35 Burst results for "East Africa"

"east africa" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:29 min | 2 months ago

"east africa" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"This week East Africa mourns the loss of an important journalist Sumi seduni was a Spanish American freelancer based in Kampala Uganda She was fiercely dedicated to stories in Uganda and elsewhere in the region that didn't get a lot of coverage So dohrni died in a car accident earlier this week in Pierre's Ada Peralta has this remembrance Sumi sadurni covered the war in South Sudan and in Uganda when suicide bombers attacked last year she ran to the scene This is a tough chaotic region but sardines photography always felt intimate as she explained in the video for the coalition of women in journalism maybe it was because she was a woman We're hard We're hardest nails you know And we also have this empathy and those two things make a really touching and very personal account Michael o'hagan a journalist and friend says had already often dressed in all black Personality at the invited people towards intimacy So the people would share their most difficult moments Some of Sedona's photographs were iconic and the region she photographed rebels getting ready for battle in South Sudan ugandans bloodied by security forces and small moments the opposition leader hugging his children women backstage at a beauty pageant She caught the moment Stella Nancy one of the Ugandan government's most vocal critics lost consciousness as police dragged her out of a protest So there were his friend Michael o'hagan again People want to talk to be with them in those difficult times In Uganda there are a lot of difficult times It's a place where authorities smile when delivering punishments and always seem to stop just short of killing you As journalists we focus on that we weigh the risks of weaving through Kampala as columns of military men ready themselves for a crackdown or the risks of getting caught in the opposition leader's house just after security forces have broken through fences when it came to that Was fearless but as o'hagan notes what her death shows us is that life is much more fragile than that That's today's tragedy that it was in the most unexpected and ordinary circumstances that she was killed It was driving to an assignment When a truck crashed into her car according to police.

Uganda Michael o'hagan Sumi seduni dohrni Ada Peralta Sumi sadurni South Sudan Kampala East Africa Stella Nancy Ugandan government Pierre Sedona hagan
Attorney says Meadows won't cooperate with Jan. 6 panel

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 5 months ago

Attorney says Meadows won't cooperate with Jan. 6 panel

"Only only clung clung cases cases have have been been confirmed confirmed in in at at least least nine nine African African countries countries with with some some officials officials reporting reporting that that initial initial cases cases appear appear to to be be mild mild South South Africa Africa remains remains the the epicenter epicenter of of the the only only clone clone a a break break with with ex ex but but finding finding the the overwhelming overwhelming majority majority of of thousands thousands of of new new coronavirus coronavirus cases cases per per day day all all of of the the new new variant variant in in East East Africa Africa Uganda Uganda has has reported reported its its first first seven seven cases cases on on record record detected detected in in travelers travelers from from South South Africa Africa and and Nigeria Nigeria who who are are the the only only team team International International Airport Airport on on November November twenty twenty nine nine all all are are currently currently in in isolation isolation one one in in southern southern Africa Africa Namibia Namibia has has confirmed confirmed eighteen eighteen cases cases of of Omicron Omicron none none of of which which are are hospitalized hospitalized early early evidence evidence is is suggesting suggesting that that all all bitcoin bitcoin spreads spreads faster faster with with the the symptoms symptoms appear appear to to be be mild mild I'm I'm Charles Charles de de Ledesma Ledesma

South South Africa Africa East East Uganda International International Ai Nigeria Namibia Charles Charles De De Ledesma
"east africa" Discussed on Crack the Customer Code

Crack the Customer Code

04:12 min | 8 months ago

"east africa" Discussed on Crack the Customer Code

"I started seeing it as the core issue. And and that led to me thinking about it more and then it led to me my grad work which became you know interesting to people much more important than me and that led to a you know a this kind of miracle deal on a on a bestselling book trust edge. You know over a decade ago did so well self-published the biggest published in the world picked it up on this kind of crazy crazy buyout out and whatever and then And then we you know the first time we use it in a company by the way that that led to another thing is that company only six hundred people and they said in nine months. This work helped us drop attrition by two to four million dollars. And then i had a company right after that say a big fortune. Fifty companies say in one year. A billion dollar part of that company said this helps us gain eleven percent market share and then we had a person say it helps them triple their sales in ninety days. And so we had these these. This is evidentially. This is working. And now you know we've had people say everything from a triple their sales to save their marriage. And i'm as passionate about either one so we use it on corruption issues in east africa. We use it in You know we've used it with pro sports teams and and You know we're on six continents. And now i have certified partners on six continents using the work and it's been very exciting and i'm more passionate about than ever because now we put up one of the biggest studies on trust and leadership every year that trust outlook and of course we continue to research. Right on an apply. The work and i believe it's the core issue. That's that's what ultimately happened. It's the real root issue of everything. Most people are solving the wrong issue. That's fascinating and i love that. You talked about those results because you know in the work that adam and i are passionate about with customer experience and customer service like there is so much around trust. There's so much where you look at it and you think well that's that's the missing piece right And so when you when you talk to these leaders and you come in there and you say and they say we've got a leadership problem or we've got a sales problem. How do you really break it down for them and let them know that trust is what really matters here and this is why. How do you do that. Well i try to show them quickly. I a couple things one. How a lack of trust is the biggest expense. They have how everything values built on trust from the greatest financial institutions. Every good relationship. They have so if you think..

