25 Burst results for "Ebert"

"ebert" Discussed on Channel 33

Channel 33

02:19 min | Last month

"ebert" Discussed on Channel 33

"They had his show's creator was woman named the flow. We really kind of invented this whole phenomenon and you know when they were doing the early episodes which going really badly she would say. Look this is what people wanna know. What's the movie about. who's in it it. Should they go see it. And that is there is a value to that And it might not be as valuable to people who want to sit and think about a movie for hours upon hours and discussing for days and weeks but for people who just want to know what to go see. There's a there's a real value in that. And i think we see it now with rotten tomatoes where we all i mean. Even i am ashamed. Admit there's times where. I'm trying to decide if i wanna see kind of smaller indie movie. That's gotten some good buzz. And i'm like it's got ninety three percent. Sure i'll watch you know what i mean. That stuff is helpful. Yes i absolutely hell. I always think of that when people you know when you see that four thousand word back the book new yorker essay about a book where they like to things about the book and then they write this glittering go you know what would also be helpful to tell me whether i should buy yes. Exact thumbs up thumbs down and into the to your point about like yes it was you know it was more of a consumer guy. Let me tell you david night. Growing up in texas. The new yorker was not coming to the house in house. The newark rimes was not coming to our house. May not the dallas morning news in the fort worth star-telegram was coming to our house. That was by far the smartest film criticism. We had access to the end period. Yeah it not maurya no not just accessible but smart but hi middle-brow right. These people know about films they know about truffaut they know about score says he just found that so like we weren't reading pauling kilby's we have access to that so no i mean i think the only other thing the only other sort of entity that influence how i think about movies neighbor when i was a kid i mean i had. We have great movie. Critics where i grew up but i mean it was just going to mad magazine where the two ways i learned about movies and i learned about how to think about them. I mean that was really kind of the two. I loved reading the love enquirer Every friday but you know as a really young kid. I mean mad and siskel ebert. Yeah we're gonna learn about movies and old movies and what and how you should talk about. There was there was no other avenue to that well. And it's the gateway to. You're absolutely right about mad magazine. This incredible but the but you know..

fort worth star pauling kilby The new yorker newark dallas texas david siskel ebert
Create Synthetic Data Using AI With Alexandra Ebert (Full Episode)

The FIT4PRIVACY Podcast - For those who care about privacy

02:19 min | 2 months ago

Create Synthetic Data Using AI With Alexandra Ebert (Full Episode)

"If i may i ask you how this unique title i usually say our guest is unique. But you have unique title also. You're not unique unique. Titled what do we understand on the from this chief privacy officer. That's a good question. I get asked quite frequently. Luckily i'm not the only chief trust office in the world. But you're right. It's usually a title. That's rather rare in the don't be. Very huge companies have traditionally achieve trust offices responsible to ensure that consumers trust away organization handles protection uses the data within mostly i. We provide our synthetic data solutions to our clients to large enterprises. So we may be. Don't handle any customer data therefore my main responsibility as chief trust officer within mostly i is to create trust in synthetic data and mostly is accompanied synthetic data. What do we understand from it because we are used to hitting did personal data and then we heard something synthetic identity from one of our guests. But what do you mean by now. Synthetic data good question so synthetic data would guess that he would get different answers depending on who you ask so we'll start with how i understand. Synthetic data for me specifically talking about a. I generated synthetic data. This is rian advanced. Immunization technology that allows you to retain basically all the information in me customer data set without risking the privacy of any of the individuals within the state to set. So how does this work. How is it different from traditional. Minimization technologies traditionally. When you wanted to anonymous data set you have different approaches. Like masking of your skating generalization and so on and so forth all these approaches from the nature destructive approaches so you always had a customer data set and try to delete mask of escaped those parts of the data set that you've deemed to that seem to be Re identifying dangerous to the privacy of deity data subject within this data set

Rian
Iconic Theaters in California to Close Over Pandemic Losses

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

01:53 min | 5 months ago

Iconic Theaters in California to Close Over Pandemic Losses

"The pandemic has cost us a lot, but the hope that someday post vaccine we would return to our favorite places that hope has carried us through the hardest parts of these last 13 months. Well. News came this week that the iconic Arclight cinema and 58 year old Cinerama Dome in Hollywood would not be reopening post pandemic. In fact, the owners of ArcLight Cinemas and Pacific Theater said none of their locations would be reopening. Post Cove it. That's right. No more ArcLight caramel corn or movie pore size glasses of wine. Joining me to remember these theaters, particularly the iconic Hollywood location is Christy Lemire. She writes for Roger ebert dot com and Who hosts the podcast breakfast all day, and she's our regular one of our regular and most beloved film critics on Fridays. Hi, Christie. Hello, my friend. What a sad day it is. I know, And we have all spent so many glorious hours at the arc lights, especially the one in Hollywood. Talk about many, and yeah, from your perspective. So it's funny when you're a film critic, especially if you're a freelancer like so many of us are like you don't have an office, right? You watch movies at your house or you right at your house, and so going to the Arc light on a Monday night to see a big studio release, and all your fellow critics were there, and there's a buzz in the audience as people who love film You know, it's It's like going to your favorite office but also your favorite watering hole and there's such a great energy the minute you walked into that lobby with just the job. Soaring feelings and the huge marquee with all the times and the big clock, and you felt like you were walking into a cathedral of swords. And yet there's also a very intimate sense of community because you could go and have a bye deep beforehand or have a glass of wine afterward and talking about what you have just seen

Arclight Cinema Cinerama Dome Arclight Cinemas Pacific Theater Hollywood Christy Lemire Roger Ebert Christie
Nike exec resigns after son used her credit card to fund sneaker business

