36 Burst results for "East Africa"

Fresh update on "east africa" discussed on The Dana Show

The Dana Show

01:03 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "east africa" discussed on The Dana Show

"And I would like to see a legitimate like Deli deli Get open. It's gonna Mediterranean Deli was just taken over Maddie and pity past ladies and I will do a marvelous job with it. You know, the Swiss family? You know, Mr Weiss brothers squeezes. They're Christians. Yeah, they're Christian Arabs, and they go to ST Eugene's. I think No kidding there. Peter Bread is amazing. Especially trunk. You goes on May 23rd, mate. Yeah. The brother passed away a couple years. Oh, really love them. They always write what I would come in there at least once a week, and they would give me this like one right out of the oven. You just tried. They take. Yeah, I remember. I was a boy that nuns and priests were told when they went to Mom and pop Italian restaurants. Don't praise the food until you're checking out because if you do it while you're eating, they'll bring out more of its exactly do that She will feed you till you pop right. Remember what they said about the Godfather, the only the only realistic thing about Italian life with how much they Everything right? Is that every time someone came to the house that Oh, yeah. Yeah. You have to take something of a polite and he that's true with Arabs to just you know, if you're not hungry, you know? Yeah. You're always hungry. And Italian Italian family. Yeah, one of those shows he was on standard. Tucci was on last night and said that the towns like to talk about death, everything cause you do died and then food. We'll do that. Yeah. You know, when you get the phone call from the family Someone died. And then you start making food. Yeah, Exactly. That's true. My mom's version was guess who died? Yeah. Take a guess who died that summer? The Irish weeks. They're a blast. Yeah, There's there's a whole different. There's a really sad and everybody's realized. The Lord gets drunk and has a blast that right after everyone is sad and crying. We all go eat way. It's a huge Italian feet By then we're fighting with each other because we drank too much. Remember where First Watch used to be Now that's owned by and you know, the guy who owns Apologies, but he just sold it to the African people. Nobody every people switching it to. I saw this. I don't know They want to keep it that, But she's from Mauritius, which was a colony of France versus Island. Yeah, off of East Africa on and she's got super plants and she's Creole. There means a lot different than what it means in New Orleans, But so she's got a lot of plans for Things like that. But when poor Mr Devore who owns you know he owned that one in the owned the still loans 1st 1st bite. He changed the name of that, but his son died. I went to the funeral. I went to the wake. And mine is so much of an Irishman pills that were Bill. What do you want to drink? And I started to say, Would you have any scotch? But then I realized that the other pro Don't you know that there's no light? No booze, but everything else was like an Irish wait relation. That, you know the sadness and the talking about the decedent's accomplishments. And how much will be minister? Yeah, it was like a woman. Long way started going in there when they first opened. Yeah, and which was first one on Memorial. Yeah, One of Cathy's old bosses was the general manager for the region down helped open that with them. Okay. What was his kids? He's from Kansas City. OK, I remember when, when poured into Jim died. They came down here and took it over because the family couldn't even move. Their grief was so strip horrible. There was their only son. Our lives as restaurant. People are in the public. Yeah. I mean, there's no there's such a social life too, right? Yeah, I'm George not used to come to first watch every Wednesday. On D was frail, but I think this is look back to a happier time in Oklahoma politics where you can escape good people or his. He loves Kathy. Yeah, I love he's 90 something. Now he's from McAllister, which always had a lot of diversity. You know, Italians and blacks and everything else right? That made him very and he had a group. He delivered his his Father in law had a grocery store. Oh, really? And he delivered and he delivered to the future, Congressman. You know who's speaking looking back to food? Yeah, Okay. We're tracing the station is right, right? Oh, my God. My family had a grocery store for 50 years, and Kansas City is called the country club market. Which was right across the street from country Club Dairy where Shawn's dad was the milk, man. Oh, wow. So you're destined to be together. Isn't that weird? How our family and went to the restaurant? Did they have just a few tables in the back where they serve food? That's well, My uncle was a butcher. And so Yeah, there was a table for the family back there, But yeah, but the kids would you were working. You get some deep, right? Right. And then we opened a little Italian deli for and that was that close by, Or was it? No. I was downtown Kansas City. We had that for almost 40 years. Wow. Yeah, that was a real Italian or anything there. Now they wore down and put a build a high rise with high rise and override. Yes. You have pictures of it. Oh, as someplace. Yeah, it was pretty infamous. Yeah, No, no, Jim. The boar. He went to, uh You know Israel and took a picture of what had been his grandfather's place before..

New Orleans East Africa Mauritius Kansas City George May 23Rd France JIM Kathy Devore 50 Years Israel Shawn Weiss 1St 1St Bite Oklahoma Deli Deli First Last Night Bill
"east africa" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

01:43 min | 2 weeks ago

"east africa" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Atlantis was an island which lay before the great flood in the area. We now call the Atlantic Ocean. So great an area of land that from her Western shores, those beautiful sailors journey to the south and the North Americans with these In their ships with painted sales. To the East Africa. Was a neighbor. Across a short straight have seen miles. Great Egyptian ages but a remnant of the Atlantean culture. The antediluvian King's colonized the world. All the gods to play in the mythological dramas and all legends from all lands. Where from fair Atlantis. Knowing her fate. Atlantis sent out ships to all corners of the Earth on board with the 12 point. Physician farmer assigned just the magician and the other so called gods of our legends. The gods they were on. Does the elders of our time choose to remain blind that has rejoice and let us sing and dance on ring in the new Hand Atlantis way..

Atlantic Ocean East Africa
A Big Dose Of Perspective With Jack Kornfield

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:43 min | Last month

A Big Dose Of Perspective With Jack Kornfield

"Jack. Great to see you and thank you for coming Great pleasure thank you. Dan also for having me. It's time when we. I think we need to all come together and use our best wisdom and understanding of how to navigate. I completely agree and so let me. Just start with your mind. What are you doing to stay even in your own mind. Of course i meditate some but more importantly arrested in place that has a lot of spaciousness in it and a kind of trust. I'm old enough at age. Seventy five to have seen revolutions. Common go and difficulties arise in pass. Have and i also see that. There's i guess it was martin. Luther king talked about the moral arc of the universe being long but advance toward justice. I see that there's ways that systems also regulate themselves so whether it's the pandemic that we are in the throes of that is really causing enormous amount of suffering and loss whether it's the political disruptions in the capital and otherwise were just the calls for racial and economic justice that we needed for so long. I feel we're in a evolutionary process with its fits and starts. And i think about people like one gary mata who won the nobel prize for the greenbelt in east africa. She started by planning one to ten. Twenty fifty trees got other people to do. It eventually was thrown in prison on. I think that's a requirement for nobel peace laureates mostly And ended up planning fifty one million trees in changing a lot of the face to be africa or or or ellen sirleaf in manga bowie also nobel prize winners who said their country. Liberia used to be known for its child. Soldiers in had these terrible civil wars and now it's known for its women leaders and so there is some way in which just as the green sprouts come up through the cement in the sidewalk. There's something about life in. it's also the human heart that wants to renew itself. And so i rest back in kind and loving awareness to say yes. Let me turn my gaze away from the from the needs suffering the things to respond but also to hold it in a much bigger context justice. I agree that universe in the world is breathing. And that's how i keep my mind on a good day not the mean. There are bad days a bad moments but mostly my heart is pretty peaceful but you know there are things. I get a call from my daughter. Dad you know. This terrible thing is happening. At the nonprofit she runs for getting asylum for all people whose lives are endangered. What do i do our calls from dear friends. Oh my family has covid. So i'm deeply touched by these things and responding. Sometimes they really affect me. And i can feel the pain of it. You know or give worried but with all of that. There's a rounded a field of loving awareness of spaciousness entrust. That gives a much bigger picture and there. I'm just going on back away trying to answer your question and also spread out a little bit. When i was a monk training in the forest monasteries in southeast asia as a buddhist monk the main forest temple i lived was in a province adjoining. Both laos in cambodia was during the war in vietnam and laos cambodia. So we would see fighter jets going overhead and bombers and you know in some of the branch monasteries you could even see flashes from the from the bombs and people would come visit us. I had friends who were working in. Vietnam laos people that i knew as i had been working on medical teams in that ray calm river valley saying what are you doing sitting on your you know. There's a war to stop. There's things we need to do and my teacher would say. This is the place where we stop the war.

Gary Mata Ellen Sirleaf Luther King Greenbelt DAN East Africa Jack Martin Liberia Bowie Africa Laos Cambodia Vietnam Laos Cambodia Asia River Valley
Desert locusts in East Africa: A plague of another order

UN News

01:13 min | 2 months ago

Desert locusts in East Africa: A plague of another order

"Fresh swarms of desert locusts are formed in the horn of africa threatening crops in the food security of millions the un food and agriculture organization fao warned on wednesday according to the agency locust infestations increased over the past month in ethiopia and somalia as a result of extensive breeding favorable weather and rainfall with populations predicted to increase further in coming months. New loker swarms are already forming and threatening to reinvade northern kenya and breeding is also underway on both sides of the red sea posing a threat to our trailer. Saudi arabia sudan and yemen. Fao said in a news. Release the greater horn of africa witnessed one of its worst. Ever desert locust infestations earlier this year. A new crisis could have devastating consequences for communities affected by recurrent drought conflict. High food prices and the coronavirus pandemic the upsurge occurred in spite of an unprecedented campaign supported by fao and partners in which more than one point three million hectares of locust infestations were treated across ten countries. This year control operations prevented the loss of an estimated. Two point seven million tons of cereal enough to feed eighteen million people year in countries. Already hard hit by acute food insecurity and poverty.

FAO Africa Somalia Ethiopia Red Sea Kenya Yemen Sudan Saudi Arabia
UN says Sudan needs $147m to help Ethiopian refugees

UN News

01:09 min | 3 months ago

UN says Sudan needs $147m to help Ethiopian refugees

"One hundred and forty seven million dollars is urgently needed to support people. Fleeing ethiopia's tigray region into neighboring sudan the refugee agency. Unhcr said on monday. More than forty. Three thousand people have fled fighting in ethiopia in recent weeks. Almost half of them are children leading the appeal. You n refugee chief. Filippo grandi welcomed sudan's border policy to vulnerable people before noting that the government of sudan needs a lot of help the un agencies expecting one hundred thousand people to arrive by april next year although the worst case scenario is for an influx of two hundred thousand the new appeal aims to fund crisis response by the un and partners in sudan for the next six months in a related development. The un world food program. Wfp said that lack of funding had forced it to cut rations for refugees. In east africa while wfp ethiopia urgently needs two hundred nine million dollars to help six point two million people from now until next. May the un agency said that. The fighting between the ethiopian national forces and the tigray people's liberation front had displaced more than one hundred thousand civilians including those who had fled into eastern sudan since the fourth of november

Sudan Ethiopia Filippo Grandi UN Tigray Unhcr WFP Government East Africa Tigray People's Liberation Fro
Cyber is as Much Psychology as it is Technology

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

05:05 min | 3 months ago

Cyber is as Much Psychology as it is Technology

"I got convinced to join a stereo which is the company. I'm working for right now I've been with history for five. Monster is a brand brand new organization. It it's a different type of organization and from my experience. I concluded that this is executive type of organization. We needed to have so the very moment. I learned about historian about what it was all about. I was really adamant to join in and so so it is so. I'm not a managing director for europe middle east africa And a little. Bit for usc at a starring. But can you give us some insight. So what is your day today like. What would take up your time these days. Well my day to day. I'll have to divide my time in between Three things is to manage my wonderful team as any manager. we'd have to do another one. Is we have a community of members. Mum some would call that client who prefer to call members. These are very big organizations all over the world with which we have decided to have a very close trusted relationship and so a certain amount of my time is to engage with this community. Tried to understand what's going on. Try to understand the emerging problem trying to understand what's happening over the arisen as well as the most immediate problem so that's one big spirit of of my time. Another aspect of my time is history is also investing into cybersecurity and overall digital risks organizations. So i spent quite some time to king With emerging organizations indo digital risks cybersecurity field talking with venture capital talking with the leaders talking with regulators trying to understand what is happening what is relevant trying to create an ecosystem if you will of organizations in which we can invest and also trying to understand the need for today tomorrow and the next six months On on the typical customer side. You know strikes me that With your experience you have You have something that i think. A lot of people don't which is A real view of the global situation when it comes to cybersecurity. Your your experience has taken you around the world literally am. I'm curious what insights you can share about. That experience i mean are having been to different parts of the world. Seen the way that different cultures approach cybersecurity. Are there lessons that you've learned there. Are there important take homes you can share all. That's an extremely good point. You make what. I let me just share a little bit i. I'm very hopeful to sit on the board of advisor of elvis. You know the If unique and space defense organization have been sitting on this star community as they call it for for many years and the reason why invited me is because they said i understand cyber for an american company amid a european person i'm belgian guy from heritage and i leave thirty years while nearly thirty years in asia. I've got a very good understanding of what's happening on a worldwide basis when it comes to digital re cybersecurity so you quite spot on what. What i found out is the risk same. I mean i have worked with the If you will the equivalent of the sizzle of the chinese government. When i was working at microsoft and i found out that this gentleman is exactly the same problem as any other seasonal anywhere in the world in any other country or any other enterprises fish with exactly the same problem so the problem we faced with are the same the difference if you will resides in the sophistication. Some organization sub countries are way more sophisticated than others for some. We could speak about bits and bytes issues for others. We're talking about just to learn to walk and not certainly not to learn to run and the thing that is critical to me is the difference of culture also the organization level. I found out. And i have wounds all over my body to prove it because i thought it out the hard way i found out that you cannot take something that works in one culture and plug it into another culture and who backed it will work the same way. It's not true. Cyber inflammation security his as much psychology as it is technology as i usually say behind every cybersecurity incident. You have a human being either because you have an attacker attacking us for whatever reason either because we made a mistake a human mistake into way we tried to To to configure to deploy was security at the organization. And so it's very important to integrate the cultural aspect to make sure that a message is done is propagated the right way. Make sure that that people synchronize in endure is some crystallization iran. Some problems and delete works in. Us's not the way it works in career. That's not the way it works in germany and so on and so on so. My experience told me the problems i usually the same but away. You address them varies. And you've got to be very cognizant on on this cultural aspect to be able to the right wing.