east africa adam
Giant Tortoises Eat Baby Birds

Dude Soup

01:58 min | 9 months ago

Giant Tortoises Eat Baby Birds

"Scientists have just published the first piece of video evidence that proves the giant tortoises are fucking murder. Machines cool yeah. They have a list they do. Yeah checking one item fair. It's true the bird. They are from east africa. Shows one of these big boys hunting killing and eating a baby. But that's very exciting to watch telling fish swim in school tomorrow. You really cool evolution right. What murder but once you get good enough at evolving you just murder humans apex. Swear not late. that's an apex. Turtle it off so you said it was a baby bird though. It was a walk up to a nest. And just like oh. This looks lucia. Yes so the bird fell out of a tree. Oh of all and then fell onto the ground and then the tortoise walks up to it and just fucking start snapping at and the bird also to its credit starts pecking tortoise. The tortoise bats. Well okay. here's the thing a biologist who watched it spent a lot of time in his right up trying to convince us that it was actually a fair fight. Tortoise tortoises the size of the advantage of size the bird try to defend itself by pecking at the reptiles is. which is. it's only weak spot. Who's actually a fair fight. Is that a fair fight. Or one creature has one weak spot in one's a baby and one's probably a hundred and twenty years old. Yeah it's also got age it's aged. Yeah okay so who won though the tour okay. He's wearing armor. Yeah that's what i'm saying though. But he was. The bird was had open access to the is. That's the weak point of the eternal but deter had open access to the birds is like smacking guy in the nuts is a fair fight. That is a fair fight. Not

East Africa Lucia
"east africa" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

04:03 min | 10 months ago

"east africa" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"I mean that is so we sort of know the part of it is that the national security briefing wasn't given At the highest levels on time. So they're all these things that come together and you know it's it's it's as you're indicating. It's so tragic that it was allowed to happen. But there's no one single vulnerability there's a number of honor abilities and and they happened at every level long-term middle term and short term. And so that's sort of what happened. Yeah it's interesting. Because i think we hear intelligence failure and we think a failure of intelligence gathering by it seems like the much bigger problem is intelligence understanding and intelligence share and communicate. You so two point as we start to wrap up here. I mean if you can take a bigger step back and think about just. I mean you're so good at thinking about intelligence security you know how these things flow together And you know maybe this is. Maybe this is where you're you're kind of new book and sort of work you've been doing on security written largely ties in but you know what lessons are there here from this. Nineteen ninety eight bombing. Four how our intelligence community and the public at large thinks about security writ large. You know it's funny because my book might comes into kind of oblique angle to this because what we're kind of saying yes because what we're saying about about ninety eight is that we didn't pay enough attention to it right. We didn't put enough resources. We didn't make enough of it. What my book argues is at after nine eleven. We did everything we could to abandon. our norms. our laws are institutional integrity. Many things. And so i guess the lesson. If you wanted to tie together is not only. Do we have to to play by the book and by the laws but we have to do so in a way that tells the american people that that too will protect them and because nine eleven happened they were able to say as a as a widely absorbed way and widely impactful way. They were able to say you know what we can't trust our arms. We can't trust our laws and so that's where the the really sad lesson both of the nine hundred ninety eight bombings of the east africa embassies and nine eleven. Come about and what i argue in. The book is that we haven't recovered and until we recover on that level. We're going to be in trouble as democracy kick a lot. I suppose we should tell listeners. We're also recording this. The first thing we're doing in the morning so they karen now our days. Sorry no. I think that's just i just think that's so heavy. You know in the sense that like because we abandoned these principles you know that that is like the undoing of it. You know that you think you have to take an extra step or you think you have to not be transparent in order for you to be effective and and that really is so much of the problem. Oh my god you said it exactly right. So vagueness secrecy institutional degradation. These are exactly the things you'll like the part on secrecy very anyway. Thank you so much for inviting me on. This has been great so the book is coming soon. It is called subtle tools the dismantling of american democracy from the war on terror to donald trump. The podcast that can greenberg hosts vital interests and she is the director of the center on national security fordham university. School of law karen. Thanks for all your work and thanks for taking some time to chat with us to all you guys so much. This is great. Thank you Nicole hammer thanks to you as always thank you. Jody and kelly carta jackson. Thanks to you my pleasure.

