35 Burst results for "Eastman"

Episode 210 2019 After the Fall of New York  - burst 14

The Moratorium

01:41 min | Last week

Episode 210 2019 After the Fall of New York - burst 14

"They climbed the wall to get out of this complex. And there shorty immediately and come with me guys. I know the way they jump over that wall they climb over the but then there's the year acts just kind of opened the gate and walk through massive open the whole time they just want to make it. Look cool wasn't even slightly locked. Yeah i saw super richard mulligan accidents more like pirate. That helps you. What would that sound like. I can't do a good richard. Maga will work on that it sort of christopher lloyd from taxi a little bit. Yeah but i'm not gonna attempt that here but they immediately escaped to the sewer again. That's like go chant. Can't get those guys out of the they end up. I guess getting upon Now a mutant little person village. Oh brother also about the sewer thing. I guess you get production value. Because it does. They probably didn't have to do much you know. It's just the sewer. That's what we're supposed to be imagining here. I just can't imagine having like an expensive camera alike in a sewer where there is waterfalls and even if this is not an active you know maybe this is like a storm sewer rather than like a wastewater sewer which i assume or two different things even ask gross. You know what. I mean. I get it but i mean you know. It gives us a chance to girls t shirt wet. So least there's that thanks

Richard Mulligan Christopher Lloyd Maga Richard
Facebook and Antitrust

On The Media

05:52 min | 5 months ago

Facebook and Antitrust

"Beginning to look a lot. Like sherman. Senator john sherman. That is who in one thousand nine hundred ninety sponsored the antitrust law that bears his name one hundred thirty years ago he pronounced quote if we will not endure a king as a political power. We should not into her king over the production transportation and sale of any of the necessities of life on february. Eighteenth one thousand nine hundred to without any warning. The president ordered his justice department to file suit against one of the trust. In which j. p. morgan had major interest the northern securities company. Its goal was the monopolistic control of all of the railroads between the great lakes and the pacific ocean. Since then other powerful repressive kings have been dethroned from standard oil to eastman kodak to at and t. and t.'s. Dogwoods as good as gold. It was independent on our currency. It was gold. Now it's gone. That was one thousand nine hundred eighty four. This is now twenty years into the digital century. Big tech remains supreme. All but unchecked by law and regulation the so-called duopoly of google and facebook valued at just under two trillion dollars between them control thirty five percent of the six hundred billion dollar global advertising market. Not to mention evermore of our personal lives. This is harvard. Professor emeritus shoshana zubov in the documentary. The social dilemma. Facebook discover that they were able to affect real world behavior and emotions without ever triggering. The users awareness. They are completely clueless in the past. Ten days came a storm first week before last. Forty eight states and territories along with the federal trade commission filed suit against facebook that suit alleges that facebook bought up rivals with the explicit intention of stifling competition legal filings include an email from mark zuckerberg in two thousand eight in which he allegedly said quote. Better to buy than to compete. And then this past week. A second thunderclap. When texas's attorney general announced new antitrust charges against google the suit claims that google in a conspiracy with facebook abused its market power to chip away at consumer privacy protections and rig the advertising market. But if you think they trust busting senator. Sherman has come out from decades of hiding. That's not quite the case for decades. Antitrust doctrine has been fixated to the exclusion of everything else on harm to the consumer as measured by out of pocket costs social media mind control and the erosion of democracy do not fit into that calculation that sort of the traditional metric that we've used to bring antitrust cases and to really understand and measure consumer harm. It's been those price hikes that really hit consumers pockets Vossen author of the twenty two thousand nine paper. The antitrust case against facebook and illegal consultant in texas suit is on the leading edge of an evolved antitrust doctrine based on harms not necessarily inflicted at the cash register for example invasion of privacy on a grand scale. I just found it so interesting. You know why is it that the communications utility in the twenty first century that all consumers use essentially conduct something similar to surveillance. You sign up for facebook and facebook not only monitors your communications on facebook but even when i go to for example the new york times in the morning facebook is making a record of that and it is extracting from consumers the permission to basically track them across the internet. And it didn't seem obvious to that. Consumers would sign up for that proposition is something that they really liked. It's also a bit ironic. Because as i understand it. In the beginning. Facebook was favorably compared to. Let's say my space in early social network where your personal profile was at least one point. Public and facebook was theoretically an antidote to that. That's right if you go back in history you see how. Facebook entered the market with very firm. Privacy promises it got users to choose facebook over other competitors in the market and only after it gained market power and competitors exited the market. Was it finally able to extract this sort of surveillance term from consumers a large and you contract that facebook's growth goes up privacy protections straight down that's right and the fascinating thing about the new york attorney general's suit last week. Is that internal communications. Confirm that that's indeed. How facebook internally was considering strategic moves about decreasing users privacy. I don't remember another case that has been brought in a market where the price is zero and the government is deciding to defend the people based on things like a lack of innovation in the market. A lack of choice. Everybody uses facebook to stay in contact with their friends and family. And then just privacy harms.

Facebook Senator John Sherman Shoshana Zubov Google Eastman Kodak Sherman Justice Department Vossen Pacific Ocean Great Lakes Mark Zuckerberg Morgan Federal Trade Commission Texas Harvard The New York Times
17 GOP attorneys general join Texas election lawsuit

KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

03:00 min | 5 months ago

17 GOP attorneys general join Texas election lawsuit

"Georgia wisconsin pennsylvania and michigan bob. Good morning good to have you back. Good morning gary. I appreciate you sending along the The pleading in particular is in is very well written. But i'm wondering they It it goes into detail about Statistically the some of these things have never happened before but isn't that kind of argument. Easy for the court to swat away. Don't you have to stick to the to the constitutional principles. Well the Brief that i sent you. A brief has actually filed on behalf of donald trump as an individual citizen and It was So that isn't the brief that we joined The state in a brass cajones brief that was filed by the state of missouri. There a total of seventeen states who have Joined together In support of the brief filed by the state of missouri so it's missouri and sixteen other states including nebraska have filed a brief in support of this case filed by the state of texas against as you mentioned pennsylvania georgia michigan and wisconsin constitutionally based Claim that is You know what i sent to you is is something that the president i. The president's lawyer it presents lawyer by the way is a brilliant jurist jurist brilliant lawyer who Clerked for a very fine. Court of appeals judge. And then and then clerked for justice. Clarence thomas this guy is not chump. Change the fate eastman eastman. Who was born in lincoln by the way point favorite there. Let me ask you a number one. Disabuse the trump haters of the notion that this is only a frivolous partisan exercise. I don't think doug peterson. For example. Who i know and a lot of nebraska do and other state's attorneys-general. They don't just do this for fun. No they do not We have a serious problem in our country with confidence in the The legitimacy and the integrity of our election process rasmussen poll December third the sixth rasmussen's a pretty well known well respected pollster. When what he found is that forty seven percent of frequent voters in this country. Believe that the believe that the election was either likely are very very likely stolen. Now that's a serious problem for our country we cannot have. We can't go forward with our representative democracy of people that confidence in the in the integrity of our elections. And i think that's why those of us. I today inexperienced. What else difference. Find your next mazda place mazda dot com today or you can visit our communication at a hundred and forty four th and giles to shop our showroom and take a test drive making your car buying

Missouri Wisconsin Pennsylvania Georgia Michigan Eastman Eastman Nebraska Donald Trump Doug Peterson Gary BOB Clarence Thomas Rasmussen Court Of Appeals Texas Lincoln Mazda
Washington to receive doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine this month

News, Traffic and Weather

00:45 sec | 5 months ago

Washington to receive doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine this month

"Of doses of the first Corona virus vaccine are expected to arrive in Washington state a week from today. Combos Charlie Harder has the story. FDA is expected to approve the first vaccine on Thursday. Washington Health Secretary John We, Eastman says five days later, it'll be here. We should be getting about 60,400 doses of the vaccine. And during the month of December total 219,000 of that vaccine, he says. The first group to be vaccinated will be high risk health care workers there around 300,000 to qualify. Then the vaccine goes to people in long term care settings, meaning it could still be months before the vaccine can get out to the general public.

Charlie Harder John We Washington Eastman FDA
COVID outbreak at Atlanta nursing home infects nearly 60 residents

America in the Morning

00:19 sec | 6 months ago

COVID outbreak at Atlanta nursing home infects nearly 60 residents

"Nursing home especially hard. Nearly 60 residents of the William Bremen, Jewish home in Buckhead testing positive since the pandemic began. In 10 of those residents have died. Other nursing homes in L. A. J. Fairburn, Eastman and Lafayette yet have also reported outbreaks this month. Covered 19 creating a

William Bremen Buckhead L. A. J. Fairburn Eastman Lafayette
"eastman" Discussed on KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

