35 Burst results for "East Asia"

Interview With Carmela Wilkins

Revision Path

07:59 min | 1 d ago

Interview With Carmela Wilkins

"Now for this week's interview. I'm talking with Carmelo Wilkins a graphic designer at ab partners in New York City. Let's start the show. Paul Right. So tell us who you are and what you do everyone. My name is Carmel Wilkens and I'm a graphic designer ab partners, which is a digital strategy and creative storytelling agency that is black owned and founded Nice I. Definitely want to get more into that but before we do you know of course, we are recording this now it's in the middle of. Even to say, it's the middle because of the rising cases I feel like we're still somewhere in the beginning but how are you holding up during this time right now? Oh my goodness I would have to say the biggest struggle for existing in the same space in which I work and also live. Or I used to be able to leave my apartment, go to the office and then be able to come back home. You know my retreat my safe haven. But now there's no distinction between two because my desk in my bed are about I don't know a third of an inch away from one another. It something that I've experienced since working from home and having short from home that it's especially the first couple months was really difficult to to have that distinction to create space for myself where I can just rest be at. Men. Also explore my own personal pursuits within my practice. So that's something that's definitely been difficult and also having to support and maintain my family as the breadwinner, my family that live in Rhode Island, and during the beginning of the pandemic, the beginning of quarantine, I had to run around and figure out how to get my sister who studying abroad in Japan. While he was supposed to the umbrella in Japan this past semester from Tokyo back to the US. Yeah. It was. It was really intense. My greatest fear was number forty five was going to just block off all of East Asia including US citizens and that would cause an entirely new problem but are very lucky me and my mom are very lucky to get my sister over here as soon as we could very thankful for that. Haven't even think about like I knew that there were supposed to be some travel restrictions from I think some countries in Europe I hadn't even considered Asia. Although I think now, countries, WANNA keep us out like I. Think the just recently as like Americans y'all stay over there don't come over here. It's a real kind of interesting struggle I. Think a lot of folks are getting into you know I'll tell you I saw a few months ago I was working for a company and. right around like March the folks that were in the New York office they said, okay. We're going to close the office and you have to work from home and then they had to kind of adjust to. Kind of being in this sort of now space where you have to work in live in the same spot and. Work remotely for like over ten years now I, live in Atlanta so like for me wasn't a big huge departure in that like you said, like you're better your desk like a third of an inch away from each other same but. I think what's been the rough is like not having the option to leave like you could leave and go somewhere but it's just not the smart thing to do. So it's like this weird kind of push pull tension between. Wanting to almost want to say rebel and go out. But then there's also like the fear of missing out if you're staying inside being safe. So you're like Oh. What should I do? You know what's the right choice to make? So I understand that that was it been in New York? Has Been, very, interesting as had so many ups and downs are have had my. From all the stays outside of New, York contacting left and right from overseas just wondering if I'm okay. How am I eating how my paying my rent? Like how do I have a roof over my head and it's it's been stressful on to reassure everyone like hey, I'm okay. Responsible saying if I am leaving my apartment, I'm also coordinating with the three other people that live with. We have this rotating schedule of WHO's leaving the House to specifically for groceries not for everything else not like from going for a walk or something but. On the quarantine in New York when we were really confined to art to disarm apartment and we were concerned with if of our roommates were sick or not not knowing like having massive era of uncertainty with what was going on in the households on just how going to sustain ourselves. So we created those really awesome system of how we're going to get groceries who's going to get. It has greater safety net and why like physical safety? Not all's. When it comes to go outside and retrieving groceries and coming back and sharing that space in the kitchen and how to do that A. Mindful away. If we're cautious about, say one of our roommates being sick which actually did happen. One of my roommates were sick for about thirty five days and we were very confused and also scared honestly, and they were definitely as while if they were sick or not. If they had covert but we all got tested I believe last month while three under the four of us got tested last month and to including came back negative and then one of my roommates came back positive. So. What it means because it doesn't really mean anything the tests aren't hundred percent accurate sort kind of like, okay. We live together like we're gonNA continue watching for each other symptoms and see what happens. That is both confusing and scary. Yes exactly. I mean to take the test. I mean, of course to know whether or not you're negative or positive but then because it seems like well, the virus is mutating and you know the symptoms are changing and. I. Hope you're staying safe I mean I I don't really know what advice to kind of given that. Than, just to the vigilant wash your hands so Social distancing. Well, let's talk about a be partners. You mentioned that being a digital strategy firm, it's black owned. How has it been adjusting to working from home if they've been cool everything. AM So. To be working where I work book, we have had moments on a one to one basis with on the team recall said moments as full team to just talk about their current reality that we are all facing. The is impacting us in various ways that we either have chosen to spoke about or having spoken about one another, and this is also my first full time job before I was freelancing. So it's really comforting to know the management team and those are the overseeing everything have employers in mind like our health, our our mental wellbeing, our overall wellbeing in mind, and at any point during the last, I don't know how many months has been I'm like losing track of time at this point. Like. If at any point, we needed to just take a step back from all the craziness going on. It's okay to do so and they completely understand. So that was really really important for me because I really value work life balance I. Think they've done a great job at the beginning of the quarantine they're just like, Hey, folks. So we want everyone to be really comfortable and adjust themselves to work from. Home. Like here's some extra cash like on us to really make your `rumour habitable for working and living, and I was really I was really kind. They didn't have to do that but but they did and I really appreciate it out. So did everyone else

New York City Paul Right Japan United States Carmel Wilkens Carmelo Wilkins East Asia Rhode Island New York Asia York Europe Atlanta Tokyo
Researchers Throw Cold Water on the Panic Around COVID-19’s Alleged Short-Lived Immunity

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

04:56 min | 2 weeks ago

Researchers Throw Cold Water on the Panic Around COVID-19’s Alleged Short-Lived Immunity

"There was a study put out by King's College in London a few weeks ago, which found that covid nineteen antibodies in people who had been infected largely disappeared after two months. The headlines about covid nineteen immunity being temporary were all over the place with more than a few implying that this means will never have a truly effective vaccine and never truly defeat the coronavirus. It's all terrifying so I wanted to share some insight from Derek. Thompson over at the Atlantic spoke with a number of experts to get a deeper understanding of the study and inject some good news into all of the headline fearmongering. Now I'm not going to tell you that. The study was totally wrong and that we're all going to be completely fine nothing about covid nineteen is completely good news, but as Shane Crotty of urologist at the La Hoya Institute for -Nology told the Atlantic actually looking at the data. I feel okay about it. Quoting further from the Atlantic acquired immunity is. Memory when our bodies fight off infection, we want our immune systems to remember how to defeat it again like a person who, after solving a big jigsaw puzzle recognizes and remembers how to set the pieces the next time. The whole point of vaccination is to teach the immune system those same puzzle solving lessons without exposing it to the full virus. This is why Casey L. study initially seemed so dreadful it. It found that the number of certain active antibodies called neutralizing antibodies declined significantly between tests especially in patients with mild or no symptoms. Antibody levels are one proxy for the Immune System's memory. If they plunged quickly, that might mean that our immune system can't remember how to solve covid nineteen for more than a few months at a time do minus to start from square one with each new exposure end quotes. Now while those findings from the King's college study are definitely concerning, there are three main reasons to be skeptical about the study and therefore hopeful for futures. I, the study only looked at one part of our immune system, our vast mysterious immune system about which there remain many unknowns quoting again when a new pathogen enters, the body are adaptive immune system calls up a team of BCL's with produce antibodies and t cells to over simplify the B. Cells antibodies intercept and bind to invading molecules and the killer t cells seek and destroy infected cells, Evaluating Immune Response Without A. T cells is like inventory, national air force, but leaving out the bomber jets, and in the case of covid nineteen, those bomber jets could make the biggest difference. A growing collection of evidence suggests that t cells provide the strongest and longest lasting immunity cove in nineteen, but this study didn't measure them at all end quote, further study and a Francis Strasbourg university hospital found that patients recovering from covid nineteen had strong t cell responses, despite not having any detectable antibodies. Now second decline in antibodies that unusual Shane Crotty the Varela gist from the Loy. Institute for Immunology. said quote it unusual to have feeding antibody response after several months the off. Isn't that surprising when you look at something like the smallpox vaccine easy the antibody responses down about seventy five percent after six months, but that's a vaccine that works for decades. We need a study like this to look at Cova patients six months after infection to really know what we're dealing with and quote. And third, and finally it's possible that even these low levels of antibodies could trigger a larger immune response in the future like if the individual is exposed to SARS Cov to again, this goes back to the immunological memory. It's like the memories and that strong when it's not confronted, but win the trigger of the virus returns, so does the memory. Even beyond the critiques of this one study that caused so much panic in the news, there remain many other reasons to be hopeful. Vaccine Research continues to steamroll along at an unprecedented pace. Several studies on monkeys have shown strong long lasting immune response and a new study shows that patients who recovered from SARS East Asia indeed have long lasting t cell immunity. Plus Journalists Noah. Smith shared on twitter, pointing to research from immunologist professor. Akiko, it was sake. This news about antibodies doesn't necessarily mean the vaccine would be ineffective because quoting Sake, vaccines can elicit stronger immune response than natural. Those covid nineteen vaccines can and should induce more robust and durable protection than natural infection end quote. As no Smith sums it all up quote. One antimony bunnies aren't the only thing that can give you. Immunity to your body can probably remember how to make new antibodies and three vaccines can potentially give you longer lasting immunity than you'd get from actually getting covid end quote.

Covid Atlantic Shane Crotty King Derek Thompson Smith London Francis Strasbourg University East Asia La Hoya Institute Casey L. Cova Akiko Institute For Immunology. Twitter BCL LOY
Jonathan Luff on Co-Founding an Incubator for Early-Stage Cybersecurity Companies in the U.K.

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

07:46 min | Last month

Jonathan Luff on Co-Founding an Incubator for Early-Stage Cybersecurity Companies in the U.K.

"I'm not by background attack person I come from a liberal arts background I studied politics in languages at university, and I was fascinated in international affairs I was always interested in history and politics. And that developed into a into a study of international relations, so I I studied. To universities in the UK Newcastle, which is in the north of England, and a Master's degree at Bristol University in the south and it was really. While? I was at Bristol that I developed. An interest in joining the foreign, Service Exams for the for the Foreign Service while I was at university there and I joined the British Foreign Office in in one, thousand, nine, hundred eight, and that took me on a fascinating professional journey, had the opportunity to study Arabic while I was in the Foreign Office and that took me to the Middle East. where I I had a couple of postings. Including some time spent his adviser to UK and US military forces during the war in two thousand and three, and over the course of my my government career over the course of my Foreign Office career I increasingly focused on national security issues. So you know things like counterproliferation, counterterrorism and Cybersecurity, and so that that really took me sort of further towards the the work that I now do but really my my leap into startup space, and and the work that we now do with with cybersecurity companies that was that was triggered towards the end of my government service, I spent a couple of years as an adviser. Downing, street a prime. Minister's Office that was two thousand ten eleven twelve, and around that time there were number of reviews taking place into UK national security, and that flowed some very interesting work around cybersecurity as a as a tier, one, a national security threat, and and you know I I was involved in some of that work. And after leaving, government decided to to make it one of the things that I would focus on. And so, what are you involved with today? What is your day to day like these days? Well since two thousand fifteen with my co-founder grace, cassie, who was another friend of mine from Foreign Service Days A. WE wanted to put in place. A way to support entrepreneurs. In the! Early days of establishing a cybersecurity company we had seen in our time. In government that the this was one of the most important. Challenges and opportunities of of the of the of the decade and we felt that weren't really any. Systems or structures in place to provide the support that was needed. This is fascinating complex area of technology and business, and while there were united some fantastic institutions in the UK there were already a number of significant companies operating this space. We couldn't see the number of innovative new companies emerging that we that we expected to say on the E. found in in somewhat more mature ecosystems like the US, and and to some extent Israel, so we started, Ceylon and Ceylon was A. In early days and experimental accelerator modeled to some extent on programs like Y combinator, but dedicated to Cybersecurity, so we initially Ranna three month program in London, and it's really grown from there and over the last five years we've. We've run ten programs in London and four programs in Singapore and we've had with one hundred companies come through those programs, and so we we spend our. We spend our day odd as in running those programs finding and supporting those entrepreneurs, and then, and then continuing that that support once they leave the program. Can you give us some insights on the state of Cybersecurity and entrepreneurship there in the UK? Yeah well I think it's developed. significantly certainly over the the ten years. That we've been really focusing on this and. Definitely we've seen that. Over the five years we've been running ceylon there really wasn't a a community of of of cybersecurity startups here in the UK back in in the first part of the last decade. We we've helped to capitalize that community here, and there is now a thriving startup ecosystem right across the range of technologies, but definitely in cybersecurity. And I think there are now there are some really quite successful companies that have been set up and developed here over the past five years, and it's now very much part of a a broader technology system here in the UK. And part part of the reason for that is that? The UK has a good reputation in this space, but it's also a a good place to to set up a business if you'll from somewhere else It's been a draw for talent. globally and we certainly saw that in in cybersecurity. We could see the talent. In cybersecurity was was very much distributed around the world. It wasn't just an isolated pockets, and and we found in. Many people wanted to come and. Join our program and get the business started in the UK, and as a result there now you know tens, if not hundreds of of interesting small companies in this field. Is there, even a geographic advantage of of being where you are. I'm thinking you're sort of you. Know equidistant to S- to some of the other important centers of cybersecurity. There's no question. I think you know. Greenwich Meantime has been a competitive advantage for the UK in many different areas of a of business and finance. Over the centuries I think it gives us a genuine advantages being as you say, in time term sort of equidistant between. The economies of the of the of the Americas and those of The Middle East Asia, and that definitely that definitely helps you know having the the economies of Europe on on our doorstep, and you know the last forty years at least strong connections to those economies has been helpful. London has been a melting pot for anybody trying to start a business seek finance and I. Think you know the world the world does come to London or at least it did until we were hit by the pandemic I. Think it will nonetheless emerge from the current crisis is one of the world's great global cities, and and so you know geography masters in Business and certainly been helpful to the development of the cyber ecosystem here.