Mark Thompson

02:04 min | 7 months ago

Nike exec resigns after son used her credit card to fund sneaker business

"Veteran Nike exec has quit. After her son used a credit card in her name. To spend $132,000. Unlimited edition sneakers. The reason he did it is he wanted to flip them. For a $20,000 profit. For his resale business. He had a whole business. Involved in re selling these collectibles sneakers is a sneaker flipper. And you know when your mom is an executive at Nike That's a bad look right? And Ebert has been forced to quit Nike departure effective immediately. Listen to me. I don't want to hear you. That's right. Hit the road. Her son, Joe used a credit card in her name to purchase limited edition sneakers. The college drop out as they call him. You need to call it. God, I guess you gotta gotta drive you. Sorry. Left school. I don't think that you just shame tour, leaving college Necessarily. Not for everybody, but they do column a college dropout, so I did it. I find it funny. I'm laughing cause I just think it's ridiculous. But anyway, the guy didn't do a good thing. He resold the sneakers on his resale company, so he had powered up and it's no wonder he left college. He found a lucrative profession. Reselling sneakers, and he set up the whole business to do it. His mom is a Nike vice president. What could possibly go wrong? So He used her credit card in her name and bought $132,000 worth of limited edition sneakers and then sold them with that $20,000 profit. But you can see how you've got. I don't know the answer there, but the answer is certainly not letting him use your credit card and your money to them. Bye, collectible sneakers and probably have an inside. Track on getting a lot of the

Nike Exec Nike Ebert JOE
Rich People Problems

The Cut

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Rich People Problems

"I realized I've been using the words envy and Jealousy interchangeably when there's actually a fine but stark difference between them. Jealousy. is about fear. Jealousy is anxiety about losing what you have that nervous feeling that someone is out for your spot. Envy on the other hand is about desire. Envy is wanting what you don't yet have its daydreaming and striving and keeping up with the Joneses. But. The primary difference I would say is that these are two radically different feelings. Jealousy. Is Corrosive and painful, and it drives you absolutely up the wall. Envy on the other hand is almost. Fun. I mean I feel like what my therapist would tell you that my obsession with comparison is like not good for my life. But I also feel like it's a strong part of unfortunately my personality for writer Evie Ebert envy is a byproduct of ambition I had kind of built my life around this idea that This version of me and the president is not the real me. The real me is this like Hologram of myself that I'm pursuing where things work out the way that I want them to and I'm better and I'm smarter and I'm more successful and I'm getting there. and. Then it was sort of like the pandemic HIV extremely harsh pause button on everyone's life and it was like, no the what you have right now is all that there is there's no forward movement we had to remind ourselves to be happy to be alive and lucky if we're in good health. Grateful for what we have right where we are. Blake. That's hard to sustain. Aspiration without opportunity ferments envy. Of course, I could be much worse off but I was like green with envy about people whose homes are larger were living in better climates maybe who had outdoor pools and I had a real inclination to kind of judge myself for becoming obsessed with. Who has a better basically and so I was like, no, this is part of my self care practice is allowing myself to be annoyed by people. But then every realized that other people were probably allowing themselves to be annoyed at her. He's essay in the cut is titled Do. You hate me for my lawn. She has a law and it feels extremely luxurious like being able to open the front door and signed my four year old out I feel like marie-antoinette basically for a while felt like everything and anything was a luxury showing off your sour dough bread meant you had groceries Zoom conferences meant you had a job complaining about your kids had human contact you can't win at this. I mean, some people are having A. Hard. Time but nobody's having fun and then in the midst of pointing our fingers at each other and tossing are envy around our immediate circle. We picked our ears up. We heard sound. Horrible sound. No has been the siren song of extremely wealthy celebrities. Huge We rose up and grabbed R N D, r proverbial pitchforks, and we marched to the photographs of Drake's weirdly empty hotel lobby of mansion. We swarmed to pick apart the celebrity bookshelves on zoom. We roundly mocked the rich and famous as insistence that all in this together it was so overtly tone-deaf. Are. Envy. was almost. Delicious I'm having this resentment and you're having to and it's it's something that we're kind of sharing. I feel like it's part of the shared pandemic experienced. It was suddenly like we were truly all in this together. Freud talks about this in civilization and its discontents that cohesive society unites around a common enemy an out group. There are lots of scary an unfortunate examples of the groups America has ostracized, but the rich and famous are not among them. Because, it's so much more complicated than pure animosity if they're so awful and they're so ridiculous in there. So repugnant why? Why does Kim Kardashian have like a Zillion instagram followers molly young is the literary critic for New York magazine and she was wondering why we want to keep looking at rich people for envy or fantasy or whatever we turn to them for I mean what's interesting about the quarantine is you started seeing a lot of people turn against celebrities right like Ellen complaining that quarantining in her gigantic house made her feel like she was imprisoned or whatever, and finally people are starting. To kind of examine the purpose that these celebrities are serving in our lives need to examine why we're interested in them in the first place

Joneses Blake Kim Kardashian Ellen Freud Evie Ebert America New York Magazine A. Hard Instagram Writer Drake President Trump Molly Young Envy.
The State vs. Slowed + Reverb