east africa karen center on national security fo donald trump greenberg Nicole hammer kelly carta jackson Jody
"east africa" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

05:38 min | 10 months ago

"east africa" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"The world's attention is on nairobi. Kenya and dar-es-salaam tanzania where the day before august seventh that they were actually talking about here august seventh a coordinated truck bomb explosions had rocked the us embassies in those two east african countries. Two hundred twenty four people died in the blast including twelve americans. More than four thousand. Five hundred. people were wounded fairly quickly. These bombings were linked to al qaeda and most notably osama bin laden al-qaeda and bin laden were certainly on the intelligence communities radar. But i think it's safe to say less on the public's radar and this a notable moment in the rise of al qaeda which of course culminated in many ways in the attacks on the world trade center on nine eleven three years later so here to discuss all that context and the nineteen ninety eight east. African embassy bombings are always nicole. Hammer of columbia and kelly. Carta jackson of wellesley. Hello there hello. Jody hey there and our special guests for this episode is karen greenberg one of my favorite writers and scholars on all things terrorism and security. She is the director of the center on national security at fordham university school of law and among other things host of the podcast vital interests karen. Welcome to the show. Thanks for doing this so much for having me and i will also plug your new book coming out soon. It's called subtle tools that dismantling of american democracy from the war on terror to donald trump. We will maybe see if that ties into this conversation as we go as we go along here but congrats on on the new book so care on why these embassies in east africa targeted by al-qaeda at this time you know i think the significance of the east africa bombings at our manifold as you've described it but it really is the emergence of bin laden onto the scene onto the international scene in a way that the public noticed him. Not just as you said the intelligence community and they've been looking for a target for a while to understand how to make their their case. No not just against the united states but to to do it bin laden and tried to do with al qaeda which was to make it an international presence and to make it clear that it had international aims not just tied to the region itself and so there were efforts throughout a number of places including sudan to try to figure out where to ground al qaeda where to make their presence central and we can talk about the what happened after the bombings..

osama bin laden al al qaeda African embassy Carta jackson karen greenberg bin laden center on national security qaeda salaam dar nairobi tanzania Kenya fordham university school of l wellesley east africa Jody nicole kelly columbia
History of Religion & Violence

Immigrantly

02:06 min | 10 months ago

History of Religion & Violence

"I am so excited that you're on our podcast today festival and i have a ton of questions for you really looking forward to it and you know the interesting thing is every time we have and it could make or scholar. I'm excited about how much i can learn from them. So i have a lot of questions and a few theories to test. I want to get your opinion on a few but before we delve into that that stock about you having grown up in east africa how do you think the culture there has shaped your worldview and before we talk about that. What was the culture like growing up. Was i only have fond memories of the place. It was a very mixed place. Ethnically linguistically inclusionary culinary terms Because you had all kinds of people it would if you just sticking with the salt agents for the moment of course small minority minority in east africa as a whole you know you had people from all the way from the top to the bottom. Bit of the western indian coastline. You had people speaking different languages with different religious identities and different traditions and will look different from each other. And then of course you had other migrant krupes from arabia from the arabian peninsula. So oman. which ruled is on the bar and some parts of the east african coast in from the towards the end of the eighteenth century into the nineteenth early twentieth. You had people from yemen and then of course you had you know. African operations came to be known as african racially But who were comprised of many different groups with many different languages and traditions again. So it was very mixed. Group was somewhat segregated because remember these were colonial

East Africa East African Coast Arabian Peninsula Oman Arabia Yemen
"east africa" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:31 min | 11 months ago