UK British Foreign Office London Ceylon United States Foreign Service Bristol University Newcastle Greenwich Meantime Counterproliferation Co-Founder England Singapore Middle East Asia Europe Middle East. Israel Americas Grace
Open Eyes to Know Christ - Matthew 27:54

Pray the Word with David Platt

04:34 min | Last month

Open Eyes to Know Christ - Matthew 27:54

"Chapter Twenty seven I fifty four. When the Centurion and those were with them, keeping watch over Jesus saw the earthquake in what took place. They were filled with awe. And said truly this was the son of God. Like that was the conclusion. Of the Centurion and those who were with him. Who just witnessed? Jesus, die on a cross, and they see all that happens after that including this earthquake, and what took place, and they were filled with all, and said truly this was the son of God. They saw at this moment who Jesus was in his death on the cross. I just think about San Corinthians four four or six talks about how the God of this world little g of this world has blinded the minds of unbelievers from seeing who Jesus is Verse Five Says We preach Christ and I six seven four talks about how God's shines light our hearts, so that our eyes are open to see the glory of God in the face of Christ I. This is a supernatural. I opening work? The God does by His grace. And he did it in this centurions life, and those who are with him in this way like truly. This was the son of God. His brain them to that realization. And I just WANNA lead us to pray that people in our lives and our families. Are. Of influence who don't know who Jesus is. That God would do this. Work Govett. Open Their Eyes God we pray right now Second Corinthians four, four, thirty, six on Matthew Chapter Twenty, seven, fifty, four, knowing that the god of this world little g God of this World Satan. Adversary is blinding minds all around of family members. Friends. Neighbors Coworkers and People right around us and people around us our cities. People, far from us to think about praying for the unreached to the day today for the no sue in East Asia. So many. Millions, scattered throughout remote regions who have never even heard the good news about who Jesus is. And what did you sit on the cross-country pray for all of these people for people in our homes to people far from our homes open is today we pray. God would today be the day got to repay? The today would be the day for a husband or a wife or son or a daughter are mom, or dad or grandparents, and uncles some money in our family brain for. So long with today be the day you open their eyes. I'm blind. There is something to see your glory in the face of Jesus. Go Re parade for that for for friends remain Brian for for neighbors around share the Gospel with coworkers. The We've shared the Gospel with with the day the day. We're thinking of all kinds of names, even right now in our minds got made today the day we pray, and then re pray we preapproval far from us with today be the day the no sewer reached with the Gospel that no sooner men and women and children here the good news foods uses and watches has done for the first time got. Please made today. The day open is that people might say confess today. Truly Jesus is the son of God. reprints we brady, you give us boldness today to share the Gospel to share this truth to share this real to show people who Jesus is. And we pray that you would open is. That they might know. You. Jesus As the one who has died on the cross for our sins, and risen from the debt and victory over the grave that they might know you are the Christ, the Savior, the Lord, the son of God. Bringing about we parade in Jesus name. Amen.

Jesus San Corinthians East Asia Brady Brian
India's Burgeoning Crypto Scene with WazirX CEO Nischal Shetty

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

03:30 min | Last month

India's Burgeoning Crypto Scene with WazirX CEO Nischal Shetty

"Waza Rex is part of the Internet and Mobile Association of India is the largest exchanges exchanges in India. So lots of talk about. regarding both the Indian crypto. SCENE AND The. General! Performance of the quine in other assets. In emerging markets stop in particular India's interesting, because it is the largest democracy world they've had a number of interesting macro events of course last year couldn't demonetisation. Where many people were stuck in bank lines trying to redeem their cash? After the government's slashed the maximum size paper currency they have a cultural affinity for Gold's. Ritchie exactly. What that translates shoot terms of digital goals. And talked about quite a few topics that might be of interest as we think about emerging market interest in crypto beyond just China. And East Asia. South Asia perspective long overdue for this podcast and I'm excited to talk more about it. Shelter Yeah. Great great connect here. So why don't we? Why don't we start just by Having, introduce yourself and and talk a little bit about S-. While direction and some of the work that you've been doing. Over the last couple of years, maybe you start with the origin story personally how you fell down the rabbit hole. On a show so to give a bit of a background about me. I started my career as a software engineer. Writing Gold for a typical corporate job, and then eventually I quit my job and start it up. a social media management off. Guard crowd fire, and this is be back in two thousand ten of been event credible still new. Building on top of the API was like a really new thing. The API platform ten stuff The advent vital. Signed up millions of users on that and a wild. This was happening I was also the Hula zone or finding what was new? On the time reading every blog that spoke about new tax and stuff, so I came across Bitcoin, billy, then two, thousand, nine, I even bigger remember trying to mind bitcoin on my. PC BAGHDAD But it was just you know just coming across as trying it out and then mowing. then again, Gordon? Do a Bitcoin and twenty, two, hundred, twenty, thirty when a couple of Wallace started emerging in that space. again tried out a few of those early wallet. Sand sent. A bitcoin through my friends Some and then again I just lay. brainy seventeen years the whole. I got garden the Rabbit. Dole says that I've never been able to come out of it, so I would say my initiation into crypto happen and twenty seventeen. And eighteen built was. My my idea was to build sort of. Obey for people in India too easily on Crypto and when I experienced a global products and products that well being built in our country I saw a stock defense in the whole use it expedience, and that motivated me to build something which everyone in India accord easily on Border Crypto, and that's how I ended up bailing was he'd eggs?

India Mobile Association Of India Gold East Asia South Asia China Ritchie Dole Software Engineer Wallace Gordon Sand
Donald Trump Jr's rare sheep hunt cost US taxpayers $76,000

AM Tampa Bay

00:23 sec | Last month

Donald Trump Jr's rare sheep hunt cost US taxpayers $76,000

"A trip to Mongolia to hunt to near threatened species by don trump junior has cost taxpayers tens of thousands the trip was fully paid for by the president's eldest son but it's still cost taxpayers seventy six thousand dollars in secret service expenses the younger trump visited East Asia last August so we could hunt are golly sheep the largest species of sheep

Mongolia President Trump East Asia Don Trump
Orchid expert Dr Manos Kanellos answers a Dendrobium question

On The Ledge

11:12 min | 3 months ago

Orchid expert Dr Manos Kanellos answers a Dendrobium question

"It's time for question of the week and this one comes from Gaskin who has an issue with dendrobium orchid skin rights. I got it a couple of years ago and it's been a joy flowering profusely for the first eighteen months. He's also doubled in size when it arrived it had a few stumps which made me think you'd have been divided or cutback with my kids. I know to Prune flowering stems back to the next node after flowering wanted. My danger need something similar and should I be dividing those rooting branche. Let's at the base. I am no dendrobium experts so I called on somebody who is to answer this question. Manosque ANALYSIS IS THE CO author of book growing orchids at home along with another orchid expert. Peter White so he was just the person meads speak to thankfully Manas was on hand to answer all Gaskins dendrobium queries. And then some are GonNa see three questions here. The basically the dribble what we're looking at is the drug of nobility which is native to Southeast East Asia and it is often referred as a cool growing in boom which is not doesn't do doctors in that it doesn't really need cool temperatures. But it's kind of spacey kind of special because it is one of the few calm only sold or kids that has a distinct growing unrest phase. It's going phase starts when you see buds on the gains in the rest phase stotts when the new gains have reached almost the height of the old canes their best boat late spring about. Now it's arrest and growing phase coincides with them with the nobody with a here now so I can see city questions that need to be honest from from paragraph. So the first question is what these stumps these dumps. In fact cut of games. The plant didn't need a one that say these case cut off but grow did cut them off so the blunt looks prettier for somebody to bite. Which these second question do you need to cut off the gains of the end of the Florence. No because they are used as reservoirs for nutrients and would that feed the new cades when the plan does need these old gains it will become crinkly yellow and then you can cut them off. It's not like offices which is unique in that. It Kennedy Flower on the same stem. These a flower. Normally it would just stop a move to the new gains but as they do not got the old game. I think this is where I've fallen down with this plant in the past because I in my ignorance of this plot have have cut off those stems before they sent me before they've gone completely yellow and Brinkley and as a result I've I was doing the right thing but obviously I wasn't and you end up with kind of an unbalanced ugly looking plan as well grow can do this because in the nursery does that. He's doing just before shows blunt. But he's doing it because in in your house you have perfect. Conditions was at home. The blood is not in ideal conditions. Most of the time so taking away it's Bui- Wa Shales nutrients in what is it. Makes it much more difficult for it to show? Its best left of left on the left with the plan until the plan tells you does need. I'm I guess this is. Why if you grow a few follow ups all kids you have to understand that the dendrobium Zarb different because that flowering style is quite different. They don't fly off from the same in the same way. Do they? Sort of flying from the side of the stag with a very short flowering stem as opposed to that long one get. We found offices years. There is different than two or three ways from other orchids. And as soon as you realize that most of the darkest got two or three significant but as if you only differences than the very to grow one is you know one or two key things. The key for this one is an interest and a glowing period joining address. You keep it cool in cool bright dry conditions Jewish growing face you know what orchid the key to eight was you do this L. Thrive. It's not difficult to grow at home now. The third question w dividing the Bronx leads at the bottom and a difficult one to answer. It's basically that says yes. No these orchid if it's not given a proper rest videoed develop not bronze. Let's they're called chi-chi's new plantlets on the canes if it does so these are best sprayed with some water will. Miss missed it and win the have enough road full five a couple of inches in length either be snapped off and then all put together in small report and you have a new plan but on this case in this picture this is not. Lebron's lead it doesn't look like a is. It just looked looks like a new cane. Orchid looks that it could do with reporting and now it is that I tend to report it all the way until the end of June. So it is best reported in a weaponry party is good to take a little bit of also dog from the bottom of the boat and boot the audit into its new book which should be only slightly bigger a little bit deeper. These huge go into into the bar. So if you really really wanted you cool take that bit off. But it's risky and you have to ask why the best thing is to be less with planned so you end up with a big stronger thriving blunt and what is the best mix to use with the dendrobium is it just like kind. Classic orchid bog just simply bought a don't balk based or anything called compost. You Know Eh isn't a very and you do. Not because they have long games a lot of people feel they need to put him in a big. But the problem with this is that it's not easy to keep it on the very dry Jimmy. It's rest period. So if need be for weight you could put a couple of Februaries in the but the best to just every time you just slightly at the best the next size up in terms of thought so the nets sized book on. I know that I say it. It looks a little bit too big for its board. But that's what it needs to do to do and say just balk which will enable enabled the grower to keep it on the on the dry side during rest field watering these kids. I mean is there any special requirements? Here judy is growing face You what you keep it moist but not overly wet. You can use hardwood that it's easy but it's good at least from time to time to use a rainwater always luke warm temperatures and it was. The new. Gains was the end of the season growing cheese on Wednesday new case of the the height. Alsi availed gains than you. Keep it on the dry side very little water from time to time with Chevy Mistake. So doesn't get bone dry and deal. You see a new buds appearing on the new gains. The new gains also good to be stoked will be supported otherwise can just fold over all or the garden grow. Not Straight okay. That makes sense. Well that's helped me. Also because I've I've got a couple of little Katie's or might dendrobium which I have. I have to say already removed without really checking what I was supposedly but removed them and they were glass of water in the minutes. Must pop those up there quite small but they have got decent read some them so they can just go into one newport with market bark and hopefully they'll go next year with the oxy skype is is you can just snap them off the gain of the boom rather than a cover to cut off a little bit of this time as you have to do with the with the front office and then. Yes dorothy three together with them on on a very small against the Mita in Bach and and not too much watering at the START STUCCO FLEETS. And then you'll have a and what about this worry that people have the they're all kids in see through. Pulse is not true because I can't seem to come from the nursery and report to. We need to look for seats. Report Oral Paik once. Okay very good question. A book is good because you see the system village focusing the size especially Clear all else equal is a good thing. I clear poured for not only for August for plotted plants as well because I can see the roots but it is not necessary to grow or what is essential in a boat. The guarding orchids is that it has good. Greenwich has blend your host closer to drain or kids especially for an obvious need to drain and dry well. Between what the other thing. Also which is the secret is easy. Key is don't even have a dome even clear participation it the Dome it is definitely made for orchids because no The plan needs that kind of special boot so there are clear thoughts in the market. Which frankly not really good for you. Because they don't have good Greenwich as long as the pot has very good grant. A lot of big holes at the bottom is good for orchids. The all clear is better because you also she system in the roots This House is when you say talk about the Dome is the Boston. Part isn't flat. It's got a raise section which presumably is increasing surface area for more act coming in the menu holes at the bottom of the foot. Give it good drellich than dome is mostly for Asia. The center of the if you think about it is basically a niche may be a neat and a half from the what whereas in innumerable port. It's still possible to have inches away from

Greenwich Gaskin Dendrobium Zarb East Asia Florence Kennedy Flower Peter White Bui- Wa Shales Manas Bronx Boston Brinkley Asia Lebron Februaries Jimmy Oral Paik Judy Katie Newport
"east asia" Discussed on Go Beyond Disruption