On Shuffle

05:20 min | 1 year ago

The State vs. Slowed + Reverb

"Welcome listeners sound only I'm just in charity and I'm Mike Peters Square your sound only co-host here to record our deepest darkest thoughts about the twenty first century. In the millennial lifestyle we're talking about music video games, anime, Youtube Social Media and the wider Internet. This week, we're talking about slavery and reverse the controversial DIY remixing smile that snowballed into a large youtube subculture in recent years. This is what it sounds like. Always. Want to go back to our beautiful. Until I goes away. Mega. Mega. Kinda millier to me stylistically speaking not entirely unprecedented, not entirely new as far as musical subcultures of the twenty first century ago. Yeah. I mean like you just go ahead and come out and say you come out I mean I'm just saying. Well. Well, it is. It sounds a lot like chops screw music. Right Air. Oh, right right yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So the the architects of slow to revert mixes is probably a piece on pitchfork by Andy. Crush where he interviewed slater, who made the song that we just listened to, which is a homemade remix of Lucy verse twenty minutes, which was on love his rate to. Anyway surfaced on youtube in two thousand, seventeen with a looped animation of. Pink skeleton and then it racked up according to slater about four million views before it was taken down since it's been re uploaded, it's racked up seven billion. But. Basically. The entire slowed in reverse John followed after that. Mike. You mentioned a pink skeleton I want to say that the. Song? Choice right. Lose Ebert. Twenty minutes the pink. Skeleton. On Youtube on a otherwise, very bare YouTube channel the paint skeleton is a very specific aesthetic. Millennial vary. I looked at it and immediately thought vapor wave. and May I'm biased because I say I immediately thought V wave because I'm literally currently wearing. A brave T. With with sailor Saturn Holding A. I was like in the background I S I spy. Blue poster. So yeah, I know that you're you're up on vapor away. But that's the thing is that it's that it's that family of millennial aesthetics right or now I guess you know Zumur adjacent millennial aesthetics. Sure. Call it that it is. It is. It is a very distinct vibe right but despite the fact that visually it feels very modern very post. Internet. Very very teen. I'm a team. That's right. Musically it is drawing from something older. Yeah. It is drawn for something older in that same interview that I was talking about slater talks about he's from Houston and grew up listening to music and watch anime seem except but otherwise they. Will Yeah that'd be. Same except Baton Rouge so but anyway. The The piece also mentions that he doesn't like explicitly mentioned screw on his own channels and he talks about slowed in reverse as a way to bring like screw Buzek to a wider audience like he's talks about being happy when he sees the Youtube comments that people are like. Screwed. Music the spirit of screw lives on and so to revert music but I mean you know Then there are the people on the other side that just kind of like this ginger fraud script music right. Though came out like three years ago. The remakes came out a couple of years. You know slater's Remix a couple years old at this point. Why are we talking about this song this week Well, because we need a foothold and a point of reference to talk about. Why people were mad on the Internet this past weekend Okay. So there is a tiktok account called Song, Psych and song. Sake is a music analysis outlets that you breaks down sundry. Songs, videos what have you? Anyway, there was a video talking about and revert music that made the rounds on the Internet this past weekend and credited. Slater's twenty minutes as the cornerstone of the slow down remixing style. Now, when that rose to the attention of Houston's and then the larger arap Internet. You could imagine there are some static.

Youtube Slater Mike Peters Houston Buzek Andy Ebert Baton Rouge Zumur John Fraud
The movie of the year is here: Boys State

The Big Picture

06:46 min | 1 year ago

The movie of the year is here: Boys State

"Sean Fantasy. And this is the big picture conversation show but the best movie I've seen in twenty twenty. That movie is called boy state. What is boy state? Well, it's a documentary. It is now available on Apple TV plus and I thought it would be appropriate for us to just talk about this film which I think is fascinating and incredible document of life in twenty twenty in many ways. Specifically, the way that we engage with our political system Amanda I wanted to talk to you about it because I know that you like the. Film as well. We're GONNA. Talk a bit about what boy state is the institution, and also what this movie isn't how it captures it but what did you make of it off the top see you saw this movie at Sundance as did our colleague Noam Away and you both raved about it and I didn't get to see that sundance so I caught up with it about six months later with all of the expectation that goes along with you guys being this is the best we've ever seen I was wrapped. This is A. Very documentary that is about each. Summer Camp Robert Graham, and we'll explain the program a bit more. It's Kinda complex. I still have some questions about how boy state the Summer Camp Program works but whatever. And I was just completely in Michigan. It's one of those documentaries where you're like I can't believe you got this on tape and also I can't believe that you've got this on tape and also it speaks so profoundly to the moment in which I'm watching it even though it was filmed during the summer of two, thousand and eighteen. Yell leader in this episode, and you can hear a conversation with me and Amanda mcbain and Jesse Moss the filmmakers behind the movie and they explained a bit about how they captured what you're describing, and there are several moments in this movie that will make you say this is must be scripted. This can't be real. I mean in many ways it seems. Like archetypal narrative, dramatic movie making, but it is very real and boy state. The institution is very real. So what is boy state? It's it is as you say, it's a sort of a summer camp. It's a, it's a summer leadership program I assume you as a as a high achieving young person. You must have been a part of some some programs. Like this I get sent to Arts Camp I. Never did the Politics Camp I did have to go to girl scout camp once even though it wasn't a girl Scout, but this is sponsored by the American Legion and I only really interacted with the American Legion. In that. Sometimes, we had our middle school dances at an American Legion clubhouse. Okay. So the American Legion does sponsor this program they nominate High. School Juniors and they come in the interview and they talk about their idea of the country and patriotism and the idea of public service that means to them, and it's essentially a training program for politicos aspiring Politicos, and that's a fascinating thing growing up I went to basketball camp. I was an aspiring. Professional Basketball player unfortunately I am incredibly slow and can't jump and can't shoot. So that's that was never going to happen for me, and for some people at boys anger, there is a girl state as well. We should say that you know in in most states in this country, they offer this program. There are a lot of people who aspire to kind of public service or at least to get a a sort of a sense of civic duty, which is not necessarily the same thing as public service. And this has been happening since nineteen, thirty seven. And the. There is a long list of famous and accomplished alumni in boys and girls stayed more specifically boy stated won't probably won't surprise people to hear. Just a shortlist of incredibly well known people who participated in this program includes Bill Clinton Dick Cheney. Justice Samuel Alito James Gandolfini my boy. Roger Ebert. Michael Jordan. Tom Cotton. Rush Limbaugh Cory Booker. So you know luminaries or lowlights depending on your point of view of the world. This is quite a quite a list of people there and the program itself is kind of interesting. So essentially, I, feel like we're talking around specifically what it does, but the programs vary by state but in Texas where this movie takes place participants are divided into two groups. The federal and the nationalist and what are the what are these two groups have to do and and how does that set up the Phil Do a lot of things but the film follows the political campaign aspect of boy state and boy state is a week long program in Texas and kind of the climactic event is an election for governor of the state, the boys state of Texas. So these two parties, the federalists in the nationalist, which by the way just already casts a quite a shadow over the whole. The. The documentary because they really they adopt these names as teams, and so they're yelling about being federalists and nationalists and anyway. At they elect. Party chairman's they they kind of do a platform that we should talk about the platform they have primaries and they each eventually select one nominee for the governor's race, and then at the end, there is election and one governor emerges. So you know approximately eleven hundred boys participate in this process, and that means that out of large groups. One two three people have to merge and the reason that this movie happened and the reason that Jesse and Amanda sought to identify a handful of people who'd be significant to the process in the given year that they were shooting is because in two thousand, seventeen Texas boys state legislature voted to secede from the Union and that if that doesn't some American politics in the trump era I don't I don't know what does the fact that it was your teenagers decided they needed to succeed from a program which is already imaginary. Is Perfect, we should note that two thousand seventeen was when the state legislature of Texas successfully voted to see from union. It is apparently a emotion that came up for several years but this time both bodies ratified this action, and of course, that is a an ongoing dialogue in the state of Texas. In the true American experience you know there are many Texans who would like to not be a part of this country maybe not many there but there are certainly some we know that that's the session is an ongoing conversation in some states. Around the country. So the point is, is that boy stayed in many ways reflect the political system or does it? It's I think the nature or nurture question here is essential to this movie and what makes it so fascinating and even when I talk to Amanda and Jesse I, think that they were unwilling to put their thumb on the scale to say what were they felt it lived or died but as I said, this movie is just exceptional and