06:16 min | 6 months ago

"eastman" Discussed on KFAB's Morning News with Gary Sadlemyer

"A test drive making your car buying experience easier. This is what House Mazda One week and twenty three minutes away from the polls opening. Here in Nebraska. And a lot of focus. Obviously. nationally, and it pertains in the second district of Nebraska. Because of the way we allocate electoral votes and factors you know the president is going to be doing a rally here. This evening, we'll have that live on Kfi be He's hitting. Iowa with that. Rally of course, with a hot Senate vote over there and district two here in Nebraska. News Channel Nebraska's Joe Jordan my favorite political junkie. Or one of them joins me a few. Joy You doing. I'm good. Gary. How are you? I'm well, thank you what? Are you seeing the tea leaves in the Second District Raise Don Bacon, a car eastman. Well the key. For. Bacon right now is coming from an outside group, the Ricketts family basically Joe Ricketts is pumping. Dozens of thousands of dollars into this race the And spending. Action Fund Pack. back in September they put about one hundred and one hundred, seventy, six, thousand dollars of ads for baking against. Eastman here Gary just in the last week between now and election day that's it's it's GonNa be like over four, hundred, thousand dollars in ads, for Bacon, against Eastman, and right now that's that's a significant edge and it may be part of the reason why the five thirty eight website group that that watches all the polls and everything they've got bacon as a slight favorite to beat Eastman at. The same time they've got trump you know losing slightly to to Joe Biden So it's both are are razor razor thin and turn out as obviously always the key in the end a lot of people have already voted. So maybe some of those ads that are pro Bacon Anti Eastman won't resonate because people have already cast their ballots but you know we've become conditioned to the fact that this district for the last ten years or so has been like this going right down to the wire every time. Doesn't it down to? if. You WanNA simplify it. On. A Haver says the suburbs if you if you look at it and you can see that trend of you drive around and you can just see the trend in the yard signs depending on which part of town you're in. So I, assume jail turn out will be huge. nationally And locally, the big question to me is always. Well. The millennials, Jen's ears who always say they're going to vote never do actually turn out what do you think? Well I think that's a good question as it always is but I think the real question when you talked about the city versus the suburbs, the question for both Eastman and you know book the congressional rates in the presidential race is what of those suburban voters doing we've been hearing for months and the president has made the comment about you know suburban women you know, please love me th. That's where the make or break is are those suburbs are All. The traditionally vote locked up Republican is they're gonNA give they're not necessarily that the Democrats are going to get the majority but if they can cut into that into those numbers than than than than than a you can have a Biden Eastman, win I. Think it's more likely at the way things are going that that Biden wins and Bacon wins as opposed to any other Coming up at the end. One of the things I'm interested to see as the US Senate race. Ben Sasse and Christianity. For this reason Ben Sasse checked off a ton as you know, a ton of Nebraska with his comments on trump on that conference call a couple of weeks ago Do you think they'll be a significant protest vote for Christianity? I think what happens in that race Gary is you're going to see Republicans who are upset with SAS simply not. Marketing, you know a circle for anybody. I don't think Janice gets a lot more than I. Don't know twenty percent I'd be surprised and then there's the Preston love right in which is. Even tougher. Tougher to deal to come up with. So my guess is that you're mad at Sasse and you're a conservative Republican I don't think you're gonNA vote for Janik or right in Preston love I guess is just GonNa Years GonNa leave it blank, which will be interesting to see what vote Ben Sasse does get on election night. Could he come in around fifty five or or or or so as opposed to the seventy percent he might have had and he kept you know kept his mouth different quiet good going into the election. I. One of the most bizarre races I thank you would agree that most of us have ever seen is this republican versus Republican Nasty. Nebraska legislative race in district one. Julie Slama uncommon appointed by governor records versus Janet. Palm tag as far as you now is that thing tightened up at all because Lama won handily in the primary. She did almost five forty, some odd points Gary and the only thing that's tightened up, and this is very interesting to me is the spending I mean both those can't both those races are spending probably two hundred thousand plus before this thing is over Usually when you lose by forty points in the primary, you're not gonNa you know you just Kinda you know pack up the tent and go away but COMTEX campaign has been shelling out. You know as I said, they're going to spend a couple of hundred. Thousand Dollars the Slama campaign spending that much if not more and so money's an issue down there but it's really you know when people vote for you in the primary, it's hard to convince them that the vote for you in general. Now you're gonNA have a significant enough number people vote in the general that didn't even show up for the primary probably maybe twenty percent thirty percent more votes, but that's still a huge I'm not sure I've ever seen any any deficit like that erased in a state legislative race. Between the primary and the general you came back from forty points down to win I. Don't. I'm not sure I. Stand corrected but I can't remember one. We shall see Joe always good to talk. Thank you. Thank you gary..

Don Bacon Nebraska Biden Eastman Gary Ben Sasse Joe Biden House Mazda One Senate president eastman Joe Ricketts Eastman Joe Jordan Sasse Iowa Kfi Joe US
19-year-old man suspected of plotting to kill Biden

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 7 months ago

19-year-old man suspected of plotting to kill Biden

"Court documents show that the man found with a van full of weapons and explosive materials may have been plotting to harm Joe Biden. Here's CBS's Jeff gave, prosecutors say 19 year old Xander Trace men arrested for possessing child pornography posted evidence of wanting to kill presidential candidate Joe Biden on his phone and social media. They found images from mass killings and an Internet mean caption. Should I kill Joe Biden? Court documents show. Eastman had a fascination with mass shootings and had swastika drawings in his van, court papers say. In early May, he drove to within four miles of Joe Biden's Delaware home. After purchasing an A R 15 style rifle. This all comes just days after we learned about a man in Maryland being arrested for leaving a hand written notes that threatened to kill Biden and running mate Kamala Harris.

Joe Biden Xander Trace Kamala Harris CBS Eastman Jeff Maryland Delaware
Man suspected of plotting to kill Biden

WBZ Programming

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

Man suspected of plotting to kill Biden

"Newly released court documents show a man found with a van full of weapons may have been plotting to kill Joe Biden. Your CBS Jeff gave, prosecutors say 19 year old Alexander Trace men arrested for possessing child pornography posted evidence of wanting to kill presidential candidate Joe Biden. On his phone and social media. They found images from mass killings and an Internet mean caption. Should I kill Joe Biden? Court documents show. Eastman had a fascination with mass shootings and had swastika drawings in his van, court papers say. In early May, he drove to within four miles of Joe Biden's Delaware home. After purchasing an A R 15 style rifle.

Joe Biden Alexander Trace CBS Eastman Delaware Jeff
The Importance of the Print

This Week in Photo

06:28 min | 7 months ago

The Importance of the Print

"Able to little something different for you today here with an old friend of mine as in I've known him for a long time not that he's. Data's. Data start is here. He's from Epson a little company that that makes printers that you may have heard about printers and a bunch of other things but we're GONNA WANNA. Have Dental on to talk about printing. From the standpoint of the importance of it in how people that that may be afraid of printing today or somehow said, you know I don't print stuff on facebook and instagram whatever what's a print? I WanNa talk about that and get to the crux of why people should be printing especially if you're an advanced amateur beginner or or or professional photographer. So denno Steinar welcome to the program and how you doing great veer. It's great to see you and you're a game of thrones. Very symmetrical background their employees. Against Green. Screen. Good Yeah. Thank you. This is this is a brand new setup. People have been watching this show no, that normally that's not my background. Normally, my desk is actually slipped in the room is the background. So some different you guys got mix it up every now and So let's let's talk about this. So you're at you're at Epson let's talk about like the your role at Epson what what does Danone do at the company? Well, title is marketing manager my primary responsibilities are. Working with the creative professional markets in the marketing things that go along with that primarily photography certainly work with anybody that's creative professional. A fine artist and illustrator in other markets. I also do video production and amd because of some of the crazy background ahead in the early days of printing I've been I sometimes a pulled into some color science things related to projection because of all the pain we went through early in printing. I consider these long boring international color science meetings and understand what's going on. The. Yeah Yeah Yeah I definitely want to talk about that because. You know we were. We were talking before I clicked the record button about. Just sort of back in the day you know we won't have to go back. You have to put a time stamp on it, but back in the day. The printing experience was, hey, I got this brand new printer gamma. I got my box of paper and you run your first print through it and he came out. Magenta. Okay let me what did I do wrong. Okay and now gotta understand all this stuff. You run another printer it comes out yellow. This was you know. So let's talk about that a little bit. or excellence. Let's let's do that a little bit deeper I want to talk about the history. Of Printing itself you. Touched on that a little bit. Back in the day was enlargers. Remember those you know we had enlargers. Black and white, and then we went to color enlargers, which was a little more involved than a little less tolerance of temperature and all that, and then today you know it's it's file print. So talk to talk about sort of the evolution of where things were in the digital printing world and where they are today. How much time do we have? We have have about three days. So make a quick. To say you know. If you were to take the entire history of photography from nips if I'm pronouncing that correctly, when took that eight hour exposure the French street scene. and to kind of the the beginning of the digital age, you know that is like ninety five percent of photography and digital that term is just this. Let little. Little Flash. Little. Wink of the eye and just in perspective how quickly and things evolved. But as I've been with Epson and a little over twenty years, I was recruited from the Eastman Kodak Company. And this was when Kodak was Kodak. Amazing Kodak Moment. But it was so. Before, that I was a commercial photographer, I used to use a biton view cameras. Shooting. Food for magazines. Cargo, but if you look just a quick thing in the past. The. Printing was always about black and white printing. And it was not an uncommon thing that post World War Two for hobbyists to have dark rooms and advanced amateurs do dark rooms, and if you define yourself as a professional photographer, you always had a black white darker. Color Printing as we know it, we call now the analog world then it was called color print. That slowly came in the kind of mainstream. Sixties seventies, but that was purely big labs big photofinishing houses. It was difficult. You need a big processors he needed temperature control you needed. People Staff and. The Lap And? And it'd be fair to say that traditional see printing. I've never met anyone that said, Gosh I just love the way my seat prints used to. There were revered print processes back there like dye transfer some people remember CPA chrome off of things. But they're just kind of there in the past. It's kind of interesting history lesson in I. I lived at and that's where all this hair went in those darker. Darker. But the first kind of digital printing. started. Really A in the early nineties and I was then a Kodak technical sales representative which was a revered job back in the analog days in my territory to zip codes in Manhattan. New. York City district.