Go Beyond Disruption

14:24 min | 3 months ago

"east asia" Discussed on Go Beyond Disruption

"The question is how can we re most remotely you? First of all we did have very system that rate authored inflammation serving and also vic between the Potently and regularly so it because of the older cookbook Become a shooting portion on February thirteen and fourteen and then to catch up the locker so this is something that I won't say information therapies one thing but also the team Jaren T. He's also very compulsive and when we look at the plans we've made we know that many business comes nudity. Plans tend to focus on short term disruptions. They may focus on things like emergency on sites cybersecurity hacks Perhaps something in the line of The storm or types are civil unrest. But I know that's very much like California like a New Orleans like Kansas USA that suffer from tornadoes. There were several regions in your part of the world. There in East Asia which experienced natural is awesome things like earthquakes hurricanes to nominees and there have also been previous epidemics of disease which very significant regionally but of course on a much smaller scale compared to the massive scale of what we're faced with now would be covered nineteen looking back on some of the lessons that you'll local business communities have learned from those previous experiences How do you think they apply in this time of the corona virus crisis so I think John let me take this back to you in Shanghai? What have you seen? Local business communities learned from previous experience of disasters and regional disruption. Yeah to be honest. I think I'd like to take two. Pots waited for the local community. And the others for my company. I think companies are very special for the local community. It's the interesting things is we learn much from two thousand three. You know the time as you'll know Shanghai and other other cities not severe but at this time in local communities especially the risk local communities. You find very interesting that almost all the company originally originally were computers. You know for the Insurance Company but in that time well corporate are so good. That's weekend sheer the industry inflammation by each other in the we even share the network of by e tries. It seems that the first priority is to keep staff security and second is keep the constant good customs service then allowed to win the considerable profits so in the local community in really much on the two solid and sweet sauce business and you know most of the system that we have already have most of the night I I know the most thing financier institutions have a backup system. The they can stock into to the Remote work from home. Easy the local community from my company. It's very interesting. Thing is that my company is the base thing Japan. You're a Japanese comedies. So many things that you know you mentioned the Santa Earthquake Ericsson and Nami so we have already has such kind of the system. Each year we were prepared for. The business continued gene contingency place and the we also will do the excise for the last year. I just mentioned We were the we are not prepared. We just address. The excise was that we have really disappeared for the home. Office the cynical office and we're really has no such May Sever we need to start out the cops server so we really do such kind of excise why we have so many people? We have the Laptop we have the VPN prepared things. We have already get such kind of being. From the kind of knowledge the really we have got such great propel and I s I know in the financing toossion most of the company in China in I think in not not Asia including China Hong Kong Taiwan and Japan Korea. Also have such kind of be playing so I think most of the time not only you can try not in Hong Kong. I think there's not asked to this county searching the performance of the Conde. The industry is quite good. Not only insurance company but also. The banks also disagreed comedy. I think let's go back to Hong Kong William Chen We're talking about the ways that local business communities can benefit from previous exposure to disasters. You may have seen in in your experience Certain lessons learned. How have you been able to apply those today? Being you home call. We experienced a sauce in two thousand three and also be also have some experience to how to and I mean to protect the Stop Stave and how to do Some spots for the nineteen DIS This time Mucus. Freidy probably different Because too too widespread and also the impact so I think As you mentioned that Adobe Yo have two different kinds of this country but we really did to the team and people will just after the prank school execution and now we're talking about the dispute of execution is show impact them different to be. We all speak the loose change all the news everyday change so I would say I I still want to focus their their their their crucial in footprint is more important and then it is We did this regularly. Lie which you think. Pissed lawyer human body released different of the information or to indicators that relate to assess the record pubs and into how we adjust so I say the information transparency and to have quick. That'S THE MEAL. Financial impact is raising. You talked about volatility. The speed of change is something we've never really seen before and let's talk a little bit about that volatility especially paps when it comes to small businesses because business communities that are made up in a very as you say many different parts just like for every corporation every massive enterprise every Chebel In career you will have hundreds of thousands of small micro-businesses Street traders very small enterprises. And of course the way that they manage this kind of situation is entirely different so Perhaps if I could ask you William in your experience of how many different layers of business. How many different sized businesses make up a business community? Do you see that they're Ways that the government will the state in in Hong Kong for example is supporting businesses. That taps on different to the way that they may be supporting businesses here in the UK or perhaps in the USA. What are some of the differences in the way that Businesses being assisted by local government. To take let me in to our region. I mean Hong Kong also also because we've got to saturate possibly try and You honking also do some pets. Subsidy in terms of the particular. Those being hit a subtly light or from retail and hospitality. I think the government some subsidy on it but in terms of the destroyed intones off to speed things that we can. I mean the government can do A bit more but in in other ways that you try to the definitely also supports quite not tons of all the subsidy locally so I thank God for different government also to a very good in terms of their support but you just mentioned how do we Being a community with different pieces that can have hopes that the taste a it is a thing yesterday for example like our chase Read some surprise from the probably the probably the Congress Hsun Production. We also can't to to the profession so I think that com- off the train. It is very critical because in this moment. And now the the Oprah is this going out to the US and UK in separate. We are very concerned about the price with China now. We consider surprise fun overseas whether they can do the ship surprise to us. So now it's really a couple of really into interlinked. So yeah not something that we need to to learn every day and to we thought I think is the benefits of caring perspectives from different parts of the world the UK last week USA last week and then today the third of all live webcasts from the EPA and Seema looking at the regional perspective. How we manage the local impact to the scope of disruption I'm hearing it from the East Asian regional perspective like almost all of us listening today working in a very different situation Working from home any of us come many of us have the technology but perhaps because of all the other people in the house. It's a little less easy than the technology would make us believe. We have to do things like cope with children in the house. Pets needing to be taken for a walk board wives or husbands sitting playing the xbox fine to stop the children from using the Internet because we need it for video conferencing all of those things that somehow. You don't really plan for new business contingency plan but however we cope. We may have questions about how we can do that. And that's why I'd like to invite any of our audience to submit questions you can do that via the Q. And A. in this Webpage that you are listening to this webcast on and you can submit the questions. Tell us where you are and we'll do our best to answer your question. We just wants to welcome those people who join us. We know that's Angus is with us. Nancy Ada Ken Li- whole Linda Catherine and many other people who are joining us and If you have questions please do some them. I'm joined by Dr William Chen from Hong Kong. Who is the? Cfo OF QUASAR Engineering Ltd and the CFO of Mitsui. Sumitomo Insurance China John Dang from Shanghai generally question for you because you're in the insurance business. How does a business assess its ability to cope? How does it know when it needs to get some help To be on this disease the very interesting situation. It's a good question there's at For example as you know we dinning everyday that insurance companies dealing with risk management every day we provide the risk of solution so From my point of view I'm in charge of the back office and I also walkways. And the rioting and does these kinds The claim team our target is that provide very good quality. Sivvy's but as you know in current situation the crisis the current verse as you know. It's really really really really hot to operate and to assess so as you know for us for insurance things a financial institution. We always not only help ourselves but our clients to boot off to their stress tests. You know this is very very interesting. And then bury their potent. We know that we can understand the situations. That's where we are and Inga. Shuten what we need to do and in the London. What did we need to do? And in the meantime as you'll know interesting is that as a content and also ensure we need to know the cost how to cope with it..

Hong Kong Shanghai UK John Dang Hong Kong William Chen East Asia Jaren T. California China Hong Kong Taiwan Cfo Stop Stave China Kansas USA New Orleans Dr William Chen Asia Pots
World Bank warns China growth could screech to a halt

BBC World Service

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

World Bank warns China growth could screech to a halt

"Bank has warned of unavoidable in significant pain in countries across East Asia as economies contract in the wake of the corona virus pandemic it says the virus poses a big threat to the region's tourism trade and commodity driven economy as Christmas wani reports in China where it all started the bank says the viruses impact will see economic growth shrink from six point one percent last year to two point three percent in twenty twenty if the pandemic doesn't get worse but if it does then we're looking at growth of just zero point one percent this year the bank for costs nearly twenty four million fewer people will escape poverty in twenty twenty because of the virus Asia and in particular China have been the world's economic engine for the last decade the corona virus has stopped that growth in its tracks recovery will be long and difficult

East Asia China Asia
Malaysia gets new PM, Muhyiddin Yassin, after week of turmoil

Between The Lines

07:53 min | 5 months ago

Malaysia gets new PM, Muhyiddin Yassin, after week of turmoil

"To Malaysia which has a new prime minister seventy two year old my eden. Yesen it's less than a week after the abrupt resignation of the world's most national later. This is the ninety four year old Muhammad Muhammad that plunged Malaysian politics into turmoil. So how has this South East Asia nation about thirty one to thirty two million people? How has it gone from an inclusive? And reformist government to a nationalist conservative law. Within days. Bridget Welch is an honorary research associate at the University of Nottingham. That's at Malaysia's Asia Research Institute bridget. Welcome back to between the lines. Great to be here now. Mahadi rule Malaysia for more than two decades until a two thousand and three in my twenty. It mighty gripe political comeback. Those last time we had you on the program bridge. What did he suddenly resign? Listen to us into his tenure. Well I it's reasonably clear that had he had very serious tensions between himself and anwer Abraham and the coalition that he led the pocket harp on coalition was divided and ultimately it split And as a consequence of that The the coalition collapsed and part of the collapsed however in the ball to move to a new coalition government and mightier himself was not willing to accept what other other parties in the coalition were doing montier resented working with. I'm no particularly the former leaders of the former government who were Who are tainted by corruption allegations? So what we see is a situation where Montier many politicking dividing rule many of the trying to split the pot the coalition itself his his reluctance to to leave Turn power over to Anwar set the conditions for the power. Grab that took place but at the same time Montier was not willing to go full. Go through with it. Because he wasn't willing to to allow the new new coalition to include the members of who he stood against when he came back into power. I'm into thousand. Mahalia and You mentioned ny Abraham now. Let's be clear. He's the protege turned. Raul turned ally although they fill out about a waco so ago they have reunited though having I think they have reunited from a perspective of They're now forming the opposition. But they have not yet completely resolved their differences. The fact of the matter is is that if Montier had supported Anwar clearly laid out a time line and stopped the politicking within the coalition then the government would not have collapsed. So I think for now. They are working together against a now common enemy. Who was someone who took the took took over the government in a in a power grab but at the same time that doesn't necessarily mean that they are fully resolved the question of the Lisa Session? If alcohol everyone was to come back to government says he feels but tried he success that. Yes in his malign nationalist. He's backed by this corruption tarnished former governing party. You mentioned the Mama tells more about yes so mine didn't yes and has been in politics for over forty years He joined politics in nineteen. Seventy eight He came into. I'm no He was the Chief Minister of the the very important state of Jehovah on the southern part of Malaysia and he has served in different capacities as different ministries that has held six different ministries In I'm no I'm he has not necessarily Had A clear Persona that That an extensive grassroots but he's been a very effective tactician and capable administrator And as a consequence he rose through the ranks through I'm no And he became deputy prime minister under the previous government From two thousand nine to two thousand fifteen We didn't ask known predominantly for three things He's I known for defining himself I as a Malay- as opposed to a Malaysian which is of course part of the reason. There's the brand that he is. Emily nationalist government and this new coalition that exists combines is predominantly Malays based parties And so this is something. It seems to have been Quite defining of who he is. The second thing is is that he's also known for standing up for against Najib on they won. Mvp scandal He he was sacked and after putting pressure On on Najeib to on these issues of corruption and he after in this happened in two thousand fifteen when the scandal is revealed so he stood up for On this important issue. And he's also known now for The effective maneuvering up becoming the winner in the power. Grab Which of course they're very different views and Malaysia about this Those looking at this recognized that that there are real serious. Ethical concerns about Whether or not amyloid and Yeltsin actually had the numbers which really did not seem to be the case in terms of A majority government When he was positioning himself for taking over power And others feel that that there's a there's an that he had. He had more than most numbers at that time and that he should that He was effective and moving and getting the position of power. There people in Malaysia are divided right now. Some people are are willing to give mood in a chance Wanting the situation to be more stable is and others very very angry that they feel that their sister the government has been stolen from them their dreams of different Malaysia of stolen for them. And there's a bit of considerable fear among people that this that lead in Yassin were lot real will be an old Malaysia. Politician Aka using the levers of power using issues of race using of issues of of of exclusion as a way to build up his powerbase so to the extent that this new Malaysian pm a struggles to govern and of course we have to remember elected public. Mandates does this mean this unprecedented instabilities. Luckily to continue the fact of the matter is is that Malaysia is a coalition government And is dealing with the situation of coalition governments in coalition governments across the world. You have one type of party set. A parties emerged. And then you can have a very unstable situation that a new set of parties emerged from Malaysia. This is a very new dynamic and of course it played out in the uniquely Malaysian Way with with intense amount of personal drama and Intrigue Enemies and betrayals Because the politics of Malaysia or highly personalized Right now mood in is Has Very is behold into the parties that he that he is that a put him into office and and the questions of Prot. Who is he's going to prosecute or maintain the prosecution's how much Islam governance he's GonNa put in whether he's actually GonNa try to seem to have any reform without his gonNA use race relations and of course importantly now lead in. Essen is is somebody who's just recently had a very serious bout of pancreatic cancer so the issue of the leadership succession is is equally important for this new government so there are very important points of instability and and as a result of that This is something that the people are watching very carefully. The instability is also facilitated by the fact that the opposition the new opposition bucket on Harapan. Now is that is actually quite emboldened by how this power crap has taken place.

Malaysia Montier Prime Minister South East Asia Muhammad Muhammad Anwar Bridget Welch Anwer Abraham University Of Nottingham Mahalia Harapan Asia Research Institute Essen Raul Research Associate Najib Yeltsin MVP Waco
Coronavirus: Twitter tells staff to work from home

BBC World Service

00:25 sec | 5 months ago

Coronavirus: Twitter tells staff to work from home

"The social media network Twitter has told its employees in East Asia to work from home to help stop the spread of the corona virus in a blog post the social media giant said it was mandatory for staff in Hong Kong Japan and South Korea to work remotely the company also said it was strongly encourages all of its five thousand employees around the world not to come in to work the firm has banned all non essential business

Twitter East Asia Hong Kong Japan South Korea
With its epidemic slowing, China tries to get back to work

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:50 min | 5 months ago

With its epidemic slowing, China tries to get back to work

"Local governments are trying or not trying to get businesses going again and beers Emily thank reports China is slowly getting back to work one of the factories it has restarted its production lines is Shushan auto technologies and the Chinese port city of Mingora immigration parts interval to European and American cars one one hundred witnesses our clients are international and they didn't stop operations during the outbreak unlike other companies who sell to Chinese clients who have to shut down we really have to get back to work that's cloud trial the sales director at the company restarting production was a lengthy process they first have to provide local officials a full list of all employees she entered the finals on this list is analyzed by the public security bureau and using big data they determine which workers are safe and can come back to work in the factory by big data Joe is referring to a new government after failing to help control the spread of the virus workers enter their national ID number and phone number the app then spits out which cities and provinces the worker has visited in the last two weeks if they pass through a heavily affected area they must quarantine for two weeks before they return decisions production line and that's just the first step once upon a time for use of the value in terms of materialistic preparations we have to show that we have isolation wards and that we're buying face masks and disinfectant for the factory that we have enough thermometers all those plans are submitted to the local government which sends teams of inspectors for issuing approval she shown is back to eighty percent of its pre virus production capacity this month Chinese leader xi Ching paying give a teleconference beach to one hundred and seventy thousand local officials she called on them to help small and medium businesses whether the economic impact of the outbreak China's central bank has also said it will make taking out loans overpayment debt easier perhaps even cut taxes but specific measures haven't been spelled out yet from from from a partner and political risk firm plan says the over centralization of power in Chinese political system slows things down they were told to focus on poverty alleviation to focus on financial de risking which means they were originally entered a impression and they were planning to do so to to lower the credit lower credit as in lower corporate debt and fewer loans so local officials have waited to loosen up and reopen shop until they get more instructions from cheating being himself so it takes time from province to province to comprehend what she can he really talks about especially lower ranking officials they don't have incentives to work on their own because the risk is if they are at odds with central policy with central decision making they may be purchased with the supply team goes in both directions even though China seems to have contained the virus to just one province the virus is spreading globally the rest of East Asia the Middle East in Europe Michael Chang manages an electronics manufacturing plant with about two thousand workers in the south of China he's already preparing for the worst we're going to be awful live on the Han gonna guardium freedom we've been stockpiling are Japanese and Korean components in case they close the factories there and we can import parts into China anymore chan also recently imported south Korean manufacturing equipment for new production line and it's the Korean engineers who designed the tools to help install them but now that South Korea is reporting ever rising numbers of new coronavirus cases come from well I'm I can't come to trying to come up with a four they didn't help her not allowed so now the equipment is just sitting in his factory unused chance as long term plans are now impossible to make the situation is just changing too

Emily
What happens if Uncle Sam goes home?