Texas American Legion Amanda I Basketball Apple Sean Fantasy Robert Graham Amanda Mcbain Amanda Sundance Michigan Cory Booker Jesse Moss Justice Samuel Alito Roger Ebert Bill Clinton Dick Cheney Michael Jordan Tom Cotton Noam Away
"ebert" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

Black Men Can't Jump

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Black Men Can't Jump

"Louis Hassett at this point. Okay. I think personally, and now that's why I'm like, I I've read Roger Ebert review this moving dead on. I mean, he was basically like this movie is he was like he was like this movie is terrible. I don't understand why anybody made it any also was like, I think that. There's a fine line in comedy between like satirical and offensive. And this this movie goes past the line, and it doesn't give any humanities to its characters. Like, the it feels like mean-spirited in the way that characterizes these women in the beginning. And then it like glamorizes them in the end in like makes them look a little bit. It's like 'cause know at the end like Halliburton wearing a blonde like, wait. And like, I don't know if they have goal to in there. Oh, are they long gone even noticed that? I know she has a blonde week. But then the doctor the woman who wrote it now has one of those crazy hairstyles as she's walking next to him right today like transformed hers. Well, right, anyway, the thing is there are parts of movie. I really is enjoy. But there's something about the way. Honestly. And and apparently Troy a buyer the woman who wrote it didn't like the final product. And she felt like Robert Townsend changed it a lot. And like didn't didn't like that. That's what I read on Wikipedia. I don't know if that's true -pedia. But it's feels true to me because there was a party me. That was like, I think this movie was directed by a black woman. I think it would have been much better. And and that's not to say Robert towns, the bad director. But there was a party. That's like this. This wasn't as wheelhouse and like one like I feel like this was like older comedy. And this is like ninety seven. It's like dude like did not update his game his comedic like kinda sensibilities and then also like. There are subtle messages in this movie that I felt I wasn't connecting with with black women because. I don't know. It's it's a weird thing. But there was like a part of me that was like it was defending. And here's thing we should defend black men in terms of they shouldn't have the he had stereotypes for both black men and black women in the movie. But there was like this. There was this thing of like they have learned a lesson like the whim. I don't know. It was weird. I guess Blackman. Learn listen to I don't know. I got we to talk about it. You will go you'll million please. I hate this movie. Like, I think I saw this when I was younger, but I remember thought of before so like my family like we have mostly women in my family and. There are very well off. And I'm member. Ars? Remember them not letting my cousins watch I remember like older women not being like because I remember them not being allowed to watch it on the I was I'm not sure if I wanted to just know they couldn't see it and got wonder why? 'cause it's not like like really graphic is not a lot of cursing. I'm looking at my hair down. I'm thinking in my head. Now, they not want these two young black girls to watch these stereotypes of black women. I guess we always have a hard time with movies at the pick people color from the hood without any type of Moore's any type of like feelings type of personality. And I think this movie didn't give them like they did have any depth to them at all. And I think they had spurts of it..

Louis Hassett Robert Townsend Roger Ebert Robert towns Halliburton Troy Blackman Moore director
Marijuana is now legal for medical purposes in 30 states