Epson Eastman Kodak Company Facebook Instagram Marketing Manager People Staff AMD Danone York City Sales Representative Manhattan
Georgia medical examiner says death of Cobb County teen shot by police is a homicide

Atlanta's Evening News and Rick Erickson

00:33 sec | 7 months ago

Georgia medical examiner says death of Cobb County teen shot by police is a homicide

"Of a Cobb County teen shot and killed by police has been ruled a homicide by the Cobb County Medical examiner's office. The Con county medical examiner finds 17 year old Vincent True, It was shot twice in the back with a fatal shot. Entering his lower back. Compal Eastman contended he opened fire when true, it ran away from a stolen car and brandished a gun. While family attorney Gerald Griggs disputes that he urges called police to help reveal the truth when you see Ah, that video, the dash camera and the body cameras so we can fully understand what happened. The G B I is investigating

Cobb County Medical Cobb County Compal Eastman Con County Gerald Griggs Vincent True Attorney
Newsweek apologizes for op-ed questioning Harris birthright

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 9 months ago

Newsweek apologizes for op-ed questioning Harris birthright

"Newsweek is apologizing for an op ed that used a false and racist conspiracy theory to question senator Kamilla Harris is citizenship and her eligibility to be Joe Biden's running mate the op ed was written by John Eastman a conservative attorney who argues that the U. S. constitution doesn't grant birthright citizenship in the essay he tries to sow doubt about Kamilla Harris is eligibility based on her parent's immigration status but he spends theory is false while Harris's mother was born in India and her father in Jamaica she was born in Oakland California and is eligible for both the vice presidency and presidency under the constitutional requirements lawyers say the issue is not even considered complex in an editor's note Newsweek says it failed to anticipate how the essay would be interpreted distorted and weaponized he says it's now being used by some as a tool to perpetuate racism and xenophobia despite Newsweek's apology the off head remains online Ben Thomas Washington

Newsweek Senator Kamilla Harris Joe Biden John Eastman Attorney India Jamaica California Editor Ben Thomas Washington Oakland
Kodak Insider Makes Well-Timed Stock Gift of $116 Million to Religious Charity He Started

Bloomberg Markets

00:21 sec | 9 months ago

Kodak Insider Makes Well-Timed Stock Gift of $116 Million to Religious Charity He Started

"Eastman Kodak CE wild stock market right produced what might be the biggest contribution on record to a religious nonprofit product for well timed gift by Kodak Board member George Carter Garfunkel. In the securities violent Last week, Mr Carr Funchal and his wife, Rene said they donated three million of their 6.3 million Kodak shares to Congregation Israel in Brooklyn, New York.

Kodak Mr Carr Funchal George Carter Congregation Israel Brooklyn Rene New York
Potential Kodak deal paused until 'allegations are cleared'

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:19 sec | 9 months ago

Potential Kodak deal paused until 'allegations are cleared'

"A government agency says a potential deal have Eastman Kodak helped make generic drugs being caught paused until allegations of insider trading of the governor cleared. Sweet from the U. S. International Development Finance Corporation, says quote recent allegations of wrongdoing raise certain concerns. We will not proceed until these allegations Air cleared

Eastman Kodak U. S. International Developmen
Potential Kodak deal paused until 'allegations are cleared'

A Closer Look with Arthur Levitt

00:26 sec | 9 months ago

Potential Kodak deal paused until 'allegations are cleared'

"Baseless. The federal agency that announced a $765 million loan to camera company Eastman Kodak. Weston two weeks ago, said the offer is on hold pending probes into allegations of wrongdoing. US International Development Finance Corporation said in a tweet that we will not proceed any further unless allegations are cleared. Congress and the Securities and Exchange Commission are investigating the deal and Kodak Sport said Friday. It's also opening a review of the loan

Eastman Kodak Kodak Sport International Development Fina Securities And Exchange Commis Weston United States Congress
Identifying AI Opportunities, a Key to AI Readiness - with Mark Ewing of Eastman Chemicals

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

05:02 min | 9 months ago

Identifying AI Opportunities, a Key to AI Readiness - with Mark Ewing of Eastman Chemicals

"So. Mark will kick off with just getting your perspective on what the aspects of Ai Readiness are a lot of enterprise leaders. Sort of wondering you know how do we get a already but there's components to that there's different aspects to that. How do you like to break those down Yeah Hey dan first off thanks for having me on today real pleasure to be here. So when I. When I think about readiness I think there's the technical front end side of things that. Have to be addressed, you have to have some some means methods of actually building the solution, but I think more important than that. From an Air Readiness Perspective is a defined need for where is GonNa make an impact in your business. It's easy. Relatively speaking to hire talent who can come in and talk about a I. It's relatively easy to buy software that will do I think where the rubber really needs. The road from Readiness Perspective is leadership who can look at the processes that they deal with on a regular basis and identify where there's value in having intelligent automation through ai or identifying places where there are opportunities to realize a lot of additional value from mining their data and in using the insights there to then build out a solution to help them make faster or better or decisions. I? Think if you don't have that part right there, everything else you're doing is building up a framework that's not gonNA deliver value and so long turn that around likely isn't going to be successful. So, completely understand the the. Just, where you're headed here mark. When you think about I, guess what people can do to arrive at that point where were they can have a clear enough idea to to get things to be successful what folks need to do I guess to get there to that place you're talking about? Sure I think a lot of what we do is try to guide people through a journey of trying to look through the eyes of their line of business operations, right? So If, we look at, for example, a logistics department in a supply chain, where are the places where they're making decisions that are based on data, but those decisions are taking a long time to make or maybe the decisions are made inconsistently. For example, if we want to identify orders that are at risk of shipping late. What can we do to identify and prioritize the rights shipments to get extra attention to ensure that we are delivering s for Lonzo? Right. So looking at that look at our processes and saying, we have an issue of late orders, we want to address that issue today. What we're relying on is watching analysts who manually are digging through the data trying to figure out where an opportunity to make an impact, right. So being look through identify those key elements that are you have data, you have a process today that is utilizing that data to make decisions, but the process is being done by people. It's not necessarily being done consistently or quickly, and so that's where the opportunity comes in for a to make a difference. Yes. It sounds like for you. Part of Ai Readiness what I'm here you articulate is having I guess functional leaders who can have their antenna up for opportunities like that. Right because I think if you don't understand a at a conceptual level, you're not gonNA be able to ask yourself what are the data based decisions whereby there are errors where we could leverage I. IT sounds like there's probably some. Background knowledge folks would need to have that the readiness of those antenna for lack of a better I. Don't know if I'm not shelling this well for you. Yeah. No, I think Dan. That makes sense. Obviously a functional leader would need to understand. where I can make impact worry, i. can't make an impact and I think that's essential at some level because a highly technical individual. If you bring in a data scientist who has a lot of ideas about where things could make a difference, they're gonNA have to try to be pushing that vision up the chain to get buy in from sufficiently senior leadership to invest in that sort of an initiative. And honestly that's a lot of work especially for people who have just hired into a company where they may not know the politics and the INS and outs in all people who are involved as soon as you have leadership who begins to have an idea and a vision of where and how you can make an impact that conversation shifts to a whole from the top up saying, how do we elevate the organization with what we're doing here? At. So if you have the social leaders who are primed and ready with their value cases and then you bring in your talent, now you've got a match made in heaven of we can take action. You can do that quickly. We've got the by, we've got the investment and we also have the framework for the change management is going to be required for in a implementation successful in the long run.

Mark Lonzo DAN Scientist
Dig for Victory

Gastropod

06:06 min | 11 months ago

Dig for Victory

"To get to today's urban gardens, let's go back in time to the founding of the US, there were certainly major cities Philadelphia New York Boston, but it wasn't. Until the eighteen hundreds that more and more people move to cities and urban ization in the US really got underway. These are people who would have grown almost all their own food before, but now they live in a city. They can buy food at the market. So how many of them kept up gardening in their new urban homes? A lot of food production went on. On within city boundaries well through the start of the twentieth century, there were lots and lots of urban livestock, because people were raising pigs and cows and chicken for food within city limits anesthesia day as a historian at the University of Delaware, and she's working on a PhD about Victory Gardens. It's only really during the city, Beautiful Movement and the progressive era that city start passing ordinances that actually outlawed these forms of local food production in the name of cleanliness and sanitation and middle-class standards of respectability, because only poor people grow their. Their own food. The city beautiful movement was big deal during the eighteen nineteen in one thousand, nine hundred wealthy urbanites, all this rural migration and immigration, and of course, the rising inequality and poverty and tenements in their cities, and they were not happy. They tried to clean the city up. They built big boulevards and parks with monumental fountains, and eventually they also introduced strict zoning laws and chickens and vegetable patches were not part of these new beautiful cities urban agriculture. Something poor people needed. It had to go some cities overtime had already. Already banned maybe the animals in the streets, or even keeping certain animals within city limits, but this really solidified during the city, beautiful movement city started to enact ordinances that said no farm animals in the city at all and no front yard vegetables, either meanwhile the poor had more pressing concerns than how the city looked frequently, when bad harvests and economic fluctuations raised food prices, they could not get to eat. There were dozens of major food riots in American cities throughout the eighteen hundreds. The first urban gardening movement starts in eighteen ninety. Ninety three in the town of Detroit, because of this panic of eighteen, ninety three, there were lots of panics. In those days, the stock market was very new, very volatile and long story short, suddenly, basically overnight, forty three percent of detroiters are unemployed in what had been a booming city and the Mayor Hazel S Pingree I has to find some way to answer. The cries of his constituents. So what he does is, he starts the first urban farming movement, which is ironically happening at the same time that many productive activities within the. The city are being outlawed. In other cities, urban leaders didn't want farms in their cities, but they also didn't want riots, and so letting poor people groza food on vacant land was seen as an acceptable temporary band aid in times of shortages. The Detroit plan was called the potato, patch plan and it had pretty impressive results by eighteen, ninety, six seventeen hundred families were farming more than four hundred acres in the city, and there are letters there from local detroiters writing into mayor Pingree, saying you so much I was able to grow. Grow Food for my family and lots of the people that wrote in. It's heartbreaking, because these letters are hardly legible there in broken English. Many of them were recent, German and Polish immigrants who were taking advantage of this program to grow foods dot connected them to their home as well as to feed their families. The Potato Patch program was seen as a success, but it was never meant to be permanent in less than a decade when economic situation in Detroit started to improve urban farms kind of petered out until the next big. Big Crisis, which was World War, one, the city beautiful movement had stamped out urban gardening the Detroit potato patches were gone, but suddenly there was a huge need both for food, and for kind of coming together in a patriotic sense. At least that's how Charles lay through peck sought. He was a lumber baron from New Jersey and early on in the days of the European conflict. He wrote the US government and said people should be reason. Food would help them contribute to the war help stock shortages, and the USDA promptly said Sir. We've got better ideas going here for better uses of fertilizer and seed supplies so thanks for your input and no thanks Charles hadn't made his fortune by taking no for an answer, so he took that Fortuna and started a Liberty Garden Movement himself, and he quickly found a whole group of rich people who wanted to join him in getting Americans. Gardening again to support the war Charles and his friends created a movement. There were Liberty Gardens. Gardens on Boston Common, and in Union Square in New York and big corporations like Eastman Kodak and General Electric set aside land at their factories for employees to grow and boy scouts even had a garden at Grover Cleveland's Childhood Home in New Jersey. Even the government caught the Liberty Garden fever, and they created a school program to teach budding young home farmers how to grow food and support. The soldiers was actually one of the first nationally. Nationally promoted curricula in the country, the Liberty Garden Movement seemed to really catch the public imagination. However, there was no infrastructure for collecting numbers. The only source we have is Charles Lathrop pack himself wrote a book called the war garden victorious in one, thousand, nine, hundred nineteen, and he claims that the movements sponsored five million gardens which time when there were just over six million actual professional farmers in the US is kind of impressive but remember. Remember Charles is our only source for this number and he might have been biased. It's really incredibly hard to say, but despite its holds on the national imagination, it had nowhere near the impact of world. War Two Gardens in terms at share mount of produce ground, sheer numbers of people participating sheer difference it made in the global war effort, and that's probably why you listeners at least in the US you don't use the Term Liberty Garden. Gardens you probably say victory garden.