"east africa" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Uh, country in East Africa, and whenever you're feeling oppressed here in the United States, you just think about some of the stuff that's going on in Zambia right now, especially the past few years. Brutal crackdowns, human rights violations. They're calling it brazen attacks on any form of dissent there ahead of some elections in August, but the reason bringing this up as we have this audio here, the Zambian TV reporter It's gone viral hammer after he's interrupted a live broadcast to claim on the air. He hasn't been paid by the news station that he works at. Here's how the whole thing went down. We are human beings. We have to get paid. Unfortunately on que bien, we haven't been paid. We have To get paint. Could you imagine working somewhere? They haven't been getting their paycheck. It's like, and they still show up for work. I don't know what country you're living in, man, but I would not be. You know, I thank God every day that if I don't get paid, I'm allowed not to show up for work and I won't get in trouble for it. I won't get arrested for it right They are making these guys go to work without a paycheck. And it's something like that habit. It wouldn't stand anywhere in America. I mean, unless you're being paid under the table, right, right. There's some back alley deals that take place back alley deals and it's really dangerous for people that are here illegally that are working those jobs because their employers take incredible advantage of them. So that's gone viral, that poor Zambian TV reporter not being paid still going to work, though, and you said it earlier, Nige if you feel like you're so oppressed in the United States. Don't just spend a little time in Zambia. Once you fly over and hang out in Syria for a little while, or Iraq or Iran, and just tell me how oppressed you are here in the United States. It's funny how it's very rarely. Immigrants who come to this nation who say how awful. The United States is It spoiled brats that just listen to everything they hear from CNN and MSNBC and see on Twitter and just run with those talking points about how oppressive it is in this country. You'll never hear somebody that escaped Syria come to the United States and go, man. I'm ready to go back. Not at all. You're right. I'll give you a perfect example. Here. Look, I'm on the Amnesty International and they've got a story about a boy in Zambia. Who was 15 years old arrested for criticizing the president on Facebook. He's currently awaiting trial. Johnny Depp threatened to shoot him as John Wilkes Booth and the crowd cheer here. Unbelievable. Um Zambia. Zambian Sounds like an extra strength Ambien to me that it does you really want to catch some Z's forgetting Ambien. Take Zambians your fat ass. So hibernate all spring long. Uh, alright when we come back more on boss, Hogg said, and by God, that's Kane. What? Dr Virginia cane lifting the restrictions. We've got some audio next from 2000 and 6 to 2020, the S and P 500 average to return of 7% annually..

Johnny Depp Zambia Syria United States East Africa Amnesty International CNN America August MSNBC John Wilkes Booth Iran Iraq 2000 7% Hogg 15 years 2020 Twitter 6
New Humanitarian's Mission-Centric Focus a Model for Other Newsrooms

It's All Journalism

01:58 min | 1 year ago

New Humanitarian's Mission-Centric Focus a Model for Other Newsrooms

"About lee is the ceo of the new humanitarian an independent nonprofit newsroom covering humanitarian crises. She's here today to tell us how the new humanitarian has thrived during the coronavirus. Pandemic have welcomed. It's all journalism. Thank you so much pleasure to be here. So first of all you know usually ask people to tell me about themselves that let's start with the new humanitarian. What can you tell me about that. What's the mission. And how did it come about then. Humanitarian was actually founded as urine. I r i n acronym and that's because it was founded by the united nations in the wake of rwandan genocide in nineteen ninety five. And as you know that was a terrible genocide and so many people died and humanitarian responders at the time felt that had been able to better share information about who is doing what they could have saved more lives and so we began really as a kind of information coordination product under the helm of the un and then over the the years and decades evolved to become the benefit a newsroom. That we are today in really moving towards a much more journalistic approach and growing our offices around the world from what was then an east africa focus and incorporating much more storytelling to our approach but that mission of informing the way the world response to crises has remained. How did you get involved with humanitarian. What what's your background. I'm canadian actually raised to egyptian parents. So i was living in canada. I had studied journalism and human rights and was working at the time at the canadian broadcasting corporation covering local news. But my heart was always abroad and one day. My dad just put a brochure on my desk about an internship at a u. n. news outlet that i had never heard of and nothing about but it covered humanitarian crises. And so it. It married the two worlds that i was interested in which was marginalized people and human rights issues with

LEE United Nations East Africa UN Canada
Behind the Story: Planet Aid Lawsuit Against Reveal Dismissed by Judge

On The Media

02:26 min | 1 year ago

Behind the Story: Planet Aid Lawsuit Against Reveal Dismissed by Judge

"In two thousand sixteen the reveal. Podcast of the center for investigative reporting produced a multi-party expose on the maryland based charity planet aid and its connection to a danish cult called the series documented abuse of us foreign aid by the charity and its sub-contractors diversion of charity. Donations to the cult. The shakedown of its own employees to kick back chunks of their salaries and elaborate efforts to the schemes from government auditors on the ground in east africa without offering evidence to rebut the allegations to charity promptly sued news organization for libel a week ago. A federal judge in california ruled in favor of the center for investigative reporting. It was a victory at the expense of millions of dollars in legal fees and thousands of man hours for those who are savoring. Defamation suits against fox news for its voter fraud lies and incitements. The planet aid case is a sobering object lesson in the dangers posed by liable cases to even the most scrupulous and rigorous journalism. Victoria manetzky is general counsel at the center for investigative reporting victoria. Welcome to otm. So nice meet bob. So congratulations i guess. What did it cost. You guys to be proven. Non liars cost us Quite a heavy final number upwards of several million dollars but moreover cost a lot of time resources and sleepless nights for myself and everyone else involved with this case or more on the implications of dislocation to follow. I promise but i please just give me a capsule version of the reporting that you did that led to the lawsuit and the stories revelations sure you know. This investigation was almost a two year long investigation. That of our most esteemed reporters at that. Time took on to look into how government funds and grants were meted out to different organizations in particular planet and how those resources were then