Between The Lines

11:54 min | 5 months ago

What happens if Uncle Sam goes home?

"Support for Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders indicates more and more. Americans are questioning the nation's role as global leader. But what happens if Washington Jettison? Us alliances and ended the Ford Presence of U. S. forces according to Thomas wrought in the Lightest Foreign Affairs magazine. That's a distinguished New York based journal a strategy of Retrenchment. He argues would among other things. Destabilize the regional security orders about Europe and Asia increase the risks of nuclear proliferation and aggravate the threat of major power conflict. The foreign affairs article is cold. The folly retrenchment. Why America can't withdraw from the world? The author Thomas Rod is director of the Center for the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution and is affiliated as Nonresident Fellow with the Lowy Institute in Sydney. He's based in Washington. Hi there Tom Hi Tom. It's great to be Richard and join us in cine studio. Is Doug Bandow? He's a senior fellow at the Cato Institute also in Washington a former special assistant to President Ronald Reagan and this she's scholar in residence at the Center for Independent Studies. That's a Sydney based think tank that I had welcome back. I glad to be on Tom. Tom Why do you still support a foreign policy? Strategy that Yusei quote has served the US. Whoa for decades. Well I think that the you know the. Us has had a critical role to play in Europe and in Asia since the end of our two and then after the Cold War And I think it really has worked. You know it's it's created sort of stable open and prosperous regional orders. I think if the US was to withdraw from those regions those orders will be at jeopardize some. We'd see all sorts of negative effects and I think as we look at American farm policy. Be Up to distinguish between some of the conflicts in Afghanistan and elsewhere that might make sense to to to pull back from or to to to end and the more broad sort of American commitment to international security. And I'm sort of worry that we might throw the baby out with about water in this when we talk about you know how engaged the US should be in the world but your critics would say that the US has over extended itself Particularly in nations. That don't directly affect the American national interests. I think of Afghanistan Iraq Libya many people would say strategic disaster after strategic disaster. Doesn't that undermine the case for? Us Global leadership role. Well I think that we can. We can debate the merits of of each of those and certainly in Afghanistan. Icee in the piece that it's time to end the the Board Air. I think Iraq is a sort of a tricky case because there needs to be some sort of a small presence to prevent the resurgence of Isis. And but the main point of the piece actually is that the US has not overextended in Europe and Asia. So all those cases you mentioned are sort of the Greater Middle East right there nod And Not in Europe not in Asia and I think the strategy in those two regions is basically working has worked quite well and so I don't really see the evidence of an over extension in either of those two places over extension dot band. I think we're clearly overextended. The problem is it's going to get worse. You look financially at the United States. It has a trillion dollar annual deficit for the foreseeable future without a financial crisis. Those numbers will get worse of the entitlements. Is the elderly retire? The question is how one maintains globe spanning military capable of trying to contain nations along their borders essentially everywhere and also fund other commitments. I think is going to put enormous pressure on the US budget. And I think what we see today is basically an overhang of a policy. It's inertia for policy that worked well in terms of containing the Soviet Union but doesn't make much sense when it comes to Russia and a policy that in East Asia's very complicated China's strikes me as being the major problem that we face but it makes no sense to extend ourselves everywhere for primarily concerned about China. I kept isn't a US. Pullback from Asia and Europe want that be more likely to embolden regional powers like China and Russia. I don't view Russia's being particularly strong power the stage Russia doesn't dominate Europe the way the Soviet Union threatened do so Russia doesn't have anywhere close to the relative strength towards Europe that China does Europe strikes me as being a very good example of where history suggests we should change policy changing circumstances. Meena change the policy now argue frankly. Us policy's been destabilizing. American policy towards Russia in terms of NATO expansion involvement in Ukraine and Georgia has actually provoked the Russians and has created greater problems there and argue greater threats than an alternative policy. Would Have Tom Rock. Well I guess I would sort of ask Doug if you pull of NATO or reduce the US commitment to troops in the to to the countries in the Baltics Eastern Central Europe. I mean I see the presence there as having a deterrent effect. In that if we didn't have NATO Basically have Russian incursions into those countries in greater instability. I also think NATO helps to sort of try to slow the rise of authoritarian intimate some of those countries. We have big problems in Hungary and elsewhere. I think if NATO was to disband pullback those problems get worse than that. We need to be more focused. On Democracy. In those countries that are currently in the NATO Blah if as the retentions argue the US should basically withdraw from NATO or weedy ended started military. An present there that will have significant negative consequences in another part of Tom. Wright's thesis in his Foreign Affairs as I dug Bandau is that. Us retrenchment leads to nuclear proliferation that is US allies. No longer protected by uncle. Sam would be tempted to acquire nuclear weapons of their own. Why Co that danger Doug Bandow? Everything's relative here. Sometimes you live in a world with bad choices so if the question is to the United States forever defend lots of allies being willing to sacrifice American cities to defend them or should they have nuclear capabilities. Themselves it's not so clear to me. That proliferation is such a bad thing. It's not a good thing but the question is does. The United wanted to risk Los Angeles to protect Taipei and Sydney and Seoul and Tokyo should the US be prepared to risk. You know. The United States still cities and dealing with Russia when in fact already Britain and France have nuclear weapons. Perhaps the European Union are some European defense for should also have nuclear capabilities. I don't think that it's a good alternative. On the other hand the assumption undebated you know kind of unconsidered. I think that. Us should of course maintain this Really starts falling apart especially in Northeast Asia if North Korea possesses missiles capable of hitting the United States and targeting American cities doesn't make any sense for the United States to be prepared to go to war on the Korean Peninsula. What risks are at stake? What interests are at stake? I look at that and say this really is at point to argue that. Maybe we need to reconsider. Who has want Tom Rod on that note? How would you respond to Doug? Bangles question does the. Us wants to risk of Los Angeles to protect Taiwan. Yeah I just. I just think it's really. You know in the exaggerated concern. I mean this is a very real concern. At the height of the Cold War there was a problem. Extended deterrence you know. Obviously there was a number of Said's and brinksmanship but since the Cold War the US has been able to deter Russia in Europe and Saudi. Different way you know actors in Asia what I going to the brink of a global crisis and You know that would precipitate nuclear war. Hasn't we haven't seen that pattern of crises in the last three decades so The evidence would suggest that deterrence in Europe is fairly stable. I came guests. Doug band out from Kite. When Thomas Rod from Brookings? Both prominent washington-based think tanks. And we're dividing. Tom's lightest site in Foreign Affairs magazine. The folly of retrenchment. Why America can't withdraw from the world before we turn to Australia's neighborhood in is Doug. I just want to put it back to you on this question of pulling America out of certain regions. Say the Middle East if the US pulls out of Iraq and Syria a want you just invite those suny jihadist or even the Shia militias to fill the void while they're already there. I mean the reason. Shia militias are active in Iraq is because we blew it up. I mean the notion that America promotes stability in the Middle East. I think is a fantasy the? Us helped blow up Libya now. We created the precedent that if you're dumb enough to give up your nuclear weapons and missiles we take you out who what dictator wants to follow more Merck Offi. I think the the Iraq circumstance you cannot complain about Iranian involvement there when we took out the anti Iranian dictator. So I don't see us as being able to promote relative stability in Iraq in twenty eleven when Obama Administration withdrew. Us troops that created a vacuum for those Sunni. Jihadists non-islamic stunned. I mean th this. As soon as you hottest were active. The reason we have al-Qaeda's it was created al Qaeda in Iraq which transmuted into Isis Obama pulled out following the George W Bush plan Bush could not get a status of forces agreement through when he had all the troops. So the blame Obama for this. I think is silly. And if American troops had been there there's no reason to think they would have maintained stability they would have been a target not only of Shia militias it would have been targeted Sunnis. Both sides would viewed the United States as being a problem. I told me dot band now. He he's a former Reagan. Adviser Menu reflects with I express themselves in different ways Obama trump and sands would essentially agree with Doug Bandow. How would you respond? But I think Obama. The Obama Administration came to the conclusion that it had sort of made a mistake in pulling out of Iraq in the manner in which it did because it went back in. You know to fight. Isis applied played an isis merged So I think you know. I think there's a tendency when we look at these issues you know to say the US withdraw from all of these conflicts to say. It's a Bama toward the beginning. Iraq was the wrong war. Could start it on false. Premises and Afghanistan was the good war Because it was legitimate when it began and broader than looking at the strategic consequences of both which are sort of independent of the causes right. And you know if you have a country `significant you know as Iraq in the heart of the Middle East. What goes on there has consequences and consequences for the region at a time when there is still continuing terrorism threat. I think is happening now. Let's bring it to Asia a dog. You obviously five a retrenchment of US power from not just Europe in the Middle East. I completely get that but you also support a retrenchment from East Asia question. Why China just feel the strategic vacuum left by Uncle Sam and therefore threaten the integrity of many sovereign states in the region. Doug Bandow well. China's the great challenge and the question of how to deal with China. There's no easy answer. I think the question of what America's role should be. It's clearly much more of a backup role it's not America's job to protect scarborough reef for the Filipinos me last year. Rodriguez territory announced after the Chinese Sankar ship. The US should send the navy in and start bombing. And I'm here with them. I mean it shows the danger of essentially transferring these decisions to local powers. And there's no doubt I think providing security guarantees

United States Doug Bandow Europe Asia Iraq Russia Middle East TOM Afghanistan Nato America East Asia China Sydney Thomas Rod Washington President Ronald Reagan
Novel coronavirus cases top 80,000 as Trump administration seeks $2.5 billion in funds to fight it

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:12 min | 5 months ago

Novel coronavirus cases top 80,000 as Trump administration seeks $2.5 billion in funds to fight it

"Coronavirus cases are surging in Italy Iran in East Asia reaching over eighty thousand worldwide this morning China reported five hundred eight new cases another seventy one deaths sixty eight of them in the central city of Wuhan where the epidemic began South Korea now has nearly nine hundred cases correspondent Brian Todd reports a large percentage of the cases are linked to a branch of a particular religious group the Xinjiang Gee group's branch in the southern city of Daegu south Korea's top health official says the group's practice of having many people sit close together in confined spaces for more than an hour during services could have led to more exposures tonight the group has halted its gatherings sanitized its buildings and thousands of members are in isolation president trump has sought to downplay the threat of corona virus which is drawing criticism from senator Chuck Schumer all the warning lights are flashing bright red we are staring down a potential pandemic and the administration has no plans now the White House budget office is sending Congress a two point five billion dollar urgent budget proposal to address the outbreak the funds are for vaccines which don't yet exist treatment and protective

Iran East Asia China Wuhan South Korea Brian Todd Xinjiang Gee Group Official Senator Chuck Schumer Congress Italy Daegu President Trump White House
Where are all the Asian Beardsmen?

Asian Americana

10:40 min | 6 months ago

Where are all the Asian Beardsmen?