Charles Lathrop Liberty Garden Movement United States Detroit Victory Gardens New Jersey Hazel S Pingree Liberty Gardens Term Liberty Garden New York Us Government University Of Delaware Philadelphia Usda Boston
Joe Biden picks up more delegates in Nebraska primary win

Pat Walsh

01:36 min | 1 year ago

Joe Biden picks up more delegates in Nebraska primary win

"See the Nebraska primary voters avoid tolls avoiding the polls and they shall be male and record in Nebraska Nebraska's primary voters mostly steered clear of the polling sites today wall shattering the state record for absentee voting with nearly forty thousand mail in ballots in the midst of the of the pandemic of course Donald Trump and Joe Biden sailing the easy victories in the election first in the the first in person primary since heavily criticized election Wisconsin five weeks ago this is the middle of the corona virus pandemics in Republican U. S. that was his man I'll just say this in a closely watched democratic primary for no bomb obeys congressional district voters chose restive Carrie Eastman over more conservative candidate Eastman was ones will once again facing Republican don bacon she did twenty eighteen in the breast is Republican dominated third congressional district Republican Adrian Smith easily won the GOP nomination not that you care visits Nebraska but I'm just let you know the Joe Biden it is a wonder Braskem trump easily

Nebraska Donald Trump Joe Biden Wisconsin Carrie Eastman Don Bacon Adrian Smith GOP Braskem
Inside Dennis Rodman's Wild 90s

ESPN Daily

08:51 min | 1 year ago

Inside Dennis Rodman's Wild 90s

"So Tim. Did you watch last night. Thank you for doing your duty as an Eastman Employees Tim. Cuban is a senior writer for. Espn Tim I am looking cover of the book. Bad as I WANNA be and it has a picture of Dennis Rodman. He is naked sitting backwards on a motorcycle. A there is a strategically placed basketball. His air is too Tan Blonde. And on the bottom of the cover it lists Dennis Rodman as the author in very big letters and then right below that in much smart letters it says with Tim. Cute which question. How did YOU COME TO BE WITH TIM? Koon and goes right. Dennis Rodman's autobiography my epitaph with Tim. It started with a friend of mine. Mike Silver who at the time was working at sports illustrated and had written the provocative cover story about Dennis where he was on the cover wearing the feather boa with a parrot on his shoulder. Mike was supposed to write. This book and sports illustrated would not let him because he was an NFL writer at the time and it would have taken up too much time of the season so they put out a casting call of writers. And Mike recommended that I put my my name in the hat. Several of US interviewed with Dennis to see who might mesh best with him. Who also might be able to finish a book in a shade? Under three months I interviewed with the Denison. A diner for breakfast in Anaheim with his agent at the time. Who's a coin collector named Dwight Manley who had just dipped his toe into sports agent? Tting after he became friends with Dennis. What into this diner set down with the two of them. Dennis Kata said Hi Kinda grunt high kind of thing I can remember the waitress coming over and Dwight ordering for both himself and Dennis and Dennis just not ever even looking at the menu and thinking. This is going to be a tough book you know. Get a hundred thousand words out of a guy who doesn't even order his own breakfast. I kind of looked at it. As as a Lark at the time Lo and behold a few days later I got a call that that I was chosen. Why do you think he got the job funny? I've I've run that through my head so many different times and I honestly think that I got the job because I I was just desperate for the job. I think that I just kind of sat back and maybe give off that impression that I was not going to be demanding to be his lifelong friend. You know I I wanted to hang out. I wanted to get the work done. I thought I could do the job. Well and something in the way that I carried myself. I guess hit a chord with Denison in made it work so this was nine hundred five. Dennis Rodman is already a known quantity and as you mentioned. He had been on the cover of sports illustrated. He was fairly far along in his career. What was your perception of him. Going into this. You know at first I was a little bit leery of the whole thing. At that time there wasn't a whole lot positive coming out about Dennis. He did have this high profile and his Rodman with that wild hairdo of his a lot of it was because he was disrespectful to referees. He didn't get along with coaches now. He's fighting one of his assistant coach. I was very curious as to who was the guy behind. All that is getting really annoying when you too. You've got to go out there and kick somebody's ass basketball is nice. What about as a basketball player? I mean before you spent time with him. I imagine you spend a lot of time thinking about his play on the court and what he had achieved so far with his career. Where was he at that point but that point he had been established as probably the best rebounder in NBA history especially for someone his size debt is just got the word doing his usual established early on that the way he was going to make his mark was by doing things that nobody else wanted to do doing the menial tasks of basketball and almost refusing to shoot which made notes to almost anyone his determination and the way that he played every possession like it was just a referendum on his self worth. I think was fascinating to me. I think it was so different from anybody else that we'd seen to this point now work very hard work. At the moment he was still on the spurs he was yes. He was rapidly playing himself off the spirits to San Antonio Thirteen months ago. Dennis Rodman has had three suspensions eight injections forty technical fouls and paid fifty four thousand two hundred fifty dollars in fines. They were desperately trying to rid themselves of him and it was actually with him when he got the call that they were trading him to the Bulls which just spun everything in such a different direction. I mean this book and Dennis's career and the world of basketball everything. Everything changed when with that phone. Call before we get to that call and how it led to everything we saw that transpired last night in blast aunts once. Dennis had chosen you. What was your next move? What are the parameters you had for working with him well it? It became clear probably at that breakfast meeting that Dennis was not going to be someone who is going to be able to schedule meetings. That just wasn't the way his world worked and so his his agents said okay to do this. You're basically going to have to move in because he's not going to be on any kind of schedule so I did two stints of living with Dennis. Rodman that we're about a week each the parameters were that you pretty much just had to absorb yourself into his life because that was the only way to get the information that was going to be needed to write a book. You get a sense from Dennis. Why he was doing a book and what he wanted to be in it. He wanted to do a book in part because I think he felt like. He had something to say to people that were like him. You know people who had been marginalized and and sort of shoved over societies edge. And I think that he knew it was an incredible marketing opportunity for himself. At that point he had established himself as this flamboyant character in basketball and he had gotten a lot of attention outside of basketball with his relationship with Madonna and. I think that this was something he saw as a a way to sort of spread his name even outside of any kind of sport parameter. So you're told you got to move in with him. At what point. Do you become a roommate of Dennis. Rodman's it was late. September of Nineteen Ninety five if I remember correctly and it was at Dwight Manley House in Orange California. I slept on the couch and I can remember at many points wondering if this book was ever going to be done because Dennis for all his flamboyance in the public eye is a very shy at times non communicative person. There were a lot of really really black spaces on my audiotapes from that time. Dwight his agent at one point said you know the best way to deal with Dennis. Get Him in the car to get him in the car he's captive. He will talk and so you know we started going out driving to Los Angeles going different places. Dennis would be driving and talking and would tell me stories about his childhood about how he fell into a basketball career so randomly even over the roar of the Ferrari. Engine I could make out with. Dennis was saying in the car and you know it made a book thankfully.