Center For Investigative Repor Victoria Manetzky Center For Investigative Repor East Africa Maryland Fox News California United States BOB
"east africa" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"east africa" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Atlantis was an island which lay before the great flood in the area. We now call the Atlantic Ocean. So great an area of land that from her Western shores, those beautiful sailors journey to the south and the North Americans with these In their ships with painted sales. To the East Africa. Was a neighbor. Across a short straight have seen miles. Great Egyptian ages but a remnant of the Atlantean culture. The antediluvian King's colonized the world. All the gods to play in the mythological dramas and all legends from all lands. Where from fair Atlantis. Knowing her fate. Atlantis sent out ships to all corners of the Earth on board with the 12 point. Physician farmer assigned just the magician and the other so called gods of our legends. The gods they were on. Does the elders of our time choose to remain blind that has rejoice and let us sing and dance on ring in the new Hand Atlantis way..

Atlantic Ocean East Africa
A Big Dose Of Perspective With Jack Kornfield

10% Happier with Dan Harris

04:43 min | 1 year ago

A Big Dose Of Perspective With Jack Kornfield

"Jack. Great to see you and thank you for coming Great pleasure thank you. Dan also for having me. It's time when we. I think we need to all come together and use our best wisdom and understanding of how to navigate. I completely agree and so let me. Just start with your mind. What are you doing to stay even in your own mind. Of course i meditate some but more importantly arrested in place that has a lot of spaciousness in it and a kind of trust. I'm old enough at age. Seventy five to have seen revolutions. Common go and difficulties arise in pass. Have and i also see that. There's i guess it was martin. Luther king talked about the moral arc of the universe being long but advance toward justice. I see that there's ways that systems also regulate themselves so whether it's the pandemic that we are in the throes of that is really causing enormous amount of suffering and loss whether it's the political disruptions in the capital and otherwise were just the calls for racial and economic justice that we needed for so long. I feel we're in a evolutionary process with its fits and starts. And i think about people like one gary mata who won the nobel prize for the greenbelt in east africa. She started by planning one to ten. Twenty fifty trees got other people to do. It eventually was thrown in prison on. I think that's a requirement for nobel peace laureates mostly And ended up planning fifty one million trees in changing a lot of the face to be africa or or or ellen sirleaf in manga bowie also nobel prize winners who said their country. Liberia used to be known for its child. Soldiers in had these terrible civil wars and now it's known for its women leaders and so there is some way in which just as the green sprouts come up through the cement in the sidewalk. There's something about life in. it's also the human heart that wants to renew itself. And so i rest back in kind and loving awareness to say yes. Let me turn my gaze away from the from the needs suffering the things to respond but also to hold it in a much bigger context justice. I agree that universe in the world is breathing. And that's how i keep my mind on a good day not the mean. There are bad days a bad moments but mostly my heart is pretty peaceful but you know there are things. I get a call from my daughter. Dad you know. This terrible thing is happening. At the nonprofit she runs for getting asylum for all people whose lives are endangered. What do i do our calls from dear friends. Oh my family has covid. So i'm deeply touched by these things and responding. Sometimes they really affect me. And i can feel the pain of it. You know or give worried but with all of that. There's a rounded a field of loving awareness of spaciousness entrust. That gives a much bigger picture and there. I'm just going on back away trying to answer your question and also spread out a little bit. When i was a monk training in the forest monasteries in southeast asia as a buddhist monk the main forest temple i lived was in a province adjoining. Both laos in cambodia was during the war in vietnam and laos cambodia. So we would see fighter jets going overhead and bombers and you know in some of the branch monasteries you could even see flashes from the from the bombs and people would come visit us. I had friends who were working in. Vietnam laos people that i knew as i had been working on medical teams in that ray calm river valley saying what are you doing sitting on your you know. There's a war to stop. There's things we need to do and my teacher would say. This is the place where we stop the war.

Gary Mata Ellen Sirleaf Luther King Greenbelt DAN East Africa Jack Martin Liberia Bowie Africa Laos Cambodia Vietnam Laos Cambodia Asia River Valley
Desert locusts in East Africa: A plague of another order

UN News

01:13 min | 1 year ago

Desert locusts in East Africa: A plague of another order

"Fresh swarms of desert locusts are formed in the horn of africa threatening crops in the food security of millions the un food and agriculture organization fao warned on wednesday according to the agency locust infestations increased over the past month in ethiopia and somalia as a result of extensive breeding favorable weather and rainfall with populations predicted to increase further in coming months. New loker swarms are already forming and threatening to reinvade northern kenya and breeding is also underway on both sides of the red sea posing a threat to our trailer. Saudi arabia sudan and yemen. Fao said in a news. Release the greater horn of africa witnessed one of its worst. Ever desert locust infestations earlier this year. A new crisis could have devastating consequences for communities affected by recurrent drought conflict. High food prices and the coronavirus pandemic the upsurge occurred in spite of an unprecedented campaign supported by fao and partners in which more than one point three million hectares of locust infestations were treated across ten countries. This year control operations prevented the loss of an estimated. Two point seven million tons of cereal enough to feed eighteen million people year in countries. Already hard hit by acute food insecurity and poverty.