Mayo Clinic Radio

04:50 min | 3 years ago

Marijuana is now legal for medical purposes in 30 states

"Recently the US food and. Drug. Administration approved a. Form of medical, marijuana after the treatment. Of seizures associated with two rare, and severe forms of epilepsy and it really seems like we hear more, and more about people using marijuana to treat all sorts of medical problems and to help overcome the side effects of some. Traditional medical treatments thirty states and the district of, Columbia currently, have laws legalizing medical marijuana in some form here to discuss as, internal medicine specialist and addiction expert Dr John Ebert welcome back to the program Dr, Ebert it's, great to see you thanks for having me back Dr Robert, thanks for coming, so medical marijuana legitimate for medical use since we last spoke about this the national academies. Of science came out with a report, in that report essentially summarizes all the available medical literature looking at the efficacy or the effectiveness of it in the safety of medical cannabis and what they found was that it is very effective for three specific conditions and one of them is specificity the other one is chronic pain what was that first one so asbestos muscle spasms so some people that have spinal cord injuries or some people who have multiple sclerosis can have incredibly painful specificity the muscles spontaneously spasm very painful it's like a charlie horse but constantly okay right it's effective for that it's effective for nausea and it's effective for chronic pain and specifically neuropathy pain or pain that comes from a nerve so what's interesting about their findings as they didn't have a lot of data that actually supported that it was truly effective for the indication that the new drug approved by the f._d._a. is indicated for which is which is epilepsy or the severe forms of epilepsy there is some existing data but but they didn't have a lot i think it's important for patients who are interested to to or interested in exploring this as a methodology to talk to their clinicians and and really asked the question would it seem like the condition that i have might be effectively treated by medical cannabis and those clinicians i think need to have that information or there is that information's available on the internet and can be searched and can be learned so that they can share that with their patients Is there some. Science behind it you know why it works yeah so there's been lots of science in the space which has somewhat been impeded by the fact that under federal law, medical cannabis is illegal so there's no research so there is there has been you can? Actually and there, has and is ongoing research it is possible to have approval to do research with medical cannabis so there's there's research suggesting that is for these conditions so why why does it work Well what's interesting about so I I. Sorta fi patients for medical cannabis and when I speak with these patients, a lot of. Them are interested in medical cannabis because they nothing else really seems, to have worked and most of the patients at up. Certified have been for chronic pain? They say I want to? Try. Something new and I say it might be effective for pain and one of the things that they they really struggle with some of those. Preconceived notions about what. It is to to smoke pot, if people traditionally, smoked tied in what it is to. Use medical cannabis very different experiences so if someone smoked a medical. Marijuana cigarette for non medicinal purposes you get a hundred. And four? Different chemicals in there States like Minnesota that we are in now have actually limited their program to two of those chemicals so of the hundred, and four possible. Chemicals that, you get when you smoke a joint, if you will you only get two, of them in Minnesota in those two are tetrahydrocannabinol which is the the molecule that gets people high. When they smoke in Canana dial now we think that the Kanana dial. Has some, very interesting and important therapeutic properties it doesn't work like tetrahydrocannabinol but it can actually. Help with pain as an anti inflammatory, it can actually help with pain to reduce nerve transmission which is how it might be working. For seizures and epilepsy that new medication approved by the FDA basically just, pure CBD or. Dial in most of the states have that as one of the, molecules that you can get when you are when you're Subscribed or your proof for medical marijuana in

Medical Cannabis Cannabis Marijuana Minnesota Dr Tom Shy United States Dr John Ebert Mayo Clinic Radio Mccray Dr John FDA Kanana Muscle Spasms Columbia Canana Nausea Dr Robert Depression
"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Got there okay and then got this movie made this one thing that i like really like about ted he he loves movies he gets and he wants to see them he wants to see he wants he wants them wants to turn out well so as a producer he tries to give them every you know opportunity that he can't and now that he's over at amazon i i'm thinking it must still be the same way but i wish him every success because he's got good taste yes so so you'd have the alloy orchestra here yes and they're fantastic and you wanted for this anniversary edition of ebert fist to single out women and senile directors out of the twelve films six would directed by women and that's just something i helped to even increase it or we're keep it you know sort of an basis that we were at south by southwest this year and there was a day where someone pointed out all of the films that played at the paramount theatre directed by women day yes it's a pretty cool the thing i wanted to point out about the word overlooked for instance we opened with the fugitive andy davis's fugitive which wasn't an overlooked film but all of our films every film we bring your isn't overlooked some films we bring because we just you know just love them and and at the at the time this was very early on thing for harrison ford and for tommy lee jones and watching the film i noticed something that that maybe i noticed subconsciously before how indy davis was one of the first directors to people his scenery with people who look like people from society so there could have been someone who made another director would have made this film and you would have never seen a black person in the movie at the police station at the hospital anything everyone would have been white andy davis and this movie was how old is this the twentieth the twenty fifth.

producer andy davis harrison ford tommy lee jones director ted indy davis twenty fifth
"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"That's what we showed although there were still some bigger films by about year six some of the rectors or objecting to the word overlooked they were like i don't want i don't know if i wanna think of my being overlooked where i don't want in the public perception interesting to have my film thought of is overlooked so we said you know what will will eliminate that word but i but pride tonight both love overlooked film overlooked i don't know i don't see that as a negative i see that as a positive because it's promoting discovery yes you know but semantics can be funny thing yeah so then we took out the word overlooked and it's the roger ebert film festival but it's caught just called ebert fest works for me and you're and you're still doing what you set out to do and this this weekend we're we're talking on the sunday closing day of the festival right now as we're recording this we've gotten to revisit and my case are some your case jesse i lina before which i didn't know now a lot of us monica st oh she was one of the people who interviewed gregory malfa who was rector and he he didn't realize how my generation we know that movie word for word we know that movie word for i don't know how many it's first of all it's on tv damn near every day it's on all the time but it's also just for the cat i'm i'm gonna be thirty two like for anybody right around my age is we love this movie we know this movie i never seen it in theater though because when it came out i think it was eleven and seeing that on the big screen for us my first time so he never seen it i as not only do i know the story so well and i know her so well but it was really cool to sit next to my dad because obviously normally it's the other way around yes and say here's this movie that i love in joy in this case i got to say here's this movie i love.

jesse gregory malfa
"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"So we wanted today but we're not gonna let him get away with that cute little boy his his son is so gorgeous gorgeous and you know and they say that he count they think it was conceded ebert fest so it should have been like the beckhams nicknamed him champagne or band ebert fest that would be a good one fest poland that's got a ring to it right a correct me if i'm wrong this originated as roger ebert s overlooked film fest it was called roger egrets overlooked film festival in a beginning and that's the name that roger gave it they had the roger ebert roger discarded the overlooked the overlook phone festival because he didn't want to he wanted to when when the university i asked if he would be interested in starting to film festival university of illinois thank you you know he's hit the university of illinois in her banner champagne the college of communications as it was known then it's now the college of media the dean ask if he would consider starting film festival and rogers said if i do i don't want to ask for new movies that i have not seen from the studios because i'm an active ethical film critic and i don't want to be beholden to them so he said i will do it only if you don't mind that when i'm going to do is find little gyms of movies that haven't been seen as much that need a larger audience but i've already reviewed favorably and i feel very comfortable inviting or formats or john ras the film that i think are overlooked such as black and white silent films a seventy millimeter films said even foreign films are somewhat overlooked so these are the things i wanna show at the festival and in the beginning for the first few years that's.