"In November of twenty seventeen filmmaker Justin. Chang decided agrout his facial hair for the first time I had never tried to grow out my facial hair before because I was just scared to do so like I wasn't sure how it's GonNa turn out you know. My Dad actually has a pretty boss mustache. And he's known as the Asian Guy with the mustache but I didn't know if I had heard of those genes just in his Chinese American and he says people always treated his dad's moustache like an exception to the norm. A lot of Asian. People were impressed that he could grow it out. On a lot of non Asian people read more impressed and sort of I think I signed him like these masculine values. That a lot of Asian American men MM stereotypically are not granted I think part of that too is because he grew up in Tennessee and Texas and in the sal you know facial hair was even more of a signal. Oh masculinity down there and it helped him get by email. Think that something like phase. Here's that big of a deal but like everything communicates. Justin didn't go up in the south like his dad ad. But he's from San Bernardino California where they're also wasn't a very big Asian community just an always has some scruff but he had never let his facial hair grow now in his late twenties he was about to travel across the country to film a documentary. I found my own production company called J school and we focus on telling stories of underrepresented represented people in other words people caller women and the Lgbtq community and movember provided him with an excuse movember also known as no shave. November is an annual event where men are encouraged to grow mustaches for the month of November to raise awareness of men's health issues. The Movember Foundation a global men's health a charity which began in two thousand three has always focused on educating man about prostate cancer. Anticipation cancer but in twenty seventeen they expanded their mission to include spreading awareness about mental health issues and suicide prevention in issue that was really meaningful to Justin quick onto warning. There's a short mention of suicide coming. Yeah I had a friend when I was younger. Who took her life and it really is what I attributed sparking my career path onto a creative journey and it was my only outlet when I I was younger to write in sort of tell stories as a coping mechanism from when my friend died so when I saw that Movember had expanded its causes to also covering suicide aside if I like the perfect kind of aligning of the stars that I want to try going on? Facial hair was 'cause I believed in and since he was on the road working on his film there there was no one around the laugh at me if it look bad so he started growing at his facial. Hair Okay Caroline. I think this is a good time to admit that we don't have much personal experience. Dance with facial hair right ADA and we're also not Asian American men but we've decided to explore this topic Asian American men and facial hair. Because we've heard it's a thing he's like kind of a thing right now. It's definitely think there was even this article called. Why Asians Dread Movember about difficulties? Some Asian men have growing facial higher. I laughed because I get it. I understand because I know that. Some dudes can't you know what I mean just like hey some dudes like me aren't six feet tall. You know what I mean. It's like you're dealt a hand play it. I do think that there is something very specific about men feeling like they can do anything that that they see other men being able to do. I know some Very Very Astute East Asia gentlemen and if I'm really breaking down what I feel too was them. It's probably jealousy and breaking you know whether jealousy comes from this idea that they can fit into Western perceptions of masculinity better than I can also. It's important to question when you hear the phrase. He's Asian men and facial hair. Do you think of East Asian men Southeast Asian men South Asian men. These communities can have very different issues regarding facial the hair I grew up in a six. I don't have a choice. Beer's become such a hip thing so for me. It's very interesting to observe because I keep a beard for very different reasons. Both to my parents were really worried about me going airports because I mean I'm a brown dude with a beard people get uncomfortable. I can see it in old y people's faces when I am boarding a plane so this is our investigation. What's the vocabulary we don't know what does that have? A Moustache flavor saver. Chinstrap is just like when it goes your sideburns. Connect your cheekbones connect your Chin and how do other people feel about their facial hair. This is something that loves those bugging let me about to because she was so good looking back in the day but first. Let's go back to Justin so he's on the road traveling across the country doing interviews for a documentary series called ritual which is about NFL players and their pre-game superstition and he's also a few weeks into his facial. Missile Hair journey by week three like I had a pretty good moustache. I was pretty sure wasn't able to grow a full beard. I was manicuring it the best I could. He's googling photos those of Johnny Depp. Michael B Jordan and Robert Downey junior to get inspiration on how to style his facial hair into a goatee one day. He was in Denver Filming. Maria's Thomas a a superstar wide receiver for the Denver Broncos who also happen to be doing movember for the first time and he actually flies out a barber from la every every couple of weeks to do his hair and he was doing well for the first time too and his barber was giving him shit basically for being like him. Ed Others Asian duties grown up way better than you can. You can't beat the Asian Guy. So how did that make Justin fail. I dig any offense to it even though like it clearly had racial overtones overtones because I get what he was saying like. They didn't expect me to have such a full mustache. Goatee and this Guy Thomas. WHO's like obviously way tougher for the Niamh as an NFL player? He could barely grow the peach fuzz. It was just kind of a very self aware moment where you're like. Damn I can't handle a tackle or run. The forty yard dash or catch a touchdown in the end zone or win the super bowl ring like he can but for damn sure I cannot gross facial hair this might sound like a nice happy ending of Justin's the number story but it's just the beginning he soon finds out that not everyone has positive reactions to his facial hair one of my friends who will remain nameless she goes. How's your new former birth control but we'll come back to them later so we've learned not the ability or inability to go facial hair can be a source of insecurity or pride for certain men men but for most it's still purely aesthetic choice just like I put my hair in a ponytail or choose whether to wear makeup a certain way for a lot of men facial hairs away the former identity through their appearance? But what if your facial hair could actually affect your job prospects. We're going to take you to Hollywood where your appearance. Especially as an Asian man competing for a limited amount of rules can either get you a coveted role or lead to rejection desmond. Jim I'm an actor on generic barnacles implant season villain in season two saga shake hosts. A podcast called the Bollywood boys and I have facial head. Desmond is an Australian actor Who's been in shows like reef break now chocolates and missionary chronicles and most recently got cast in Marvel's Falcon and the winter soldier? Saga was in a web series called unfair ugly about a Muslim American family in Orange County. He is the Co host of the PODCAST. Bollywood boys and on the cast of the sketch comedy. Show that get Brown. We got them in a room together to talk about their facial hair. Visual here right now is recently shaven. It's an attempt at the Tony Stock Goatee and I haven't pulled it off in addition to Desmond's goatee. He also has long black hair. That goes just past his shoulders that he sometimes wears in half ponytail. Saga wears his hair shorter but he has a full beard like like the beard. Easiest of beards that anyone could possibly have. My beard hair is like as thick as wire. It feels like wires. You're coming out of my face from every possible poor. It's pretty intense. It's a lot of maintenance earns when saga says his beard was high maintenance. He wasn't joking so a lot of work. You you know like I got a shampoo rush it so the shampoo can get like in their condition. It I brush it against the conditioner. Rinse that out and I tell dry air dry for like five minutes. I blow dry. I gave some beard oil and brush that in and I gave moustache wax soccer. Who is Pakistani American? started his acting career without facial hair. In the beginning he wasn't booking anything his agents eventually dropped him. He says he started growing his beard out of laziness. I remember the first year that I grew out my beard. Maybe maybe four or five conversations that I had daily whereabout my beard. The first thing anybody would say to me would be dude sick beard bro. Dude how did we get itself full on my God. That's such a nice beard things like that easier or fuck. It feels like okay. It's catching atun on. People are watching me. I'm doing something right. At least I can grow a beard to get some people's attention because like in this industry you can be Super Knbr talented by the look and you're not going to be seen and so definitely helped get me into a lot of doors in two dozen fourteen. He started art decorating his beard and putting the photos on instagram. We're in Venice and we're sitting like this grassy area and there was like these little white flowers I I was like hold on analogy. Hey grab fifteen of ood beard and then I posted a photo on instagram and got like a couple of hundred likes and this is when like getting a couple of hundred likes. It was like Oh shit. This guy got a couple of hundred likes. He also decorated his beard for Christmas using miniature ornaments and for Easter. He put peeps committee eggs in his beard with toothpicks. By November of two thousand fifteen he had collected a series of these beard photos and a reporter from buzzfeed interviewed for story. The article coincidentally came out the day. Okay before his ten year high school reunion which he thought about skipping. I was really hesitant because people have done things and like they're working regular jobs they are married and have kids and like what do I have. You know I was what twenty eight I feel like. I haven't accomplished anything at this time. Caroline did you go to your high school reunion being in no did you. Yeah I I still have really good friends from high school so I thought it was Super Fun but I totally get it. If you don't don't WanNa go but it sounded like he wanted to go. He just needed a confidence booster and that oddly enough came from his

Facial Hair Justin NFL Saga Guy Thomas Movember East Asia Prostate Cancer San Bernardino California Chang Movember Foundation Johnny Depp Denver Buzzfeed Tennessee Tony Stock Goatee Texas Denver Broncos
Boston Symphony Orchestra Cancels East Asia Tour Over Coronavirus Concerns

WBZ Afternoon News

00:40 sec | 6 months ago

Boston Symphony Orchestra Cancels East Asia Tour Over Coronavirus Concerns

"Better the Boston Symphony Orchestra says they didn't want to do this but the BSO is now cancelled its upcoming tour of Asia because of concerns about the corona virus orchestra CEO mark will be telling WBZ newsradio toys take two plus years to plan so it's it's not an easy decision to cancel and there's certainly I just met with good number the players you know there is still sadness and disappointment and yet disassembling tore you know especially when it took three years to build is very complicated so so we we obviously first focus on on that and all the communications in Asia well who alone talking to the good people of Boston says they decided to scrub the trip after trying to cancel their planned Shanghai

Boston Symphony Orchestra Asia Boston Shanghai CEO WBZ
Leaders: Seondeok

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:35 min | 6 months ago

Leaders: Seondeok

"Today. We're heading back to early seventh at Century Korea to talk about the first queen of the peninsula and the second recorded female ruler in East Asian. History meet Queen Seon Deok of Silica. Ah Seon Deok was born around the year. Five Ninety five to Queen Maya and King jin-pyng of Silla Silla one of three kingdoms made up. What became known as Korea? It was located on the southern and central Korean Peninsula. Seon Deok father ruled the kingdom for fifty fifty eight years Seok had at least one sister but no brothers when it was time for him to pick an air her father eventually chose Seon Deok. It wasn't unheard of for a woman to control power in Silla as regent but in the year six thirty two seond yet came the first woman to sit on. The top seed need a power. She was the kingdom's twenty-seventh rule when she ascended to the throne. Sylla was in a good spot. The Kingdom was flourishing from in the beginning of her reign Queen Seon Young proved to be a caring and concerned leader of people in a historical record of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. She was described Abdallah's generous benevolent wise and smart after rising to power inventory of what was happening in her kingdom. I sending inspectors throughout her dominion to take stock of and care for the vulnerable including the poor the elderly and orphans in her. First Year of rule she also sent a diplomatic like mission to emperor ties zone of the tongue dynasty of China despite her friendly overtures the emperor fuse to recognize the new sovereign of Silla because of Her Gender Still Queen Seon pressed on with continual efforts to try to improve the lots of people in her second year of rule a a stargazing tower was built. The observatory is actually still standing. It's considered the oldest building of its kind in East Asia. Wean Seond Yok also pulled move. That's made politicians popular with their people throughout time. She slashed taxes entirely for peasants and reduced taxes in the middle class. Unsurprisingly these efforts were very popular among the people of Silla Queen. Seon tried again that second year to send tribute to the Chinese Chinese emperor. He still wasn't into it and refuse to acknowledge her position. Eventually he gave in and clean CR and the tongue dynasty even formed an alliance against the neighboring kingdoms trying to encroach on Silla under Queen. Seon deacs rule the arts and sciences prospered. She was a Buddhist and also oversaw the rebuilding of many temples. One particularly notable building project completed during the reign was the temple of the illustrious dragon. The Finnish Pagoda on the site was nine stories tall making it one of the tallest structures in East Asia at the time the temple also had a very a large statue of the Buddha despite the fact that Seon Deok had managed to ally with the Tang Dynasty at one point the emperor was part of her eventual demise around the year. Six forty seven. A group of Sylla's aristocrats led a rebellion against Queen. Seon Deok because they didn't approve of having a queen on the throne. The group group was backed. By the tongue. Dynasty Queen Seon Deok died during the rebellion. She was succeeded by her cousin. Another queen it's likely annoyed. It those who fought to try to get a woman off the Throne

Queen Seon Deok Silla Queen Silla Silla Queen Seon Seon Deok Queen Seon Young Seon Deacs Queen Maya Century Korea East Asia Seond Yok Sylla Korean Peninsula Tang Dynasty Abdallah Seok China Finnish Pagoda
Inside the Data of Loyalty

Dots, Lines & Destinations

06:46 min | 7 months ago

Inside the Data of Loyalty

"To run the enrich loyalty program at Malaysia Airlines ominous. No longer doing that but has done that. And a lot of other bits in the space before and agreed I believe I have several beers in Singapore maybe the most expensive production episode ever but agreed to sit and chat a little bit today about some of the stuff you've seen in the industry over the years and sort of where it's going on so welcome thank you go for. You had to look on your face. Ace We're GONNA say something hell. It was just an added to the introduction. There were a bunch of a bunch of guys who we've we've all been in. Senior management allies will run out of career. Sixteen or the world of experience there. It's kind of cool to share was happening in different parts of the world because we worked in in South East Asia would never ever woken mold. America it's good that you bring that up because we've had these conversations at conferences never in North American that I think about it but we don't have something to you in London. Asia sort of China China. Yeah we've had some of these chance but how different is loyalty. Globally like is are there people like in Europe. That are listen to this podcast. Every week. It'd be like talking about. We have to get America. Also say that about us but when we talk about largest offer is is it. Is it really that different. I think so. I mean I think most of us are going to send. The Lati- is traditionally is credit. Cards programmes elite status. Airline lounges. Sort of stuff is the is the shiny cards. It's the mouse. And especially North America's Israeli driven by interchange of the banks which is not regulated down like it is in a lot of Southeast Asian countries Europe's regulated down. And so just I understand. That's the one nice. Try Card my Visa Card. The merchant pays to three or four percent to the bank. The bank gives me some of that back in terms of points shepherd and in the rest of the world world outside North America. Basically that you can't get percent you get two different countries different breaches your point. Four percent which is is virtually nothing Malaysia. where I live is the one percent Australia? Singapore where we are now is is is not regulated yet so a lot of that drives the credit card and the bank loyalty usage airline miles with the bank the more likely to fly the more invested in the program for Sunday. You're building a new Mazda balanced pasta than you. Otherwise would if you adjust flying so it's catching people people that are not necessarily frequent flyers maybe consensus so this is really big in America. Where your ability to earn miles is greatly increased compared into other regions therefore the way you look at the way in Iraq with a part on the way you fly the whole? The Monchique is different to Southeast Asia. Especially taxation his Asia low cost airlines has ruled supreme in Asia Asia. Massive is a very strong radio program could be better. I think After better you sort of made the argument that if you've got the loyal customers loyal Gio Brandon anyways. You've got you've got the so you've got the service that they like you've got the rap structure they like and you're in theory chief does the points matter Devil Delta another airline where people people generally like the product a lot Ted. This pretty good operationally. You can rely on the good strong brandon pretty solid. They have drastic changes in the market. And it's like you fly lie Delta Gouzer Goodell on going pretty good always law towers. There's American Hilas. The loyalty program is kind of pulling passengers passengers along. It's it's the it's the leading product I have it's issues and so you can you can you can get over some delays. You can get over. You know bad food you can get over. Average lounges. If there's an awesome those who program because that's kind of making you forget things. Yeah it's a bit of a different strategy fully and in southeast Azazel follow cost airlines. Do they need to program. I mean they they will do deals with banks gala points and cash into the business high margin cash as well local state aligns margin news. Everything is so co Grande Caccia. They look and feel of instances and automatic debit cards BRANCHVILLE. It's interesting I mean. Here's Singapore here in Malaysia about Malaysia. Okay 'cause it's interesting that there is a debit card with the regulated regulated interchange. And they looking for one mile per dully spend it might be get this cod And so again in relation to the Asia he paid of has for two prepaid mastercard. And when you use pay day you get like the discounts on baggage and transaction fees on the website is different top of okay. So you're not you're loyalty isn't the points it's direct it's branding than its direct discount on these stuff should be a frequent traveler. Okay so yeah yeah. I mean I could argue that especially in this market or what. I what I think of as the el-sisi market in Asia which may be completely wrong. The value of free checked bags EXC is greater than the value of points. I could collect for our future flight when I bought my tickets around. I flew from Hanoi. Kale to see you Days ago I I paid a hundred and twenty dollars all into that ticket which was expensive. You know an area checkoff whatever three and a half hours probably barely covered the house but it was eighty eighty dollars in on about seventy five or eighty dollars for the fair and then had to check a bag. That was really heavy. So twenty five dollars for the bag ten dollars or eight dollars for the seats maybe lesson. I couldn't get into the hot seat but not the actual offseason by eight dollars for the seats farmers row to not bulkhead not baulk road to so they're hot hot seats. So you're at the front of the plane but they don't have after legroom. Save costs a possible fast off in an empty metal and I appreciate your sh sh- blessed the meals so in fact I had better food. The British business zero to two meals on Airasia of another ten dollars so I think that altogether got me to my one twenty-five but if my backseat was my half and I was saving ten dollars goes on every flight I took. That would be more valuable to me than the points. I could have earned on an eighty dollars ticket right Earn rates that you get in the states with five dollar. Eighty four hundred points nominally. That's about four dollars of points. Maybe six you get a good redemption. I get ten every time for half price bag. Actually better value. Being Loyalty Program is revenue earning as well and it does a good job of keeping loyal to Air Asia specifically not even us and our partners and and and third party whatever. So That's interesting. It's sort of goes back to the. Is it really that different here. And we've come a long way around and say maybe you're