FAO Africa Somalia Ethiopia Red Sea Kenya Yemen Sudan Saudi Arabia
UN says Sudan needs $147m to help Ethiopian refugees

UN News

01:09 min | 1 year ago

UN says Sudan needs $147m to help Ethiopian refugees

"One hundred and forty seven million dollars is urgently needed to support people. Fleeing ethiopia's tigray region into neighboring sudan the refugee agency. Unhcr said on monday. More than forty. Three thousand people have fled fighting in ethiopia in recent weeks. Almost half of them are children leading the appeal. You n refugee chief. Filippo grandi welcomed sudan's border policy to vulnerable people before noting that the government of sudan needs a lot of help the un agencies expecting one hundred thousand people to arrive by april next year although the worst case scenario is for an influx of two hundred thousand the new appeal aims to fund crisis response by the un and partners in sudan for the next six months in a related development. The un world food program. Wfp said that lack of funding had forced it to cut rations for refugees. In east africa while wfp ethiopia urgently needs two hundred nine million dollars to help six point two million people from now until next. May the un agency said that. The fighting between the ethiopian national forces and the tigray people's liberation front had displaced more than one hundred thousand civilians including those who had fled into eastern sudan since the fourth of november

Sudan Ethiopia Filippo Grandi UN Tigray Unhcr WFP Government East Africa Tigray People's Liberation Fro
Cyber is as Much Psychology as it is Technology

Recorded Future - Inside Threat Intelligence for Cyber Security

05:05 min | 1 year ago

Cyber is as Much Psychology as it is Technology

"I got convinced to join a stereo which is the company. I'm working for right now I've been with history for five. Monster is a brand brand new organization. It it's a different type of organization and from my experience. I concluded that this is executive type of organization. We needed to have so the very moment. I learned about historian about what it was all about. I was really adamant to join in and so so it is so. I'm not a managing director for europe middle east africa And a little. Bit for usc at a starring. But can you give us some insight. So what is your day today like. What would take up your time these days. Well my day to day. I'll have to divide my time in between Three things is to manage my wonderful team as any manager. we'd have to do another one. Is we have a community of members. Mum some would call that client who prefer to call members. These are very big organizations all over the world with which we have decided to have a very close trusted relationship and so a certain amount of my time is to engage with this community. Tried to understand what's going on. Try to understand the emerging problem trying to understand what's happening over the arisen as well as the most immediate problem so that's one big spirit of of my time. Another aspect of my time is history is also investing into cybersecurity and overall digital risks organizations. So i spent quite some time to king With emerging organizations indo digital risks cybersecurity field talking with venture capital talking with the leaders talking with regulators trying to understand what is happening what is relevant trying to create an ecosystem if you will of organizations in which we can invest and also trying to understand the need for today tomorrow and the next six months On on the typical customer side. You know strikes me that With your experience you have You have something that i think. A lot of people don't which is A real view of the global situation when it comes to cybersecurity. Your your experience has taken you around the world literally am. I'm curious what insights you can share about. That experience i mean are having been to different parts of the world. Seen the way that different cultures approach cybersecurity. Are there lessons that you've learned there. Are there important take homes you can share all. That's an extremely good point. You make what. I let me just share a little bit i. I'm very hopeful to sit on the board of advisor of elvis. You know the If unique and space defense organization have been sitting on this star community as they call it for for many years and the reason why invited me is because they said i understand cyber for an american company amid a european person i'm belgian guy from heritage and i leave thirty years while nearly thirty years in asia. I've got a very good understanding of what's happening on a worldwide basis when it comes to digital re cybersecurity so you quite spot on what. What i found out is the risk same. I mean i have worked with the If you will the equivalent of the sizzle of the chinese government. When i was working at microsoft and i found out that this gentleman is exactly the same problem as any other seasonal anywhere in the world in any other country or any other enterprises fish with exactly the same problem so the problem we faced with are the same the difference if you will resides in the sophistication. Some organization sub countries are way more sophisticated than others for some. We could speak about bits and bytes issues for others. We're talking about just to learn to walk and not certainly not to learn to run and the thing that is critical to me is the difference of culture also the organization level. I found out. And i have wounds all over my body to prove it because i thought it out the hard way i found out that you cannot take something that works in one culture and plug it into another culture and who backed it will work the same way. It's not true. Cyber inflammation security his as much psychology as it is technology as i usually say behind every cybersecurity incident. You have a human being either because you have an attacker attacking us for whatever reason either because we made a mistake a human mistake into way we tried to To to configure to deploy was security at the organization. And so it's very important to integrate the cultural aspect to make sure that a message is done is propagated the right way. Make sure that that people synchronize in endure is some crystallization iran. Some problems and delete works in. Us's not the way it works in career. That's not the way it works in germany and so on and so on so. My experience told me the problems i usually the same but away. You address them varies. And you've got to be very cognizant on on this cultural aspect to be able to the right wing.

