21 Burst results for "Eastern State Penitentiary"

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:07 min | 3 weeks ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"To change. Now there is a presence here at City Hall, where people have been walking by with mixed reaction. They should've came sooner. That's more Shana from North Philly. She believes the National Guard's presence is deterring additional looting. Today wasn't here. It was seven as of now because they wasn't stopping. Meanwhile, Soo from Delaware County tells me having the National Guard here in Philadelphia makes her uneasy. I think this is overkill. This is too much. It's scary to walk by them, and I'm walking by guys with machine guns to get my lunch. I don't I don't like it at City Hall had a cousin, It's K Y. W news radio. A vigil was held in Philadelphia's Fairmount neighborhood, during which people reflected on the police involved shooting death of 27 year old Walter Wallace W's Antoinette Lee has more from outside Eastern State Penitentiary. Families came out by the dozens in the brisk fall weather to show solidarity with their West Philadelphia neighbors and Walter Wallace Junior's family, and I just I hope that this helps people to feel More inclined, Tio, take action and really show off. Great. All I did was make a flyer and it all just came together. Kathy gave Ian Meghan Burnett organized the event. A lot of us who have black lives matter sign that felt really important to show in this moment that we felt really solidarity with our black neighbors and the movement for black lives and our neighbors in West Philadelphia. They lit candles, said a prayer and passed around resource is for ways to continue their involvement. Many parents say their attendance was an opportunity to teach there. Kids about what happened to Wallace and the unrest in the city following his death and not giving too many details, But I think it's important that she really understands like the actual events. In Fairmount. Antoinette Lee KOW news radio. That's when his attorney general says authorities searched the home of one of the two men stopped by police on the parkway at Logan Square Wednesday night. Now stand accused of having a propane tank torch and explosives inside their vehicle. Law enforcement has been on heightened alert after at least 38 e m bombings in Philadelphia over a four day period. Attorney general Josh Apparel, says Brian LaRue and Eric Murray or charged with possession of weapons of mass destruction and risking a catastrophe and our.

Philadelphia City Hall Antoinette Lee National Guard Walter Wallace Junior Walter Wallace W Fairmount Kathy attorney Wallace Eastern State Penitentiary Logan Square Soo Philly Ian Meghan Burnett Delaware County Tio
Isolation and Freudian Paranormal Slips

The Ladies of Strange

04:11 min | 3 months ago

Isolation and Freudian Paranormal Slips

"When eastern state penitentiary or Cherry Hill as it was known at the time was erected in eighteen, twenty nine and Francis Ville it was the largest and most expensive public structure in the country which country. I've never heard of the eastern state penitentiary. It's Bainian okay was. nope Cherry Point. Just Kidding Cherry Point with Carolina's where my brother was born Cherry Hill. It's still the same country. Back to it. So about that map. Okay, starting off the strong today. Did you mean which state? Even when I, you align. Oh, happy. Belated birthday by the way tiffany was going to mention it but I didn't want us to be all of them. You let that slide since it's your birthday week. All right. So from eighteen, twenty and From eighteen twenty, nine to nineteen seventy-one, the eastern state penitentiary in Pennsylvania United States of America north. America. Earth Opera Milky Way Galaxy. Belief operated as one of the most famous and most expensive prisons in history at its completion. The building was the largest emo-. I can keep saying that the largest and most expensive public structure ever record in the United States and quickly became a model for more than three hundred prisons. Worldwide Eastern state emerged from concerns of prison reformers in Philadelphia in the late eighteenth century when prisons held accused criminals only until their trials if convicted prisoners face public in corporal punishment in seventeen, Eighty, seven, a group of well known and powerful Philadelphians known as the Philadelphia Society for alleviating the miseries of public prisons. Oh. What is the please? Give me a what's it called acronym Yup Thank you the Fist Sim. Map. The FISA Abba Papa they met in the home of Benjamin Franklin. The members expressed growing concern with the conditions in American European prisons conditions at the Walnut Street jail, which is located directly behind independence hall were appalling open in Seventeen, seventy, seven, the Walnut Street Jail House accused men, women, adults, children's thieves. Murderers were all jailed together disease ridden dirty pins were rape and robbery were common occurrences. Okay. I know that this is an other movies and TV shows and everything. 'cause you know this is something that was prevalent in history but this reminds me of outlander haven't seen IT A. Girl Uni Watch it but there's a scene where Jason are like a season where he's in prison in its continue. Okay I think lots lots of prisons are bad. The jailers made little effort to protect the prisoners from each other. Instead, they sold prisoners alcohol up to nearly twenty gallons a day Jeez. Food Heat including clothing came at a price and it wasn't unusual prisoners to die from the cold or starvation and keep in mind. They were only cap until their trials because if they are found innocent, they were like, Oh, if they were found guilty day, we're usually guilt Dr Benjamin rush spoke on the society's goal to see the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania set the international standard in prison design. He was convinced that crime was a quote moral disease and suggested a house of repentance were prisoners could meditate on their crimes experienced spiritual Ra- Morrison undergo rehabilitation good for him. What's his name again? Dr Benjamin Rush Okay you rush rush come down on the Cocoa Award Good Just hear me out for pages. The concept grew from enlightenment thinking but no government had successfully carried out such a program. It took the society more than thirty years to convince the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to build this kind of prison. But in eighteen twenty, one, Pennsylvania legislature appropriated two hundred and fifty thousand dollars for eastern state and thus began a revolutionary new building on the farmland outside of Philadelphia at twenty twenty, seven Fairmont Avenue all

Dr Benjamin Rush Pennsylvania Cherry Hill Benjamin Franklin Twenty Twenty Philadelphia United States Philadelphia Society Walnut Street Jail House America Carolina Francis Ville Tiffany Jason Fisa Rape Robbery
Philadelphia's Eastern State Penitentiary Cancels ‘Terror Behind The Walls,’ Forced To Lay Off 40% Of Staff Due To Coronavirus

KYW 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

Philadelphia's Eastern State Penitentiary Cancels ‘Terror Behind The Walls,’ Forced To Lay Off 40% Of Staff Due To Coronavirus

"Loss of revenue due to cold nineteen forces a popular Philadelphia historic site to reduce staff and programming more from K. Y. W. stomach other eastern state penitentiary in Fairmount has been closed since mid March because of the pandemic historic sites says with no earned revenue was forced to lay off forty percent of its staff on Wednesday big salary cuts and to scale down programming it's popular Halloween fundraiser known as terror behind the walls has been suspended this year eastern state says modifications to the heart of the traction to comply with covert nineteen guidelines would have presented significant operational challenges and financial risk the presenter museum says it's still will reopen in mid July a shift to smaller scale evening tours is planned