USC Chinese Government Africa Europe Elvis Asia Microsoft Iran Germany United States
As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:18 min | 4 months ago

As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

"Tons Anita went to the polls yesterday to vote in an election overshadowed by opposition complaints of irregularities such as ballot box, stuffing President John Maga. Fully who is accused of stifling democracy seeks a second term in office alongside fourteen other candidates talk to Dan. Padgett is electoral politics at the university. Of Aberdeen, he specializes in political communication through mass rallies and populist and nationalist ideologies in Tanzania and joins me on the line. Now Don Tanzania's long been thought of in the West is a a haven of stability within east Africa but I mean this isn't necessarily the case and I. I wonder if you could sketch out the political dynamic there, the ruling party's been in power since nineteen sixty one. Yes that's right. It's is the longest ruling party in sub. Saharan Africa. The political dynamic in Tanzania has been one of the ruling Kanzi, CCM's decline over the last fifteen years. Reaching a low point in two thousand fifteen where it where the margin of victory was. The fittest is ever been. Since then President Michel, Foodie, it came to kyle and that's election has led Tanzania. Very shot an increasingly extreme offered Harry. Intern. And we weren't sure how just how? Radical that authoritarian agenda would be and the election this we're just getting results from now suggests that it is as bad as any of us feared as so the opposition allegations of vote rigging, etc do stand up. Well. So. Of course, normally I would turn to international election observers. Attorney to arbitrate these claims to decide which to give credence in which not to give credence. Unfortunately, we can't almost no international election observers. Were invited and those that were invited were. Invited at our so Given that and given the advantage of the opportunity that this creates the ruling party the elections it's hard not to give at least prima facie credence to these opposition claims especially given the the wide range of anecdote to. Video and photographic evidence that I've seen an which which I've been collecting these last twenty four hours, and of course, zipping a social media crackdown various restrictions on the press. Has Been, a crackdown all over and and for the last five years. So in many ways, the the rigging receipt which we've been seeing apparently seeing of the next twenty four hours. Is. Really just the icing on the authoritarian cake. There's extreme. Media Censorship rallies have been banned and consider route the rally. The most important means of communication tends to emotional time about seventy percent of people attend local meetings on a regular basis and attend election campaign rallies they were they were abandoned twenty sixteen and indeed the opposition at large have. Hottest. Struggle underneath. Almost constance. Of States and extra state harassment in includes trumped up court cases but also extrajudicial. So extra state attacks. Unknown assailants that have arrested some abductors killed. And in fact, one of the main challenges has recently returned to the country after recovering from gunshot wounds. That's right. So tenderly series is. Presidential. Candidate is the largest opposition party in Tanzania. and. So that's Experience of being of surviving attempted assassination attempt has has given. US already in very impressive political figure a sort of a sparkle. Some people referred to him as a living miracle. But of course, we don't know the results. Yes. But we all seeing violence particularly in Zanzibar. Zanzibar the autonomous. ARCHEPELAGO's Zanzibar, which is a federally devote area of 'em. Into UK. Has has often seen electoral violence. We saw it in ninety five and two, thousand and thirteen, thousand, five and twenty fifteen and actions by varying degrees. So in in some ways, this is a return to form It's not. The recurrence of violence is is. Seems to be because the opposition has probably one in sensabaugh almost every time. But they've never officially one out one means or another has always been used to not in the that's the that's the the scholarly consensus on. Politics what's different? This time I think is that there's violence on the mainland as well. So this is no longer an issue of contained physical violence in Zanzibar. There have been a series of incidents including. What appears to be an attempt to a to attack the chairman of the leading opposition party on the eve of the elections. So that's one difference the other is considered. No money there is. A. Sporadic protests violence and in return state brutality, police army heavy-handedness in putting down those protests that the protests have often been. Constrained and sporadic because they have not been condoned led. By, by the leaders of the opposition there, there are indications that this could be different this time one of the reasons for that is. The, the rhetoric is different. The leader of the opposition in Zanzibar say amount has been say had has been saying that in the past he's held his supporters back. He's been of restraint, and at this time he he won't urge restraint to newly sue has said that he will. Bring people out onto the streets and consider the state of the opposition behind because it seems like this might be the last stand in a sense that vikings they can make, and so they they don't have that say incentive to hold back this time and say the keep up how to drive the next time. Just finally before we go, do you think that this is part of something that we're seeing across parts of Africa there is a younger demographic. They were all born after independence that not prepared to accept authoritarian rule the just coming to the age where they are protesting we're seeing it in Nigeria within saws and in various other places could this be the the Africans spring. My sense is if there is African spring to come, it will come off and an Wiki will extend. Mexico an authoritarian winter. The trend on that strikes me is that a number of leaders are emerging in an intense Aena in Zambia. In other parts of the consonant, which bear a striking resemblance to this sort of authoritarian. Developmental. Nationalists of is so The there's a young population I are angry. But in fact, I think the trend seems to go the other way. And results. When can we expect those? So the first also are already dripping in and they show. That a series of opposition strongholds, there's places that you would never expect or or at least likely. To expect to go to a to the ruling party are being won by then by margins of three to one, which suggests that the the the rigging. Being worried about maybe taking place typically a Tanzanian election result takes three or four days that was related end and announced especially with the presidential elections but. So far. This is actually has been crisis already.

Tanzania Zanzibar Don Tanzania Saharan Africa East Africa Padgett DAN Aberdeen Anita President Trump John Maga Africa Aena President Michel United States Intern Harry
Interview with Rough Translation host Gregory Warner

Inside Podcasting

04:57 min | 6 months ago

Interview with Rough Translation host Gregory Warner

"Hi and welcome to the PODCAST Brench Club podcast. My name is Adela and I'm the founder of PBC today. I'm so happy to be joined by Gregory Warner host of NPR's report translation a podcast about the things that we're talking about in the United States are being talked about in some other parts of the World Hi Gregory thank you so much for joining us today. So rough translation is a favourite among many podcast ranch club listeners, and we've actually included episode in a listening less. We did last year called looking for love but for those who aren't familiar with their show, can you just give us a little bit of an overview? Sure sure. We'll. Our tagline is. Stories from far of places that hit close to home. Our original tagline and season one folks have listened back that far was things we're talking about how they're being talked about in other places but both those ideas are. Sort of around the the idea of we're going to tell stories that. Take place in some other. Maybe, some other countries, some other culture that's but but it's GonNa feel close to home. It's GonNa. It's GonNa hit you in some way it's it's not that we're specifically telling non-american stories or it's them and us but just we're gonNA take you places but it's going to feel that it's GonNa hit you personally got it. Yeah. It feels familiar but it's a from like maybe a different perspective. Yeah. So I'm curious about your background and how the idea for the show came about. Sure. So well, let's see so. Terms of my radio background. So I went to Salt Salt Institute for Documentary. Studies that was my. First taste of radio I worked in some local worked at a local station called North country public radio. Up in very northern New York and then after that, I went to Afghanistan So which was not as much of a leap as you think because I went from one very rural area to another very rural area and the stories of actually quite similar in terms of the story of the economy as well as the story of. Loneliness and and and all that. So I spent I ended up spending about two years on and off in Afghanistan. Let's see that was from. Two thousand. Six to two thousand eight. And then I left for a number of reasons. But also because that period two dozen sixty, thousand eight was was you could do a lot of reporting then. That that you just couldn't that was a lot harder to do after two, thousand, eight kidnappings it started in a massive way and then I was based after that in in Rwanda, and also some in Kenya, an eastern Congo. So we spent some time in in Africa again as freelancer and then came back to the US started working for marketplace as a staff reporter kind of learned. Later the art of grabbing tape and making a same day story, which is when I ended up getting the job at NPR's the international correspondent in in Nairobi. Sort of it is a you have to use fast twitch muscles but. What's Nice about that job is that there was also a lot of potential for storytelling feature work. and so he was in in Nairobi actually actually in Ethiopia that I came up with the idea for this podcast country that you've lived in. And it. It came about I mean came up through a number. Probably the simplest story is that I had done a story for for radio lab on their on their episode call translation and it was it was an episode about an incident that I watched that I I was I was actually following the secretary of state then John Kerry he gave a speech and this Ethiopian reporter in the room stood up and asked the question. I remember that episode yeah and Yeah it was. It was like this very brief I mean honestly the whole incident really the question and the answer which was at the end of this conference which I mean in the story we talk about how this there were all vetted questions until this one guy got up because carry decided to be generous in this one moment anyway. So this guy asked this question but. It was it was such a mistranslation around this one word and because of this one word. Secretary Kerry seemingly. Totally. Misunderstood the question answered it. In this way that was very unsatisfying and the guy ended up taking a quite a great risk to to ask this question on Ethiopian state TV. For nothing but it was this opportunity to learn about this one word serious, which has such a different meaning in east Africa.

Gregory Warner Nairobi John Kerry United States Reporter Adela Afghanistan NPR Salt Salt Institute For Docume PBC Africa Secretary Founder Rwanda East Africa Ethiopia New York
Finding justice in the gym with Ben & Felicity

Together Podcast | A conversation about faith, justice and how to change the world

05:04 min | 6 months ago

Finding justice in the gym with Ben & Felicity

"Welcome to what in the world where we discussed the latest in news and current affairs cat what we talking about today. Yes I'd stay. We're talking about the explosion in Lebanon. So time of recording, it's Weinstein is the day after the explosion. So we don't Philly know the extent of it on the real triggers behind it. But what we nights die is that explosion in the city poor area has killed at least one hundred people and injured more than four thousand others. The president has said that two, thousand, seven, hundred and. Fifty tons of ammonium nitrate has been stalled on safely in a warehouse for six years and investigation is underway at the moment to find the trigger of the explosion. Of course, we don't know the exact trick is at the moment, but we know that law people morning low people are inferior it just because you know the experience is expected in Nollie, what happened but there's been a little reports of. Gloss. Flying Everywhere and even if people went close to the explosion that was property damage in our homes. and. Yet, just think it's important for us to lift them in prayer at the moment and I'm just think about the not just maybe physical implications but also mental implications and what does that look for our content found in offices there as well? Yeah. Definitely can't even have information as we recorded this a little while ago we can definitely be praying for those who lost their lives and their families and for those. Who are injured and you mentioned tiff do work in in Lebanon and so everybody's press for tiff and and their continued programs would be appreciated if you want to find out more about what if I'm does there in their response after the explosion, then do have our instagram at we are tear fund and we'll keep you up to date with the response back. But in the meantime press would be greatly appreciate it. Now. It's time to hear from Ben and felicitate in their chat with Chris about how merged fitness and justice. and. My. Wife and we run a gym called Bryson. In Brunton Loosen, we've had on locker magazine Online magazine featured you very recently and so like I. Know you guys like a little bit just a little bit. As me big begging friend but. If. You if we WANNA story just a little bit just before fit Brian. How did you guys meet? What was your? Passion is what your interest was. Johnny that got you. Yes Oh, you grew up in Sudan in east Africa So my parents worked. The Church that I've seen education programs join, civil war. Came emend the same boarding school didn't know each other at the medicine. was older. and. Then went to University of Sussex and studied international development and had a real hall. To work overseas go involved when in helped savage in on an island between Yemen and Somalia. Codes culture. which was just a random always love fitness and somehow opportunity came about and go on a boat from Amman that carried cement blocks and slept on it for fourteen hours and help these guys those incident, and then yet not was kind of really where the bridge between fitness on development came into contact and then I made a video about it on Youtube and And of slowly in vote but. was restored and say I say went same said Ben my life went to Sussex, Investi? Say. When school in both finished that. Actually did look like stuff with tear fund at my year out. And then. Three months. Yeah. So I was with tiff entrepot vet. Volunteering, and then spent some time in Greece out refugee camp. That kind of Maha Development was always there trying to figure out like area that was in and then started studying investigative Sussex Fan of. Yeah. That was great. And then I've just finished my degree say, Benon Michael married last summer and. Coming up. With very thankful for that. And then. I was just finishing my degree when I started getting both entitled kind of married into the title community. then. Start getting involved with them. An Abedin are opened a gym in. And then I just finished my degree last month. Great