Dennis Rodman Dennis Basketball Dennis Kata Tim I Mike Silver Dwight Writer Dwight Manley House Dwight Manley Tan Blonde Espn Eastman Cuban United States Anaheim LO Denison Koon
Leo Baekeland Announced Bakelite - February 8, 1909

This Day in History Class

03:25 min | 1 year ago

Leo Baekeland Announced Bakelite - February 8, 1909

"Or wherever. You get your podcasts. In this day in history class is production of iheartradio. Hey y'all I'm eve and you're listening to this day in history class. A podcast for people interested interested in the big and small moments in history. Today is February. Eighth Twenty twenty. The day was February. Eighth nineteen thousand nine Belgian chemist. Leo Bake Land announced his invention of Bake lite to the public. Bake lite was the first truly synthetic resin fake. Lynn was born in Belgium. Jim In eighteen sixty three. He got his bachelor of Science at the University of and a couple of years later he received his doctorate of science bakelman invented Velox photographic paper and by the late nineteenth century. He was wealthy. He sold his velox paper rights to Eastman Kodak for a million dollars. Yes and at that point. He moved into his snug rock estate in Yonkers New York there. He had a home laboratory. Where he worked with his assistant Nathaniel Thurlowe? Oh in the lab bacon began experimenting with combinations of all and formaldehyde years earlier. Scientists experimenting with the Substances Senses reported that the combination formed a hard material other chemist had been working with final and Formaldehyde to create a material that that could compete commercially with Lloyd but they were unsuccessful Bake Lynn and Thurlow began working on creating a synthetic shellac since natural. Natural selleck was in short supply was used to insulate electrical cables but since it was made from a resin secreted by a bug there wasn't enough of it to meet demand hand they did create a female formaldehyde. SHELLAC called Nova lack but it flopped. They switched gears to creating a synthetic resin that could be infused in would to strengthen it. Bacon started writing in a new laboratory notebook in June of nineteen seven documenting the tests using the mixture. Sure on wood. In his June nineteenth century he wrote the following in part all these tests were conducted in concentrated horizontal digest and and the apparatus was a reasonably tight yet. The surface of the blocks of wood does not feel hard although a small part of gum that has moved out is very hard at first. He called the substance Substance D but soon he began referring to it as bake lite with two days in a lecture he gave to the New York. Section of the American Chemical Society on February eighth. Nineteen O nine Bacon announced his invention in it. He said by the use of small amounts of basis I have succeeded in preparing a solid

Bake Lynn JIM Leo Bake Land Twenty Twenty Bacon Eastman Kodak New York American Chemical Society Belgium Yonkers New York Selleck Nathaniel Thurlowe University Of Lloyd Thurlow
"eastman" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

12:42 min | 1 year ago

"eastman" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with amy. aaronson author of the New Book Crystal Eastman. A revolutionary revolutionary life. And if you haven't heard of Crystal Eastman you're probably not alone. She was one of the Most Progressive Communists of early twentieth century and she was also branded. The most dangerous woman. In America Crystal Eastman was an uncompromising feminist. She was also an early advocate for workers rights and a self branded socialist and anti militarist militarist. The two other important facts about crystal Eastman's life. She helped to write the equal rights amendment crystal Eastman was also the CO founder of the ACLU. So one of my very first questions about crystal Eastman's life is why she faded from history. Why there's so little information about her? So here is author Amy Eareckson explaining why she thinks that is. I think the main reason that crystal Eastman has kind of.

Crystal Eastman crystal Eastman Amy Eareckson Jim Taylor skinner amy. aaronson ACLU CO founder
"eastman" Discussed on MZNOW with Michael Zavala

MZNOW with Michael Zavala

11:54 min | 1 year ago

"eastman" Discussed on MZNOW with Michael Zavala

"Hey i hadn't been stung by the wasp in a long. Sometimes i realized ten shot like it really stings like a anything. I thought it was going to be something crazy. It uh-huh burned for like two hours and after that it was like a mosquito little welt. Oh it wasn't anything major. It's still a little bit a couple of days later that was at the most because i'm an alpha male and i don't go to the hospital from a mere wafting but anyway <hes> that's been my big news for at least fifteen breaks to get him to the hospital right. They said a normal man would've had twenty five finally had fifteen where they said they never seen anything like that. A normal man wouldn't have broken flag. They said he had died a normal man. I was so i went to vegas last week. I won't spend a lotta time on vegas but i went to vegas last week for the star trek convention and while i was at the airport i wasn't even in vegas yet. I was still in dallas at the t._g._i. Fridays so that needed all day. I'm sitting there eating and i look over and there's a guy proposing to she was girlfriend t._g._i. Fridays airport bar d._i._r._w. At d._f._w. And now is not the greatest place yeah eh and but they have good food so i go. Where's her a normal t._g._i. Fridays on here not the only one that i know of is like a in the west end and down so yeah so there's nowhere like convenient convenient. Yeah still could identify that one which is downtown. You have like you know. Why would you do that so many everyone's clapping. They saw the girls crying and i'm like someone's gonna ask you at about five years. How did he do it. How did he grow. Tell me how he did it. Yeah oh so we were on our trip to vegas and before we got on our spirit flight he took me for two dollar margaritas data fridays and then asked me to marry him in front of all these strangers and it was wonderful the like in <hes> see. I wish i had been there because i would have boo'd the whole time. I'm sitting here like the people i'm sitting next to her. Like oh my god that's so beautiful. This is and like you guys do realize we're at t._g._i. Fridays the airport. He's not even at his destination right and he said the reason why he did it that quickly. That wasn't planned. He said the reason why i did it. Was his mom posted. This is something on facebook so he decided that he would do it right then and there but you still don't like what i do is just wait like taylor tonight's dinner. This is what i would have done. If my plan was blown on nice dinner ramp it up like you're going to ask her out. Yeah maybe get on your knee start getting ready to tight but just on your shoe and break up their break up with her and then the next day ask her to marry you blow amman okay his mom's on his post or whatever commenting about that that just take down the post just ladies slide michael's deums trick yeah. I don't know what you're talking about with mom's crazy gray a you know that she's going to see going senile and then waited. Maybe you got back. Maybe you plant a nice dinner somewhere. You decided you spare the moment not not there at the airport bar right and any person in there. That's clapping for that. You're moron or maybe hit me up. Because you have low self esteem installer our clamping i was i was crying. Swish america's blue and one of those situations but i did get to hang out with luke brown on remember yeah so he lives out there. Now oh really. I didn't know that till three weeks. He's proposing to his wife fiance. He was there at the airport restaurants onset. Nobody i hung out with him on yield show and he took us to the fremont street and we hung around there and he's doing really good and wow fell yeah anyway anything new with you yeah. Actually we didn't really have a planet i have did but it was all hymie based and show up forgot yeah are supposedly right even even though i just talked to him last night about it no so because of your outburst on the last show i decided to give you again outburst yeah yeah outburst about out. It's been two weeks. You've probably forgotten about you and supposedly text me and i wasn't going to go. I really like them till this amount of time right anyways so i got you a gif as like an olive branch for you to apologize to me. Oh i'm walking over to you walking over handing a small sliver paper. What do we have here so your coupons coupon for seventy dollars off. My fourtou coffee shot across at kroger's. I had to go to kroger's kroger's or me so i gotta go out of my way. Thank you eric. Though i appreciate it. I will <hes> exactly the one. I drink the chocolate. Why no thanks <hes> mocha whatever you're right yeah it's great. How are you appreciate that and then i decided holidays from my hours because of this olive branch so then and also next year i will be going to vegas. Hey guess who else is going now luke so it'd be you me. Luke okay i. I thought about the new show coming out next year. It's an a b huge coach. Yeah and i heard i don't know this is true but i heard that the rio where it's currently at right now may be sold and torn down after next year also so this might be the last bench and at that hotel obviously we'll be the convention ever so oh also that's what i wanted to talk about. We we need to have this is gonna be hymie section when he was into a eulogy to <hes> the show the ohio which cancel they got cancer to see was this incredibly ended at the first one yeah so if you've listened to this show long enough you know that eric and i are not huge fans of the oh well we were but then turned out to not be yeah. I watched it. We were like this is incredible going somewhere yeah and then the payoff what it's like one of those fireworks where you really expecting smattering something begging you light it and then that's it. That's what the was yeah. Maybe could explode never explodes. That's it so the came out. She was insane. It just insane insane and that's why he got so much publicity because just crazy. Nobody could imagine why the show existed right and then season two came out which is even crazier. They doubled down on the craziness dennis. Did you watch season now. I didn't even watch it. Season two ended really weird and then go on season three but it's one of those shows that it's so stupid <hes> you can't watch it like it's supposed to be artistic artistic sifi with that being said i do like the fact that brit marling and her in writing partner only work on stuff that they right and only do things that they you know they. It's only they're projects. Which i think a lot of people in hollywood one to do but i don't have the resources of the talent or the time or whatever the case may be and they get to do that which is really cool so i want to support him but the progress not are are never that great so i feel like it's time to bring in a third person just script and be like hey guys. This is great. I see where you guys are going with but let's <hes> <hes> rewrite the ending. 'cause it's awful. It doesn't make any sense. I think anyway the r._i._p. To the way yeah all right. We'll.

vegas kroger luke brown brit marling dallas facebook ohio america hollywood partner taylor amman eric michael seventy dollars three weeks five years two dollar two hours
"eastman" Discussed on MZNOW with Michael Zavala

MZNOW with Michael Zavala

11:36 min | 1 year ago

"eastman" Discussed on MZNOW with Michael Zavala

"I think this this might be the <hes>. The first time starbucks got my order right. What did you get anyways so i have a frappuccino mocha frappuccino no fat milk nonfat nonfat and no whip whip you gotta whippet dogs one hundred forty calories milligrams of it's like five hundred champion. I'm looking for a yeah. I wish there was just a caffeine extract. Do you know he was online. I wish it would tell you exactly. How much caffeine isn't everything right. Have you never tried cranky. Ninety green tea extract not the watching home yet. We're gonna do it live. When we come back. We haven't asked him but right. Spiders guessing. This is how it's gonna go. He's very meta. He knows predict the future with a thumbs right all right. We're back m. Z. z. now dot tv. Hey imply a <music> allows.