Fairmount Philadelphia
Kingpins Daily: Willie Sutton

Kingpins

04:23 min | 7 months ago

Kingpins Daily: Willie Sutton

"Today's quotes is from bank robber. Willie Sutton known for his gentlemanly manner and for Escaping Jail Multiple Times. His crimes eventually earned him spot on the FBI's most wanted list according to the FBI. When asked why he robbed banks he replied. That's where the money is first off. We have to burst our bubble a little according to Sutton. He never actually said this. It was invented by a reporter looking to capitalize on his fame in nineteen fifty two but the quote fit his spirit so well that he later embraced it. Writing a memoir called where the money was in nineteen seventy six sutton very literally learned. That's where the money is early in his life. When he walked to the bank at the age of fifteen he sold the drudgery of the working people coming in early to take out nickels and dimes while the bank owner pulled up in his private car. Eleven Sutton's father. Older brothers were working. Men Struggling in mechanic factory jobs and growing up in Brooklyn he was also surrounded by Irish. Italian mobsters the haves and have nots. Where apparent on top of all this. He had an aunt Alice who was from a wealthy family. She would dress him in suits and take him to fancy restaurants giving him a taste of what things were like on the other side of the divide. If the problem was how do I get around? The dreary lifestyle of a lower class worker than the simple answer was just not live that life. He spent the rest of his teens. Committing acts of theft. Eventually he would take his chances at the big leagues in Nineteen thirty. He robbed his first bank. This first part of his crime spree didn't last long. He was caught and sent to prison less than a year later but he escaped the year after that once again. He had encountered a circumstance. He didn't care for and chose the simplest way out of it. He used a makeshift ladder to climb over the prison wall. Once he was back on the streets sutton came to be admired as he lived a life. Free of restriction. In a way that many Americans wished they could he was known for being a snappy dresser and a snappy talker which is why he got the nickname slick willy. He was the last person you'd expect to rob you. In fact in where the money was he says the Willie Sutton trademark has always been to get inside the bank by wearing the kind of uniform that would lead the gone to open the door for me without question. He also says that he preferred rubbing crowded banks as it made it less likely that anyone besides the person he was rubbing would pay attention to him again. This speaks to his. Keep it simple mentality rather than trying to finagle. A specific complicated scheme. He chose the more direct path walking through the front door. And clearly stating what he wanted as if it were no different than making withdrawal but of course eventually the consequences of his actions did catch up with him. He was called again in one thousand nine hundred eighty four and sent to the eastern state penitentiary in Philadelphia. This time getting out wouldn't be as easy as leaning ladder up against the wall. In fact it would be eleven years before he successfully escaped and even then he was recaptured on the very same day. But he simply kept trying. He escaped again in February. Nineteen forty seven this time making it as a fugitive for five years before being caught again on the one hand that's where the money is exemplifies. Sutton's inability to see the bigger picture to recognize that his crimes had consequences and one day. He'd get himself into a situation. He couldn't walk his way out of. But on the other hand it shows how shutting out the voices in our heads that fill us with fear and doubt and focusing on our goals can lead to amazing things.

Willie Sutton FBI Reporter Alice Theft Brooklyn Philadelphia Nickels ROB
Searchlight with Caits Meissner and Justin Monson

PEN America Works of Justice

08:56 min | 7 months ago

Searchlight with Caits Meissner and Justin Monson

"I'm Sean Kelly. I'm here live at eastern state penitentiary for our weekly searchlight. We're going to START SEARCH LIGHTS OFF For the foreseeable future. Unfortunately we running through some numbers As of today and US prisons in jails. There are three hundred three thousand three hundred. Thirty eight cases confirmed infections of covert nineteen. There have been fifty fifty deaths today to people incarcerated in jails and prisons. There's also prison staff again. More than three thousand members of the prison staff around the United States have been confirmed with a virus and sixteen deaths. We're going to keep looking at these numbers at the start of every searchlight moving forward for those of you who don't know eastern state penitentiary. We are a prison museum in Philadelphia. The prison was built on the belief. That people are inherently. Good and can be rehabilitated. Through solitary confinement that is has a distinctive wagon wheel floor plan that was copied all over the world and there are about eighty three thousand people who were incarcerated inside this building men women and yes children as well. The prison was opened today for tours was abandoned in Nineteen seventy-one today we give tours when we're able when it's safe to do so we have artist's installations like this glorious piece by Jesse Crimes. This is a mural that he made while incarcerated in federal prison this is our graph illustrating the US rate of incarceration the highest in the world by far and our exhibit companion exhibit is called prisons. Today ask questions like have you ever broken the law and what is criminality and do prison work. And what are we? What should we do next last year? We had three hundred and ten thousand daytime. Visitors including twenty-eight thousand school visits. We are proud. Second chance employers. We seek out people with the experience of incarceration to join our education team. We find it's one more tool if they choose to use it That we can use that. They can use to engage our visitors in discussions of the impact of the policies. Around incarceration in the United States are big project. Last year was called hidden lives illuminated. We worked for over a year inside of two prisons here in the Philadelphia Area Teaching animation to artists or incarcerated This is working on his On his film and then we projected those films onto the front wall of eastern state penitentiary for months last summer. You what we're doing here. We encourage you to become a member. I can also support us in many ways from our website Which you see right there. The science close to the public because of the virus through at least may thirty first I. We have wrought much of our programming online. Those hidden lives luminated. Films are being feature one per week out. Different different film focused on every week this week. It's Davids film called freedom. We have a twice weekly visit video. Podcast it's called prisons and the pandemic. It's three minute episode twice a week covering what's happening in American prisons in jails and detention centres with this virus. I can find that on facebook. We have what we call the hospital tour twice. I saw once a week Wednesdays at two thirty live Matt Murphy from our team talks about issues of health both historically and currently in prisons and of course we have the searchlight series. Next week's topic is cove in one thousand nine hundred impact on incarcerated youth. We have heard on contain Martinez from youth. I rethought on a Terry from New Jersey Institute of Social Justice Vincent Schiraldi from the Columbia School of social work. And it's moderated by Liz Ryan from. She's the president and CEO of the youth. I initiative join US. One week from tonight for searchlight but tonight we have Cates Meissner She is a pen America. She's the Panamerican Prison Injustice Writing Program Director Welcome cates we're going to be joined in a few minutes by Justin Reveals Monson. He's pen America writing for justice fellow in his poet. He'll be calling in. So hey it's welcome to searchlight from eastern state penitentiary. Thank you for having me and I was just smiling to see Vinnie. Giraldi on your next week is he'll also an upcoming issue of our newsletter. He is a a real leader in this field. Bigtime happier topics about right now. But agreed what? It is We're just a few minutes actually. Did the introduction a little faster than I thought I would few minutes our second guess. Justin is going to be dialing in hit. You want to tell us a little bit more about our guest Justin and how you know him And then we'll be a unfortunately kind of a lab process them online here with us but a little bit about how you know Justin while I knew of Justin's work a little bit. Before he became a writing for justice fellow. He'd won our prison writing awards and honorable mention a number of years back and so I have read this poem. Thought it was quite a phenomenal. So it's really exciting to see his work elevated through the fellowship the fellowship by the way the prison writing awards and I'll talk a little bit more about our program down the line in prison. Writing Words is solely for currently Karsh Writers and the rain for Justice. Fellowship is a very prestigious opportunity. Eight hundred people apply to across the US. It is an ecosystem of writers. Confronting mass incarceration through various mediums. And is not just people justice involvement? Certainly we have currently and formerly incarcerated to a currently incarcerated fellows. Each round justin was part of our inaugural class last year cohort but but we have people representing all different interests in the field so through that Justin one obviously the fellowship and because he's able to be in communication more than some other folks because Jay communication system which will also talk about a little bit down the line. I found that I was able to communicate with him almost as easily as somebody on the outside. Not Quite. That's not always the case. It's rarely the case in fact says through that because I'm also poet in my other life and Justin's a poet and we share a lot of the same influences reading looking at who are interested in we really developed also a friendship through the work in in a in a shared aesthetic. So it's really a pleasure to get to each your him and bring him on today and hear his thoughts. I think they eat will offer a lot of insight around a variety of topics for people who are tuning it tonight more about communicating with people who are incarcerated as do. This work is a challenge that we have as well in our work. And I'm sure you face it at least as much as we do that you know you wanNA partner with people and bring their voices into the projects And the communication is often We'll hear it here in a moment. Even when a good situation I say relatively good like Justin's where three of us spoke yesterday or speaker got an a moment Even that at such there's so many barriers in the the communication ends up being so challenging. If you say more about working with creative people on these projects yeah and I think it's part of what I will be later but certainly you know I mean in a kind of lucky way or a decision made is that we don't work with. We don't actually do classes on the inside. Where National Program? We work with individuals through the mail snail mail and occasionally through one of these kind of pay to play email systems depending on people have access to it depending on the money on etc. So right now. It's even harder because we're doing a once a week. Mail pick up because the virus at the office thankfully. My team member has a car. If he didn't we would be really at a luck and And we get a stack of mail. Uk High Foot high a week and people are requesting all kinds of support. And so obviously when you're doing an editorial process are awards that I mentioned earlier are in theology that the work is very raw and unedited. Because we can't go through a real aditorial process in the turnaround. You need a good couple months because of the snail pace all prison mail is reviewed as we're GONNA here tonight and I'm thankful in advance to everybody who sticks around embarrassed with US Justin's phone calls aren't fifteen minute increments Hang UP AND CALL BACK. The gotTa go through a whole screening. That would in a moment so people's people's lives and communication are one hundred percent red often censored it's often up to the mail room whose mail gets through or not clerk working that day Actually I I. I don't know if we can include this. I wrote a Tony. Eighteen Bed about it for the Guardian. That details of what that looks like