poland roger ebert university of illinois
"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Lots to kenner and my my mom when she eats you have to love her to watch lobster because it's a terrifying site if that thing wasn't dead it's dead now okay and my mom said if he calls me after this then he's the one and he did here you are forty only are here we are enjoying ebert fish little about the festival as us amaze i'm looking i'm looking down the suit i thought i was looking at a theater but there is the liffey isn't it the the orpheum down the orpheum okay marquee beautiful the virginia theatre is where we have hold art film festival but around the corner there's a a theater call the movie theater called the art and and they're showing value on the best beyond the valley of the that was written by roger and so some of the people from ebert fest when over to see some claudia quique had never seen claudia plea who is the head the president of the off to quit channels film critics association had never seen beyond the valley of the dolls and just i wish i told me doing that i would have it would have missed something else because they had a great great time you know this is something at the film festival because we show twelve we show anywhere from twelve to fourteen films we used to one a couple years we show fourteen films we've found that that was too long too many films because didn't give people enough time to have dinner or to have a decent lunch and i advocate people getting up not sitting in the dark and the theater all day i have a kate getting up in between movies if you can't go out get some fresh air it's usually warm down here in april this is surprisingly cold for this time of year in champaign urbana and i also encourage roger nice to go out and take walks in the park across from the theater.

roger claudia quique president kate champaign urbana kenner
"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"They they like when i do this one he don't have the social skills which is is kathy bates in the waterboy one talking about her sub bob shaye they don't have what they call the social skills a lot of times when we meet we meet some people that's that's are feeling very sweet wellmeaning lesson they associate you don't have to social skills no there it is put it in your pocket use it whenever it's necessary or handy and increasingly we're seeing more female film yeah but they seem to have better social skills yes will you monica castio here oh who's wonderful issue the new york times she's now she's not washington post yeah no you've got a lot of ladies here of course one of the big people this year varney the photo you posted of young eva with roger i will post this to the internet so you all can see it it's arms eight years old think it's your ebert fest instagram or something like that's where i found it it's this incredible shot and i have no idea it's i mean they're together he knew roger mute this is the thing hear from so many local or or able to do because man smart so when did you so you decide as this about this podcast ma'am because i say i'm all over the place i started story i don't think i finished one is it okay that'll work okay oh no we don't we don't add it up and try to make it more linear more coherent it's incoherent or coherent as it turns out to be okay this like everyday conversation everyday conversation it's all we're after so since i'm gonna start a new topic your your cue there well i do wanna just so you met roger you went on a date with roger yes and then how did you know it was roger how did you know that it had to be roger well it's funny because of friend of mine who was our one of our bridesmaids later.

kathy bates bob shaye new york times monica castio roger i eight years
"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Young so where did you grow up i grew up in chicago on the near west side of chicago and i went to crane high school and there's something about that that school that's kind of interesting well a lot of things interesting but they were going to it was one of the schools that they were going to shut down in chicago and art class went and sort of help not lobby but we went to support an encourage the school district not to shutdown that school and along with neighborhood community activists and that school was saved and they turned it into a college preparatory school and they divided it into four different houses and one of the houses is called the chaz ebert house now so cruel as that so i tried to go back and do things i've given scholarships at the school and i have there's your very philanthropic you really are when i was in third grade i wanted to be a philanthropist where she did i learned that word in third grade i wanted to be when i at about the carnegie's and the melons and everybody and i wanted to be a philanthropist and my teacher say it she was so sweet but you said you could never be a philanthropist i say why not you say it because you don't have any money so yes yes so anyway i mean that is you and roger and you in rogers name now sponsor so many young filmmakers you meant or so many young people you inspire great many young people both film makers and film critics and aspiring film critics and and it's always exciting to hear your name attached to some prize some award some honor of that sort.

chicago roger crane high school chaz ebert
"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Because you guys are such a big part of our lives my entire childhood is everyone asking me if my dad is cisco and ebert not siskel oris siskel and ebert and a lot of people have heard us tell stories about how this to this day is a question he gets asked now gene passed away a longtime ago roger it's i can't believe it's five years five years and you're still not both of them is is what we have either of them yeah will i actually feel like we're family because of that you know roger always said that it's like a i don't know a film critics family or something but especially with littered because people either thought they were the same person for brothers actually at one point may be that linnet was roger's son no and rivals but the thing about there was some always some connection yes yeah and what you created here's a community of film critics as well as film lovers you have people who drive here people tell me from all over the country really to come just to be part of this and to experience seeing movies with likeminded people strangers alike in this beautiful virginia theatre where roger watching movie yes they're jinya theater when we first started the film festival twenty years ago was actually in endanger of being eliminated and so small at least a small part or maybe in large part i don't know ebert fest help save virginia theater and help get started with the restoration of it and it's all it's nearly completed still needs a few more i'm asking for donations to the virginia theatre at the champaign park district to finish the restoration of the virginia theatre it's such a beautiful movie palace is still has that built in oregon that in nineteen twenty one cost fifty thousand dollars can you believe that and the screen it has one of the largest greek outside of the festival so nice to watch anything on a huge screen the organised was playing.