Lebanon Bryson BEN Brian University Of Sussex Weinstein Chris Philly Brunton Loosen President Trump Emend Nollie Sudan Maha Development Yemen Sussex Johnny Benon Michael Youtube
The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

Short Wave

13:31 min | 8 months ago

The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

"At the beginning of an epidemic, it's essential to discover the source of the disease. For scientists who do that work, it's extremely challenging and without risk to their own health. But the scientists who played an essential role in discovering bulla way back in nineteen, seventy six doesn't always get the credit he deserves in today's episode. We explore the history of a bowl and the consequences of scientific exploitation. It's part of our week of episodes here on the show celebrating and recognizing the contributions of black scientists enjoy. You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. Safai here with none other than NPR East Africa correspondent Ater, Peralta Hey there ater. Hey, Mattie, thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled. But I want to open with a quick question. Who discovered Ebola and do not Google it. First of all. How dare you asked me a question? I should definitely know the answer to, and don't and yeah I already, Google Bet. Came up was. A Belgian microbiologist, but I think you're about to tell me. There's more to this there. Absolutely, there always is right so. Cheated. What you probably saw is a bunch of white westerners like. Dr John Jack. Yembeh does not yeah. He was not one of the people that came up. Yes, so, he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo, but back in nineteen, seventy six, we embed. First doctor to. COLLECT ANY BOLA sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote, a lot of the history of people. Has Been Written? Without your name. Yes but. You know this Yes it. Did Not quite. Today on the show correcting the record on a Bola, the story of Dr, John Jack Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing it's. To some in the medical community, it's a controversial move. Okay Ater, so we're talking about a Congolese Dr John, Shaq. And his role in discovering a bola. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa. He said we should start in. Hundred seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD microbiology at the Riga Institute in Belgium, and he could have stayed in Europe, but he decided to come back to Congo, but when I arrive via. The condition of work were not I had no lab have no. Mice for experimentation, so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah, it's tough to do lab work without a lab, you know. Without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen seventy-six. was sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak. it's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola, but no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever, and he goes to this local hospital, and he says he finds it completely empty. Why was nobody there? Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and people had died there. But in the morning when they heard Giambi was sent from the capital, the thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital, and we started seeing patients. So so, what's he seeing? When the patients come in, he was seeing. People who were very weak fever? They had headaches I started to to make the physical time. But at that time will have no gloves. And, of course he had to draw blood, but when I removed. They're the sit inch. Both continue to spread out. What I am to see these phenomenal. And also my fingers or with a bow. Wow. Yeah, so he says he he would wash his hands a lot, but really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah, definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's no gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on, and he was able to not get it in at this point. We MP he was startled. But then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village, also got sick with fever. All the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point me MBA was like. Oh, it's probably not those things. Yeah! I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different, so he. He convinced one none took back to Kinshasa with him. So what happens next? She died at a hospital a couple of days later, but he took blood samples, and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end that was Peter Piot. Who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium, the guy who turned up from Google search. Yeah. That's right, and so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit. The CDC in the US gets involved and the realize. This is a new virus that caused hemorragic. Call it Ebola. They name it after a river by the village where it was discovered. So, what you saw out in the field, the blood samples guide all of this plays a crucial role in the history of right. It was huge, but it's PR who gets the bulk of the credit for discovering all up and you can tell this bothers John Jock membe. If you don't recognize the work done in the field, I, it is not correct. it is a team. You know it is a team. Pr Actually wrote a memoir no time to lose and he does mention. But just in passing as a bright scientist, whose constantly pestering him for more resources. Has talked about this well. Peter Pyatt, facetime video, so I got on the phone. He's now the director of the prestigious London, School of Hygiene and tropical medicine and I asked him if he felt at all responsible for writing. Out of his history of Ebola I think that's a comment, but my book less not an attempt to write than that's history of Boll and sold more. My personal experience is more biographies that sense. Was this kind of like an awkward conversation to have ater. Yeah I mean especially because he's Belgian and Belgium was the colonial power in Congo. Ultimately, he looks at it with a little bit of distant. That at the time African scientists they were simply excluded and white scientists parachuted in they took samples, wrote papers that were published in the West and they took all the credit he so he actually said he did. In that actually surprised me and I think. Part of the reason. I feel that he so comfortable. Talking about this is because he's in an academic setting. I think in universities across the world. Students are talking about privilege, so he seems like he is very comfortable having this conversation right now. I mean there's there's something very weird kind of about that coming from him right as a person who has admitted to taking part in exploitative science, absolutely and one of the good things is that he says that things are changing. We mbappe for example has received several international awards just recently for pioneering. The first effective treatment for Ebola reflects our stinky you. Say the politicians in global health in science, General. So okay. I want to ask you about the treatment in a minute, but to put it very bluntly. Have there actually been any concrete steps to try to change this power dynamic in the global health field? Because this is certainly not one of you know two stories. This is one of many many stories. There is I mean look. NBA has made a decision that many thought unthinkable leaving just a few years ago, he decided that all of the blood samples collected during this most recent Ebola. Epidemic will stay in Congo, so if anyone wants to study this outbreak, they will have to come to his institute. I bet that has ruffled some feathers though. I have I've heard from some American scientists. Who have privately expressed frustrations in the are really the ones who have led the way in studying Ebola, but peanut understands that decision when you think about how African scientists have been historically treated, and he says that Western scientists should just get over it. We have to wake up key things one. The world is changing too much endless Nah it's so weird to hear him say a matter of fairness, ater matter of fairness. Okay, so before we move on, tell me about the treatment that Mugabe worked on. So this is the thing that makes him smile right. We embiid calls it the most important achievement of his life, and it goes back to one thousand, nine, hundred, five during another equal outbreak in Congo. Eighty one percent of people infected with Ebola in this village were dying, and he wondered if antibodies developed bipolar survivors could be siphoned from their blood and used to treat new cases, so he gave sick patients transfusions of blood from a bowl of survivors. Too He injected Ebola patients with the blood of survivors. It vision. And seven survive, he says the medical establishment brought him off because he didn't have a control group. That's what they told him. But if this idea was accepted by scientists. We see a lot of life. Okay I mean to be fair. That is a really small group with no control among some other stuff. But on the other hand, it doesn't mean that he was wrong. You know that it should be totally dismissed, and maybe if more scientists looked into, it collaborated with him, maybe tried to replicate that data in some way, they could have learned something with him right because we now know that he was in fact correct about the antibodies. Yeah, I mean that's right in the context is important because I think what really eat set him. Is that maybe lots and lots of people could have been saved during the West. West Africa outbreak, which happened from two thousand, thirteen to two, thousand sixteen, and look just this year that science became the foundation of what is now proven to be the first effective treatment against the Bulla that is saving seventy percent of the people who are treated with amazing. Is He getting credit for that? At this point, he is yeah, absolutely okay, so how does look back on all of this week? What's what's his view on this is so he's he seventy seven, so he's obviously thinking about his legacy. One of the things that he told me is that he's always dreamed that big science could come out of Congo, and partly because of him, that's more likely happen. He got a commitment from Japan to build a state of the art research facility in Kinshasa and in the lab, just a few feet from his office where we talked US scientists were using advanced machines to sequence DNA of the Bulla samples that have to stay here in Congo Okay so moon bay, doctor and scientists who started in the Congo with no lab has a lab and is soon getting an even better one to do his work. Yeah, exactly, yeah, now I have my share. In. So I have my I have. A good subculture will bring joy. But he also has vice rate with micro biologist without Nice, I, asked myself that every day. And, so you know what he says, his biggest legacy won't be that. He helped to discovery or cure for it. It'll be if another young Congolese. Scientist finds himself with an interesting blood sample. He'll be able to investigate it

Ebola Congo Kinshasa Scientist Google Belgium John Jack Mugabe Fever Epidemic NPR Typhoid United States Dr John Jack Ater Kenya Mattie Dr John Africa Peralta
Does closing schools protect kids, and us, from coronavirus?

Coronacast

08:28 min | 10 months ago

Does closing schools protect kids, and us, from coronavirus?

"Federal government's pretty obsessed with schools. Victoria's taking a hardline. Wanted to get the Infection time to even lower levels because there still is virus circulating in Victoria and New South Wales. Probably less so in some of the other states can probably make more of the political fight than there is. But I think it's worth stating a couple of things about schools here. The Commonwealth is making a lot of the evidence that children don't spread this to the same extent as older people and therefore the we spoke about this last week with the New South Wales Schools Study of eighteen people nine students and teachers who were infected elsewhere and did the spread it in the classroom and yes the war spread however and therefore they say Scotia Auburn and some people say they should never have shots because the spread is so low. Well there is spread. It is low but it's not insignificant. Maybe two to four percent of deaths and other studies maybe ten percent of the spread. Some people say it's less than that but there are two other reasons and very important reasons. Why schools had to be shot early in this pandemic. It's very hard to go to. Extreme social distancing such as we've had which have really turned around this pandemic without schools being shot and that's not about spread is just that when schools are shots. Parents have to stay at home. Says very hard to stay at home when your kids are school. And so it's a very important part of the process and it maybe wasn't as transparent. Maybe that wasn't in the minds of people who actually shut schools. But it's a really important part of the strategy very hard to go to any degree of lockdown without schools being shot irrespective of whether or not their source of infection and the third reason that you shut schools is for consistency of messaging communication and consistency of communication is essential in pandemic and people. Just get confused. Why can my kids go to school and shoot if you know that it can spread? Okay maybe not as much as another age-groups. Why can kids not have any social distancing at all in classrooms when I've been told I can't go for picnic and I can't go mixing with people when that message got out before we had lifting of the lockdown people get confused and cynical about the whole lockdown social distancing process? And Those. Are the three reasons why you shut down schools? And you do it early so that you you go hard area to help control the pandemic equally on the other side. Which is where we're where we're at now. You actually do have to lift the restrictions on schools fairly early if you want the economy to get back going going again because it's hard for parents to get back to work if their kids are still at school so the very reasons that you shut schools also reasons why you open them up but you can only open them up when you're really confident that we've got the testing regime in place where the communities committed to. If they've got a coffin call they're going to turn up for testing and if you have to be isolated you will. We have to be quarantined. As a contact you will be unless we as individuals are all willing to do that for the community. It isn't GonNa work back where we started. It feels like we're inching towards that. Now we are and it's great news and we just need to monitor to one thing. Time Monitor. Small things at a time monitor. See where we're going. Make sure there's no outbreaks make sure we can control the outbreaks. And then keep moving forward and I think very quickly. We'll forget how tough this has been because we open. I think much sooner than we think. But we've got to be really patient for the next two weeks because the next two weeks really will see the infection rate. Go Down I think. Just don't forget how quickly this evolved. It's quick at the beginning of this pandemic and slow to resolve at the other end paying the price at this end of the pandemic for perhaps being a little bit late at the beginning. But we've done incredibly well is just a bit slower. We've just got to be patient for the next couple of weeks. Do things slowly. Don't go nuts and then things can be much more under control. Let's talk a couple of questions from the audience. We Betsy asking about Vitamin Day doesn't protect you from private infection or does it reduce the severity of the infection. Nobody knows the answer to this. It's all a bit. Theoretical one of the theories behind some viruses being commoner in winter. Is that our vitamin lead? D LEVELS DROP. I mean become more susceptible to infection and there is some evidence that your immune system doesn't work as well when you're vitamin D deficient. That is very different. Thing from saying does taking vitamin D potato against covered nineteen. It is almost certainly won't protect. You could maybe reducing. The severity of the infection is hard to know here. Vitamin D goes through. Waxes and wanes is a popular vitamin with a lot of evidence of great benefits a few years ago then the better of the studies. Where as time moved on didn't show much affect on bonds didn't show much affect heart disease and cancer which are the ones shown so I think the benefits of Vitamin D are less than people. Think it's a very important vitamin very important for health but with taking a lot of it makes a big difference. I don't know and in a country like a stranger. There are groups who are vitamin D deficient elderly people who don't get out much in the sun people with dark skin particularly from east. Africa who cover themselves up a lot in Melbourne is? There's been a lot of vitamin D deficiency children with problems when they're born into those communities because the these women are used to the courtyards where they cannot cover their skin quite as much but essentially. We don't have too bad a problem with Vitamin D. Having said that there's no harm and taking vitamin D if You want to and if it if it protects you that's fine just don't take a huge amount of eight taking it as a supplement or just getting enough sunlight. Fifteen minutes of sun on the upper part of your body near midday was it gets into winter. That's all you need if you want to take a supplement then you can. You can take one of the standard supplements at a standard. Does we've got another person asking about low blood oxygen and in the states. There's been anecdotes of people coming in To Emergency Department and they're actually quite got quite low blood oxygen levels and they seem fine. Can we test corona virus by testing the amount of oxygen in the blood? No but if you come in otherwise well with a low blood oxygen level of not very sick and your blood oxygen levels disproportionately low. It's a very strong sign that you've got covered nineteen and you do need to be tested. But it's not one for one you can't guarantee just because you go to low oxygen you've got virus you still need to test for the actual virus. So let's talk about a bit of Research Norman. What's what's coming out about recovered patients who are still getting positive test results. There's been a report from career. I haven't seen the paper on this yet but the news about reinfection came out of South Korea where people were saying. Well had gone negative van. They went positive. Where the REINFECTED COROLLA CAST? We got a lot of questions about this and the answer I gave at the time was well. Suspects have had the virus in them. It's waxed and waned the test. Isn't that that that accurate and come back positive. When the virus hasn't disappeared the reason according to this recession. I- stresses yet to be published. Is that the test. May well have picked up dead virus fragments in other words. The virus was still there in the throat but not alive so the remnants of the virus they are and because the taste picks up the genetic material of the virus. It doesn't have to be alive. Pickup genetic material and speaking of material and scoring positive. When in fact there's no live virus there and that's the reason they think it's not real reinfection. How Thirties then make a decision? As to whether someone's allowed to go back out and mix with society again really good question because that could keep them at home the answers. I don't know how they're doing. And but what I imagine is the cases that the median time in meeting the time that most people stay infectious for the last time. I loot these things change was about three weeks when you've had a good going infection so I imagine if you're still positive at three weeks in your otherwise well it's not a high signal then they might give you a pass on that. I'm not sure if there's a test for a live forest and this because you'd have to grow the virus