Justin Reveals Monson United States Eastern State Penitentiary Searchlight Philadelphia Sean Kelly President And Ceo Pen America Facebook Jesse Crimes New Jersey Institute Of Social Cates Meissner Philadelphia Area Teaching Davids Liz Ryan Uk High Foot Martinez Karsh Writers Matt Murphy
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:49 min | 11 months ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Lane overnight the bridge is in good shape the mass transit that is on or close to schedule next update less than ten minutes in the K. Y. W. twenty four hour traffic center AT Anderson thank sandy let's talk about the weather snow is on the way but before it does come it's going to be pulled over night windy to down to below freezing at twenty seven degrees then the snow comes by mid day on Saturday it will turn to sleep then reign in the late afternoon and evening snow totals before the rain approximately one to two inches the high forty degrees for Sunday cloudy windy and cold temperatures start in the low forties and then drop into the thirty Sunday afternoon right into Monday morning right now the broadcast center quality in twenty seven here twenty five in Collings wood twenty fourth may fear twenty five degrees in half pearls sponsored by acme don't miss act means but the bag produce sale this week only exactly don't miss out on what's happening around Philly this weekend it's the K. Y. W. to do list hi you might start we're gonna have a great night in the city of Philadelphia it's Martin Luther king junior weekend and there are several events celebrating his life including four days of fun at the African American museum in Philly it's free to get in on Friday and only two Bucks for the rest of the weekend admission is also free at eastern state penitentiary and they'll be family friendly MLK activities for Monday you must have as a basic principles with determination to achieve some more than one hundred fifty thousand people are expected to take part in the MLK day of service in Philly on Monday and thousands will gather in Logan circle for Philadelphia's women's March Saturday morning at ten o'clock at least forty black.

Anderson Collings wood Philly Philadelphia Martin Luther African American museum eastern state penitentiary sandy
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Partial sunshine high seventy four right now it's seventy eight in college fail AT in mount laurel it's also eighty at the acme on Snyder Avenue in South Philadelphia sponsored by acme sign up today for just for U. rewards for one of the area's most popular haunted houses is returned. to the Fairmont neighborhood of Philadelphia Hey why W's John McDevitt reports terror behind the walls at eastern state penitentiary will run on select nights through November nine. the walls is six hundred houses in one big how we did traction when you agree to where the glow necklace you give the goons permission to touch chase and possibly make you part of the show it was the high tower rocks burrows first time at the entrance there was a guy walking around who had his tongue is pulled out of his mouth that was in his hand he was like walking or like from there I was just ready to go but. we get better or worse it was worse from there it was just. a good way worse in a go away like I was I was because I wanted to be scared I was scared I was scared throughout Kenny Wheeler is with terrorists the ethical team as we are seven pop Mart interactivity over making the show more interactive and more immersive and many people say the fact that the hundred takes place in an abandoned prison adds to the fun John McDevitt K. one of you newsradio. fifteen twenty times time for money news on K. Y. W. liberty St monster movie theaters are trying to find new ways to get people back into those plush seat instead of staying home to watch Netflix box office sales are down six percent this year fathom events.

mount laurel Philadelphia John McDevitt eastern state penitentiary Kenny Wheeler Netflix six percent
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Eastern state penitentiary historic site in Fairmount is holding its six annual toy drive for area kids was incarcerated parents KYW's. John mcdevitt has more the old abandoned prison now historic site eastern state. Penitentiary in Fairmount snoop mission is to connect the building to what is going on in the current criminal Justice system. Sean Kelly, a senior vice president of eastern state Eighty-one thousand kids in Pennsylvania alone, whose parents are incarcerated two point seven million kids nationwide. We talk a lot about mass incarceration. Well, this is the impact that a lot of us don't think about but every person who goes to prison. So many of them have kids and those kids did nothing wrong to brighten the holidays for those kids. The toy drive is being held it runs through December twenty first last year. More than a thousand toys and books were collected a buy one get one free tour mission will be offered to those who donate a Booker toy. John mcdevitt, KYW NewsRadio at seven fifty five. It's money news on KYW. Here's bloomberg. Jeff bellinger. Federal Reserve officials noted in the central banks new beige book that businesses in their districts have expressed concerns about tariffs Buchanomics growth is still described as modest or moderate just about everywhere Meghan green of Manulife asset management talked to Bloomberg radio about the economy, noting the differences between soft data and hard data. When you ask consumers and businesses how they're feeling about the economy. They all report the feeling great. When you look at the hard data. You get a totally different story. Consumers are feeling great. But they're not going out in deploying capital accordingly. Retail sales have been pretty bound since the recession. Green says that likely has a lot to do with the labor market unemployment is low, but workers aren't feeling it so much in their pockets home loan demand was up again last week mortgage bankers report application volume rose and other two percent after a five and a half percent mounts. The prior week. There was no mid week trading. On Wall Street, the markets were closed wander. The memory of President Bush with money news from Bloomberg on KYW. Hi, I'm Jeff Bellinger. The casket a former president, George H W Bush has returned to Texas is private funeral service and burial are planned for tomorrow. At texas. Am that story ahead in three.