Asia Southeast Asia America Singapore Malaysia Airlines Gio Brandon Asia Asia Air Asia North America Europe Mazda Grande Caccia Gouzer Goodell Hanoi China China Malaysia Australia
U.S. Strike That Killed Soleimani Leaves Questions About Fallout

WSJ What's News

06:08 min | 7 months ago

U.S. Strike That Killed Soleimani Leaves Questions About Fallout

"Trump ordered an air strike in Iraq overnight that killed a powerful Iranian military leader Kacem Sulejmani. President trump spoke about the strike and remarks from his mar-a-lago resort. This afternoon. We took action last night to stop a war. We did not take action to start a war. I have deep respect for the Iranian people. They are a remarkable people with an incredible heritage Gen unlimited potential. We do not seek regime change. However the Iranian regime's aggression in the region including the use of proxy fighters riders to stabilize? Its neighbors must end in a must end now. But Iran has vowed revenge for the airstrike the. US Embassy in Iraq has urged all all American citizens to leave the country immediately and the US is planning to send an additional thirty five hundred troops to the region. Joining me now from Washington is National Security reporter Warren Strobel Warren. What can you tell us about what you've learned about? The factors that led to president trump's decision to launch this strike. I think in the first instance it was the death of a US contractor A week ago today and a military base in Iraq trump sort of drawn a red line regarding Ron's actions and that red line being deaths of Americans and so that happened that led to retaliatory strikes Last weekend a Sunday by the United States and then the siege of embassy in Baghdad over this past week and from there the US they had good intelligence on pseudomonas movements and they are saying without providing a lot of detail all that he was planning to oversee massive series of operations against US interests. That would have Killed Lots of Americans and that's why they acted now the. US had declared declared the group that Sulejmani commended the cubs forces a terrorist group. Did that designation play any role here in authorizing the president to carry out this strike. There has been some conversation about whether whether or not it was legal to proceed without congressional approval. Yeah there's the administration has not sort of laid out yet What it's legal reasoning is or the legal legal rationale for doing this? One could argue that it was self defense which is allowed by the UN Charter and U. N. Resolutions Sion's and I think generally by international law. But they haven't sort of gone into detail beyond saying this was legal. This was legal. I think you know the fact that the cuts force was named a terrorist organization Organization of designated terrorist organization could be part of that but I think the primary rationale here is if they acted to prevent the deaths of more Americans and others in preventing terrorist attack. What can you tell us about the reaction in Washington today? The strike took place overnight. You know the reaction has been very mixed I don't think you have anybody not either on the Republican or Democratic side whose morning Qassem so the money and he's been a factor in the region for years and has killed a lot of Americans and advanced. Iran's is interest in Iraq Syria Lebanon Yemen and beyond but there does seem to be a partisan split with the Republicans very much supporting this. The Democrats grads supporting the action but asking questions like what's the legal rationale. Why wasn't Congress briefed beforehand? What's our strategy for dealing with our allies and most importantly perhaps was their strategy for dealing with any Iranian response and retaliation which is almost certain to come at some stage keeping in mind? We're less than twenty four hours from. I'm this as we're speaking. How does this change you as policy regarding Iran and Iraq where this strike took place? I think there's three possible places where this will impact the first. I is the fight against Isis where there had been some tacit cooperation between running back forces in Iraq and the US led coalition because the Iranians also very much oppose isis. And you could see a situation where that task cooperation goes away and Islamic state is. It's not the way it was with with the Caliphate but it is starting to slowly regenerate and parts of Iraq. So that's worrisome. The second impact is the US relationship with Iraq which I think officials shows have told us and analysts is very worse. Because there's talk now of moves within the parliament or the Iraqi government to Force US troops out the argument being that the the US action against the demonic violated the terms of the US presence there so you could see a situation where the US presence in Iraq is reduced or eliminated entirely in who benefits benefits from that while Iran does then Iran question the third place where impacts on us around relations. It's really hard to tell at. This point spoke with a few analysts who believe that Iran will take its time retaliating. They don't rush to retaliate. The calibrate their responses. And so you could see just as the months go by weeks and months go by ahead of us. More of the sort of shadow war tit for tat without blowing up into a full-scale armed conflict which I don't think either side wants and Iran has said it will retaliate. Anything anything else you can tell us about what we can expect in the next few days and weeks. Well I mean Iran has so many options to retaliate The retaliate talk with the cyber attack. They could retaliate by getting the groups. The militia groups that they back in Iraq to attack US troops in US bases. They could do things in the Persian Gulf. That would you know tax shipping that would interrupt the flow of oil raise the cost of shipping or they could They have done operations ends in Bulgaria and Argentina and South East Asia so they could buy their time and reach out at some point in the unspecified future to attack. US Embassy or diplomats in far our phone corners of the world. So I wouldn't necessarily say we're going to see in Iranian response in the next day or two if we could. But I don't think that's a foregone conclusion and the next the other thing I think we'll see a lot of debate in Congress about authorizations of the use of force in whether there needs to be changes in the what's called the authorization for use of military force that covers us US operations Nine eleven that's Wall Street Journal National Security Reporter Warren Strobel joining me from Washington. Thank you so much Warren. Thanks pleasure

Iraq United States Iran Us Embassy Warren Strobel Warren President Trump Donald Trump Kacem Sulejmani Congress Washington Reporter Persian Gulf Warren Strobel South East Asia Un Charter Wall Street Journal Baghdad Cubs
"east asia" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

13:51 min | 8 months ago

"east asia" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"Strom. Seth and Lynn Kwok here in the the studio with me. Jonathan is the League when you chair in South East. Asian Studies at Brookings and Lynn is a senior research fellow at the University of Cambridge and Associate Fellow at the International Institute for Strategic Studies. Lynn Jonathan thanks. Happy to be here too. So even talking in this episode about China's efforts Birt's to consolidate control of its periphery and I talked to Richard Bush in the first half of the episode about Cross-strait Relations East China Sea. And so so we're going to get warmer head south for this part of the episode. Talk about the papers that Youtube road which deal with China's relationships in Southeast Asia and its activities titties in the South China Sea. I wanted to start off with you guys just with a simple question which is basically. What does China want? Why do Southeast East Asia and the South China Sea matter so much to Beijing? Jonathan Stewart. Sure I've had the opportunity to live and work in both China A and southeast Asia for many years. I was very struck when I moved from Hanoi to Beijing in the mid to thousands. About how sort of little interest. There was in Southeast Asia at that time among top think tanks and other experts who are experts on Asia for instance. When I go back now I'm just struck at how important Southeast Asia looms in the thinking of these folks who showed less interest when I was actually living in working there these would be at think tanks and universities in in Beijing and Shanghai and so on and so I sort of have thought? How did that change? What does that suggest in terms of China's current foreign policy priorities for Southeast Asia? And I think it's important to sort of see South East Asia within the rubric of China's neighborhood or peripheral diplomacy or generally and the way that as China is becoming a great power rising significantly in the world neighborhood. Diplomacy it's region and Southeast Asia. In particular alert has become kind of strategically indispensable in their own thinking in other words. How do they shape their own region as the process of rising in the region and more globally and I in that kind of sense see Southeast Asia as a testing ground or gateway for China's rise? More generally it's obviously maritime region so it's an opportunity for China to expand navy power also. It's made up of very diverse set of eleven countries and some are small some are medium. Some are very large in terms of population like Indonesia and so. I think it's an opportunity for China to have different informed of outreach and engagement that really could be a kind of barometer for how it's going to behave in the world more generally in the future great and land the of South East Asia is sort of the most important backyard that Beijing is paying attention to the South China Sea would be basically the gateway in and out. So how do you think about what Beijing's ambitions on its goals in the South China Sea. Well I think in determining what China wants in the South China Sea it's necessary to look at what China is doing the South China Sea. And I think in this respect we can look at two more categories of what it's doing. The first one is how it's consolidating aggressively consolidating its territorial claims so beginning December two thousand thirteen as we all know China began converting small rocks and reefs into large artificial islands began building facilities on them as well by the end up. Twenty seventeen China had naval and F- abilities in the South China Sea by two thousand eighteen. It was escalating. Its militarization of these features. Beijing repeatedly claims that it's entitled to do as it likes on its own servant territory but in fact these territories are hotly disputed and in the case of at least one feature. Aw has been found by an international tribunal to be a low tide elevation within the Philippines Exclusive Economic Zone and therefore within Philippines jurisdiction and control cool. So what China is doing is completely illegitimate in terms of its territorial claims but China has also sought to strengthen its maritime claims and control around features. So it's encroached on coastal states exclusive economic zones which fly in the face of the tribunal's ruling it's increased its presence around features with hundreds of vessels swarming areas around Philippines occupied features in the South China Sea and China has also been very adamant about objecting to the US and other warships exercising navigation other freedoms of the seas. What can we infer about what China wants from these actions now? I think it's quite it clear that it seeking to exclude other powers from itself from its backyard is also seeking to allow itself economic. Resources is which are not legitimate under the law so it seeking to encroach upon the economic resources of its coastal states and I think to a large extent it's also oh seeking to undermine. US credibility in the region it has presented the US with the federal complete by its artificial islands in the China Sea. And and I think you know in this respect not only does this gain China advantages of the South China Sea but more broadly in the region as well in so far as how it influences countries peace in the region or it's able to influence other countries in the region. Let me follow up on that. I can't because there's been some debate. In the scholarly community sense Lance China's island building campaign started about what the significance of these islands actually is for China. Is it simply creating a sense sense of pressure creating this sense of perhaps a complete that eventually the south China Sea we'll be ours and therefore smaller Southeast Asian countries and claimant's ought to essentially seed the ground now or is there actually a significant military advantage that Beijing accrues from having these islands as well. What's your perspective? Well one view is that the features or its basis in the South China Sea pretty vulnerable to a US aircraft aircraft ships and submarines and therefore. Really don't play much of a role in terms of military conflict that me certainly the case. However what we're anticipating for most of the time is really non military conflict so low level grey zone type conflict where there isn't kinetic force US and in this respect I think China has gained significant vacant advantages through its base in the South China Sea? I think Japanese Ministry of Defence Report found that China's Naven facilities in the South China Sea allow for a more robust maritime presence and boost China's intelligence surveillance reconnaissance and other mission capabilities. It was found that runways for aircraft improved China's ability okay to project airpower capabilities and possibly allow China to enforce an air defense identification zone. Should it declare one in the future but I think quite apart from military advantages in situations short of outright war China has also gleaned non the tree advantages from its actions that are often overlooked. And I've touched them earlier so one would be to undermine his credibility in the region and the other thing is well as of course to deter regional countries from putting up a strong resistance to China's claims Jonathan in terms of undermining. US credibility. When you look at what's been going on in the South China Sea and perhaps Southeast Asia more broadly? Are there specific things that you feel like have been particularly influential for Beijing in using to poke questions questions and how much commitment and credibility the United States has in the region to me. I think the South China Sea issue is critical to me. The the main storyline of the last year or two has really been China's expression of economic power in the region just as frankly speaking the the US economic strategy for the region seems to have been in retreat. I for instance we Got Out of TPP and there hasn't really been Effective give strategic follow up on the economic side since that time beyond sort of interest in free and reciprocal bilateral trade deals which not a lot. A lot of countries in the region seemed to be pining for I mean if I look at China's toolkit for Southeast Asia I think it's kind of balancing of hard power and soft power today. Hard power is as lind suggested is looking at these land reclamation and militarization efforts in the south China Sea as they try to enforce their Komo far-reaching nine-dash line throughout Southeast Asia soft power is economic engagement primarily through its belt and road initiative and other other forms for instance I really see China's ability increasing to achieve its strategic goals in the region through economic statecraft and that can have hard power element to it. Because it's not just inducements say it's also coercion at times but the region needs infrastructure. which is what beer is all about? `Bout B. R. I in Southeast Asia's focusing on hydropower dams oil and gas pipelines a high speed rail in mainland Southeast Asia which we call the Mai may Kong countries of Vietnam Thailand Cambodia Laos Myanmar. China has become particularly strong and influential economically. There's a saying I sometimes here in the region that we focus so much on the sea we forgot about the land and these things are inextricably intertwined so for instance stints China's building dams along the Mai Cong that could have a very severe effects on water flows in the Mai Cong Delta of Vietnam. So when you think about Vietnam Calculus on the South China Sea as the main frontline state and how they push back. If China in time has leverage to basically control water flows toward southern Vietnam that could create a different way of thinking among Vietnamese leaders in Hanoi. I would also say that while one has seen unease and some pushback in South East Asia over the Belton road initiative concern about financing lack of transparency. Too many Chinese workers for instance as opposed to having it more focusing on domestic priorities of the countries themselves I think increasingly UC Southeast Asian countries. Getting smarter in the way. They're negotiating with China. China has also learned from some of its mistakes and see kind of mutual learning dynamic at play that's likely to they may be more sustainable over the long term so in talking about China's toolkit. This was a conversation. Richard and I had earlier in the episode where where in discussing Taiwan he said Beijing sort of has this. Goldilocks strategy right. Military intervention. Probably don't want to have to go that route unless you're absolutely forced to positive inducements and persuasion doesn't seem to be working so instead we have something in the middle that's a mix this kind of intimidation a strategy that mixes both positive economic inducements alongside perhaps more coercive pressure techniques. And this is sort of what you're describing in Southeast Asia's which is well Jonathan one of the things I think that's been interesting to see as China looks at what levers it can pull is the use of of overseas Chinese and other kinds of efforts to influence domestic political situations in countries countries to help them align more with Beijing's perspective. How have you seen this play out in Southeast Asia well officially for decades China a has had a policy of non-interference in the domestic affairs of other countries? But I do think they are engaging in ways that we haven't seen in the past just one example of this in South East Asia which is really still trying to figure out where this is going but is China's effort to re-engage with the each Chinese diaspora in the region and it's huge there's over thirty million quote unquote overseas Chinese. Many of them have lived there for decades and are almost fully or are fully integrated or assimilated that seventy percent of the world's total. When I was doing some interviews in China in the summer of two thousand eighteen gene and that was around the time when the Communist Party was shifting the Office of Overseas Chinese affairs which was basically in the central central government into the United Front Agency of the Communist Party which to other people suggests southeast? Asians there's a mobilization national element that may be coming and we do see more engagement. There's official talk of overseas Chinese. Being the bridge that helps implement successfully really the belt and road initiative in the region. This isn't a perspective that I think most overseas Chinese in Southeast Asia actually welcome They've been in some countries countries like Indonesia suspected of dual loyalties in the past. And that kind of thing and so they're quite concern. This is what I think of. As a sort of tripwire fire for China in the region it is more effective and I think getting more sophisticated in some ways but this is sort of blind spot that could be very toxic. Can I think provoked quite a backlash. If they're not very very careful could blow up and see some of the backlash that you have against some of the B. R. I.. Projects as well. I think so. Uh Lynn in talking about Beijing's toolkit in this sort of like coercion strategy. I think in the South China Sea. What's interesting is you can see and watch over.