Vitamin D Deficiency New South Wales Schools Federal Government Commonwealth South Wales Victoria Africa Betsy South Korea Heart Disease To Emergency Department Melbourne
Travel to Senegal and The Gambia

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

09:20 min | 11 months ago

Travel to Senegal and The Gambia

"Welcome the image traveler. I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about West Africa. I like to welcome to the show. Brian Asher from the world hiker DOT COM. Who has come to talk to us about Senegal and the Gambia in West Africa? Brian Welcome to the show. Thank you thank you for having me. I know you were surprised that we had not previously done in episode of Amateur Traveler on this region and as we were talking about before we started recording. We don't get as many pitches but also there aren't as many travelers who tend to go to west Africa East Africa. Southern Africa tend to get a little more tourists in general. Why should someone go to that region before we focus in on Senegal? Gambia I think. West Africa's really vibrance several my friends. Who have been there for years in the Peace Corps? Said it's about the People? It's about the markets it's about the color it's about the way they treat you just the life that's on the streets of West Africa. I think we hear of animals. Safaris maybe eastern Southern Africa West. Africa's is really the beating hearts of the continents with some of the most populous countries in the fascinating region with lots of smaller countries grouped. In that you can visit In the whole region there will. We've chosen to talk about Senegal and the Gambia one. Because you've been there recently and we always try and focus on someplace. That wasn't a ten years ago trip. The you've been to all the countries in Africa. Yes four fifty four nations and Africa hats off to you. Thank you and people may be wondering why we're talking about the two of them. This is one of those very odd places where one country actually completely surrounds. The exactly the Gambia's inside of Senegal. So the Gumby has no other neighbors have Senegal to the North East. The South and the West is the ocean. So it's completely involved excellent. And why should someone go to Senegal Gambia? I think Senegal and the Gambia great introduction to Africa and especially to West Africa. They're safe countries. They're countries that are kind of a soft introduction. They're not quite as hard hitting some the other countries in west Africa. Very safe to visit for me. The the weather was very nice after coming from kind of more tropical and intense heat in the Sahara for example movement way across and the people. The people are very friendly. There's not vowed kind of lively music in the streets that you can listen to all the time and there is a decent number of Europeans between but a large French population. There's quite a few Lebanese. That live there a special indy car in the capital of Senegal. And it's it's very soft welcoming place that would not intimidate so I think most people when they think of Africa that would be a great place to start and by contrast. Then what you're saying is there's some of their neighbors. We're them might be a little more. You think twice about going because of poverty terrorism Civil war or disease. Yeah those those are the only reasons I can think of not to go to some of the areas over the last ten years at least in western Africa and I think the Transportation as well kind of infrastructure with having made my way of public transportation there are a lot of Africa can be extremely slow and the Senegal Gambia. Our little breath of fresh air to be able to get around quite a bit easier than the light of the countries in the region and I'm fascinated to hear about this. I have technically been indycar but really only in the airport. And they didn't let me off the plane so I really knew very little about the area. So what kind of itinerary would you recommend? I think that Senegal be the one that you'd want to spend more time in. The car has quite a bit to see in there quite a few beaches right there. Outside of the city I stayed in a neighborhood called walk. Tom Which is nicely placed next to the African Renaissance Monument which is the largest statue and all of Africa. That kind of looks down on the whole region there and Indycar and you can take a couple of really nice day trip south from the car so if you stayed there for two three or four days I think that would be an ideal amount of time to spend their most people like I went to a place called Goree Island which is very famous for being one of the biggest places that had slaves that were coming out to the Americas and you can learn a lot but the history. They're easy to walk around. There's a ferry that goes every couple hours to get there and place it almost everyone. The cousin Senegal visits during the first couple days sides stay for the car to three days with the city and the surrounding area and then a couple of days up to St Louis which is about four hours for five hours north by bus. Okay and you could spend a day or two. They're known for its famous. Saint Louis Arch known. Not that Saint. Louis Okay the other Saint Louis in Senegal. It takes a good six to eight hours going by bus. You could take a private car if you want. Or if you're on a tour to get down to the Gambia assume that's GONNA take up half or two thirds of a day and then I'd be down in Bonn Jewel and area right below it whether it's nice speeches and a monkey parking things for two to three days so I think you could easily piece together somewhere between eight and ten days which would be kind of a nice length of a visit between Senegal Gambia. Excellent so you started us into car and you mentioned going out to the island whose name I've already forgotten it's gory island heart ee. Eileen with just one of the biggest hubs for the slave trade and they have fairies that go out every couple hours and that's definitely Come a must do if you're in Dakar. I think almost anyone I've talked to has done not visit for half day or two thirds of the day and real easy to walk arounds. Thinks about a kilometre too long. And that's locals there with colorful art kids playing soccer in slave museums. That are there that you can visit as well and so I assume there's a fourth year which is where they keep the slaves locked up. Yes and what else are we going to do the two or three days in the car? How are we gonNA spend that you mentioned the monument and there's a couple of monuments there the country it's about ninety six percent Muslim and so there's several nice mosques to visit as well in the lot of fishermen that go out and I love think West Africa? One of the images of the coastal areas. Are these colorful fishing boats that you can see like dozens of guys sliding off into the water and then sliding back up with their catch from the day and there's a lot of seafood that they bring in so these real colorfully painted. Boats is one of the images that you'll see on the coast there in Indycar and their fishing from the there than rather than from okay and is there a place you would go to see that. There is a mosque called the mosque of the divinity which had a bunch of these colorful boats right next to it and it's right there in the car about five or ten minutes from where I was staying in the neighborhood of calm and I stayed AIRBNB. There's lots of airbnb options there for budget travelers and there's all different ranges of accommodation but there are inexpensive options for those looking for him as well and I stayed with a local man there and enjoyed always like state local people to give you all flavor of what it's like will what I usually find when we're talking about. Travelling in lesser developed areas of Africa is that we're talking about not an inexpensive flight to get in relatively expensive for the distance intra country flights inside of Africa. Compare for instance or a US but then really cheap food and really cheap housing. Is that right? Yeah that's true. And so that's the Pros and cons. I always way between local transport and the flights I think the flights between the Gambian cars forty minutes so in say but I just checked in it's still upwards of one hundred forty to one hundred eighty dollars for a forty minute one slight. It's not too bad for Africa standards. It can be a lot worse a lot worse or west African flights but bus. I WanNa say it was about eighteen dollars that took me there so you just have to pick and choose. What's worth more your your time or your money. Well and that is going to be an individual choice. Yeah another thing. A lot of people like to do is there's a pink lake there several of these in the world. There's one in Mexico unless Jerry I believe and there's one about Sarah outside of Dakar. That is is another kind of one of them. Must do things on the visit. That would take you maybe about a half day and so that is really really pick. Yeah if you look at pictures online. There's one called Rainbow Mountain in Peru or I don't know how much instagram or things put filters on it and this one depending on who's pictured is it's pink. It was quite pink but sometimes the pictures make it. Look even more amazingly think depend on. The season tends to be kind of lighter darker shades of pink. That has the salt miners. That are out there. And kind of local people selling artwork in tourist items. So and so this is Lake Ripa. Yes my GRANDPA Loch rose. I think in French shore the lake what it can go by. I would say gory. Islands and Pink Lake would be to half day trips. That would make sense to have with your day or so exploring around the car so to make it two or three days for the car and it strives. You might say

Senegal Gambia Senegal Africa West Africa East Africa Southern Africa Chris Christensen Brian Asher Dakar Gambia Amateur Traveler Peace Corps Pink Lake Sahara Goree Island Soccer Louis Arch Airbnb
Behind the scenes at the humanitarian air hub dispatching COVID-19 aid to African nations

UN News

05:40 min | 11 months ago

Behind the scenes at the humanitarian air hub dispatching COVID-19 aid to African nations

"Face mosques a million of them just some of the precious cargo being dispatched to all corners of Africa by the UN as the continent braces for the spread of cove in nineteen managing. This huge task is Amanda Dowdy Senior Director of Operations for the World Food Program will WFP in online interview with you. An uses Daniel Johnson Jordanian national. Mr Dodie takes us behind the scenes at the agency's humanitarian hub in the European capital. Addis Ababa where a U N Wide Supply Chain. Operation is now in full swing. The flights game some came from China on some came from Dubai. It was a combined shipment of Jack Ma Foundation and who own supplies? They arrived in Addis on Tuesday and from there we are moving only consignments to almost fifty countries across Africa so far we have moved up to thirty countries and every day we are completing that consignment right so on the ground then from Addis Ababa. You've reached around thirty countries as you say what's the the final figure Africa now if we African country which ones have called for help. And how is the decision taken about which ones are helped look going to all the African countries in accordance with ovulation in accordance with needs? But the most in need are where the number of cases are flaring up. We have cases in west Africa in Senegal as well as in southern Africa and flights. Today just give me a picture of actually what's happening on the ground in Addis at the humanitarian hub. Everything is working. We allocate the basically parcel or or kit the cargo in accordance to fly throughout that we have so the lanes will depart at this angle to multiple countries. Come back and pick up again. Another would go to multiple vendors. Of course we're using several airplanes in order to reach a maximum. I think today the plan is for thirty countries to receive the locations today and what particular protocols are in place to prevent caveat nineteen transmission. We follow all the procedures in terms of the guidelines of w the national health guidelines. That are in place the social distancing but we also are in a way in even when we transfer Scott Every manager in place including spraying the planes in short that there is no cross contamination even from parcells coming so we follow according to a yet according to Keio we are abiding by these owes to the letter in terms of what happened today when it reaches the country in question. How is the aid distributed? And how you show that. It's getting to where it needs to go. It's the handed over to the Ministry of of the Spectrum Authority of the member states. It's not exactly going to UN agencies or NGOs this is going to member states and the government authorities W in coordination with the local government authorities ensures that all the aid or assistance in terms of medical supplies goes to work. It is neat. Could you say this is an historic sort of arrangement to show solidarity in terms of keeping supply chains going because the secretary general has expressed a lot of concern about global supply chains when code actually hits because yes African countries that have been affected already? But it's really nothing compared with what is going to happen. This was the first flight from Addis. Ababa it was the first test for the international hub as transshipment on to the rest of Africa but also in terms of passenger because as part of our response to call with is a neighboring humanitarian and the health responding to reach the countries. And we are going to be using episode for establishing passenger service again to East Africa would be establishing multiple bessinger services. Because as you know commercial air traffic is moralists suspended so we will be establishing these passenger services to ensure that responders humanitarian workers and all the personnel needed to mitigate a fight. This virus can arrive in countries where they need to and they can also leave where they need to go so we are enabling the humanitarian and responds. To be able to mitigate against this virus. This is Africa. Were talking about. So how is the World Food Program helping places like Yemen? Syria Wall Art of the hub. Will also be providing. It's not only for Africa. It we will be using part of the others as well or Yemen for example but this is not the only in Africa we would have one enact ca one in this above and one in South Africa we have a hop ensue bank in Malaysia for Asia and we have a hump in Dubai for the Middle East. And we have a hub in Panama for Latin American for Central America. So these are all going to be coming online as we speak and they would serve as the respective regions both in terms of cargo as well as in terms of personnel the eventual aim is to help ninety five countries in total all. Actually probably it's GONNA reach almost Henry Than Twenty affected countries so we have the capacity to scale up as needed of course if the funding is provided of course and. How much funding do you need? You're asking what three hundred fifty million dollars. How much do you have so far? We entered sixty was initial request. Now we are revising these figures depending on the data that we are getting supplies. As the sourcing and manufacturing increases we will be increasing our air assets in order to make sure that the supplies getting time to the affected countries enter the countries that needs.