bloomberg KYW Jeff bellinger John mcdevitt Fairmount Meghan green George H W Bush president senior vice president Texas Sean Kelly Federal Reserve Booker Pennsylvania two percent
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

12:17 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"JV. Don't forget the second hour of the program. We have Renzo Martinez coming in. He's an investigative journalist. He's also an Amazon bestselling author begin talking about his new show, which is called the witching hour and he intends to put the word investigator back into the phrase paranormal investigator, he believes in using skeptics during investigations in the importance of maintaining historical sites and the rise in paranormal tourism now you, and I know Jay Colonel tourism really took off. You know, like. Two thousand six two thousand seven after goes sons customer said Ben do a few location Stanley hotel Odusoga saga hotels, some very very what I would call thankful paranormal destinations have put some new life into those pulses eastern state penitentiary and so much more hills eastern state there. Yeah, they they took off as well. And it's actually saved a lot of locations, which I think is is great. I agree. And I wrote a wrote a piece for the paramagazine awhile ago about how important it was that this paranormal phenomena happened because all these buildings in these locations, and what's what's the Pinhurst asylum is another one that I just was that, you know, they would be torn down they'd be gone or they would just be collapsing on themselves. If it wasn't for this interest in revenue that has revitalized so many of them well in a lot of places like the place in Philly. I'm sure I'm drawn a blank on the name fort Mifflin. I place it was it held off the British while George Washington made into Valley Forge. And that place was in disarray, ending getting ready to just be forgotten. And when we come there, we did a lot of events there as well and gave and gave Tom money back to them to keep the place open, and it's been driving. So it's it's always great to be able to do that. Yeah. So we definitely appreciative of that particular, topics. We'll be talking with Renzo Martinez about that. But right now, we're talking with Dan Baldwin about his new book, it's called the psychic detective guidebook. Dan. Let's talk a little bit about some of the work that you've done personally in an effort to find missing persons as you said, you can't always be successful. But I'm imagining imagining that if you're writing about it you have been successful at times. Yeah. Yeah. You can't help. But you could do it long enough. You don't you're going to be successful. And. 'cause I talked to him something real quick here. Absolutely off from me question. A lot of the book here deals with how to work with the police authorities, and I think that is critical because the psychic detective has has the ability to really help out the police and become a valued member of their team. Even if it's an unrecognized member, but a psyche detective also has the ability to really screw up a case. So there's a lot of my book devoted to how to actually work with the Saudis. How to become a member of the team really more than just a flaky psychic out there. I just wanted to make that point in there. And I looked he made that point because you you're correct I've dealt with who has lots of law enforcement and one of the big problems. They have they do have a handful of certain certain departments, depending some some aren't really into it some are open to it. But but some that do that actually do work with certain sensitives, our psychics, however, you want to call them also get inundated with calls from people claiming to be psychic and wanting to work on cases as well. And a lot of times giving them. Incorrect information and can just won't just lead lead. The investigation down the wrong path. Yeah. Actually, I will chapters devoted deal how to work with these people and how to become a. It's not a valued member of the team. I respected contributor know. How to out of your information properly, and how to deal with the people and how to deal with the people, and I think that's critical. Dan, can I bring us back to the discussion about some of the work that you've done can you share a story with us and how you're. Psychic detecting is not limited to time and space in other words. I don't. Yeah. I live in Arizona. I don't have to work cases. Only in my my town here in Arizona. I can work any place. I worked in Italy. Japan, Canada, Europe plants. So I was working. We got a case a couple of years ago. There were several of us working or a it was one of those cases where everybody knew who the guy committed the murder dad killed his son. But there was no evidence. They couldn't find a body. We know who did it. But we can't prove it. So we did our research and. There were a lot. I would say they had a lot of I had a hit had actually two on specific mountain up in Colorado. I said, you you will find the person the missing person or something about the missing person at these two locations and upper rider GPS, I want to map Dowsing as I described earlier, and I got to GPS coordinates, and I say go to these spots on this specific area and the benefit of that is the cops can go right to that spot that you've identified and you're either white or you're wrong. They know right away. If you're right. They can go continue the investigation if you're wrong. Well, they can move on to something more productive in this case. The police told me that the first place located where they believe the actual murder took place or the body was transferred. There was something that happened with the body at that particular location, and then I guess about another mile away. I had another hit and they went to that spot and within three hundred feet of my my GPS. Coordinate. Found. It was a leg bone and some finger bones human bones that they sent off and DNA proved. It was the remains of the missing kid. So that's I consider that a pretty good hit. Yeah. That's that's a darn good hit. Yeah. When when the pendulum Dowsing pendulum, my pendulum has a point on it. So the head of that pendulum is about the size of a football field. So I it's hard to get much closer than that. You mentioned that the book addresses issues on how to work with law enforcement authorities. Now, we all know that a lot of law enforcement might look at what you do. And what others like you do with a raised eyebrow? How do you overcome that? Generally, I found that in public. They're they're pretty off-putting as they say if you get one on one they're more open to talking with you. And if you're a psychic detective, and you can put it in terms of cop instinct, in other words, I was talking with a police went Louisiana a couple a couple of months ago. And he said, I don't I don't really believe in psychic phenomenon. I said what do you have cop instinct said well, yeah. So that psychic ability in. Yeah. You can see the light bulb. Go off in his head. And at that point, you know, once you've done that. And you put it in terms that they understand you can establish at least a base of communication were also going. Yeah. Well, maybe this guy has something. But you know, maybe I should listen to this guy. In writing the book was addressing the police authorities. I want them to consider embedded vetted psychics, you know, not the flakes. Nothing. New agers crazy people but betting psychics, at least give us the same credibility. He would give an anonymous source. And you're, but you're always gonna get those naysayers no matter what you're not going to be able to get through to them. You're not going to be able to connect with them. And because they're not willing to ever go down that path. In that case. I was at my information. I'll tell people, you know, I'm not in the missionary business. I'm not trying to convince you of the validity of psychic phenomena. Yeah. Pro or con here's the evidence act on it. If it proves valuable. You're ahead of the game. And maybe you can come back. And maybe you listen to me a little bit better next time. That's what we've always said about paranormal investigations or the ghost is. I'm not here to push my beliefs on you. And if you don't believe fine. So be it. I'm not here for you. I'm here to help. I'll do those who have a similar belief system as me and we're looking for answers. Yeah. You can say look he was videotaped on my show. There's three of us standing ear and you hear for voices. What does that voice come from? Well, that's yeah. Yeah. That's your evidence right there. It's the same way with psychic phenomena. Here's the evidence. Yeah. I've come up with his information using my psychic techniques. Am I right or am? I wrong. I mean, you can act on it. Dan, do you wait to be contacted by law enforcement to take on a case? Or do you see something in the headlines or a new story along the way and decide that you want to see if you can figure out anything without being approached by law enforcement. I'm always they have to come to a family member has to call the cops and say, hey, talk to Dan, something like that. I don't inject myself into a case. So you have to be sought out someone has to seek out. It's none of my business. Right. Jack myself into a a case, especially one where maybe I'm not wanted. Does it require that? I mean is that something, you know, wherever this information is coming from does that is that connection necessary for that kind of open up the path? Can you say that again in another way? So. Wherever this the the message messages in the information comes to from that divide the higher power swaps. Does it require? A family member or law enforcement to seek out your services to kind of open that path for you. In other words, is there some kind of? Okay. So you could you know, you don't need their their blessing per se to look into somebody's disappearance. But you, but you do that out of respect for the family occasion. I have only occasion work the case uninvited. But that was early early early in my career. But yeah, the first case I worked on it was a case here in Arizona eighteen years ago and. Yeah. It was the first case ever worked. I didn't know what I was doing. But I did my did my research, and I went down to the the detective in charge of the case. It was a missing person missing child case and a walk in and right. I'm a psychic. I've got some information. Would you like to hear what he said? Yes. And the the detective was extremely professional, very polite. Very courteous, you sat down with a he recorded the interview you took my report that I provided with him. And you know, after it was turned off the recorder, and he said just to let you know. The biggest case I saw last year was all by psychic. Oh, wow. They're generally wanna one you'll find him more open than they are maybe in a public than you. But you said he turned off the recorder he didn't know that to be part of any public record. Well, no, I think the the interview was over say, okay. Somebody's been part of his thinking, it certainly would have been mine so who would benefit most from your book. I would say people who think psychics who think that they would like to serve their community by by doing psychic. Detective this is a good way to defined out. All the hoops, you have to jump through and to do it. Right. You have to jump through a lot of hoops. And you have to do it correctly. You know, there's procedure you really need to follow. Are you going to get in the way, you're going to become not respected? Anyway, actually, screw up a case for somebody. So there's you know, there's a there's a lot of how to involved in that. Someone who is. Thinks that they would like to develop their psychic ability. Again, the second half of the book is my dousing course. And that's a good place to start. You know, you can start with the pendulum and start working with that NFC. We'll see how your psychic ability develop, and then you can move onto whatever technique works. Best for you. I didn't start off with the pendulum. I started off with. Well, crystal ball, then I moved to tarot cards, and then I found the pendulum and that was that was the tool that works. Best for me. What's is it possible to be working on a case say and then have information coming from a different case and get confused or get the wrong information. Does that ever happen? Subchapter it crossed wires good case of that. Good example of that. I was working. Akeso in Texas missing young young boy missing in Texas. And I mean, I was getting I was hitting. I mean, how was hitting everything was coming out. Right. I was getting names addresses. I was getting street addresses. I was getting the type of vehicle the kidnapper drove the street..