cisco roger ebert virginia theater virginia oregon jinya theater champaign park five years fifty thousand dollars twenty years
"ebert" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Yeah i don't trust anybody with it now i know that feeling or ask the dust the john fong tei book was made into a movie and i'm like there's no way i'm going to watch that that's just book means too much to me don't fuck it up yeah yeah we'll all right we can finish up here with a couple of segments okay finish finish up with what ebert said and then five questions okay this is a complete disappointment i always like to go back and see what roger ebert thought of these films and rumble fish got mixed reviews at the time i mean a lot of people it was very brave ardy movie i think play even called it an art film for teenagers and also shot up to sophie coupla little young sophia domino i didn't even realize it yeah are watching last night we were like oh my god that's so great to she was maybe her best acting performance as introducing domino and i was like wait a minute as looking for a name yeah but she had this big adult size teeth in that little e app kid mouth very cute super cute but a brave movie for him to make the time a lot of critics didn't like it and didn't get it i think of as nothing but brave yeah he really roll the dice he was in clearly not well at about clearly not concerned about making a commercial movie because he expressed great disappointment that teenagers didn't flock to it like they did outsiders.

roger ebert sophie
"ebert" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"Right right buttery roger ebert ebert cisco neighbor yeah there was review later on something i did and he said i broke the rule it wasn't wasn't you know wasn't watchable wild wild west was that the one wild wild west i don't know it could have been i have no idea but i'm met i met them both at different art talk to the guy in chicago the last one the die you know i talked to him in chicago one time and you know a radio type of thing way way back ebert but cisco lebron well they were very nice to me and a lot of people do remember that cisco ebert you know still nice what the hell yeah i think he said stanton broke the rule we dream a little dream i don't know that i don't know why harry harry dean just within the last year start yeah big big talent well it's true true the two of you in a in a movie is a is a sign that you're in for a decent experience well well the thing is you know harry harry night i did i did something with them without won the we we did a film together hunt was the john or he's in straight time yeah oh yeah yeah yeah yeah harry yeah the harry harry dean was harry dean you know i basically don't want you to know emmet walsh i want you to know a cop or or minister or or you know killer or the president of princeton and then when i say that i get i get thirty three hundred seventy four letters from princeton saying get our college off your fucking lips.

chicago stanton harry harry dean president princeton roger ebert cisco harry dean emmet walsh
"ebert" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Okay but it was on my radar that he had something new this is two thousand and four yeah being on social media wasn't really thing then whereas pre twitter yeah so yeah all right so this part you're not gonna like but i always go back and see what ebert said about all these movies this is a complete disappointment this is on his one of his most hated movies list really he hated it he gave it one star and he had this to say sorry to hear that i feel so bad the village is a colossal miscalculation movie based on a premise that cannot support it the premise so transparent it would be laughable were the movie not so deadly solemn to call the ending and anticlimax would be an insult not only climaxes but to prefixes i'll give him credit for that that was doesn't it was a it's a crummy secret about one step up the ladder of narrative originality from it was all a dream it's so witless in fact that when we do discover the secret we want to rewind the film so we don't know the secret anymore man that's harsh super harsh you know i guess it depends on how you approach film and he was in a bad mood that day clearly probably i mean a parking ticket yet some you know there's there is a suspension of belief you that you it's the price of admission and this is a drama it's not a documentary of something where all the facts need to be buttoned up in and i need.

ebert twitter
Playboy art director Art Paul, 93, and photographer Art Shay, 96, have died

After Hours with Rick Kogan

01:28 min | 3 years ago

Playboy art director Art Paul, 93, and photographer Art Shay, 96, have died

"It would be hard to imagine fuller lies in those led by arch and art paul to giants of the art world who died within hours of each other saturday morning both of them had been ill archie was ninety six art paul was ninety three so they had had very fruitful lives and very influential lives art shay was a photographer who died in his home in deerfield surrounded by some of the two million or more photos he had taken through his life he was there for most of the prominent events of the twentieth century met many of the century's most important people john fitzgerald kennedy merlin brando martin luther king gwendolyn brooks ernest hemingway carl sandberg james baldwin ann landers and roger ebert was roger who once set of arts photography that it quote shakes you up up sets you down gently pats you on the head and then kicks you in the ass art paul was sitting in an office in the loop he was born on the south side raised in rogers park was incredibly talented at sullivan high school and received a scholarship to the art institute he then came back went to the institute of design was freelance illustrator and designer with a little tiny office.

Archie Paul Shay Deerfield Ann Landers Roger Ebert Rogers Park Art Institute John Fitzgerald Kennedy Ernest Hemingway Carl Sandberg Sullivan High School Institute Of Design
"ebert" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

We'll See You In Hell

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on We'll See You In Hell

"The latest one the day it was available on fucking i tunes i rented it so i like the franchise i believe in it but you know i can't sit here and say they're fantastic films would you say to is the second beth now i would yeah i think they get progressively well now i say it goes one to four three and then after that it's a kind of take your pick the real roger ebert himself gave hellraiser to one star really yeah for same reasons you're saying like thought it was disgusting and shit yeah i mean just he's like it's just one horrible visual after another with no nothing really tying them together fair enough fair enough and he was you know usually pretty open about that are pretty open minded about stuff i remember him giving dark city for stars chose fascinated i like dark city it's a cool movie i wish i had it on blu ray versus dvd but i'm not bided again anyway folks that's our show that's it we had to our shoutouts shit you made a doom at you reminded me i'll do all right 'cause you did the you do the ad i do the shadow it's kind of how have you been doing it while joe's bringing this up i'm on twitter and instagram kind of at the patrick walsh show living biblically monday nights nine thirty eight thirty central on cbs i'm also sort of on twitter and instagram joe rosa comedy and then penthouse monthly column you let me down all right shutouts guys can't thank you enough for your patriots port for all of your support we're always taken aback by it it's very touching and here you're shut outs for the month of march anthony v meadow ak party mc fly phillip rashad michael al i l melissa alvarez joe cheetah come before my forest benedict beck jane doe jake book i work for zero fox trot sub guys what's up zero is that the military tshirt website i try to figure out what that was if it is they have some really cool like skull shirts i like some of the shirts so i like the zippo man shirt matt crawford.

