. So it's difficult for health workers to get to certain villages. There have been repeated attacks on health workers on health centers and Olympia, why are rebels attacking clinics. The epidemic has been very badly communicated to the population the people in his rebel groups of people from the communities surrounding temper, and they don't trust the a better response as big jealousy about all of this money. That's being pumped into the area that none of the people are really benefiting really receiving. They see these NGO workers UN workers going Poston fleets of four by fours. And they think about as business that people are there to make money, and can you tell me a bit more. About the attacks have being carried out by rebels recently. So there have been three attacks on to about a treatment centers in the last month and one of them was touch so badly. It was completely burned done. And I also attended a funeral of a police officer who was killed guarding Birla centre. He was shot in the head by a group of rebels who came to attack the center, and I attended his funeral. Lots of the other police officers with their there was music, and it was it was a pretty tragic scene in the church whose wife was there. His sister's beside the coffin dressed in black sort of wailing and sobbing an iceberg to his mother at the door. Of me. She just kept repeating that. He was a good, man. He loved his family. He loved his mother eleven. Yes, you asking who who killed him? They killed him. But who are they who are they? And she said they've told me it was the my my my my my mind is quite a blanket to be honest. There Marriott different rebel groups is basically just groups in the area the who formed to protect evidences, and they made up of young men in the community epidemic on its own terrible thing when you have an epidemic in war zone. How much harder does it make to to treat that Denic? It makes it a little harder. One of the major problems is that you're dealing with terrorists population people who've been tapped by different groups, and it's difficult for them to trust the people in the responses very little trust in institutions and authorities for very good reason. And there are lots of rumors about the army and the police being involved with the rebel groups. Does this sort of frustration that people are saying we'll we've been subject to these attacks for years and nobody's done anything. And now that doesn't about outbreak one of these phone as a flood. In and trying to help us whether before and how does that low trust affect attempts to try and contain this about her outbreaks? It means that it's going to last much longer spread over wide area than than it would otherwise it sounds like it. I spoke to many different people in the community. Who said they didn't believe a better exists. It didn't believe better exists. They're not going to comply with all of the incredibly necessary procedures to stop the spreads washing hands touching people who could have not touching dead bodies..

west Africa Democratic Republic of Congo D Rodriguez Tessie Philippines Bill North Kivu president Birla centre Akron Olympia UN Poston officer one thirty years two decades five years
"ebola" Discussed on Alice @97.3

Alice @97.3

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on Alice @97.3

"Alice's morning. Show so you're telling me there's a book called the hot, zone but it's by Richard. Preston Yeah the terrifying true story of the origins of Ebola, not what is the origin Well it's in the book I can't, remember what what, I thought the way you get. It is by eating monkey meat I think. So but you can, also get it it can. Be passed from. Human, to human I think that it's they lay on the corpses it's, highly contagious yeah but I thought, if you're saying the origin from what I read it's. From? Eating monkey meat infected. And that's the way. That's how it gets. Into humans right that's what I know I that sounds right I really don't know it looks, like Juliana Margulis. Is, going to star in a mini series based on, the book the hot zone Looks like I don't see the guy's, name mentioned here It didn't it's about Ebola and it's for National Geographic so There's that interested all right guys this part of. The show. Is brought to you by UPS jobs dot. Com Right. Now caller number nine eight. Hundred four hundred three six nine seven wins a pair. Tickets to see Greg Proops all he is so funny if you've ever seen him do his live standup show and. I want to say I saw on his Instagram. That he's going to try and record an album. This weekend so I don't think this is. His podcast thing this is he's going. To do a comedy. Album he is. So rapid fire. And so funny you almost like run out of breath you're laughing so hard He's sexy to who thinks he said. I do I don't you guys came up with. This yesterday I thought you said a friend. Of mine and you'd think he wants. To bone you know I did not, say back Oh my God? You.

Greg Proops Ebola Alice Juliana Margulis Preston Richard
"ebola" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on PRI's The World

"I'm marco werman and you're with the world where a co production of the bbc world service pri and w h here in boston some disturbing news out of the democratic republic of congo last week the world health organization confirmed that ebola is back since last month thirty possible cases of the virus have been reported in the drc international organizations in healthcare workers are moving fast to try to prevent an outbreak like the one that affected thousands of people in west africa in two thousand fourteen and fifteen helen brands wells infectious diseases reported for stat which focuses on health and medicine reporting so just to be clear helen i'm saying outbreak but as right now it's still quite small right do we know how many deaths have been confirmed in the drc as result of ebola so at this point it is small when you thinking about the context of the twenty fourteen west african outbreak but that was an anomaly more than ten times bigger than all previous outbreaks combined but this one seems to be getting off to a fairly decent start the who's has said this morning that they think there may be thirty nine cases already and nineteen those people have died we tend to think it is much more dramatic than it is in fact there are other diseases in that part of the world that can manifest with symptoms that are quite similar willer so it generally takes awhile before locations realized that what they're dealing with is not for instance severe malaria but actually a bona and the strain that we're talking about right now in dior congo is the same strain of a bulla that hit with african two thousand fourteen yeah that's correct it's the bull is ii year virus and that's.