Dan Baldwin Arizona murder Renzo Martinez investigator fort Mifflin Philly Texas Amazon George Washington Tom Ben Stanley hotel Odusoga British Jay Colonel Valley Forge Europe
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Cousin it's explains fix generation employees here at bassett's ice cream and he knows his philadelphia ice cream history the ice cream soda awesome as the root beer float was invented here eighteen seventy four mr softy started here in philadelphia in nineteen fiftysix choco taco invented here in nineteen eighty four july is the most popular month for claiming on national ice cream day there's one flavor he suspects most people will be eating sales savin hill but those with whom i spoke seemed to like all kinds dark chocolate chip chocolate and strawberry chocolate watermelon ripple and heath bar strategy how do you like to eat it in a cup glass you like it in the glass yeah tastes better for describe your perfect ice cream setup it's not even all that serious you just get the ice cream and you just eat it at reading terminal market hadas kuznits kyw newsradio fitting that france wins the world cup day after the nation celebrated best deal day it was also marked in philadelphia at eastern state penitentiary what that site says is the final time after twenty four years dan wings there on avenue is packed with barely an inch between people as the penitentiary put on its owed to the storming of the steal a key point in the french revolution but of course done with philly twist alongside characters like marieantoinette and joan of arc was ben franklin and instead of cape being given to the masses the sky rain tasty cakes the entire spectacle led to a really good night on the town where people like paul from gibbs borough i can't it was amazing no i'm telling you all the people it was excellent i swear it was really great and after the final storming of the bastille and beheading of marieantoinette fairmount have turned into a giant french lean block party with businesses and restaurants providing entertainment all throughout the area dan wing kyw newsradio kyw.

bassett philadelphia france eastern state penitentiary paul mr softy philly ben franklin dan wing twenty four years
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Kyw newsradio kyw news time five fifty eastern state penitentiary historic site in fairmont holds an event year round to spark conversation about the current prison system kyw's john mcdevitt reports prison food weekend is taking place today and tomorrow visitors taste five states versions of neutral loaf served as punishment food in many american prisons recipes vary but generally it's made of meat vegetables beans and grains blended together and baked in loaf andy anderson is manager research and programming at eastern state historically courts have sided with departments of corrections to say you're allowed to serve people in prison this food even though it's really disgusting but we are finding that some prisoners are moving away from this practice so we want to just kind of visitors and asked by mrs screw unusual could you eat this meal for fourteen days moves made by prisoners in the pennsylvania department of corrections culinary arts training program can also be sampled john mcdevitt kyw newsradio kyw news time five fifty one the kegs were tack last night officially kicking off this year's philly beer week kyw's andrew kramer report this jason kelsey lookalike help jumpstart philly beer week with a spoof of the famous eagles parade speech here we are at the fillmore for yet another opening tax had good beer lots of gay people love and jim filled right at home i would you describe your love for more than life itself.

jason kelsey fairmont john mcdevitt andy anderson is manager mrs screw pennsylvania philly andrew kramer eagles jim fourteen days
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on Apocalypse...Now?

Apocalypse...Now?

10:56 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on Apocalypse...Now?