USC Chinese Government Africa Europe Elvis Asia Microsoft Iran Germany United States
As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:18 min | 1 year ago

As Tanzania Votes, Many See Democracy Itself on the Ballot

"Tons Anita went to the polls yesterday to vote in an election overshadowed by opposition complaints of irregularities such as ballot box, stuffing President John Maga. Fully who is accused of stifling democracy seeks a second term in office alongside fourteen other candidates talk to Dan. Padgett is electoral politics at the university. Of Aberdeen, he specializes in political communication through mass rallies and populist and nationalist ideologies in Tanzania and joins me on the line. Now Don Tanzania's long been thought of in the West is a a haven of stability within east Africa but I mean this isn't necessarily the case and I. I wonder if you could sketch out the political dynamic there, the ruling party's been in power since nineteen sixty one. Yes that's right. It's is the longest ruling party in sub. Saharan Africa. The political dynamic in Tanzania has been one of the ruling Kanzi, CCM's decline over the last fifteen years. Reaching a low point in two thousand fifteen where it where the margin of victory was. The fittest is ever been. Since then President Michel, Foodie, it came to kyle and that's election has led Tanzania. Very shot an increasingly extreme offered Harry. Intern. And we weren't sure how just how? Radical that authoritarian agenda would be and the election this we're just getting results from now suggests that it is as bad as any of us feared as so the opposition allegations of vote rigging, etc do stand up. Well. So. Of course, normally I would turn to international election observers. Attorney to arbitrate these claims to decide which to give credence in which not to give credence. Unfortunately, we can't almost no international election observers. Were invited and those that were invited were. Invited at our so Given that and given the advantage of the opportunity that this creates the ruling party the elections it's hard not to give at least prima facie credence to these opposition claims especially given the the wide range of anecdote to. Video and photographic evidence that I've seen an which which I've been collecting these last twenty four hours, and of course, zipping a social media crackdown various restrictions on the press. Has Been, a crackdown all over and and for the last five years. So in many ways, the the rigging receipt which we've been seeing apparently seeing of the next twenty four hours. Is. Really just the icing on the authoritarian cake. There's extreme. Media Censorship rallies have been banned and consider route the rally. The most important means of communication tends to emotional time about seventy percent of people attend local meetings on a regular basis and attend election campaign rallies they were they were abandoned twenty sixteen and indeed the opposition at large have. Hottest. Struggle underneath. Almost constance. Of States and extra state harassment in includes trumped up court cases but also extrajudicial. So extra state attacks. Unknown assailants that have arrested some abductors killed. And in fact, one of the main challenges has recently returned to the country after recovering from gunshot wounds. That's right. So tenderly series is. Presidential. Candidate is the largest opposition party in Tanzania. and. So that's Experience of being of surviving attempted assassination attempt has has given. US already in very impressive political figure a sort of a sparkle. Some people referred to him as a living miracle. But of course, we don't know the results. Yes. But we all seeing violence particularly in Zanzibar. Zanzibar the autonomous. ARCHEPELAGO's Zanzibar, which is a federally devote area of 'em. Into UK. Has has often seen electoral violence. We saw it in ninety five and two, thousand and thirteen, thousand, five and twenty fifteen and actions by varying degrees. So in in some ways, this is a return to form It's not. The recurrence of violence is is. Seems to be because the opposition has probably one in sensabaugh almost every time. But they've never officially one out one means or another has always been used to not in the that's the that's the the scholarly consensus on. Politics what's different? This time I think is that there's violence on the mainland as well. So this is no longer an issue of contained physical violence in Zanzibar. There have been a series of incidents including. What appears to be an attempt to a to attack the chairman of the leading opposition party on the eve of the elections. So that's one difference the other is considered. No money there is. A. Sporadic protests violence and in return state brutality, police army heavy-handedness in putting down those protests that the protests have often been. Constrained and sporadic because they have not been condoned led. By, by the leaders of the opposition there, there are indications that this could be different this time one of the reasons for that is. The, the rhetoric is different. The leader of the opposition in Zanzibar say amount has been say had has been saying that in the past he's held his supporters back. He's been of restraint, and at this time he he won't urge restraint to newly sue has said that he will. Bring people out onto the streets and consider the state of the opposition behind because it seems like this might be the last stand in a sense that vikings they can make, and so they they don't have that say incentive to hold back this time and say the keep up how to drive the next time. Just finally before we go, do you think that this is part of something that we're seeing across parts of Africa there is a younger demographic. They were all born after independence that not prepared to accept authoritarian rule the just coming to the age where they are protesting we're seeing it in Nigeria within saws and in various other places could this be the the Africans spring. My sense is if there is African spring to come, it will come off and an Wiki will extend. Mexico an authoritarian winter. The trend on that strikes me is that a number of leaders are emerging in an intense Aena in Zambia. In other parts of the consonant, which bear a striking resemblance to this sort of authoritarian. Developmental. Nationalists of is so The there's a young population I are angry. But in fact, I think the trend seems to go the other way. And results. When can we expect those? So the first also are already dripping in and they show. That a series of opposition strongholds, there's places that you would never expect or or at least likely. To expect to go to a to the ruling party are being won by then by margins of three to one, which suggests that the the the rigging. Being worried about maybe taking place typically a Tanzanian election result takes three or four days that was related end and announced especially with the presidential elections but. So far. This is actually has been crisis already.