Africa Addis Addis Ababa UN Dubai East Africa Yemen West Africa Daniel Johnson Mr Dodie WFP Amanda Dowdy Senior Director Of Operations South Africa Jack Ma Foundation Syria
Prioritizing Problems and 100 episodes

Talking Machines

09:27 min | 1 year ago

Prioritizing Problems and 100 episodes

"You are listening to talking machines. I'm Katherine Gordon Lawrence and from a closet during shutdown of the universe this is. This is how we're talking to each other this the for this episode. Neil and this is our one hundredth episode a very auspicious episode. Eight a marvelous case. I just want to be very clear. I'm not in a closet with Catherine. That would be infringing physical distancing rules. I think as we're now calling it. I am physically distant from Catherine but Katherine is in a closet and I can see the coats hanging on her head. Riches a good. Look actually a hundredth episode. That is exciting. Is it my hundred episode? I think it's just one hundred episode episode. Neil I'm sorry one hundred. I think I'm very healthy. Fifty eight or something like that. I think you're I think I believe you. Actually you're at fifty nine. Wow that was great. Guess Look at me and my capability in a summation very good. Yeah I guess the first question I wanNA ask you really is. How are you is everything? Okay where you are. How are things going before we talk about what we usually talk about? Let's check in with each other as people. Yeah what Crazy Times. So things are fine but obviously naught fine in the UK at the moment. And you know I think is going to be something that plays out over a long period of time but My wife's Italian things a a a bad in Italy And they're a bit further down this road than we are so they could become quite bad hair and I think there's a lot of apprehension about them but I also noticed that different groups seem to have different different levels of concern about this. I don't fully understand those different levels of concern but you certainly see the sudden people out in sort of light touching each other and then the rest of us going. Ron Ole giving them know what we do is we give them dirty looks because we in Britain. And that's how we in fools Social distancing which as I was saying I think perhaps physical distance things the right thing because we need to be social we dole out dirty looks that seems to be how we dealing with corrupt. I'm not sure as a sufficient response but I don't suppose it surprised me but you notice how widespread lack of understanding of exponential say is which I think is natural someone was. I watched a video. Where an Italian guy who named forgets me name forgets me and I forget his name actually in this case. I've forgotten how to speak so it touting I think Delana is his name was talking about how difficult it is to express an exponential in normal times that it's concept that is difficult for our brains to handle and I think perhaps many of us in machine learning much more used to thinking about quite used to it but I was really reflecting on that and thinking. Yeah it is hot and I think the difficulty of handling experts specs potentials combined with uncertainty around. What's going on? Is You know. Really at the heart of the challenges facing for this epidemic. Yeah absolutely is there. Been any interesting work by anyone that you've seen about predicting the impact or the. I think the modeling work is is very interesting. I would not want to be doing it. I was would be but I don't envy those that are having to do it. Because I work. In galveston proceeds occasion. I worked with the Padilla millages and was organizing conference in Sheffield and I remember one of the speakers because we were recording everything for the cameras to be switched off for period. Because they were about to. Present some speculative results on malaria. I think in East Africa and they didn't want those results to be broadcast until they confirmed that modeling because the implications for those people who are funding say mosquito nets and other interventions Quite serious so they didn't want misinformation to get out there and I think that this is a really interesting challenge for the machine learning community where our instinct is to sort of share things very widely quite early and that's a good instinct but this is difficulty the sharing Wash conclusion people are reading and interpreting this and of course that is going on quite a widespread level. So I think it's very interesting around open science like festival you use. It wants to understand the models people using and how they're doing things but secondly you don't want people to get the wrong impression by misusing model models only exists with the context and I think that's one of the biggest challenges of modeling is. Is You have to deeply understand the limitations so tools. I Actually Matthew House from University of Manchester shed a tool that was just stimulating. Effects of changing. All our is the number of expected number of people you expect to transmit the disease to and it was a differential equation model and he shed. It's on python is quite simple model and actually the conclusions you could draw from playing with similar to those of very if people are interested in this for the UK and us. Imperial College has released. A model is being widely looked up and has in theory changed the strategic approach of the UK government. But I'm really uncertain about whether that's true or not. It's whether it changed their approach or whether the the circumstances change their approach. It's so hard to know so people are calling clearly for openness and so the parties in favor of that pardon me then on the stance that some of these models need to be used within a certain context and I think the thing that never fails to impress me as how Cetin so many people are about what the right thing to do is or what the right conclusion is. I just can't be certain. I I feel that you look at these things in the decisions we're making They're gonNA have serious downstream consequences You know for a long time from now. Not just in the here and now the next month's but they have very serious downstream consequences riddled with uncertainty because the major events. Like oh it turns out the drug. Kills it straightaway? Awfully changes thinking. It turns out that you know. Well vaccines I think. The best batches eighteen-month very difficult situation and I almost feel it's dangerous. Even you're talking about in some sense. He's also hard because if you talk about it then your risk of spreading your own misunderstandings or it. It really does make me happy. The we have some understanding of uncertainty a lot of us in the community. Because you study that and I it's always interesting to be to what extent you can try and deploy that in your own decision making people you know Being faced with pretty serious questions like they may have An elderly relative with conditions who live some distance away from them and they've got to make a decision about do they visit or not because the potentially endangering that relative by visiting by increased risk of transmission but simultaneously by being isolated themselves and that relative being isolated at a time. When in some sense you kind of want to be close to family. That's not really a trade off and I think that you know in in machine learning and we all these folks Walker. What's the cost for? That doesn't really work. You know and actually way even when you look at these models they are trying to look at things like so the big trade off I think in these models is the threat to health in the short term versus the long term economic damage by being shot down and some people seem to claim that. That's no trade off that you have to save as many lives now as possible and other people play well. Actually you have to think long term about downstream effects. And I think you can make arguments both ways. So I don't think there's any pure ethical correctness here but I think What actually has happened is the world seems to have gone for the last one and you can't do the former on your own. Because downstream economic consequences will happen at a worldwide scale. So I think that that basically we've the default position has ended up from some. How game theoretic way that we attempt to minimise Nieta impact. And that certainly not a wrong decision as far as we know now but you know events may prove things to take different very challenging. I think what's also very interesting and has a big effect on the way the community will end up looking at things in the future. Is the difference with the capabilities. You get in countries like China where those much will and actually Israel. My understanding is. I don't know the details you will you have the security databases in Israel and in China. You have much more fine grain data collecting capabilities which of the things that we will worry about and it turns out in these situations. They may be quite simple tool. It's actually always interested me that tension between how do you maintain the liberty we expect from not having a data overseen

Katherine Gordon Lawrence Catherine Neil UK Israel China Imperial College Sheffield Ron Ole East Africa Padilla Millages Delana Italy Cetin Matthew House University Of Manchester Britain Walker
What are Kenya and Somalia really fighting about?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:25 min | 1 year ago

What are Kenya and Somalia really fighting about?

"For obvious reasons the idea of an old fashioned cross-border dust up between two neighboring nations seems right now almost quaint and perhaps the kind of thing likely to prompt replies in the circumstances along the lines of at this point who cares or not now leads where a bit busy nevertheless despite the best efforts of covert nineteen the world will keep turning and its constituent countries will continue to but against each other from time to time in East Africa in recent days. Somalia and Kenya have gone very close to going to war with each other and may get close. Astill the battlefield is jubilant. One of Somalia's five semi autonomous states. It lies just across Somalia's border with Kenya. Kenya regards drew ballooned as a vital buffet. Between it and Al Shabaab the fanatical Islamist militia which wreaks most of its havoc in Somalia but has also been responsible for large scale outrages in Kenya including the two thousand and thirteen attack on the West Gate Shopping Mall in Nairobi and the two thousand and fifteen attack on a university campus in Garissa accordingly Kenya has cultivated friendly relations with Jubal lands regional government and with jubilant president. Ahmed Mohamed Islam known colloquially as adobe Kenya has trained Madonna obeys militia and has troops of its own stationed injury bowland as part of the multinational African Union mission in Somalia and is also believed to have many more still camped under Kenya's own flag. This is a continuation of sorts of the invasion of Somalia Kenya undertook in two thousand and eleven in order to chase al-shabaab further north. Can US troops injury ballooned are not seeing as style occupiers? However indeed President Mugabe's regional government seems to get on better with Nairobi than it does with Mogadishu. The most recent unpleasantness appears to have begun with fighting between drew balloons own forces and Somali government troops the jubilation soldiers retreated over the border into Kenya and the Somali troops followed them. At which point. Can you took an interest? The fighting appears to have centred on the town of Mandera a town wedged between the Kenya. Somali border and the Delaware River which delineates Kenya's border with Ethiopia attorney casualties on both sides left people. Each data to save bullets. Were one succumb today. A diplomatic exchanges between Kenya and Somalia. Since have been terse verging on abrupt. Kenya has jumped about an unwarranted attack on its sovereign territory by foreign soldiers and so forth. Somalia has retorted to the effect that this is a bit rich coming from a country with thousands of its soldiers parked more or less permanently on the other side of its border. Kenya's desire to put physical distance between itself. And the PESTILENTIAL MARAUDERS OF AL. Shabaab is reasonable enough but it may not be the only or even the main reason why relations between Arab and Mogadishu have deteriorated as far as they have excitingly for fans of obscure maritime territorial disputes and. Come on who isn't the two countries are also at odds of a sea border. Exactly is the area in contention the border of the two countries when it comes to the seats and the only way to explain where the disputed portion of Indian Ocean is without incurring angry correspondence from either Kenya or Somalia. Although to risk inviting saving emails from both is to say that it's either off Somalia's southern coast all of Kenya's Northern Coast. It will come as little surprise to listeners that the stretch of Ocean in question abounds with oil and gas deposits. Nineteen outbreak may focus Kenyan and Somali attention elsewhere and or it may offer a party to this argument what it perceives as cover for decisive action. There has been some suggestion. That Kenya has consented actually annexing portions of southern Somalia both to deter Al Shabaab and to further its claims on the ocean of what is presently the two countries shed coast or there may be the option of mediation by Ethiopian. Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Laureate Abby who has facilitated talks between Kenya and Somalia before I also accept this award on behalf of Africans and citizens of the world for whom the Rim of peace has often turned into a nightmare of war. Today I stand here in front of you talking about this because of fit I call them my way to pay through the dusty training so four years ago or international justice may yet prevail. Somalia has for some years been seeking an adjudication on the maritime boundary from the International Court of Justice in The Hague the I. C. J. is presently due to rule in June. But that like just about everything else may. Now be

Kenya Somalia Mogadishu Nairobi Indian Ocean Somali Government Al Shabaab President Mugabe Ahmed Mohamed Islam East Africa International Court Of Justice Mandera Adobe West Gate Shopping Mall Delaware River AL Garissa African Union Shabaab Prime Minister
Pension Time Bombs