"Let me tell you when it comes to cooking. I am absolutely the best simply the best. I know everything there is about cooking. I am the the Best Cook. And there's no one else that I would trust with my recipes other than Blue Apron. Believe me trust me. I know everything I have good opinions and good thoughts. I Cook my Blue Apron. I Cook it the best. Cook it better than anybody else. And then I take all of the trash that the Blue Apron Apron gives me an Irish cycle it. Because I'm a great person. I care about the environment. I'm amazing and you can be amazing to if you go to blue apron dot com slash Asha apocalypse podcast. And you can get thirty dollars off your first order and you can be amazing too but not as good as me. Because I'm the best. I'm the best Blue Apron Brin Chef. There's nobody else out there that can beat my blue apron recipe following abilities. You got that again. GO TO BLUE APRON DOT COM uh-huh slash apocalypse podcast to get thirty dollars off your first order. What's so bad about? Having pride in oneself aren't the most most confident people more likely to succeed or does pride turn angels into devils. This is what I believe. I don't believe that any social media has made people more prideful. I believe that we're seeing. The small percentage of what has always existed human race. I chat with David Monster of the imaginary friend. Cast about the sin of pride on this episode of Park over there now. Seven deadly. Hello Hello and welcome. Welcome back to another episode of apocalypse. God no I'm your host to Joanna van Fantine. You can find me on the Internet at Joanna Van Fine Dot Com or follow me on twitter snapchat Instagram at j o pin cushion. How how you guys doing If you're feeling extra generous go fund me dot com slash Maza mortar an easy a. m.. RTA helped me get my I web series made. We're GONNA shoot a prequel in June but I'll get to that later in the episode as always good a bit comedy dot. Co Kit to check out more funny things things and funny podcasts. As well as the darkening network is where you can find a whole bunch of other awesome. Gigi nerdy horror based PODCASTS. And thank you guys out for hosting me on that network as well and give me a call you know how much I love listening to your beautiful voices and here in your wonderful problems. Give me a call nine. Two zero four seven four six seven six three or send me an email at bid. Comedy website at gmail.com. If you want to be more anonymous automous and want me to read it. I'll read it. I'll read whatever you send me as long as it's appropriate And if you like what you hear please subscribe and rated so that people can know what the podcast is about and if they would like to subscribe as well and as always Johnny Grind Dude. Thanks thanks for for all the great music and you can find more of his music at the beauty of grind dot band Camp Dot Com all right so today a we're talking about pride and I don't have any big rance to do the beginning of this episode because the conversation with David Monster who is August is so good and it's about thirty minutes long and I was like. Hey we covered everything yeah. We talked about a lot of different things. I did some research In the Bible as to what at Pride It consists of and David is a former scientologist. He has been declared and he had some choice. Words words about prize and that institution which is really interesting. And I'm definitely going to have him back to talk more about scientology because I'm obsessed with it. I'm a desert gold. It's just a thing I have So yeah like I said our guest. Today's David Monster. The one the only you can find out more about him at Adddavid Monster Dot Com and you can also hear him on the unimaginative friend. Cast just google that they are also featured on big comedy dot. Co all of their episodes episode. Are there so I talked about that. podcast all the time to make me feel like I'm having a conversation with my best friends. So yeah listen into the unimaginable. And before I move on I just want to publicly. Say congratulations to air it in Nathan. Oh engage love wonderful. I knew them before. They moved to Los Angeles and I knew them when they worked at Eastern State Penitentiary and oh it it warms my cold black heart to see love flourish in these times. So congratulations guys. I'm happy for you. All right the sin of pride. Let's think about this. I didn't think pride was that bad. I grew up with no self esteem. Absolutely uh-huh self esteem. I didn't understand what self esteem was. My Depression Kinda helps put me in that mindset growing up but when I got out of College College Yeah College and started going to therapy I understood that self-esteem was a good thing. And it's good to be proud of yourself yourself and be good. It's good to congratulate yourself and pump yourself up sometimes because mentally that something that you should do to stay healthy but David he laid out some interesting points. When it came to pride and the research that I drove into really revealed some terrifying things to me? So I'm going to get right right to the conversation because you don't WanNa listen to me ran anymore here. It is my awesome convo with David. Monster are cool recording So Yeah Pride I wanted to talk to you because you're very low there you. I thought you were going to talk to me. Because I'm very prideful. You are also very prideful but you also have opinions on people that I think you think are too prideful. Yeah actually I have. I don't think I have a lot of pride at all myself. Wait no wait wait she okay. This is what I think about. Pride ride like people are always on proud to be Puerto Rican or I'm proud to have this body with all these curves. People seem to be proud of things that they had no control over over winter. I think instead of they should say like I love Puerto Rico and I love the Puerto Rican people in a lake but when they tried to me is a feeling. Can you get from accomplishment. You have to earn pride. Yeah so I'm proud of the things I accomplished but I don't. I don't think I've ever said it someone else like. I'm proud of this book. I wrote Oh I love my book and I think it's great. You know what I mean I get it because growing up I had no self esteem and now that I have have a little bit of self esteem. It's like oh I understand like how pride can help you mentally and as a person like you should be proud of who you are and people people come from Puerto Rico and they they are from there and as part of who they are so I would understand if they have pride. Yeah actually you're right because yeah if if people are giving you a hard time about where you are then it's going to say that you're right it should be like let me tell you I did a little bit of Since the seven deadly sins or like a religious thing I went and I looked and saw what the Bible thought of pride. It's very interesting so so it says sometimes it's okay to have pride like if your pride from Israel here they're proud of that that's okay. So it's okay to be proud to be Puerto Ricans or Irish Italian. It's okay to do that because it's a part of who you are. I guess but in terms of negative things it talks about things like arrogance conceit cynical insensitivity to need towards the needs of others and presumption I guess is one of them Aw It's their attitude and their way that they conduct themselves and People can Like a proud person shifts confidence from God to to themselves listened really carefully they can be insolent. presumptious arrogant Scott offer or a macher. Does that sound. I don't like somebody you know. Yeah and it's funny. How they they all rally around him though are well? The funny thing is like of Christians like scientologists they. They reflect their Bible more than they think. Because the Bible says a lot of horrible things like the the God the Bible of Dick he's permitted. Yeah he's not a nice guy and Donald trump acts like the garden the Bible so that makes sense that they would surround around him and and God of the Bible Lies God. The Bible Retinas. People doesn't follow through on the Bible. Does everything Donald Trump does so it makes sense since I think Old Testament God is very lightning striky. He's very and but it is very ironic that Donald trump is boasts. Awesome about his the how much money he makes. What a great business person he is and his beautiful wife and his beautiful children and how he? He's a tough guy and he mocks other people and it's it's like the definite Bible definition of pride so he's committing like the the biggest he's committing the deadly sin of pride on a daily basis even if he wakes up and takes his shit and post something on twitter. God Yes yeah so like what scientology say about pride. I'm sorry I didn't even introduce. You Davis this Scott David Monster. He's one of my imaginary friends from the unimaginative friend. CAST which is you definitely check out and I have talked about on this this podcast. Before but not only is David Monster you know. A great writer very prideful person. But he's also a former science. I mean probably the bad way. He's also a former scientologists which might not know that about you which is really interesting. I have nothing I have. No pride have nothing but shame when it comes awesome. Were you born into it or did know. My family got into later when I was like a teen. T T wow. Yeah and I'm not. I am absolutely not assigned. 'cause I was declared I wanNA make is clear. I was declared a suppressive person.