caffeine starbucks one hundred forty calories milk
"eastman" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"So that we give dreamers a pathway to citizenship and so that people can come to this country seeking refuge because that's what america was built on are there lessons that you think you've learned from you're you're previous run the that will help you this time around as you're as you're running again for congress he had quite a few it's funny whenever whenever yelled organizers denies there's a says the last time the trial run the race we learned we learned a lot but we learned a lot about are messaging we learned a lot about are strategy you know in in are sealed effort 'em we learned you know this time we know we have some data that we can go back to we have ideas of people who voted for me we have we know what what concerns people have and we also know that we need to do and even better job of going out and talking to people and making sure that they know who i am and what i stand for because if you look at the last election the republicans spent one point two million dollars attacking me attacking me personally attacking me professionally attacking even my daughter and a democratic groups spent about thirty seven thousand dollars pointing out the bad voting record which a you know the incumbent had so that discrepancy in spending was huge and so this time we know that we need people come in and help bus point out incumbents horrible voting rights are now that he's in the minority i mean his recor he's still aligning himself ninety five point three percent of the time with donald trump and the republicans and he's simply just not representing this district he claims to be bipartisan bipartisan is actually working west colleague not just voting with their own party all the time and and basically you know compromises and he talks about compromise but for him compromising values and i'm i'm not and i knew that i i believe that we need to work together but right now we can't have somebody get in there and difficult what the republicans all the time because some of those policies are significantly harming people in this country i know the nebraska doesn't usually get a whole lot of attention in need presidential elections with the possible exception of obama targeting the the second district but do you think their presidential candidate should be spending time in nebraska do you think that the the people in nebraska want to to feel like they're they're hurt by those kennedy's i do absolutely i think that we've had maybe two visits from presidential candidates this time and and i imagine will be more especially as things get closer and people look at that one electoral college votes at this district and but but i think nebraska has been overlooked in general by by the party and by you know candidates are running for president and so i it's time for people to start taking seriously were in incredible state with rich resources and a and we do things you know maybe maybe to the beat of are owned draw which is a great thing about nebraska and so i hope that more candidates come here and actually talk to us i think sometimes they go over across the river council bluffs and thinks that's enough but we actually want people to come here and and see what's going on here because there's a lot of amazing things happening on the killer and omaha our i living in tech companies coming here incredible advancements when it comes to a you know some of the ways that we do think there's a city and a lot more democrats seven people give credit for people would like to help out you're campaign winter some ways they can do that well we we're always looking for people especially locally common knock doors with a walk and parade with us make phone calls we've got some interesting field strategies this time i feel director at how they might have been ashley organizing and academy adamy her volunteers the train them in not just working on the campaign but also just in community organizing so we have opportunities there as well and we wanna start bringing are canvassing out to neighborhoods rather than having people come to us and so people can always get bob locally obviously candidates like meeting need donations i do not take corporate pack money so i

america thirty seven thousand dollars two million dollars three percent
"eastman" Discussed on Motley Fool Answers

Motley Fool Answers

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on Motley Fool Answers

"Income of one hundred sixteen million with a total debt of around four point two billion JC. Penney is clinging to death. Another one that just won't go away offs extraordinary waiting up. All right, next one Eastman Kodak. So when you Google Eastman, Kodak, Google tries to be helpful Google is like, hey, people also ask and literally I just wouldn't Eastman Kodak Google's like hear what people usually ask is Eastman, Kodak out of business is still in business. How did he's been kill himself? Why did he spend name his company Kodak to these codex? Still exist is Kodak film, still mate. So the answer is yes. It's asking where you really looking for Kodiak bear anything else. So yes. Emerging from bankruptcy in two thousand thirteen Kodak's. Bumpy ride has continued. The stock plummeted fifteen percent at the end of January after the announced Kodak coin. Yes. Tokar and see was going to be delayed. So the stock took apparently they were going to have crypto currency. But the and the stock did a little got a little bump off of that. Because. Through the market foolery library of two thousand eighteen I know we cover that on at least one episode. Yeah. So then they're like, actually, no our currency isn't going to launch when we thought it would. And so I I don't know man there aren't enough. I for that one. All right next up. Go pro. Yes. Shares of taken a beating since the company's two thousand fourteen peo- stock.

Eastman Kodak Google Eastman Google Penney peo Tokar Kodiak fifteen percent
"eastman" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Time to cover talking to John Eastman, the former dean of Chapman law school. And of course, he is the founder of the defining director of the center for constitutional jurisprudence there at the Claremont institute, Clermont dot org or g let's take it out of Florida for a moment. Let's take a look at Georgia, and you have Stacey Abrams who is now suing to keep the vote count going an extra day in the hopes that enough votes can be counted for her maybe regardless of where they come from. So she can force an automatic recount of the entirety against Brian Kemp. How how does that differ from what's going on right now in Broward and Palm Beach? Well, you know, I've I've not seen evidence of of of new ballots showing up. But if they've got. Ballots that hadn't been counted or absentee ballots that hadn't been counted. The the margin is so close that in counting those additional ballots. The the Republican ended up slightly below fifty percent then by state law. There's a run off. And so I think that's what she's trying to do. Now that that assumes that the ba- the uncounted ballots are gonna break differently than those that have already been counted. A lot of times this is dirty little secret of elections. We we call the elections. Even though all of the absentees are all of the provisional ballots have been counted. Because even if they break one hundred percent the to the to the losing candidate. It's still won't make a difference in the outcome. But what we've seen all also in other cases, just go back to Indiana in the nineteen eighties congressional seat. They kinda create different piles of provisional ballots, and what happened in that congressional seat with an outrage. The the Democrats in charge of the house of representatives, which is the overseer of of elections for the house of representatives kind of divided the provisional ballots up into different categories, and they open one one set of ballots, and he and the democrat was still losing. And then they opened another set of ballots and the democrat was still losing. And then they opened another set of ballots and all of a sudden the democrat was winning. And so they decided we're going to stop now and didn't count any of the others. The same thing happened in the Washington state governor's race a few years ago. And and also in the US Senate race, we're Al Franken won the won the election stole the election away from norm Coleman, so this is becoming unfortunately, it seems like it's a it's a piece in the playbook now. John eastman. I appreciate you taking the time. I appreciate you being with us. We may be checking back in with you on on what happens in where the legal battle goes from here. A pleasure to have the chance..

John Eastman Stacey Abrams founder Claremont institute Chapman law school Brian Kemp Florida Georgia US Palm Beach Broward Indiana Al Franken norm Coleman director Senate Washington
"eastman" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

08:29 min | 2 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"John Eastman. Former dean at Chapman University School of law teaches their former law clerk at the supreme court. Justice Clarence Thomas. Professor. Thank you very much for taking the time. I really do. Appreciate it, very is always a pleasure to be on with the great sages central. Thank you. I wanna talk to you first about the caravan. And then I wanna talk to you about President Trump's assertion that he can change the interpretation of the fourteenth amendment which has been interpreted to allow an illegal alien to come to this country have a child on American soil, and that child automatically becomes an American citizen. But first, let's talk about the caravan. Tell me what legal authority he has to put troops on the border. Troops stopping an invasion in the United States is one of the primary reasons we have troops dating back to the civil war. There's a federal law called the posse comment heart attack that says the US military can't be used in the interior of the United States for regular police activity. But that's not what President Trump is proposing to do he's proposing to put him on the border to stop folks from your legally invading our country. Professor how come previous presidents haven't done this. I mean, this so-called invasion as you put it has happened year after year after year, not quite as large, but why have another president's done this. Well, because they don't like our immigration laws, and they're not willing to enforce them. And they don't they don't think about the full consequences of what this lawlessness is doing to our society. Let's talk about consequences. Professor what happens if somebody gets shot? Well, that's a terrible thing. And you know, I'm hoping that that doesn't happen. That's clearly what the left that is funding. This caravan is hoping will happen. Even better in their view would be a child. So we can get the nightly news running constantly until between now and election day. But the fact of the matter is these people are putting themselves and their children in harm's way by violating the laws of this country. They claim that they are refugees. We have an international law obligation to consider their claims for asylum. But as far as I've been able to tell not one of them is making claims that actually fit this definition, the legal definition of refugee not fleeing their countries because they are being persecuted because of their political or religious or race or ethnic views. They're fleeing their country because they want to go to a place that has a better economy. That's not one of the grounds for refugee status. Why hasn't Mexico's stopped them. Even after Donald Trump has told them to even after Donald Trump has said he's going to withhold aid from water Malla in Honduras presume, have some sort of economic punishment to Mexico Hackel. Mexico hasn't stopped them. Well, the same international law that would require us to. Fitter their claims for asylum required Mexico to consider their claims for asylum as well. In Mexico should be stopping them because that was the first country that they entered into illegally to make these refugee claims, but but some of them have, and I think Mexico is processed processing knows, but we don't wanna stop and Mexico. We want to get all the way the United States, which is just further proof that this wasn't concerned about persecution in their home countries. It's just they want a different economy to live, and that's not a ground for refugee status. What would happen professor if we allowed fourteen seven thousand so called migrants to transport themselves through our country to go all the way up to Canada Canada would stop them as well. Same reason there are legal processes in place here and countries have the ability to define what their immigration and naturalization policies are if you don't allow that you have no such thing as a nation. You have no such thing as President Trump is absolutely correct on that without borders. You have no explain the grounds for which people can apply for asylum. Well, you've got to have a credible claim that you are being persecuted or under threat of persecution based on your political views your religion, your your race, your ethnic background, those sorts of things just being core. And wanting a better life is not a ground for refugee status for them under international law, and certainly not under any of the law the United States. The president professor has said that there may be some bad guys there, including maybe people from ISIS or even Al Qaeda is there any basis to believe that. Well, we we've seen some reports of that. I i'm. Not privy to the intelligence, but it wouldn't surprise me that border is porous. And if you're stopping people at the port of entry on the east coast and New York, or what have you and vetting them properly, then then folks that are aiming to come here to the United States to do with terrorist harm, which would see a more poorest entry and that Mexican border is right now the poorest entry wouldn't surprise me to find a significant number of potential terrorists in this group. My guess the professor John Eastman of Chapman University School of law. Professor what about funding you mentioned that this migrant caravan is being funded by the left. What do you mean? Well, you know, it takes a lot of money to transport seven thousand people to feed them every day. You know over the span of space that they'd gone in this caravan. I wanna know who's funding it they were so poor in their country that they couldn't eke out a living who's paying for them to eat on a along the way somebody must be doing it. And quite frankly, it's like. Yeah. You just kinda go to the explanation that makes most sense. It's most likely somebody that is trying to interfere with the US elections by setting up a confrontation. The news media can turn a contrary to President Trump and his supporters. Let's turn to the fourteenth amendment. Here's what President Trump said on immigration, some legal scholars believe he can get rid of birthright citizenship without changing the constitution. -secutive ordered. Exactly, right. Have you thought about this? Tell me more. It was always told to me that you needed a constitutional a member. You don't number one number one. You don't need that number. Well, you can definitely do it with an act of congress. But now they're saying I can do it just with an executive order now. How ridiculous we're the only country in the world where a person comes in has a baby and the baby is essentially a citizen of the United States for eighty five years with all of those benefits. It's ridiculous. It's ridiculous. And it has to end and have you talked about that with council where in the process in the process? It will happen. With an executive order. That's what you're talking about. Yes. I didn't think anybody but knew that. But me that I was the only one Jonathan guests. Professor eastman. Can he do this with an executive order? Let's let's just be real clear. First principles, the president cannot amend the constitution by an executive order. Congress can't amend the constitution by an act of congress. And the supreme court isn't supposed to be able to amend the constitution by doing a judgment or ruling in a cave. But that's not what the president is talking about here. The constitution doesn't require birthright citizenship. It says anybody born here and subject to the jurisdiction are citizens. All he's trying to do is clarify what that phrase subject to the jurisdiction mean. And it doesn't mean anybody who happens to be subject to our laws because they're physically present here, it meant something much more complete than that owing the lead into the country being part of the body politic. And that's what the debates or the fourteenth amendment make clear, that's what the early supreme court decisions on this may clear and the supreme court has never held otherwise we now so so that would mean that the children of citizens or the children of lawful permanent residents. Are automatically citizens by virtue of the fourteenth amendment, but the children of temporary visitors whether it's a tourist visa or student visa or or certainly the children of people who are not lawfully present in the United States at all or not automatic citizens. According to the constitution, and the president is just trying to faithfully apply that clause that was drafted and ratified, and and as it meant to the people that passed it, forty five seconds left. Professor, I thought there was some sort of court case that came out in the early eighties. Have some sort of footnote, which people point to to argue that anybody who's in the country even illegally has a child on American soil. Is an automatic citizen. Isn't there some sort of case that people point to that rightly or wrongly they used to make that argument, they do case called Plyler versus dole? And it's ridiculous case had said that states have to provide free education to the children really good immigrant under the equal protection clause. And incited a footnote that says what they're they're. They're also.