Rich Dad Radio Show

08:17 min | 1 year ago

Pension Time Bombs

"Today our subject is It started off as a five piece. Subject is called. Who stole my pensions. And the more we do these things the number of people coming out of the woodwork. Who went to tell their stories about what happened to the. Pensions keeps growing. So let's start off as a five program of five unit program is now going to ten and the reason it's important for all of you. Listen to this. You know the story about the pension time bomb is because it is the biggest story that nobody knows about. And it's only now making the news. And the reason pension time bomb is so important because as much like this corona virus and all that is a systemic problem like chronic viruses. About you and me. Getting the SNIFFLES. It's about the whole supply chains breaking down all over the world which will cause crashes all over the world. This is number three as start off as a five unit program and now it's expanding so app some very exciting people who just want to tell all and let the world know how this pension program is going to blow up and it's GonNa bring down the biggest crisis bigger than corona virus bigger than the subprime of two thousand eight and Becker than they Student Loan Program simply says you've been ripped off. That's that's really what's happening here being ripped off and one of the ways that Wall Street the US government and the banking system. Reps this office via our pensions so stay tuned on the Rich Dad. Show have more of these programs come to let you know how Wall Street the government and the Crooks of the world have been stealing our wealth via different vehicles and our this vehicles pension. One of them is student loan. One is your home mortgage one is the stock market. So this is a very important series of programs started off as five and what might stop at ten whenever no so our guest. Today again is tense Adele. Here's my co author on the book. Who stole my pension and our second gases. Mark Rain and Mark. Green is in the book who stole my pension and mark is a thirty year veteran a ups driver from upstate. New York he is former. He is formerly the organizer and president of the Teamsters Alliance for Pension Protection Aka T. a. p. p. a. grassroots pension watchdog organization mark led to raise funds to perform the first ever forensic investigation of a union multi employer plan the New York State teamsters conference pension and retirement fund. They are robbed blind. So Ted. Let's start with you because you're my co author on who stole my pension. Please give them a little little bite. Your background about why you and I are interested in pensions. My Dad didn't have a pension poor dad and your dad that have a pension so please introduce yourself tent and then how you got interested in. Pensions sure thanks Robert. My background is I'm a former. Fdic attorney and I have done over a trillion in forensic investigations of pensions. And some of the first investigations. Ever done and one of the things that I uncovered it in these investigations. Is that the reason these pensions were? Failing was not because not enough. Money was going into them or the benefits. Being paid out to workers to rich was because the people running the pensions were grossly. Mismanaging the money what we call Bros. Malpractice generally crafty and For the investigation ideas more threes. Pensions The New York State. Teamsters pension is in the book In the exhibit to the and that was the first forensic investigations of over one hundred. Twenty one multi employer pensions. That are going to be taken over by the government and so that was the first one that was ever done so and also You know like my dad lost his pension because of corruption again in government and he ran for Lieutenant Governor of the State of Hawaii and got crushed and lost his pension. And what up until your dad? My Dad was working in the intelligence community so he disappeared in nineteen seventy one in east Africa and it turned out he'd been murdered in Africa in doing an investigation for the American government of being the brutal dictator so since he just could not be found his life insurance wouldn't pay social security wouldn't say his state couldn't be pro baited so there was nothing available for those of us in the survivors of the family. Also so he had no mention either so so one of the reasons I think Ted ireson paddock. Oh you know brothers on this project. A book called. Who STOLE MY PENSION? Is that our fathers. Had their pensions taken. And we're very concerned at this moment. There's many mothers and fathers who will find out if if they already have not found out they have no pension and that's why the but it's more than just a pension is the ripple effect like the corona virus is going to have upon the whole system of the world economy so mark grain Plea thank you and welcome to the program. And I'm glad you raise the money to hire Ted's saddle to go in after the pension so tell us your story Mark Place. Thank you for having me on. I really appreciate you guys working on this project and bringing attention to this pretty serious issue which is affecting us in upstate. New York and of course the whole country so You know how I met Ted. You know it started back in two thousand ten actually the story. We have to step back. A little bit are fun. Started sending US letters in the mail saying We were under sixty five percent funded which is critical status so there was a law passed under the protection. Act of two thousand six. It said the trust. These hasn't make benefit cuts and implemented funding improvement plans. So that's what we first started forming committees. That's when I started getting people together calling attention to this problem and we saw a lot of irregularities with the trustees with telling US misleading statements and we call them out on so as the years went by kept saying. There's enough money in plan to pay low the commerce fabulous and you have nothing to worry about. That's what they were telling people publicly. This is thirty. Four thousand member plan with three or four thousand families involved. Keep in mind privately. They were telling us that the fun needed a fourteen percent. Investment returns every year for the next ten to fifteen years just to break even and not take that step so we knew they were not being honest with the participants. So we had these meetings parking lot meetings town halls and we started raising money in two thousand sixteen to get some inter interventions and. That's where Ted Payments. So thank you ted. I appreciate your work on this investigation and unfortunately we find that the plan was grossly mismanaged and now. I can't retire. You know me along with thousands of other people can't retire because the benefit is way too low and so That's the story as of right now. We can't get the money back but certainly wants to reform of pension legislation to make sure this doesn't happen to anyone

TED Teamsters Alliance For Pension Teamsters American Government New York New York State United States Ted Payments Ted Ireson Mark Rain Sniffles Fdic Becker Adele Hawaii Mark Place Africa
East Africa's huge locust outbreak threatens regional food security

UN News

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

East Africa's huge locust outbreak threatens regional food security

"To east Africa. Now where a wave of desert? Locusts is forming new swarms in Kenya Ethiopia and Somalia and threatening the main crop harvest in May and June the warning from the World Food Program or WFP follows an upsurge in Lucas colonies. That started in two thousand nineteen the worst in twenty five years for and Somalia and in seventy years for Kenya swamps have also spread to Eritrea Tanzania and Uganda and W P is especially worried for South Sudan the UN agency is trying to reach a five million people in need that this year but is two hundred eight million dollars. Short of the resources needed to mount an effective response according to WFP more than half of South Sudan's at twelve million people will face severe food insecurity at height of the annual hunting season from May to July and as many as twenty thousand people particularly in the worst hit counties of Duke and Kobo in Jonglei State face catastrophic food shortages between now and April.

South Sudan WFP Somalia Kenya East Africa UN Eritrea Kobo Uganda Tanzania Jonglei State Ethiopia
South Africa Declares Disaster as Coronavirus Cases Increase

BBC World Service

04:12 min | 1 year ago

South Africa Declares Disaster as Coronavirus Cases Increase

"It's also a roundup looking at South Africa this morning as the president has declared a national state of disaster to deal with the corona virus outbreak normal countries on the continent have cases East Africa is now the last region to confirm infections Siddhant says a fifty year old man has died Wells Ethiopia reported a Japanese man who recently traveled to the country has tested positive to covert nineteen we'll get the latest from East Africa shortly but first to South Africa and I'm joined now by letting them to cheat journalist and editor at power ninety eight point seven that says talk radio station in that go tank welcome to Newsday thank you for joining us later bring this up because we've been good to have you here brings up to speed on what what's the latest you have us have figures white how many cases so currently we have sixty one cases have gone from one to sixty one ten days we will also just confirmed our first local transmission case in the president's announcement last night so that's where we are in terms of numbers we haven't had any reported deaths and when we look at this other countries for example when you look at the Far East when you look at Taiwan the students as soon as the outbreak happened they started monitoring they started testing people they would go on forever planes to test people coming into the country from China what is south Africa's been risk a response to that been so far as far as testing goes in terms of travelers especially as our main international airports including our tumble it which is in Johannesburg in not allowing people and especially if you're coming from overseas and online you and until that check your temperature so the only screening testing measures in case at ease I'm also entry and we are trying to sort of mitigate the risk way possible if you call and get off the plane then what happens are you are you taken into isolation what happens to you then I would imagine so I'm you know I would government has sort of stayed up in the working quite closely with the airports to manage this old able to stop I quickly wearing protective gear to also protect them from any sort of risk of the virus and so they they all these measures in place and they are sort of take the next three questions especially about you how hard would it be then to introduce control measures in the country like South Africa where you have townships you have informed informal settlements you have a large number of people traveling on overcrowded trains in minibus taxis that kind of thing I mean it's going to be a challenge isn't it sixteen a difficult I mean they have risen in stage renal carriages people to limit nonessential travel specially domestic travel by air rail and taxi but this is the form of transport that most people use it so it is difficult there's no way of monitoring that is no way of noting it I think what they're going to have to do is just sort of security or brother hygiene control measures these transport interchanges and that's the most we can do at this stage because they haven't announced any sort of bans on the use of commuting by taxi or bus coming and we talk about self isolation which is difficult but possible if you if you live in a house or even a flats with several bedrooms you know it's possible for one member of the family Shotton cells away in South Africa you're talking about shared living spaces shared by many people absolutely when most people live in abject poverty and so full five people living one single room there isn't another soul thing to go into and the government's going to have to look at that in terms of what they do they do to mitigate that they obviously now with it being detained a national disaster they are able to access certain resources which they wouldn't ordinarily have been able to access this includes setting up temporary accommodation for those at risk when necessary emergency rapid sort of emergency systems that they're putting in place and they are trying to identify certain areas in different majors in districts way that can be set up so should the need arise they will be right

South Africa President Trump
East Africa locusts threaten food security across subregion

BBC World Service

05:12 min | 1 year ago

East Africa locusts threaten food security across subregion

"As billions of desert locust swarm around East Africa today the U. N. is warning that Ethiopia south Sudan Somalia and Kenya stand to face serious food insecurity locusts can eat their own body weight in a day but they don't hunt the balance and then next stop can be hard to predict as to in which found when he was sent to film the creatures in action when does a swarm of locusts become a plague my girlfriend offices I prepared my overnight bag I wasn't sure what point the little insects technically go biblical but I knew we weren't quite there yet what we were seeing was an upsurge over from the pictures that were emerging desperate farmers trying to defend that crops Somali soldiers shooting to scare them off I thought they'd need a miracle to save that harvests the question of scale was just one of many as we prepare to film the insects munching their way across East Africa that will literally billions of them so I was sure it would be easy to catch them on camera there were reports of swarms coming in from the east but that's also where the jihadist group al Shabab operates so we headed north instead the plan was to join helicopter surveillance team we imagine that we champion flights will swarm first thing in the morning while they were still asleep and grab some lovely pictures in the golden lights of the rising sun simple really except that it wasn't you see the locus were on the March because of the torrential rains that have drenched this continent for months and right on cue the heavens opened the helicopter was grounded so we carried on the A. two towards the town of Manali writes on Kenya's border with Ethiopia that would be put in touch with the local agriculture and livestock offices Francis and Coppola they welcomed us to their sponsors office phone calls resting outside Francis the more experienced of the two the motive for nearly three decades he told me he'd never seen anything like this the last invasion on this scale happened more than seventy years ago but despite not for now at least they seem to be coping with the crisis they located a couple of swarms they will be reaching us in a few hours while we waited they showed us the damage the little cross office can do we drove to a farm just outside of town the same rains that have brought the swarms had made the roads nearly impossible an old man holding a flimsy metal sheets stood in the gateway fashion from phone bushes he banged it with a wooden stick as he showed us around his ravaged plots the locust it struck the day before countless millions of them he had tried to protect his field with the dean from the metal sheet but it was no use they'd striptease beans and maize crop at his weather beaten face was a mixture of sorrow and resignation we were getting powerful testimony but we still haven't actually seen any locusts it turns out they are pretty hard to film they move fast really fast unknowingly they also ignore both the roads and borders the swarms we've been promised a turn north into Ethiopia so we headed instead to a watering hole when herds of camels were sheltering from the mid day sun hit the livestock officer Francis explained it's not just hunger that locals can Coles as neighboring counties lose their grazing lands to the insects that hurt his move into new territory conflict inevitably follows then after a few more hours of driving around we got a call from our diets over there they yelled all I could make out was a storm cloud on the horizon or was it smoke as I was squinting cameraman was rushing to set up a man possessed he'd seen what I'd missed millions hundreds of millions of the tiny creatures forming a cloud kilometers long and coming towards us but then the wind changed direction and so did the locusts we jumped into a constant chase the swarm down bumpy roads well when we got there they turned again back towards the very spot we just left by the time we returned they will already passing by we raced into the bushes trying to catch either the insects or the local boys who were chasing them off both were faster than us after a sweaty and frustrating half hour we got a few shots but lots of phones and all legs and a mildly sprained ankle the next day we decided the only way forward was to copy the insects and try and take to the air again as we headed back south the weather cleared the helicopters were flying this time luck was on our site the chopper landed in the middle of a huge sleeping swarm finally the pictures were incredible I know what was done but the Lucas are still in the March they have laid billions of eggs on that way which will be hatching the answer to my girlfriend's question of when they become a plague could soon be a parent for all of us to

East Africa
Locusts swarm into crisis-hit South Sudan as plague spreads across east Africa

Del Walmsley

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Locusts swarm into crisis-hit South Sudan as plague spreads across east Africa

"The worst locust outbreak the parts of East Africa seen seventy years has reached south Sudan a country where roughly half the population already faces hunger after years of civil war around two thousand locusts were spotted inside the country this week the locust to travel across the region and swarms the size of major cities experts say they're only effective control is aerial spraying with