South China Sea China South East Asia Beijing Cross-strait Relations East Ch China Sea Lance China Lynn Jonathan US East Asia Asia South East Indonesia Lynn Philippines Hanoi Youtube Richard Bush International Institute for St
"east asia" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"east asia" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Over to the East Asia. We have plenty of water on the roads to one south of sixteen four, they'd be closed down around one AM after water on the road forced several rescues, potentially blockbuster claimed from President Trump pay told ABC news last night. The F B I in his words orchestrated a setup to prevent him from becoming president, and he also accused President Obama of knowing about it. I would say that he certainly must have known about it, because it went very high up in the chain, I'm not going to make that statement quite. Yet, but I would say that President Obama had to know about it. The president says attorney general William bar is now investigating allegations that Democrats in the FBI pushed the use of opposition research paid for by the Hillary Clinton campaign to start the whole Russian collusion investigation. Senate Tonio city council this week will be considering a major initiative to fight. What's called the intimate partner violence and issue that burst onto the forefront during the recent mayoral race. It's called a comprehensive strategy involved, not just the cubs. But the businesses religious leaders annotation communities, one in three Texas women will be the victim of domestic violence in their lifetime at figure much higher in bear county after proposal after hearing a proposal to put video game competitions on the same level as high school sports in Texas. The u I l is listening. They've decided to formally study the possibility of sank. Meaning what are called e sports, the multiplayer games, have become pretty big business with even port San Antonio looking into setting up an arena. The ports will Garrett says that e sports really is growing rapidly. We've seen high schools within formal intermural teams sprout up, we've seen various as they call him cyber cafes or land cafes around town, where Gamerson go. He ends the UAL sanctions E sports. It could set up divisions just like football. And there could be state champions, Texas now on the line with all other states allowing breweries to sell beer to customers who can then take it home governor Greg Abbott over the weekend. Signed the beer to go Bill. He signed it not only inside a brewery, but with a six pack of beer, right on his lap brewing.

president President Obama Trump Texas East Asia Greg Abbott ABC Hillary Clinton Garrett San Antonio Gamerson Senate FBI partner cubs William bar football attorney
"east asia" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"east asia" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"I mean, it certainly been described by its critics as having the potential to build political influence that would have potentially negative or more authoritarian leaning governance effects in southeast Asia. Would you say that in the years ahead that this is a accurate criticism? Or is it too early to tell whether Chinese economic statecraft will be accompanied by political influence, so I think it's really a very fluid situation right now, we've definitely seen examples where I think a massive influx of Chinese investment and lending has tended to increase corruption or shield. Authoritarian leaders from political accountability. In the region. It's also generated you know, kind of a backlash, and we're kind of watching that right now as some countries are reexamining their contracts with China. There's growing concern about debt traps, and it is actually affecting domestic political developments in Malaysia 's election last year, Dr Mahatir defeated prime Minister Najib in part by openly campaigning against Chinese influence, and there's some concern about that now in the Indonesian electoral campaign as well. But it seems also that most countries seem interested in continuing to take Chinese money. And I don't think we should under estimate kind of China's capacity to learn as well and learn from their implementation mistakes with and figure out how to put together contracts that Mabel have a little more, durability and sustainability and development and infrastructure spending. In the broader context seems to become a tool of competition. One could say between the United States, China and others such as Japan. In the region. Jonathan what do you see is the United States doing in response in terms of its economic policies, its investment and infrastructure spending in the region to perhaps dilute the power of Chinese economic statecraft in southeast Asia. Roy think very clearly the Trump administration has launched what they call a free and open Indo Pacific strategy in the region, sometimes called Foyt is a bit of a tongue twister of an acronym and openly identifies China as a strategic competitor. It says that Beijing is seeking Indo Pacific regional hegemony through things like predatory economics, for instance. But at route this strategy seems to be an it has a lot of antecedents in Japanese policy as well. I think Maria come in on that. But it is ultimately at route American security strategy that offers a kind of counterbalance to China in that particular domain in the South China Sea Indian Ocean..

China southeast Asia South China Sea Indo Pacific United States Malaysia Beijing Maria Mabel Japan Dr Mahatir Foyt Roy Minister Najib
"east asia" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"east asia" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"They're going rivalry. I think that a steady hand looks more and more appealing. So it'll be interesting to see in coming years, whether Japan does continue using its economic way to advance these both trade, but also just rules based agreements moving forward and in East Asia. So when it comes to the issue of growing rivalry between the United States and China, Jonathan how do you see these dynamics is growing competition of influence between the United States and China playing out in southeast Asia are good question. And as Maria has already pointed out Japan plays, a very large economic role in the region of very large generally, and we could perhaps come back to that. But I think the talk of the region now is really China's dramatic rise and China has different tools in its tool kit. But I think economic statecraft is the one that most people are thinking about an observing and by that I mean, it's employees kind of combination of economic inducements sometimes coercion. To advance strategic objectives in the region, and the main platform for this the example that everybody's talking about is the belt and road initiative. It has an estimated value of something like a trillion dollars, and it's really an ambitious effort to strengthen infrastructure trade and investment between China and other countries starting in Asia and really now globally in southeast Asia. That means railways ports pipelines Malaysia, Indonesia have been particularly big recipients. China's also investing a lot in mainland southeast Asia or the six countries along the make con- Cambodia Laos Myanmar Thailand, Vietnam along with China. And so that's really where a lot of their influence is growing as their against supporting infrastructure there, especially hydropower. And so for instance, in Cambodia Beijing has become a real staunch supporter of the Hudson regime, which in turn has been supporting Chinese position say on this health China Sea at Ozzy on meet. Ting's and went Ozzy on tries to make consensus statements. It's complicated that process quite a bit. China's also the largest source of foreign direct investment, and the largest aid donor now to Cambodia I've seen it reported that its aid to Cambodia for instance, it's now about four times that of the United States. So you see a little bit of that imbalanced growing. But I think when you look at China's growing role in south East Asia, there is a lot of talk about how China might be affecting domestic political trends, Xi Jinping did talk at the nineteen th party congress about China being a new model of sorts for countries wanting to speed up their development, he was short statement. But it certainly has gained a lot of attention. When I look at this, though, I tend to think that Chinese efforts may be reinforcing or encouraging kind of pre existing authoritarian trends like in Cambodia or perhaps inhibiting democratic consolidation in countries like me on mar, but it's hard to see whether they're really pro. Actively say promoting a Chinese model in particular. I think the evidence is still anecdotal on that point. So put another way, I think China seems more interested in expanding its influence, particularly in mainland southeast Asia than it isn't sort of transforming domestic political structures of individual countries. So would you say to continue on this conversation about China's belt road initiative?.

China southeast Asia East Asia Cambodia Asia Cambodia Beijing Japan United States Xi Jinping Maria Ozzy Malaysia Myanmar Ting Indonesia Vietnam Thailand trillion dollars
"east asia" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

The Brookings Cafeteria

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"east asia" Discussed on The Brookings Cafeteria

"President Trump is very skeptical of alliances and a free-trade those are the foundations of Asia, stability and prepared. And what will be the end result of this will he undermine undercut the alliance structure in the region. Will we divert to situation of rampant? Protectionism is not just a tit-for-tat trade war, which but the fact that he has invoked national security to impose tires on our treaty, allies and our closest partners. So how all plays out in the region? And what are the consequences is something that we really have to keep an eye on. And what's interesting about both of your remarks about the dynamics the democratic internal dynamics within southeast Asian northeast, Asian countries and the geopolitical. Currence at play really show that East Asia in many ways will be at the forefront in coming years of this struggle for democracy in the new geopolitics and this contested international arena. So it's interesting to see how these dynamics both internal and external are playing out so Maria in your paper for the democracy series on Japan, you write that compared to other advanced democracies in the west afflicted by rising, populism the Japanese polity appears in good health. How do you think Japan has been able to escape the deep polarization of populism and the temptation of economic nationalism that has made inroads elsewhere and particularly in Europe. During the past six years. Depend has enjoyed political stability moderate economic expansion and stepped up its diplomatic game. And this sharp contrast to what was happening in Japan just a few years ago where every year you would have a different prime minister where the country has been gripped by deflation for the longest time this relatively strong performance Japan over the past six years is also sharp contrast, you're saying Tori with the United States and the UK who've been gripped by polarising divisions at home that have profound consequences for their international role. The United Kingdom breaking away from the peon Union United States distancing itself from Malta lateralism. So I think this is really a fascinating question. Why has in these populist fever taking over Japan deciding its future in the way in which it seems to be happening in industrialized west very complex question. And there's not just one factor. Just highlight very briefly. Three elements that I think very important one is that the globalization of China has not generated the same backlash in Japan that has generated in the United States or other industrialized countries. Japan has very much been impacted by China's emergence as is huge expert powerhouse. But you do not have the debate that we've had here about the so called China trade shock people in Japan are not blaming China for the loss of factories for the loss of employment, and this has to do with the very complimentary pattern of international trade with these two countries and that has to do with the global supply chain. So very interestingly regions, independent rate more intensively China report job growth, not jobless. So I think that's an important element. The second has to do with income inequality again, another major grievance driving populist movements in the West Japan has seen levels of income inequality rise, but the drivers are different Japan. Not have the so called one percent for nominee. You do not have this extreme concentration of wells in the upper echelons of society. So that also creates very different dynamics and the last element has to do with political competition, then years ago Japan embarked on an experiment when the opposition party who was running on an anti stash -ment compaign finally won.

Japan West Japan President Trump China United States East Asia Asia peon Union United States United Kingdom Europe Maria prime minister Tori Malta six years one percent
"east asia" Discussed on Probably Science

Probably Science

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"east asia" Discussed on Probably Science

"So what are the tesla drivers posted a picture of this laser particle counter? They have inside and outside of their tesla and outside and they live in the bay area. They're getting bad air from the paradise, California. Fires okay. Outside of the car. They were getting reading of one oh five pm two point five which is the same metric using the tesla test. What does that Stanford? You know, Matt it's not is it possible million. But what is the two point five part? I do not micrograms per meters cubed. Anyway, this this number of air quality or high thing is bad went from one. Oh, five outside of tesla to to incite. Well, I wonder if you could make that into a personal unit you could put over your head. Just like, you know, how in in south East Asia, they were medical max, trying stop the actually I I've learned from a friend of mine from southeast Asia. It's actually to stop them from giving. A lot of times someone an airport. It's like they're sick day. Don't want it. They don't or they're doing it. Anyway, just in case the, but you could make a unit like that. That's just a personal fresh air unit. Just and it's covering your face. But you can read the number on their face. Yeah. No, just covering the face and stopping them from you. So you just go straight to the because that's on a car to keep you inside the car. But why wouldn't you just have around one hundred mouth, I guess just gas masks at that point. Right. I guess fancy gas masks. I guess we could call them fancy gas masks. Tesla fancy gas masks. Every purchase you get a tesla. Fancy gas masks. Recent tweets was. Jumped into the fray to offer his help with the fires. Okay. We are two days away. Culling firefighters pedophile. Right. Submarine ago, we should use this. He'll on told you talking to work. Musk. Sorry. Ruining your. Yeah. This'll be the last episode. Oh when you got paid for. Iran coup. Oh, we'll put a link to the patriots as well. On the in the show nights. We should do that. Do you like the you guys? Get a sponsor speaking of free headphones. You get a sponsor for patriot tequila. Oh, Oh, no. no. You're You're not not. you guys are. Yeah. Patriot. Okay. Never mind scratch that the same concepts. I mean, it's the same origin. If someone who's contributing to your patriot is a patron or. Is your you become extremely drunk. Great particular, though, it is good what color or what what do you?.

tesla patriots California East Asia southeast Asia patriot Stanford Matt Iran two days
"east asia" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"east asia" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"You're just hoping it's up there or there's a satellite taking a picture of me right now. Well, just hoping. Yeah. Because we're hoping that the schedule, you know, the the sort of regular habit would catch somebody's eye because I only had an opportunity to to do it. Maybe twice a day going to the bathroom in the middle of middle of the after noon that that would work, but my my I piss in the morning and my last piss in the evening around honor does. Those were -tunities, and I thought well if I do this regularly for long enough somebody will figure it out and come in trying to see what's going on. How long were you on this boat? And how did you keep from going insane? Well on the boat. It was okay. The ship on the ship had plenty of company, you know, it was a crew of twenty guys from East Asia. And we we didn't necessarily speak to each other in the same language, but there wasn't onboard pigeon hole sort of language that they've cobbled together. So we could communicate a little bit. They're five Filipinos who spoke English. And so we had friends we had rolling. I had had people we could socialize with. And although it was extremely boring and frustrating wasn't solitary confinement. But once I jumped and they they brought me on onto the shore afterwards than it was solitary confinement. And that's where I had to actually guard against going insane. Yeah. So I feel like I would try to learn so Molly or try to study a language that language some thing or my brain would just rust. Yeah. I did since a a bunch of the sailors spoke Chinese I did learn a little bit of Chinese on the ship but on on land. I didn't really wanna take some Ali lessons from my guards. I think I've lived in a Berlin. And you know, when when east Germans were being educated in what was basically a Russian system and had to learn Russian some of them rebelled, didn't, you know?.