David Monster Bible Blue Apron College College Yeah College Scott David Monster Puerto Ricans Puerto Rico twitter Donald Trump Camp Dot Com Joanna van Fantine google Brin Chef Joanna Van Los Angeles Eastern State Penitentiary writer rance
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

Talk Radio WPHT 1210

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

"The thirteen th amendment of the constitutionalist past because the thirteenth amendment says slavery's okay and in cases of prison that that became the way for people to utilize slavery by putting people in prison and the movie talks about over the years how prison populations have surged the biggest leap in prison populations came under which president hang up mr engineer mr engineer timer here we're going to have a timer here which which president did the prison population explode under who was it forget the time but you know what forgive timing okay thank you don don't try to hide off a little bit maybe do a and maybe you know a great reveal come on three hours to kill honestly go to the prisons today exhibit with your kid to write a page he's he's out of prison today i should have known why did i know this at eastern state penitentiary see i penitentiary in the world could do it as well as you like you can do this to explode under bill clinton so now i want i can't wait for the lefty narrative one day in the future when a future lefties are sitting around reading history and they realize the prison population exploded under democrat bill clinton and matt it was republican donald trump who led with prison reform this is going to happen by the way i'll give you the results of this vote out of the house of representatives judiciary committee today which is the biggest stumbling block this'll become the law this this reform is going to be huge but just think about that for a second right think about for second because when when trump was elected everybody said he wasn't authoritarian dictator fascist it was going to build new prisons everywhere and put people in them journalists well there is that journalists labor camp that i love david gergen works and also jim acosta jim acosta you see him do it on the highway today day cleaning up c n n's jim acosta freaking cannonball on his ankle that's what i like like that chain gang for.

president bill clinton donald trump jim acosta engineer don eastern state penitentiary matt david gergen three hours one day
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Of the coolest and most reported haunted locations on the planet where have you gone to specifically and and was there one that did affect you and and raise the level of of terror in you oh gosh oh i've been to so many amazing places most of them historical and an in states of ruin i went to this abandoned hotel in bogota the hotel taco day oh gosh i'm not going to pronounce it right but it it's this abandoned hotel on the side of the mountain where the indigenous populations many of them had jumped over the waterfall and it was thought to be haunted hotel was thought to be haunted and a lot of the wealthy people who would go there ended up dying to and when i went there there it was foggy and debris super eerie and super kind of it was the opposite of when i was in the suicide for us it was not welcoming there was a sense of like yes you're not supposed to be here and he should go down from the mountain but i think that the most intense experience i've had has been at eastern state penitentiary historic site in philadelphia the the first penitentiary it was built in eighteen twenty nine and and so from architecture point of view it's just absolutely stunning it looks like a massive fortress but then inside it's it's really in a state of ruin it was abandoned from nineteen seventy one to nineteen ninety four and over those years just the environment the weather just just eroded it and now it's just beautiful but so eerie and it's right in you know in the fairmount district of philly so you have this massive city all around you but then inside the walls and it's ten acres and you're inside these thirty foot wall so you can't really hear anything and just the the presence and the weight of the history is is felt it really just weighs on you and i was shadowing a paranormal investigating a investigator and we were standing outside of a cell for a good it felt like at least twenty minutes just in complete silence and i felt a just wave of of what i describe in the.

bogota philadelphia investigator eastern state penitentiary philly twenty minutes thirty foot ten acres
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Of the coolest and most reported haunted locations on the planet where have you gone to specifically and was there one that did affect you and raise the level of of terror in you yeah oh gosh oh i've been to so many amazing places most of them historical and and in states of ruin i went to this abandoned hotel in bogota the hotel taco day i'm not going to pronounce it right but it it's this abandoned hotel on the side of the mountain where the indigenous populations many of them had jumped over the waterfall and it was thought to be haunted the hotel was thought to be haunted and a lot of the wealthy people who would go there ended up dying to and when i went there there it was foggy and irie and super kind of it was the opposite of when i was in the suicide force it was not welcoming there was a sense of like yes you're not supposed to be here and you should go down from the mountain but i think that the most intense experience i've had has been at eastern state penitentiary historic site in philadelphia the the first penitentiary it was built in eighteen twenty nine and and so from architecture point of view is just absolutely stunning it looks like a massive fortress but then inside it's it's really in a state of ruin it was abandoned from nineteen seventy one to nineteen ninety four and over those years just the environment the weather just just eroded it and now it's just it beautiful but so eerie and it's right in you know in the fairmount district of philly so you have this massive city all around you but then inside the walls and it's ten acres and you're inside these thirty foot walls so you can't really hear anything and just the the presence and the weight of the history is felt it really just weighs on you and i was shadowing paranormal investigating investigator and we were standing outside of a cell for a good gosh it felt like at least twenty minutes just in complete silence and i felt a just wave of of what i describing the.

bogota philadelphia investigator eastern state penitentiary philly twenty minutes thirty foot ten acres
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"Oh gosh oh i've been to so many amazing places most of them historical and and in states have ruined i went to this abandoned hotel in bogota the hotel taco day fashion not gonna pronounce it right but it it's this abandoned hotel on the side of the mountain where the indigenous populations many of them had jumped over the waterfall and it was thought to be haunted hotel was thought to be haunted and a lot of the wealthy people who would go there ended up dying to and when i went there there it was foggy and debris eerie and super kind of it was the opposite of when i was in the suicide for us it was not welcoming there was a sense of like yes you're not supposed to be here and you should go down from the mountain but i think that the most intense experience i've had has been at eastern state penitentiary historic site in philadelphia the the first penitentiary it was built in eighteen twenty nine and and so from the architecture point of view it's just absolutely stunning it looks like a massive fortress but then inside it's it's really in a state of ruin it was abandoned from nineteen seventy one to nineteen ninety four and over those years just the environment the weather just just eroded it and now it's just it beautiful but so eerie and it's right in you know in the fairmount district of philly so you have this massive city all around you but then inside the walls and it's ten acres and you're inside these thirty foot wall so you can't really hear anything and just the the presence and the weight of the history is is felt it really just weighs on you and i was shadowing paranormal investigating investigator and we were standing outside of a cell for a good it felt like at least twenty minutes just in complete silence and i felt a just wave of of what i've describing the.

bogota philadelphia investigator eastern state penitentiary philly twenty minutes thirty foot ten acres
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on 710 WOR