East Africa South Sudan
"east africa" Discussed on UN News

UN News

08:02 min | 1 year ago

"east africa" Discussed on UN News

"Of the rainy season in March Keith craftsman senior locust forecasting officer with the U N Food and Agriculture Organization said the agency seeking seventy six million dollars to scale up aerial aerial spraying against the voracious locus and protect livelihoods. Deanne pen asked him about the likelihood of a humanitarian catastrophe in a region already rented fragile by recent cycles cycles of poor rains drought and severe flooding. Indeed the likelihood in and the potential for that to occur is very high At this moment because of those does good rains. And also because of the large number of of swarms that have formed in the past few months and the size of these. Some of these swarms are just just enormous for example once warming in northeastern Kenya about a month ago was about sixty kilometers long but by forty kilometers wide right so this is a a single swarm if you imagine that a locus eats his own way to food in one day which is about two two and a half grams and a square kilometer of swarm contains a somewhere between forty to eighty million insects. Imagine how many insects were wearing that one huge swarm and and roughly as they could eat in one day the same amount of food as about eighty four million people can eat when you travel to the regions. And you could you meet with local people. What is it like for them Living under these conditions I mean even just to see like this before million locusts coming at you. I've just come back from the Horn of Africa. I was in Kenya recently in just a few days ago I was in northeastern Somalia. So these these two areas that are very hard. Hit by by the the locus in Kenya. Of course it's just shock for the people because they haven't seen these locust since the late nineteen forties or late nineteen fifties at scale or magnitude. So this is only something that they've heard about stories from their grandparents and now suddenly they're in the midst of this. They're actually Having to see you see these large swarms in the sky that they'd heard about and of course if you're a farmer and and this is you know your crop that you rely on for your livelihood. The food security of your family perhaps your community and you see kind of this cloud on on the horizon probably initially. You're happy because you say this is great right because I grow crops rely on rain and so here's a cloud on. It's going to bring some rain. That's much needed to the area of for my crops but as that cloud comes closer to you and you see that it's not a rain cloud it's cloud of moving things and then you realize of course immune the only thing that does something like that in the Sky Sky on our locus and then suddenly you know your grandparents stories are coming through here and you know a a swarm of locusts can come into your field in the morning and by midday it has eaten everything stripped everything to stubble and so this represents a loss of your your your crop for that year but often this occurs in years of abundant rainfall. So you're a growing extra crop for the lean years and so this represents not only lost for this year but a loss for for the future seasons in northeastern Somalia. We're in an area where it's very important for pastoralists. It's natural vegetation on the plains of of northern Somalia where the camels graze and the goats and the other Small animals eat this natural food rely on the on the green pastures awesome for their health of course on that translates into milk for the children to sustain a nutritious growth. And they're the the. The past royalists workforce very much alarm be because the swarms had already come into into the areas of of northeastern Somalia and had eaten a substantial portion of that natural vegetation. And we saw that. You could see that in and you can tell the difference of a vegetation's eaten between by locust storms in that eaten by by these small animals and so they're very much worried at and they're worry a has increase even more because now though swarms that eight those pasture crops. They've laid eggs now. Those eggs have hatched. They're they're in in in the young Stage of the locus. There's still About a two or three more weeks before those young locus those hoppers. What we call them will form new immature swarms and mind you? This is the most gracious stage of the past S. Life Cycle and what action is. FAO Hoping to see From the international community because of course this is a problem affecting not not just the region but could eventually affect other parts of the world well because of the scale and the magnitude of the problem and his potential threat not only to affect this region but then other regions. NFL has appealed for initial amount of seventy six. A million dollars to immediately scale up current efforts on that is current the area control operations as well as to protect livelihood aerial operations. What exactly this is a spring? The swarms settled swarms early early in the morning. A late in the afternoon using aircraft in addition of course there are ground operations. There there usually undertaken against the wingless staged most of the locus after those eggs have hatched Arrow control operations on are the only effective A means of controlling The the situation we should when it reaches such a scale otherwise it just simply overwhelms any other possible responses and as FAO Quite hopeful that it will receive all of this funding considering all the other crises we have going on in the world concurrently including in that particular region. Yes we've appealed for the seventy six million dollars about out. Half of that is for the control operations but the the other half is to protect livelihoods And and this is a lesson that we've learned from from the last upsurge which is about fifteen years ago We we spent most most of the money at that time just for control operations and as a result there there was a kind of a negative impact to livelihood. So it's very important to try to balance an Address both issues in parallel at the same time rather than than post factum. FAO In particular in the end the UN system In general has moved extremely fast to mobilize an end to bring this to the attention of our international partners because frankly the force is on fire now not in two weeks from now or not two months from now so urgent action is required immediately to upscale those operations after in progress now to make sure that they not only continue but they grow in order to reduce as much as possible. Those locust infestations the stations. We're not trying to eradicate the desert locusts. Were just trying to reduce those those numbers on that. I mentioned earlier. So that the that reduces the burden on on the livelihoods food security in in the Horn of Africa. And at the same time we must be very cognizant of where this this upsurge is occurring. It's occurring in a part of Africa. That's extremely vulnerable to any disruptions in terms of of crop production and Animal Production and livelihoods the Horn of Africa as you know has faced droughts In the recent past asked and now they have floods and now in addition they they have desert locus a large portion of the population in the Horn of Africa. Of course are pastoralists. Joy Isn't and farmers and there's some twenty million people that are at the near famine level. There is not famine but the we know that there is that that risk and so I think Certainly the upsurge of locus in that area is potentially a very Dane Dangers..

Somalia Africa Kenya U N Food and Agriculture Organ Deanne pen Sky Sky officer NFL UN Joy
"east africa" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"In east Africa. Our major international investigation of wine, Catherine arbs in Nairobi Ethiopian Airlines has announced on its Twitter account that it is grounded as Boeing seven thirty-seven max eight fleet until further notice a day after a crash killed all one hundred fifty seven people on board one of its planes of the same type the airline has four of these planes. China ordered its airlines to suspend operations of their 737 max jets. This is the second crash of a Boeing seven thirty seven max in five months on the search is on for the plane's recorders this plane crashed on the ground. You know, you have a debris field and that too makes things easier when a plane even in not terribly mysterious. Fashion crashes in the water it can be years before you even have the debris field have the black boxes airline weeklies journalists. Kaplan CBS news update, I'm Tom Foty. News time is two thirty two. Here's your traffic and transit on the twos. And this just coming into the traffic center. We have a building fire tenth and Sedgley in center city number seeing any delays except for on Sedgley fire is on the scene there. But volume is light in that air. Just be mindful again that's tenth and Sedgley avenue. We have a building fire going on there. We'll keep you updated on that situation. Otherwise, we're looking good in center city. Vine expressway is clear river to river, not seeing any problems inner out of center city on the Schuylkill expressway. Now, we have an accident and upper pots grove, Farmington avenue and north State Street. That's been for good. Our now police are on the scene to help you out in that area and fire has been dispatched to that location. But then good onto to four twenty two now racing any problems on the blue route, four seventy six everything. Pretty quiet this watch out for some patchy fog and certain areas. KYW twenty four hour traffic center. I'm.

Sedgley Boeing Nairobi Ethiopian Airlines Vine expressway Schuylkill expressway Catherine arbs Twitter east Africa China CBS pots grove Tom Foty twenty four hour five months
"east africa" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"And extra legal tactics to sow dissension among the radicals at the end of nineteen sixty nine Fred Hampton and Mark Clark to Chicago Panthers have been killed at home during a police raid. Police reports claim that Hampton and Clark had fired at officers which was later contradicted by forensic evidence. The debts created a wave of fear within the party and that affected the Kansas City chapter as well and late October of nineteen sixty nine Pete was visited by the FBI, the ATF and the Kansas City swat team who took him to the state of Kansas to charge him. They arrested me and charge was. Listen carefully that one year before I had bought in upon shop a nineteen dollar single shot. Shotgun. And transported it across state land. Now, they couldn't prove that because they didn't get the gun from me. They got it from another panther in Missouri. Bought it again, this idea that panther got it took it over into Missouri there from him in arrested him pizza, take fellow Panthers between states to do survival training, which meant he had brought guns across state lines in the past this would have been fairly common especially during hunting season. And p says he didn't know it was a legal. So the Pete in Charlotte. The charge seem like a completely trumped up one. So they changed chart they said he either transported or caused it to be transported and from that they concoct it three charges from that one act that would have led to fifteen years in prison. Pete was sentenced to four years in prison on October twenty six nineteen seventy and then he said Ali. But I'll allow you to stay out on bail. That was the funniest thing. I could not understand why he did that. Now, you know you've seen enough crime movies when they send they put the handcuffs on your. They take you away. Pete was worried that this was some kind of setup he says that a black police officer warned him his life was in danger. You remember Kenny Rogers? I know you do the gambler you remember that? And he said he said he said you got to know win to hold them. No windows phone them. No one to walk away. No one to run while it was common says it told me it's time to leave now. Pizza bell. And despite being watched by just about everyone with the badge. He felt his only choice was to leave the United States as soon as possible. The American exiles and Africa was produced by cholera with a New Yorker radio hour that was part one. We'll continue next week when a little Neil escaped the country in the sky. Midnight came no phone, call one car game, two of okay? And we was like this ain't going happen. So I'd taken up itchy wheat. And he had taken off his clothes. And we were like, I don't know what's going to happen after that. But it doesn't look like we're on escape. That's next time on the New Yorker radio hour..

Pete Panthers Ali Missouri Kansas City Fred Hampton Kansas Chicago Panthers Mark Clark Kansas City swat Kenny Rogers FBI ATF United States Charlotte Neil officer p
"east africa" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"As you go home girl. And I said you get your life together. United just gone. In nineteen sixty nine. Peak permission to start a panther chapter in his hometown. Embiid. Some really good brothers. Bill Whitfield, Keith Hinch and myself, the three of us decided to form the Kansas City chapter. The Black Panther party. In june. Pete was returning from a speaking tour throughout the midwest. Hit left the Kansas City Panthers. Chapters in the hands of his younger, brother, Brian. A friend dropped off Pete at the corner. Not too far from the panther pet. Prost I could hit this about musing boom to Bill don't vote at the music is rock and just dance. Around. You could almost see. Spoke imitating from the port. L is wrong with you. What are you doing? And. Everyone was speechless. They couldn't deny that they were violating the one important rule. It will not be allowed to use marijuana during office hours. What if it would you good smoke during those hours now after you, finish your office words, okay? Now, remember we're talking about teenagers and to them thirty year old Pete was no one to mess with then Pete spotted Charlotte. I'd never seen before pretty young skinny woman. I said who in the hell are you? My mind him is Charlie. He'll I said, well, why are you here? And she said I joined the Black Panther party. I want a struggle for the people. I don't know who the hell you I said, but shut up and dolts another damn word, and I turned my head to start first in at the other kids, and she said, you can't tell me not to talk and all of the other Panthers gas. And I said, what did you say to me? You can't tell me doctor, Tom. My father told me never allow anyone to start me from expressing my feelings, and my views, and you can't tell me to as you dare. You dare not say another word, I'm gonna talk a have a right to toe, and I thought to myself. Oh god. I said this is going to be trouble as I don't like it. I don't know why. She's and I'm gonna get rid over the last thing. I do I was thoroughly hooked on being panther. And I remember cutting out or the goals and pacing it on my wall. You know, one of those lists of brother Pedo Neo. And I never thought I would meet him actually, Charlotte hill a high school student in Kansas had cut out a photo from the Kansas City star it showed Pete protesting at the mayor's office. You remember what the what you're reading about Pete at? At the time before you had met him. Like, yes. Yes. Well, of course, most of the stories were negative on the on the news, you know. And that's when we were still being called, negroes, you know, and this negro is patrolled police in the police, which was one of the policies of the Black Panther party won the pitchers that was very prominent was when they were holding their of, shotguns, and rifles and announcing the formation of the Black Panther party. I will never forget that. You know, in spite of all this negative stuff that I was reading, you know, Panthers racist Panthers of wild people Panthers. Mad men and women. I also was hearing about the breakfast for schoolchildren program..

Black Panther party Pete Kansas City Panthers Panthers Kansas City Bill Whitfield Charlie Kansas marijuana Charlotte Keith Hinch Brian Tom thirty year
"east africa" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on The New Yorker Radio Hour

"I'm Pete O'Neal at seventy eight year old elder black man who else could I possibly be our story. Picks up in nineteen sixty nine when Pedo Neal was the chairman of the Kansas City, Missouri chapter of the Black Panther party. And in that year, the Black Panthers at the height of their influence with chapters all across the United States, and they loomed very very large in the American imagination for people in the counterculture who revere them and for their opponents who demonize them FBI director, j Edgar Hoover declared the Panthers where the greatest internal threat to US national security as far as the government was concerned people like Pedo, Neil enemies of the state, our producer Colella interviewed on Neil Tanzania where he's been living for nearly fifty years. Pete was a prominent member of the Black Panther party. But he wasn't always a radical person bent on ending. Depression. He has a fairly checkered past and he's tired of talking about it. But of course, I pressed them. I came up onto us where all the great jazz giants were everything all the hustlers and the pimps and the prostitutes, and these people from the age of nine were my professors, they inculcated in me a way of thinking. I don't even know if I really need to be talking about this. But nonetheless, they inculcated into my psyche. A manner of thinking that is very street oriented, est square people just don't think that way, they really don't from fairly young age. Pete was primarily a street hustler and small time pimp. He had just two concerns in life making money fast and staying far away from the police, but he had an argument with the wife of a police officer and the law caught up to him Pete needed help any thought maybe the Black Panthers could help him. So he went to the headquarters in Oakland. They had no interest in his personal affairs. But they encouraged him to stay and participate and political education classes, they started to talk to me about great revolutionaries people who had struggled and sacrifice and love. Their lives for what for the benefit of the people for the benefit of the people can said my God by God. I've been looking at this thing wrong to me was like what I am magin a born again Christian experiences when he seemed the light. I went back to Kansas City pumped. Filled with revolutionary favor. In nineteen sixty six Bobby Seale and human Newton created a ten point program for the new year stab list. Black Panther party. The back down the part of it self-defense, Bobby. Draw a basic platform while news coverage has tended to focus on the armed self defense aspect of yoga nation. Most of it was about community based social programs. The point was not to attack the government per se, but rather to empower marginalized peoples organize themselves and pursue their own interests. Won't freedom power to determine the destiny by black community full employment people. Number three, what housing fit Deaton higher than fish shelter human being four one all black, man. Big dent for military survey a bad. Get an education. Why black people community teaches us the to nature of the decadent racist society and the teach black people and young black brothers and sisters their Platon decided because if they don't know they place into science and in the world, they can't relate to anything else. Pete stayed in Oakland at the Panthers headquarters for three weeks, he returned home and decided he was finished with petty crime and pimping young women. There was this one girl who worked for him, and they were living together to told that Lou girl child, call home. Let's go now you'll make..