East Asia Berlin Ali Molly
"east asia" Discussed on Ologies

Ologies

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"east asia" Discussed on Ologies

"Katherine Chavez, Tobias, Milton Olaf Dasche key and Anna commercial Bach all asked essentially the same question. Like, what can I do? Besides just recycling? What's the simplest daily change? We can make like what's one thing we can all focus on what can we do know? So there's there's a ton we can do, like the choices that you make as a citizen and consumer have a massive impact on this sort of thing, and they can actually help to stop environmental destruction happening in other parts of the world. And so one example of that single use plastics are just generally a bad idea all the time and things like styrofoam, things that can't be recycled. If you know by stopping doing that by using reusable waddles bringing your own bags, you can actually make a massive impact on on that problem. Eating less red meat is always a really good thing. Red meat actually has a pretty. Massive impact on the environment. Being more of a vegetarian is actually very helpful to do that sort of stuff, and also like buying products that don't have palm oil in them. So if you were to look on the back of a lot of candies or other products, processed products in stores, they have palm oil in them and palm oil largely comes from these plantations in in south East Asia, where they've, they've basically cut down a lot of the rainforests and made these plantations and it's putting, you know, ring attains in all sorts of animals at risk as a result of the stuff that they're doing. So for more on this, you can catch all Ogies episode number two on Primatology. So I think just by being a smarter consumer and picking better options, there's there's a lot that you can end up doing in helping. Do you think we're going to look back and be like, oh my God, so much plastics in which meet what were we doing? Right? My mom told me a story once when she went to the obstetrician when she was pregnant with one of us, I can't remember and the her doctor was smoking and. We look back and really that wouldn't even that would be like over the top. If you saw that like in a comedy sketch, like are we going to look back and be like my God? I'm used to order things from Amazon, and it would get shipped to us in a big truck billowing smoke in carbon, and then we'd open it up and then we throw away a bunch of plastic for like a little tiny item year. Are we going to be appalled? We are one hundred percent going to be appalled, and I think like, you know, future humans will look back on our generation to say, what were they thinking, right? Yeah, that's just absurd. I mean, we're at the point now where we know better. Yeah, and the only way things are going to change is if people demand that it changes, and so that's that's why each person's opinion matters. That's why these little acts can actually make a massive impact when the entire country is doing it right. Then we can force these companies to stop using these stupid methods to do things right. I remember when they banned plastic bags in LA, everyone knew it was coming. It was like, oh, man. Sure enough to bring him bags in a grocery store men. Now, it's so commonplace right at keep a bunch of canvas bags of trunk because I don't want to be that asshole in the front of the line. That's like load me up with all the plastic. You've got, you know, like you just adjust and other patron by the name of Larry ward himself, a fishing vest aficionado. Also my dad, and thus your grandpa asked about photovoltaics and hydropower and what kind of batteries need to be developed to really make the best use of those forms of renewable energy? I love solar. I think solar is fantastic..

Larry ward Anna commercial Bach Katherine Chavez East Asia Milton Olaf Dasche Primatology Amazon LA Tobias one hundred percent Milton
"east asia" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"east asia" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"I just want to pick up on some of your expansion plans for i know you've been pushing quite aggressively because the domestic growth story turkey is pretty much done there no more airports to serve what are some of the new markets that you're targeting what's what's exciting the pipeline yes thank you actually before we gone to new markets new markets i'd like to we have already announced it two months ago but we have just signed a deal so we have acquired as fifty percents of anti airport's shares which is a very important for us because antiaids as the second airport after its tumbling terms of international passenger numbers in turkey so this will be a good addition to our portfolio and the closing is to happen within this week hopefully in terms of new markets we are region is middle east eastern europe africa and we continue to look at new opportunities in these regions now we're waiting for new tenders in sofia bulgaria montenegro nigeria also in east east asia and these are the markets we are looking at very closely and we have some continuing deals as well we hope to be able to start operations and cuba within this year and finalize the documentation and ask you when you operate women you start the operations in cuba we are aiming for the by the end of this year so it's taken a little bit longer than we thought because the privatization is the first for cuba and privatization of airports is a big thing so there's no issues it continues it will be in place by the end of the year what about saudi arabia i know that that is actually one of the stronger markets you're pushing into how much progress really making their i mean how how what's the feedback been so far how's it shaping up to be yes in saudi arabia as you know we are operating medina airport for the past five years and we're very happy with the performance of it it's a p p p and the government is very happy with the performance so they wanted to replicate the success of medina airport in other airport privatizations that's how we won the three other airport qasim yamba and how the process is continuing it had slowed down a little bit because of the issue general issues in saudi not specific to the.

turkey eastern europe sofia bulgaria montenegro nige east asia cuba saudi arabia qasim yamba africa medina five years two months
"east asia" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"east asia" Discussed on Here & Now

"During south korea no assistant secretary for east asia you start to get a better picture there look also to the fact that we're entering the 17th year of a conflict in afghanistan to we have an assistant secretary who's responsible for that region who can help with the details and the complicated nuances of how the conflict is playing out what kind of postconflict stabilization we want to have and then look just at the news of yesterday and today the decision to recognize jerusalem and move our embassy there has already sparked violence in the west bank almost every country around the world with the exception of israel but across the arab world across all of europe to include the pope has opposed this decision how did we get here and how are we going to navigate forward and i have to add the state department is so scrambling to set up task forces today they put out a worldwide security alert they believe that our embassies and our personnel are at much greater risk and were doing all of that with diminished staffing and diminished resources mitzi macaroni what are the longterm consequences of this is the kind of thing what's happening at the state department that let's say that a 'nother president comes in with a different secretary of state with different priorities that they can just reverse all of these moves by the trump administration in all will be as it was if only it were so easy and here's one of the things that people have to understand the state department is a career service we bring in diplomats and it takes years for people to become really expert in a region of the world learn how to speak the language fluently uh we've often sad in order to get a real expert in.

assistant secretary east asia jerusalem israel europe president south korea afghanistan secretary of state
"east asia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"east asia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"By brown what about leases voicemail i wonder what you're seeing in terms of our shifting views on the ivory trade and on trophy hunting that posts three hub all schools apart uh what lisa articulated in the to you is very much uh the list to view the view that many of us than ngos advocate and try to uh impasse also on consumers in east asia east asia by and large has been uh the largest consumer of wildlife uh oba checked broadly s certainly from i worry about beyond i've already now consumer demands are not limited to east asia that are very robust consumer demand in africa for a variety of uh wildlife products us about us in latin america as and as they just articulate that also in the west certainly historically much of the elephant declines even five broad the numbers than dose that uh you mentioned joe was was driven by western demand from blend western colonizer just came into africa until about of the 1970s than japan became a big consumer oh by lorry and then finally in the 1990s bit purchasing power potted did i think in china so these demands have uh shifted around uh nonetheless that his it'll be differences in opinion in africa for many uh native populations in africa and imos i've seen as something to be utilized that is also prime but really it w w in east asia and only recently that have been efforts as well as actual changes uh in opinion in africa and also in east asia um well mr and conservation that's focused on preserving ecosystems and animals for their own sake for altruistic reasons to my your nature as it exist in the socalled natural state the dow which people will that with the uh killing of animals so destroying habitats is often seen as we western imposition that boots uh conservation less than conservation ahead of the economic interest and um economic progress of often very poor marginalize populations until although more than poaching the boetsch inglewood the past and yeah this is often dissociated be major um uh criminal enterprises and global supply chains populations out often billing participants uh in uh in that ching in indonesia actual trade it's interesting that you bring that up in terms of perspectives and.

ivory trade lisa east asia latin america joe japan china brown africa indonesia
"east asia" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"east asia" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"The end of world war two there's of course the fight against islamist extremism sure there's a lot of development on go in a saudi arabia now and so forth so this is a very very dynamic period and it's it's one in which you have a united states that is seemingly ambivalent at times about whether or not we should continue to leave the rulesbased international order that we help give birth to nfl sustained ever since the end of world war two yes we could do so much on the list for us to worry that in just over the past week saudi arabia i'll send became trying to understand kind of occurred to the palace if he well if you had to identify one area we think there will be increased tensions in 20 18 what do you think that will be there's a number of candidates and certainly the middle east these would be a prominent on that list spin that i think east asia cfc other obviously the big threat who voted to create the dog closest to this letter the wolf closest to the sled if he will is north korea that's the focus of the administration v effort on this trip in fact so far to japan to south korea now in china has been to get china's attention misses all about influencing president she who's just emerged of course from the nineteen th party congress stronger than ever he's been elevated to a status only achieved by mail in the past he's very solid in his position and the hope is that he will then be willing to put more pressure on north korea given that ninety percent of the trade to and from north korea goes her china you talked about the growth and it this is the changes in china over the last couple of decades do we understand what china wants to be going forward in terms of worldleader and and and meeting really controlling globalization if you will they've summit allowed sign averted his you enter the up do we really understand why producer all you have to do is look at his speech three and a half hours worth at the party congress he tighter that being open to everybody that send say that's not necessarily well case long as it sought facebook or.

world war saudi arabia united states north korea japan china president producer facebook nfl east asia south korea ninety percent
"east asia" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"east asia" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"It often hasbeen with strong engagement of the state in the economy which to be honest was also the case of america earlier i mean we tend to forget the government's played a very strong role in continues to play a very strong role in guiding economic development in the us not as strong as courses east asia but the state has always been engaged and i think as china's look to round it feels more comfortable with that kind of statist intervention and control that it sees having produce wealth in east asia but i think the one crucial difference is that when those processes were going forward in the rest of east asia they were yes protecting industries but eventually they were preparing them for competition particularly on the global stage that doesn't seem to be no less than that is taken on board yet beyond the economic issues that china faces five xi jinping's chinese dream certainly means a more pronounced role on the worlds stage china's traditionally ben rather reserved in its in its application of power beyond its shores but i now it seems there seems to be a desire to project power a bit more obviously we have a you know continually developing situation in north korea i dare have been tensions on the border with india are there ways here that xi jinping can kind of get tripped up before he even get started yes i think that's true but i think it's also the case that this process started before xi jinping took power.

economic development us china east asia india america
"east asia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"east asia" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Daily

"That sir it's it's extraordinary yes because of the population get the launder this is a phenomenon we have seen a in in japan musovic in korea need him starting to affected taiwan as well so this he said the north east asia a many smaller pouncer people are dying young people are leaving little neither an any more on the town's basically disappeared a house remained but noone user why is this happening well at the diminishes our job opportunities are very few in these places we have countries were populations declining or all too as such the decline and people who want jobs him off to to seoul in the case of korea talk and other big cities in in the case of japan so they make to the places where they can actually find the jobs that they won at the same time sees rally tokunaga all the people living in these towns for younger people listening to me no incentive for example touch a final in the tunnel this had to move somewhere else moving on now to japan and rice yes you punish actually trying to so rice to china which is actually the biggest rice market in the world this has proved very difficult in the past weaker states for example are different it is very expensive a japanese rice a jewish holy in china but we see canal for example of trying to sell what we could called prepackaged rice that would be sold us her safer option than rice said you might will to by united chinese market supermarket for this been a huge campaign behind this with lots and lots fasting handed out free all over the place yes both in japan to tennis tour is going to upon by the especially also a in china's especially in big cities were a consumers might be open to to buy these these by some i have the money actually.

taiwan east asia japan korea seoul rice united chinese market
"east asia" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"east asia" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Basically and of course as we go on in this into unity she's going to be a story about the rise of free trade the rise of near liberalism and the world trade organization and the world bank and stuff and that's the story of this strange half communist tough capitalist society massively pollinate signs of the people out of poverty which south is not a story that the seacock as go really are going to want to one of its hall what is there that's a really important point the the only places in the world where there have been really substantial gains and developments ends our progress against poverty and hunger have been china and east asia okay and the way they've managed this impressive progress is through a mix of kind of control over their own markets and and state interventions in the economy right now this is not to say they haven't liberalized of course they have but they've done so on their own terms as opposed to the rest of the global south where the world bank and the imf forcibly imposed a washington model of a sort of freemarket liberalism that ended up crashing per capita income rates and so on so the success of china in east asia is not at all a story of the success of the washington muddle of globalization is the success of of real sovereign control over a country's own markets and so it really does challenge the narrative of free marketeers and the imf and so on now if you take china and east asia out of the equation in what we see is even at the at the lowest possible poverty lines that the world bank offers we see that there's been no progress at all against global poverty and according to many measures poverty has been increasing so it changes destroy quite a bit a mass poverty we talking about mexico hung a say how is hunger mazhit so this is a really fascinating story hunger is another of the big indicators in the millennium development goals.

free trade china east asia imf mexico washington per capita washington
"east asia" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"east asia" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Basically and of course as we go on in this into unity she's going to be a story about the rise of free trade the rise of near liberalism and the world trade organization and the world bank and stuff and that's the story of this strange half communist tough capitalist society massively pollinate signs of the people out of poverty which south is not a story that the seacock as go really are going to want to one of its hall what is there that's a really important point the the only places in the world where there have been really substantial gains and developments ends our progress against poverty and hunger have been china and east asia okay and the way they've managed this impressive progress is through a mix of kind of control over their own markets and and state interventions in the economy right now this is not to say they haven't liberalized of course they have but they've done so on their own terms as opposed to the rest of the global south where the world bank and the imf forcibly imposed a washington model of a sort of freemarket liberalism that ended up crashing per capita income rates and so on so the success of china in east asia is not at all a story of the success of the washington muddle of globalization is the success of of real sovereign control over a country's own markets and so it really does challenge the narrative of free marketeers and the imf and so on now if you take china and east asia out of the equation in what we see is even at the at the lowest possible poverty lines that the world bank offers we see that there's been no progress at all against global poverty and according to many measures poverty has been increasing so it changes destroy quite a bit a mass poverty we talking about mexico hung a say how is hunger mazhit so this is a really fascinating story hunger is another of the big indicators in the millennium development goals.

free trade china east asia imf mexico washington per capita washington