President Trump United States president Professor Professor eastman supreme court Mexico Chapman University School of l executive congress professor Clarence Thomas law clerk Mexico Hackel dole Canada Canada New York
"eastman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

08:32 min | 2 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"John Eastman. Former dean at Chapman University School of law. He still teaches there former law clerk at the supreme court Justice Clarence Thomas. Professor. Thank you very much for taking the time. I really do. Appreciate it. Larry always a pleasure to be on with the great sage of south central. Oh, thank you. I wanna talk to you first about the caravan. And then I want to talk to you about President Trump's assertion that he can change the interpretation of the fourteenth amendment which has been interpreted to allow an illegal alien to come to this country have a child on American soil, and that child automatically becomes an American citizen. But first, let's talk about the caravan. Tell me what legal authority he has to put troops on the border. Well, you know, the troops stopping an invasion in the United States is one of the primary reasons we app troops dating back to the civil war. There's a federal law called the posse comment hot attack that says the US military can't be used in the interior of the United States for regular police activity. But that's not what President Trump is proposing to do he's proposing to put them on the border to stop folks from your legally invading our country. Professor how come previous presidents haven't done this. I mean, this this so-called invasion as you put it has happened year after year after year, not quite this large. But why have another president's done this because they don't like our immigration laws, and they're not willing to enforce them. And they don't they don't think about the full consequences of what this lawlessness is doing to our society. Let's talk about consequences. Professor what happens if somebody gets shot? Well, that's a terrible thing. And you know, I'm hoping that that doesn't happen. That's clearly what the last that is funding. This caravan is hoping will happen. Even better in their view would be that it were a child. So we can get the nightly news running constantly until between now and election day. But the fact of the matter is these people are putting themselves and their children in harm's way by violating the laws of this country. They claim that they are refugees, and we have an international law obligation to consider their claims for asylum. But as far as I've been able to tell not one of them is making claims that actually fit this definition, the legal definition of refugee, they're not fleeing their countries because they are being persecuted because of their political or religious or race or ethnic views. They're fleeing their country because they want to go to a place that has a better economy. That's not one of the ground for refugee status. Why hasn't Mexico's stopped them. Even after Donald Trump has told them to even after Donald Trump has said he's going to withhold aid from water mullahs in Honduras, not presume have some sort of economic punishment to Mexico. Mexico has stopped them the same international law that would require us to consider. Under their claims for asylum required Mexico to consider their claims for asylum as well Nexico should be stopping because that was the first country that they entered into a legally does make these refugee claims, but but some of them have, and I think Mexico is processed processing knows. But sometimes we don't want to stop and Mexico. We want to get all the way to the United States, which is just further proof that this wasn't concerned about persecution in their home countries. It's just they want a different economy, and that's not a grand for refugee status. What would happen professor if we allow fourteen seven thousand so called migrants to transport themselves through our country to go all the way up to Canada candidate would stop them as well. Same reason there are legal processes in place here and countries have the ability to define you know, what their immigration and naturalization policies are if if you don't allow that you have no such thing as a nation. You have no such thing as sovereignty President Trump is absolutely correct on that without borders. You have no nation. Explain the grounds. So which people can apply for asylum. Well, you've got to have a credible claim that you are being persecuted or under threat of persecution based on your political views your religion, your your race, your ethnic background, those sorts of things just being core. And wanting a better life is not a ground for refugee status for them under international law, and certainly not under any of the law the United States. The president professor has said that there may be some bad guys there, including maybe people from ISIS or even al-qaeda. Is there any basis to believe that? Well, we we've seen some reports of that. I i'm. I'm not privy to the intelligence, but it wouldn't surprise me. Well that border is porous. And if you're stopping people at the port of entry on east coast and New York, or what have you and vetting them properly, then then folks are aiming to come here to the United States to do with terrorist harm, which would pay more poorest entry and that Mexican border is right now the Poor's entry so it wouldn't surprise me to find a significant number of potential terrorists in this group. My guess the professor John Eastman of Chapman University School of law. Professor what about funding you mentioned that this migrant caravan is being funded by the left. What do you mean? Well, you know, it takes a lot of money to transport seven thousand people to feed them every day. You know over the span of space that they've gone in this caravan. I wanna know who's funding it in if they were so poor in their country that they couldn't eke out a living who's paying for them to eat on the a along the way somebody must be doing it. And quite frankly, it's mostly. Likely. Yeah. You kind of go to the explanation that makes most sense. It's most likely somebody that he's trying to interfere with the US elections by setting up a confrontation that didn't meet Nubia can turn a contrary to President Trump and his supporters. Let's turn to the fourteenth amendment. Here's what President Trump said immigration, some legal scholars believe you can get rid of birthright citizenship without changing the constitution. We ordered. Exactly, right. Have you thought about this? Tell me more. It was always told to me that you needed a constitutional amendment. You don't number one number one. You don't need that number two. You can definitely do it with an act of congress. But now they're saying I can do it just with an executive order. Now, how ridiculous with the only country in the world where a person comes in has a baby and the baby is essentially a citizen of the United States for eighty five years with all of those benefits. It's ridiculous. It's ridiculous. And it has to end and have you talked about that with council. I have to wear in the process in the process. It'll happen. With an executive order. That's what you're talking about. I didn't think anybody but new that. But me, I thought I was the only one Jonathan guests. Professor eastman. Can he do this with an executive order? Well, let's let's just be real first principles the president cannot amend the constitution by an executive order. Congress can't amend the constitution by an act of congress. And the supreme court isn't supposed to be able to amend the constitution by doing a judgment or ruling in a case. But that's not what the president is talking about here. The constitution doesn't require birthright citizenship. It says anybody born here and subject to the jurisdiction are citizens. All he's trying to do is clarify what that phrase subject to the jurisdiction mean. And it doesn't mean anybody who happens to be subject to our laws because they're physically present here, it meant something much more complete than that owing allegiance to the country being part of the body politic. And that's what the debates of the fourteenth amendment make clear, that's what the early supreme court decisions on this make clear and the supreme court has never held otherwise we now so so that would mean that the children of citizens or the children of lawful permanent. Residents are automatically citizens by virtue of the fourteenth amendment. But the children of temporary visitors whether it's a tourist visa or student visa or or or certainly the children of people who are not lawfully present in the United States at all or not automatic citizens. According to the constitution, and the president is just trying to faithfully apply that clause that was drafted and ratified, and as it meant to the people that passed it forty five seconds left. Professor, I thought there was some sort of supreme court case that came out in the early eighties had some sort of footnote, which people point to to argue that anybody who's in the country even illegally has a child on American soil is not a medic citizen. Isn't there some sort of case that people point to that rightly or wrongly they used to make that argument, they do case called Plyler versus dole? And it's a ridiculous case. It said that states have to provide free education to the children really good immigrants under the equal protection clause and excited. A footnote that says what they're they're they're also citizens if they're born here, but that was not a holding of the case. It.