marco werman boston congo ebola helen dior congo bbc drc west africa
"ebola" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"I'd buy a colony of bat's sadly emile died of his infection and during the burial ceremony several other family members and village members became infected from there the disease spread eventually jumping beyond this index village crossing borders and invading large urban areas where it spread like wildfire infecting and killing thousands but that is a story that i want you to tell so please aaron tell me about the biggest epidemic of ebola so far really so like you said in the we call it the 2014 outbreak but it started in 2013 and it continued until well into 2015 yes in total there were twenty eight thousand six hundred and sixteen cases according to who and eleven thousand three hundred and ten deaths wow yeah but so krizan yeah so one thing that was really important in this outbreak was being able to diagnose cases rapidly on the ground and trace those cases based on their contacts so to tell you more about that let's go back to lauren crowley who was the there helping to do exactly that it was back in november hubbard helped england rich with my work on uh decided in that regard know la jahor young on and i've on under one three thousand ron gantner who i are the end um we provided by their malaria diner variance themselves by that she sends now is wrong is unsolved that five the new romney murphy lap aren't highmore her day and then i ask you went out of voice must lay down in jeez you have the e c guinea um reviving his or her i'm sequencing of new coat of paint is using knock worthy technology on this losing cooperation with the european level la the resume live without adjacent soon about achieving sent that um in in black south got the power who he.

emile aaron ebola lauren crowley england romney
"ebola" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Our symptoms of ebola virus ebola virus disease so ebola virus disease used to be called ebola haemorrhagic fever it's no longer called that but it this symptoms include a pretty sudden onset of fever and a relatively high fever fatigue muscle pain headache and often a sore throat then this is pretty quickly followed by vomiting diarrhea rash liver and kidney failure and sometimes although importantly not all the time internal and external bleeding so that's where it got its previous name hemorrhagic fever ray because two hemorrhage is basically just to bleed uncontrollably mmhmm so internal bleeding which is something that we talked about i believe and yellow fever as well that can result in things like black or bloody stool or vomit if you're bleeding into your gi tract and then external bleeding it's not i think a lot of people have a misconception that he bola results in you like explore voting blood out of your orifices doesn't happen any mola you can get using of blood from your gums or your nasal passages may be the corners of your eye and things like that because he bullock can infect a huge variety of tissues ebola virus does exist in basically all of your mucus membranes and things so anywhere that it exists you can get bleeding but you don't have like explosive bleeding ray there's no there's no bleeding out right so you tend to die from things like very similar to what you die from an septic shock which is your body rain overloaded by both immune defences and the virus itself and then just organ failure and that's what ends up actually causing death the virus is transmitted via direct contact with certain bodily fluids actually most bodily fluids feces saliva blood vomit seamen noone said it but i would assume vaginal fluids as well and then the.

fever bullock ebola virus vomiting
"ebola" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"So someone can correct me if we actually know this i don't think we really no it's not really clear what the distinctions are between individuals that end up surviving and not surviving aside from this antibody response and what causes them to have that response is unclear and also like high risk groups exactly right yeah yeah ebola virus has an incubation period which we've talked about before but i'll remind you is the period of time from when you get infected until wind symptoms first appear that's between two to 21 days on average i've seen about ten or eleven days that's what it was for example in the last outbreak in 2014 2015 no k was around eleven days on average so you touch somebody are you get infected get infected and then eleven days later you start to show symptoms to get the symptom and one thing that's important about a bowl of iris is that you are not infectious until you start showing symptoms that is very imports very important and you are not very infectious for the first few hugh days of your infection after you start showing symptoms so what that means is that how infectious you are to other people meaning how easily it is for you as an infected individual to infect somebody else depends on how many viruses are in your body and that number of viruses is going to increase over time so at the beginning of your infection you're not very infectious and so this is different than some of the other diseases that we've covered exactly where you are highly infectious even before you show symptoms right something like influenza for example you are infectious several days before symptoms start and you tend to be most infectious at the beginning of the course of infection whereas with this your most infectious at the end of the course of infection which we'll talk about a lot later but he's really important it was really important in this most recent outbreak right and and is really important in general yes in terms of predicting what diseases might be related to outbreaks of epidemics and so on exactly interesting yeah so the free.

ebola virus incubation period influenza hugh eleven days 21 days
"ebola" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"We are hilarious our most clever warranty me yet so let's let's dive right into the biology of you bola absolutely one of the scariest so ebola virus is of course a virus quite shocking i know i specifically it's in a family known as filoviruses i think that's how you say they're called this because their film and tests viruses under a very very highpowered microscope they look like worms rate all the viruses in the filovirus family cause haemorrhagic fevers mall of them um did you know that i don't know all the viruses in the sea what i hope our if there's only two i mean anything really dramatic but there's only two viruses in this family it's evil of iris and marburg virus okay okay yeah i didn't know it was just so limited i didn't either so ebola virus is an arne virus which we've seen before yanni outta it has a fast replication rate and makes lots of mistakes eccentrics odra which means faster evolution exactly right there are at least five known species of a bowl of iris sudan of all abullah virus zaire reston which is a very interesting are you going to talk about i am yes i'm excited and then tie forest which was formerly known as ivory coast or cote d'ivoire ebola virus and finally bundy booed keo i think is hey say that which actually wasn't discovered until two thousand eight which that's crazy an entire new species of virus well steps that whether or not that crazy since like we basically no nothing about microbes and even less about viruses.

ebola virus marburg bundy
"ebola" Discussed on Podcast Borracho

Podcast Borracho

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"ebola" Discussed on Podcast Borracho

"Ebola correct yeah yeah one three upi the minutes eight but it two the excellent would it be you got is eight right.