"I've had a chance to visit some of the coolest and most reported haunted locations on the planet where have you gone to specifically and was one that did affect you and raise the level of of terror in you oh gosh oh i've been to so many amazing places most of them historical and and in states have ruined i went to this abandoned hotel in bogota the hotel taco day oh gosh i'm not going to pronounce it right but it it's this abandoned hotel on the side of the mountain where the indigenous populations many of them had jumped over the waterfall and it was thought to be haunted hotel was thought to be haunted and a lot of the wealthy people who would go there ended up dying to and when i went there there it was foggy and different eerie and super kind of the it was the opposite of when i was in the suicide for us it was not welcoming there was a sense of like yes you're not supposed to be here and you should go down from the mountain but i think that the most intense experience i've had has been at eastern state penitentiary historic site in philadelphia the the first penitentiary it was built in eighteen twenty nine and and so from architecture point of view it's just absolutely stunning it looks like a massive fortress but then inside it's it's really in a state of ruin it was abandoned from nineteen seventy one to nineteen ninety four and over those years just the environment the weather just just eroded it and now it's just it beautiful but so eerie and it's right in you know in the fairmount district of philly so you have this massive city all around you but then inside the walls and it's ten acres and you're inside these thirty foot wall so you can't really hear anything and just the the presence and the weight of the history is is felt it really just weighs on you and i was shadowing a paranormal investigating investigator and we were standing outside of a cell for a good gosh it felt like at least twenty minutes just in complete silence and i felt a just wave of of what i've describing the.

bogota philadelphia investigator eastern state penitentiary philly twenty minutes thirty foot ten acres
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Of the coolest and most reported haunted locations on the planet where have you gone to specifically and was there one that did affect you and raise the level of of terror in you oh gosh oh i've been to so many amazing places most of them historical and and in states have ruin i went to this abandoned hotel in bogota the hotel taco day not going to pronounce it right but it it's this abandoned hotel on the side of a mountain where the indigenous populations many of them had jumped over the waterfall and it was thought to be haunted hotel was thought to be haunted and a lot of the wealthy people who go there ended up dying to and when i went there there it was foggy and duper eerie and super kind of it was the opposite of when i was in the suicide for us it was not welcoming there was a sense of like yes you're not supposed to be here and you should go down from the mountain but i think that the most intense experience i've had has been at eastern state penitentiary historic site in philadelphia the the first penitentiary it was built in eighteen twenty nine and and so from architecture point of view it's just absolutely stunning it looks like a massive fortress but then inside it's it's really in a state of ruin it was abandoned from nineteen seventy one to nineteen ninety four and over those years just the environment the weather just just eroded and now it's just beautiful but so eerie and it's right in you know in the fairmount district of phillies so you have this massive city all around you but then inside the walls and it's ten acres and you're inside these thirty foot wall so you can't really hear anything and just the the presence and the weight of the history is is felt it really just weighs on you and i was shadowing a paranormal investigating investigator and we were standing outside of a cell for a good it felt like at least twenty minutes just in complete silence and i felt a just wave of of what i described in the.

bogota philadelphia investigator eastern state penitentiary twenty minutes thirty foot ten acres
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The evening i like i said i've had a chance to visit some of the coolest and most reported haunted locations on the planet where have you gone to specifically and and was one that did affect you and raise the level of of terror in you oh gosh oh i've been just so many amazing places most of them historical and and in states instinctive ruin i went to this abandoned hotel in bogota the hotel taco day fashion not gonna pronounce it right but it it's this abandoned hotel on the side of a mountain where the indigenous populations many of them had jumped over the waterfall and it was thought to be haunted the hotel was thought to be haunted and a lot of the wealthy people who would go there ended up dying to and when i went there there it was foggy and duper eerie and super kind of it was the opposite of when i was in the suicide for us it was not welcoming there was a sense of like yes you're not supposed to be here and you should go down from the mountain but i think that the most intense experience i've had has been at eastern state penitentiary historic site in philadelphia the the first penitentiary it was built in eighteen twenty nine and and so from architecture point of view it's just absolutely stunning it looks like a massive fortress but then inside it's it's really in a state of ruin it was abandoned from nineteen seventy one to nineteen ninety four and over those years just the environment the weather just just eroded it and now it's just beautiful but so eerie and it's right in you know in the fairmount district of philly so you have this massive city all around you but then inside the walls and it's ten acres and you're inside these thirty foot wall so you can't really hear anything and just the the presence in the weight of the history is is felt it really just weighs on you and i was shadowing paranormal investigating a investigator and we were standing outside of a cell for a good it felt like at least twenty minutes just in complete silence and i felt a just wave of of what i've describing the.

bogota philadelphia investigator eastern state penitentiary philly twenty minutes thirty foot ten acres
"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"And lean into the fear and really see what happens you know see what happens when we allow ourselves to just kind of scream or react however we do without trying to pre defend or be kind of the the strong nothing's with scare me kind of person because that's not any fun and you can't really learn a lot about yourself but when you do just have a what's called openness to experience i you can really just and just learn about yourself grow and and feel really exhilerated so it's it's about the uncertainty and also i think the the surprise in and seeing how you're going to respond in different situations all right let's let's talk about this how did you decide where you wanted to go to really kind of learn about this aspect of fear it was really it was very difficult i knew i wanted to try and do a lot of different types of of scary things that we choose to do so i wanted to do of course a lot of haunted houses and haunted houses in different countries to see the different cultural influences and then different types of scary actively so physical thrills like lots of thrill rides and skydiving and going to the cnn tower in toronto and doing the edge walk but then also more psychologically terrifying activities so going to wanted locations to eastern state penitentiary historic site in philadelphia an into their whole the prison cell that they used for for years as as punishment to kinda grapple with the fear of isolation and confinement and tried to just have a very comprehensive look at fear in many different ways that we feel threatened or either in our in our mind or in our body to see how how those things work together and sometimes against each other and how to work through it and use it in a way that can be helpful ultimately so it was really a matter of trying to balance all those things well to do all of those things and do them in a time efficient and cost efficient way so i knew japan had some of the best roller coasters and throw rise and also was the location for the second most popular suicide destination and also supposedly one of the seven gates of how and a notoriously haunted mystical spacey.

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"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"eastern state penitentiary" Discussed on WCTC

"How we am really get now a matter that you still here are are are fine young attorney front this to a large from roddan my wrongs though may he's learning from the bus yes it onto your scary voices on with spearman all right so i guess you terra behind the walls of the eastern state penitentiary somebody is limited must be is your life the blazers at oslo and k it was my my second home we got four passes feuds who wins a standby lino the call with today's alas day they you will be able to win so we'll see how it's going to be playing out there and so i am since matthews us still here now you know maybe it's time all we ask him a few things how how is it being like a young hip happening guy new jersey i think that the army was a lot there was being a young general 'upandcoming professional right well i'll tell you i really don't have too much time to go out and help allies on earth i am troopers these the pauses lutheran hour all our work all the time i ever personal library a young attorney i'm not gonna world now lawyer lawrence of with regard now he's made me let i'll be like gouge okay so there you go all right so anyway so when it comes down to it you are you inner you wouldn't alarm and got into the gaza so grab when the brock the law firm there but that road was it a long road you think or wa who it was a pretty long road right it's.

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