United States President Trump president Professor Professor eastman Mexico Chapman University School of l executive supreme court congress professor law clerk Justice Clarence Thomas Larry Canada dole New York
"eastman" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on KGO 810

"It was he knew it was time to gut wrenching decision, very gut wrenching decision. So that that's that's how that comes to pass before we get into the the the US in World War Two and FDR's relationship with Churchill and then later Stalin. Just talk to me a little bit about sort of the enemy's list that he had already cultivated through the overregulation and and with with the big corporations in the United States a little boy. This guy had you know there were enemy. He hated money. You really didn't. Exactly counts as much gold as he get his hands on. So he really anybody who was interested in industry are making money was definitely not his friend. I mean, he really pissed off some powerful people. I'll run through the list here of the ones that I came up with the du Pont family, George Eastman from Eastman, Kodak, Harvey Firestone. Same little Colgate. Colgate. Toothpaste, Henry Ford steelhead Henry Frick, the Heinz family the Hilton family who had hotels, the melons family who was in charge of the World Bank's William taught me that was the president. Oh, I bury a- and even Robert Woodruff who is chairman of the board Coca Cola. I mean, these people would have done anything to get this guy out of power because she was costing them millions of dollars not only in production, but in personal wealth. So he he certainly had some some enemies and here we're starting to get into the motive of murder. And it's with all of my books. I run all the suspects through motives means an opportunity to come up with the person or people connected to this. And how it happened? And I just want to tell just want to jump in and tell.

George Eastman Stalin United States du Pont family Coca Cola FDR Henry Ford Henry Frick Harvey Firestone Robert Woodruff William Churchill World Bank murder Kodak chairman president
"eastman" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on KTRH

"On. So so at a corporate level, I think they they may have to have made some missteps and then. If you look at drones, they think there's an obvious the Bill for chaos with them drones fine around. You're trying to walk down the block and a strong finance you or they could be weaponized and and flown into a ballpark while a game is on. So that's the thing that finally just working remotely. I was thinking about that movie late. They'll say Vida where the guy was the star was working on the beach, and he had the boy helping them with his tapers. And you know, if they're really a reason to be at an office, most of the time and truck an office what he could just get on the computer and do the work on a beach. Wow. That's great stuff. I'd like to I'd like to talk to all three of those things to the first one, you know, you mentioned corporations and Eastman Kodak. It's very interesting to me that large companies don't usually make these leaps and the of the original Dow companies I used to say only ones left, and then it was just he listed g. And so none of the companies that were on the Dow originally, the big powerhouses are there, you know, sometimes when you technology comes along, and they just don't adopt. It blockbuster. You know, streaming video came along. And they were like, yeah. We'll we'll just wait and see and Kodak you mentioned them and a polaroid the same story which digital photography, and they didn't they didn't catch on. Right blockbuster is another one. Exactly. With regard to drones. I agree with you. We're we're going to have to work that out and. We're in such early days that, but yeah, there's going to obviously have to be some kind of like customs is going to have to be laws is going to have to be all kinds of stuff. We don't have because that's very real working remote. I kind of hope so I I don't know that I would say blanket thing for for every single person on the planet like 'cause you can just list down careers that you you can't like the electricity or belly dancer or anything that requires psychiatrist or anything that require a kindergarten teacher requires you to be present in any any way. But for people that are in the information industry, then. Yeah, there was this. There was a series of commercials. All and I don't know if you remember it in the nineties that some day, you will, you know, syntax from the beach.

Eastman Kodak blockbuster Dow Vida
"eastman" Discussed on Z104

Z104

03:03 min | 3 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on Z104

"Eastman mindset Take her home in. Your bed Keep telling me that it gets better Does it ever Sounds Gnome Strong someone Musk In Do her phone again anxious Again Can't be Some body Sounds No. Man this song in someone Kevin Sometimes Alexa play.

Eastman Kevin
"eastman" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"They were speaking with representative david eastman from district well david i was thinking about this during the break and i was just reflecting on many many many many committee hearings i watched you in and you were on the judiciary committee you were really at the forefront of trying to undo the negative impacts of espy ninety one what was your takeaway this year when you look at what you were able to accomplish as a whole and what we still have in front of us i was that you know time and time again you'd have these hearings public tests two very different crowds lining up either before four or against ninety one of its smaller parts and those who were advocating for ninety one well almost exclusively those who stood to benefit financially from espy ninety one you had those who were all in treatment former inmates you have those were involved in the healthcare industry basically anyone who was part of the food chain that was going to be getting money and of course a lot of that was sort of an expectation that they were getting money because they hadn't gotten or seeped any yet they would line up behind espy ninety one and then you had an entirely different group of people mostly just average alaskans who are calling and saying you know hey this is no good for me or my family owned by community you know one of the calls that i got it probably was more memorable than any other was i got a call from a convicted felon who had been in the system and to talk and had had cleaned herself up and she was calling in tears because her best friend had just died and and she attributed it strictly st ninety one because her friend was arrested she was immediately let go and and there was no opportunity for her to to slow stop or even slow down from the destructive power whereas in in her own case she had spent some time behind bars and that was what she needed to get straight and so she was just calling to talk about her story and how terrible espy ninety one has been not just for crime victims in fact criminals themselves yeah.

david eastman representative
"eastman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"A sense that maybe our voice has been taken for granted donald trump was a wakeup call for many women particularly democratic women they're getting out there organizing they're raising money they're putting themselves in the sort of political grassroots pipeline they're running for office and you're now seeing that take place in these primaries were women are getting nominated for these seats that's leonard stein nor we do thank cbs news four these clips and there is one more and i save the best for last there was a race a lot of people were looking at in nebraska's second congressional district and omaha a woman defeated the former member of congress a male for in an upset for the democratic nomination again there's a surge of enthusiasm for female candidates around the country that again is leonard steinhorn and we do thank cbs news for these clips her name is cara eastman k a r a she is a newbie in politics carry eastman is a very bernie style democrat carries men took on an establishment democratic former congressman from that exact seat in omaha omaha bay seat that's the one little part of nebraska with is that where the democrats actually have a chance every once in a while and and it was a fifty one to forty nine result the separation between the two candidates twelve hundred votes kara or cara eastman k a r a she won she defeated the democratic machine picked candidate she defeated the candidate that nancy pelosi wanted carey's been defeated a guy a white guy with white hair i forget his name but he was a former congressman he's a white guy with white hair who as a moderate democrat who the d triple c wanted him to be the guy wanted him and they thought he had a better chance but the voters voted and so.

donald trump leonard stein nebraska leonard steinhorn eastman congressman nancy pelosi carey cbs congress omaha bay
"eastman" Discussed on Harmontown

Harmontown

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on Harmontown

"Rubber kirk whenever ready you pick a stool you pick a my answer one yeah on june ever you weren't here are k when i'm going all oh well let's i mean i drive rally ricocheted aturday would be sorry to see if you're hobart it youths with it you're right the world is your red carpet how be awesome though be amazing he's sick are you sick of being having a guys like me uh just talk about you like a hunk of money lake flake o like that's okay right like fantastic i know you're human being i just i'm proud to to know a guy from the viking 90s black and white comic book world that that turned it into the something kevin eastman yeah fuck kevin east what's he done what is like you don't even here but the turtles anymore it's not like they're like on television every week or something for deaths crazy but uh but no no i mean at sir you know it's a little weird it's not something i think about 247 so when people say it i'm kinda like oh yeah but if you're not the only one that happens a lot tit talent just tell us something like in the last while i don't know something that sticks out in your head as a moment when you're like jesus christ that's really rich about yourself you're like someone came up to you and said can i have a car and you're like yeah and and as they drove away or like whoa that's not me.

kirk kevin eastman
"eastman" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"I think david eastman should put in for frankly i know david eastman we'll be crossed off the list immediately because governor walker is not interested and david eastman an being in the senate and i kinda chuckle because i love david you know i think i think he's a great constitutionalist and i think he's a he's a patriot but if if district nine and ten could get together in find three david eastman type canadains you know i think than they would have to pick one of them i think and if they tried to pick outside of it i think you'd have a backlash but in my view what you're going to see is governor walker is gonna pick the most liberal the most moderate person they can possibly find and that being the case you know i say fine three hardcore constitutionalist i really wish pam good had been had been a republican long enough because i think my dream team if i were to going to pick three names to put forward in district nine intent i would put david eastman pam good and todd smoldon could you can't lose with any of them is simply can right they're all constitutionalist they're all conservative there is no question now some people are gonna freak out because i didn't mention george rao shire's name but i like george rao sure i you know all that good stuff you know hugs and butterflies and cupcakes and all that i like him but the thing of it is is davies meant a warrior pam good as a warrior types moldan he's a warrior he is not afraid of his conservative and i'm not saying anything negative about russia i'm not saying he's not all i'm saying is i know these other three far better and i know there's they just they know what they believe in they're not afraid of it and um i think governor would really be put in a pickle because who would you pick who would you pick.

david eastman governor walker senate pam george rao shire davies russia todd smoldon george rao
"eastman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"eastman" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of an ability to earn a living the first forty miles of this project from the very beginning has been the big sticking point in this energy forty mile starting where where does it come it through pittsburgh yeah yeah the northermost town in new hampshire near cobra yep exactly called brooke is three town or two towns below pittsburgh pittsburgh stewart's town will actually pittsburgh clarksville stewart's down then colbrunn k and it would it was proposed to go through all three of those now they're trying to avoid called brooke because there is a whole lot of opposition of things hats obviously gabriel does ganic get paid attention to well that that does help yes absolutely plus the ability for people to say no to the project they didn't sell their land to it instead they took conservation ease minutes on their land instead so that they couldn't get that project through so then they tried to find this tiny little wedge did to try and get around it on some town roads which then becomes a whole 'nother issue whether they can do that what's a come out as the conservation eesmond work well the conservation knees mit is administered through organizations like the society for protection new hampshire forest and many many environmental groups will have conservation these missile people will say okay i on this land but i don't want to ever see it develop because when my time on this earth passes i want to make sure that future generations get to enjoy this land so he put a conservation eastman on that land so that it's available for for various uses that are set forth in that legal document generally it's for for open use for the public goes snowmobiling through there here's what about being passed down to their heirs does that is it sound like a trust where their limitations not well again it would be limitations on what they can do to that land the land was still transfer to the heirs of would you be able to develop that now okay so that would affect the value of the property it could know as far as potential developled right which is high weather is good good down care about that fire fine with me and are those things those conservation is eastman's.

stewart brooke pittsburgh gabriel eastman