Black Panther party Pete O'Neal Kansas City Oakland Pete Edgar Hoover Panthers Bobby Seale Depression Missouri Pedo Neal United States chairman FBI Colella Tanzania Neil director producer Lou
"east africa" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Would it take to acquire citizenship? That's that's you know, something that will be. Well, there are a lot of African nations had a more amenable to it. You know, but it is not that difficult. If you wanted to really live in a nation. You go and learn to culture learn to people. Yeah. You can do that is it's very possible and people do it all the time. We can get a whirlwind trip price. No. There's always a one way trip. Yeah. I brother Levy, man wise. Look, we gotta take a break. Don't go into place is six o'clock time, you know, don't go into place for for eight nine two two seven zero three go check it out. America's I don't play one things. I love about travel. What it does is open your eyes to the possibilities. That the world is not just in Atlanta. I've always been a travel always been explorer. And when I made the decision Elma fifth birthday every year. I'm going to take at least one trip to take people with me. Last year was our opening Morocco because I had gone to Morocco before. And so what you find is Africa is varied as estates here. I remember Africa is a continent. It is not a country. And so from North Africa, the east Africa, the central Africa, all other nations are very different, and this one will be Egypt and the opium and in one trip and in short order, we've been say that we don't made I circled around the entire continent. But come and go. To do is call that'd be one one way ticket if their hook you up Jeremy glad hooky up, and but one of the things I tell people go check it out we've done, but I want to go to Israel. I'm a stay over there. And. Been over there. Know what he relies on? And as it on. I am added them. Now, let did it. I'm good look at we gotta take a break. We'll be back as news and talk thirteen eighty wwl care. Call us at four zero four eight nine two two seven. Oh, three on news talk thirteen eighty.

Africa Morocco North Africa central Africa east Africa Elma Levy Atlanta opium America Jeremy Egypt Israel
"east africa" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

Showcase from Radiotopia

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on Showcase from Radiotopia

"Silly la. I did my DNA tos. Okay. A while ago. You know, I am from Sudan in east Africa. Yes. So Meyer results told me pretty much what I already now I'm from east Africa, some North Africa, some west Africa, some Arabian peninsula, and nothing was really new to me sounds very beautiful. Actually, I like the sound of that. Then you like me because that's what that's who. I am. Yeah. So you took the test because I wanted to see if there were any surprises that I could bring up to my mom them like, but you're not that there's like maybe war more blackness than they thought. Maybe there's like Libya like were were just from like west Africans, South Africa. There's like no era blood or something like that. So you did the testify not if you were blacker than you actually are. Yeah. Oh because you wanted to. Kind of in your face. Like I wanted to see if we had any surprises in our in our in our DNA, you know, because I mean, again is not something people talk about a lot. But there is privilege if you are more from the Arabian peninsula, right then Africa, then west Africa or South Africa, particularly not north and east. Right. That's interesting to bring home look Ghana Senegal. Yeah. You know, South Africa. So what about you? What about your ancestry? Why are you doing this test? What do you wanna know? Actually. I'm not even sure if I really do wanna know that's why haven't done the test. And so long you said, you know, it's been around for so long. But honestly, I'm totally fine with just being black. But I do want an answer to this question..

South Africa east Africa west Africa North Africa Libya Sudan Meyer Ghana Senegal
"east africa" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

Healthcare Triage Podcast

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on Healthcare Triage Podcast

"Any major issues in that front. We spend, you know, certain number of weeks where we're out of the country. And then we're right back at it with things going onto we have not seen the large impact from unrest there. And in fact, Kenya historically has been a stable country within east Africa. And so we've found it important to continue to work on the system in that way. And. We get you know, I'm as Americans panicked about unrest in other countries. But has it been is it overblown by our news year? Or is it it is often. I mean, you often are seeing pictures and video from the the places where there might be the worst few things going on where we work in western Kenya were primarily am is has been very calm. And we definitely wanted to be cautious. When we have learners involved in and the university has taken a lot of precautions in terms of when we think something's going to be happening, politically really being careful, but we have not had problems. It's you know, it's been an incredibly stable place. Again, the fact that we've been partnering there since nineteen eighty nine we are parts of the departments in which we work at the medical school. We have a lot of close connections built up. So it's really been a very safe place for us in in that way in as we translate our work into other places elsewhere in east Africa like Uganda and Tanzania working elsewhere in southern Africa. And so on were able to take the weight of that partnership in terms of what it means that we have. Strong East African partner as well. And I think that gives us a credibility and in that way of safety inability to continue in other places, also so Nauman -ticipant in all the emails. I'm going to get people like oh my God. How do I get this job? So let's talk about like what where do you actually spend your time these days? Well, I do have this administrative leadership role with the medical school here at Indian university. So I spend some of my time here, I do make multiple visits to Kenya. In particular each year, and I do increasingly play in international role in what in in guiding research related to kids in lessons with HIV worldwide. And so that does bring me to a number of other places internationally.

Kenya east Africa Nauman Indian university Africa partner Tanzania Uganda
"east africa" Discussed on Slate Money

Slate Money

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on Slate Money

"I think the thing that impresses me most with the peso is uh for those are the know is a the move on money system in kenya which is spread to tanzania gun in a couple of other countries in east africa um and you know it's become the full 40 percent of kenya's gdp in the uh well not accounted for but forty pills of you due to be random of a ruined route through an mp weirdly is is one of those talk down things right is more or less invented by safari com and everyone was like yeah we trust the very come we'll give my money and then we'll use it will use that money that we have on our phones for cell service and we'll use it for a million other things as well right comes like this sort of defacto currency the way you pay for things yeah yeah exactly that's and the big question within pace of for many years was always like can it expand beyond kenya effectively and does it need to have that monopoly status where you know is the only game in town the only other country where i see you know that level live mobile payments his china he was also very good value downplays yeah i i think the the the story with the pay says kind of an interesting one in in that it was almost one of those islands weather one of the problems in that happens a lot in africa especially with technology is you have an issue with regulators and this was one of those ones where.

kenya mobile payments tanzania east africa africa 40 percent
"east africa" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"That children need to grow healthy so that's a new area for us but you know we're we're open to lots of different things so long as it can be have trained by the the same people can go through our distribution channel and and be financed crop rashar insurance is one of those things right absolutely yes i mean unfortunately this past year there is a terrible drought in of east and southern africa and crop insurance historically has been for rich people that if you think about it rich people are are not the kind of people that need insurance they can cover their risks its poor people that need it were now east africa's largest insurer of crops and we wanna keep improving that product so that farmers are covered for their harvests i want to speak you a little bit more mad about your corporate culture and especially the investment you have made in developing and trained your people tell us about it yeah i think what's some people equate nonprofits with you know just goodhearted people out there delivering services but you know we really want to borrow from the best of the business world which is really about you know good professional development and training no matter what level you're out at one eight refund you're probably going to be spending at our organization thirty percent of your time in some kind of a formal training program a leadership accelerate program we have examples of frontline staff who as i said of a primary education in your one they might be working with two hundred farmers by year three or four they might be in charge of a whole district of a few thousand farmers and they're getting technical meant leadership skills from us were trying to make up for the lack of education in that happens in rural africa and that's really critical because you know it's much harder to attract with the salaries we pay very well educated african national staff who may be recruited by the large multinational companies were taking this abundant labour force kind of making up for the the lack of education and then all of a sudden these are the leaders of africa's next generation and as a managing director of one acre fund your base here.

east africa africa managing director one acre fund africa thirty percent one acre
"east africa" Discussed on The Food Chain

The Food Chain

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on The Food Chain

"The but less of of the packaged white bread we probably going to eat less spread than we used to simply because we have more varied type of diet so we're seeing this decline in bright in europe and in the us though was about the rest of the world so the middle east africa is one region which is growing still but is also already very welldeveloped with bread consumption being among the highest in the world for countries like egypt and algeria for example in asia there's an increase in consumption linked to the greater adoption of of the year western diet things like burgers so that means that the adoption of bread is still relatively low but because of this shift in consumption habit this has been growing quite a lot has potential to grow much further so in africa we've seen a lot of grow simply juju population growth and also because brady's of prague that's really affordable do we see a link between the types of bread the people late and economic development he has this is a general trend as we sheen europe for example if you choose to buy your bread from nazism bakery the stephanie as a as a class lemon to this if you choose to bite from farmer's market also that that says you pay much more attention to providence of the product in the quality bite from from a discount clearly it's the prices the mont main drive of fuel from nuclear choice.

europe us middle east africa egypt algeria asia brady prague africa economic development
"east africa" Discussed on Forbes Under 30

Forbes Under 30

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on Forbes Under 30

"Drivers are responsible for their own safe driving always pay attention to your surroundings and drive safely depending on the conditions of roads whether in vehicle the systems may not work as intended federal troops in the congo and you had worked in the moroccan desert so what was it that compelled you to go to east africa provide clean water and business opportunities in a region that you know re really is in short supply of both of those things what was it that that compelled you to go do how did you know that was would you needed to do i guess the connections in goma sort of are included in that sort of east africa network or even though it's not technically east africa so as sort of a starting point that i cofounded it with my father and he sort of is coming out of a long career in the private sector as a hightech entrepreneur and it was sort of a convergence of of passions where he wanted to do something where he can leverage his his business expertise in his skills to to try to make a difference and so then when it came back and was i was hunting bigger dc and getting into another organisation there um i kind of expressed to my parents you know what this is what i'm thinking and we're on a go and eventually you'll give a nba than than use used business to to go back over he hid he he sorta talked about will the jitters this there's this idea with water and then.

congo moroccan desert nba east africa goma east africa
"east africa" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

17:18 min | 3 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on Business Daily

"east africa" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on Business Daily

"Sleep frees up the entire lending industry correct even the public sector banks are scared of that is in you mentioned all of this in the context of the demonetisation experiment the end of last year when those two major bank notes were who withdrawn from circulation in the entire economy kind of ground to a halt by all accounts at the time and there's been a lot of debate hasn't robots how well india's economy is faring since bank loans bank lynnding the figures a really poor this year on inindia they seem to be grounds for some concern about the state of the indianicl oh yeah ii think if you look at the numbers we have of the wholesale markets all over india there the numbers look really quite dire amended looks like the transactions in the last quarter of the year an early this year where about 20 below what they would have been predicted western past years gdp the way they calculated they don't actually calculate what's happening to the informal sector to the farmers and people the farmers by from so there's not much in the landscape that looks wonderfully promising the only thing is holding up rescue alleged taken the space is publicsector investment publicsector investment is taking the space that left void by the private sector investors naughty investing and they can only do that for so long yes we let's return then to the farmers and the the agricultural economy the where we started this story obesity this will be a huge relief this debt forgiveness to to millions of people who've been struggling under debt but the underlying problem here is that it's incredibly hard for many farmers in india to breakeven that's upsurge.

bank loans india
"east africa" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on Business Daily

"Do you think though there is a case for saying that the tribal fault lines within somalia could be exacerbated by reestablishing that border well you know what i will let go into close to borders it's a tall howery vision for the region is a region which economically integrated with people can move and goods can move so there's going to be a war between somaliland and somalia toward and we believe the independent commission of somatic will benefit somalia also smell and has been a role moral comes to democracy stability reconciliation demobolisation all these things i think we have experienced to share with somaliait's now more difficult to attract 40 and investment because of the lack of recognition at with commission would be able to attract major investors the load simple johnsonsomaliland to invest everywhere in fisheries agriculture in mining industry in trade everything's is a mining in somaliland is the other other sets under the ground the ripe for it reuters will we believe that we have manila's in somaliland geological some ellen similar to kenya233 therapy ah we have jimsuewe have copper we have gold we have for many other manila's which we think are commercially can be commercially exploited but we need to attract investors are you of domestic i'm very very optimistic because i think we have a very good case illegal case humanitarian because in historic case as well don'tassadalisherry former foreign affairs minister epic upon of somaliland in the horn of africayou're listening to business daily from the bbc with edbutler suicide among farmers in rural india is a problem of epidemic proportions says a many experts current estimates suggest that some 12000 farmers and labourers have been killing themselves every year in india staggering 300000 overrule in the last 20 as much of this down to the ican the perilous economic existence of farmers in many states that take one shit row hawkhe is a maharashtra cotton pharma this year he told the bbc he has something like 40000 to the government and to local money lenders debt incurred after a succession of failed harvests he tweeting desperate former warmer nepad does matter.

somalia somaliland somaliait manila bbc india reuters maharashtra
"east africa" Discussed on Business Daily

Business Daily

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on Business Daily

"At the present time i don't even seen a somali gets much bilateral aid all aid is channelled through 3rd parties particularly the us so that could change because somalilandunlikesomalia is a simply peaceful place near you would be able to receive munster record from the initial communes yes we would own i hope so now we have mechanisms top sold on to manage for such resources dnasoi think we're better placed for bilateral aid wants to cnn to not being a nation makes you a second closets and when it comes to the fire let's itit's indeed is very very difficult okay there is the objection of course to that and it has been put many times that you mess with the post colonial borders of africa at your peril i mean they have done at once or twice right with era trey are in south sudan but it's a dangerous precedent to set because africa could very easily that we all kinds of secessionist movements all over the continent who could want to move in cool somalia rates gulf his especially the vulnerable vice with poodle went to can declare your banned that he's a tour somaliland was in demand for nearly three years as a state has a cantey we're we're we're not you just reintegrate just be clear for those who don't know you reintegrated with somalia and 1990 one ride if a you reintegrate we joined with united would to independent countries that voluntarily united and we dissolve that union in 1991 because unity to work.

us somalilandunlikesomalia africa trey sudan somalia munster cnn itit three years