roger ebert joe twitter matt crawford patrick walsh
"ebert" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Movie Crush

"Nervous that ebert was gonna be like what movie his deaths that i'm watching it stunk zero stars but he got at the rug out it the rest of it talks about the satire uh of his review talks about the satire end um he was totally on bordin is like it's a lot of fun and funny and yeah that's how you should see this movie yeah i mean i think it it is you know incredibly well crafted yet that movie like like a singer lee the way he's able to mix these highs and lows of comedy and violence and commentary in at all feels really really seamless those just making me think when you were reading that about how just sort of snake eating its own tail the idea of depicting gratuitous violence in american media is like how much it sort of you know i was reading about paul very ovan that he grew he lived in the hague during world war two the naughty capital in the netherlands and as a sixyearold she lived through bombing raids and said that the streets were always just filled with cadavers embodies and explosions and it was just like this was ingrained in him yeah so i think it's something that he has had to express yahya but also interesting you know the 80s when i felt like violence was getting out of control and gun violence was you know starting to become a problem like the issue of how much does commenting on something just perpetuate right the idea you know i don't know if there is a even time to talk about something like that but i don't know is this like something i was thinking about during the movie if like wow this is so violent it's a reflection of what a violent culture we live in but then also like can't help but contribute to it via if you're depicting it well and also where he thinks it's headed to like yeah dopey in uh.

ebert netherlands yahya paul
"ebert" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Movie Crush

"This movie is at complete disappointment because i like to go back and see what the great roger ebert said about these movies and usually have a pull quotes that i prepared uh but it didn't have that one on this but i have pulled up the review and very surprisingly uh roger ebert did was not a fan of this movie really yeah it's kind of disappointing he gave it two and a half stars now's read a couple of little selections here unfortunately this good movie is buried beneath millions of dollars that were spent on production value that wreck the show this is often the fate of movies with actors in the million dollar class like newman having invested all that cash and a superstar the studio gets nervous inside spend a lot of money on its investment that's what happened here the movie starch promisingly when amusing period piece newsreel and then there's a scene in the tavern but the tough gambler and that's good but then the trouble starts after heyrman hires the posse it's called the super posse because it's includes all the best laumann and trackers in the west when it approaches the ground rumbles and we get the feeling it to supernatural force which indicate try to hide in the badlands but the super posse cannot be fooled it's always on their track forever uh any bear he basically says that this goes on forever and it gets bogged down and never recovers from that kind of second act tracking while which i totally disagree with yeah i do too i do too i i sort of understand it because it it feels like it does feel like well this is the rest of the move you know his name being pursued by these guys but then it's like okay that's an expectation but just because they subverted video he's the first rex dictation that's not the movies fault right you know they're allowed to make the movie that they wanna make right yeah it's i'm really surprised because this is a.

roger ebert newman million dollar
"ebert" Discussed on Movie Crush

Movie Crush

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Movie Crush

"All right so we finish up here with a couple of segments okay uh every week one called what ebert said movie is a complete disappointment 'cause i always like to go back at this one's actually interesting yeah well he gave a four stars um i think this is one of the ones and ebert did this quite a few times where he would go back years later and write a second review um in it's not like he didn't like 'groundhog day at first i thought i gave it threestars i thought he did not give it that he did he three starts pretty good alka uh but he gave it a good review at first and then i think in two thousand three is next review um it's one of those that grew on him and he saw the deeper meetings as well so it's kinda cool it was sort of critically like hey it's a good bill murray flake when it came out yeah why does this happen so often where ling at movies only reach surya genius level american classic status like a decade after they are released i don't know well maybe especially in a case like this it is under the guise the very light in take homolka point you go to it thinking like oh it's gonna be a fun berry movie yeah it's not like a plucky go into 'bladerunner twenty fortynine yup all right i'm ready to start digesting yet sonatina uh so even though i want you soap i got well i now new hey last time we traveled for the live shows we did you all gonna move we all went to a movie as we are all relative million address and travel through like let's go see spiderman qualifying rounds last movie i've seen the most recently oncoming yeah that was good did you like it i loved it yeah me too uh so here's what he had to say in the in the re review groundhog day is a film that finds its note in purpose so precisely that it's genius may not be immediately noticeable they haven't uh it unfold so inevitably.

ebert
"ebert" Discussed on Cracked Movie Club

Cracked Movie Club

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"ebert" Discussed on Cracked Movie Club

"This is news not liked by roger ebert ever really to get over this one now he thought it was meanspirited he gave it i think like one and a half stars in spirit how so i think it's because john candy is kind of a bully he's re his the way he solves all the conflicts in the film is to bully the shit out of people that school official that is one part that as like roof they'd button to that seen is like and yeah are ugly have a rat xu all the thing off the ice since it's cheeses ca i mean but that's just like another badly written female characters movie just receiving abuse and then john kennedy loyd early pumping his liar i really told her what four smokes in a school yes with cigars danson out of funky cold medina there but then but then i also but it's also like i didn't totally hate him in that sink no ending offers little meets yeah yeah like you agree with his point of view where it's like well you of course she's going to but also why does that seed happy what they never ever there's any indication that she's doing poorly in school and it's never and it never never does bag niece has no arc with that no yeah that's the one thing that happens are in the entire movie yes there were two tv show versions of aqaba produced one in the immediate wake of the of the original films starring kevin meaning or a happy in the title role and then like last year they try to do it again with my gift zia why keep trying to reap the uncle buck avert islander will know 'cause like in order like they figure this out in the kevin meaning version i don't know if they did this in a mike apps version but they figured out will they can't the parents can't just be away like because her father had a heart attack they fucking kill them in the mainly show ms yeah the parents.

roger ebert john candy john kennedy loyd aqaba zia official kevin meaning