Tanzania Zanzibar Don Tanzania Saharan Africa East Africa Padgett DAN Aberdeen Anita President Trump John Maga Africa Aena President Michel United States Intern Harry
Interview with Rough Translation host Gregory Warner

Inside Podcasting

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Rough Translation host Gregory Warner

"Hi and welcome to the PODCAST Brench Club podcast. My name is Adela and I'm the founder of PBC today. I'm so happy to be joined by Gregory Warner host of NPR's report translation a podcast about the things that we're talking about in the United States are being talked about in some other parts of the World Hi Gregory thank you so much for joining us today. So rough translation is a favourite among many podcast ranch club listeners, and we've actually included episode in a listening less. We did last year called looking for love but for those who aren't familiar with their show, can you just give us a little bit of an overview? Sure sure. We'll. Our tagline is. Stories from far of places that hit close to home. Our original tagline and season one folks have listened back that far was things we're talking about how they're being talked about in other places but both those ideas are. Sort of around the the idea of we're going to tell stories that. Take place in some other. Maybe, some other countries, some other culture that's but but it's GonNa feel close to home. It's GonNa. It's GonNa hit you in some way it's it's not that we're specifically telling non-american stories or it's them and us but just we're gonNA take you places but it's going to feel that it's GonNa hit you personally got it. Yeah. It feels familiar but it's a from like maybe a different perspective. Yeah. So I'm curious about your background and how the idea for the show came about. Sure. So well, let's see so. Terms of my radio background. So I went to Salt Salt Institute for Documentary. Studies that was my. First taste of radio I worked in some local worked at a local station called North country public radio. Up in very northern New York and then after that, I went to Afghanistan So which was not as much of a leap as you think because I went from one very rural area to another very rural area and the stories of actually quite similar in terms of the story of the economy as well as the story of. Loneliness and and and all that. So I spent I ended up spending about two years on and off in Afghanistan. Let's see that was from. Two thousand. Six to two thousand eight. And then I left for a number of reasons. But also because that period two dozen sixty, thousand eight was was you could do a lot of reporting then. That that you just couldn't that was a lot harder to do after two, thousand, eight kidnappings it started in a massive way and then I was based after that in in Rwanda, and also some in Kenya, an eastern Congo. So we spent some time in in Africa again as freelancer and then came back to the US started working for marketplace as a staff reporter kind of learned. Later the art of grabbing tape and making a same day story, which is when I ended up getting the job at NPR's the international correspondent in in Nairobi. Sort of it is a you have to use fast twitch muscles but. What's Nice about that job is that there was also a lot of potential for storytelling feature work. and so he was in in Nairobi actually actually in Ethiopia that I came up with the idea for this podcast country that you've lived in. And it. It came about I mean came up through a number. Probably the simplest story is that I had done a story for for radio lab on their on their episode call translation and it was it was an episode about an incident that I watched that I I was I was actually following the secretary of state then John Kerry he gave a speech and this Ethiopian reporter in the room stood up and asked the question. I remember that episode yeah and Yeah it was. It was like this very brief I mean honestly the whole incident really the question and the answer which was at the end of this conference which I mean in the story we talk about how this there were all vetted questions until this one guy got up because carry decided to be generous in this one moment anyway. So this guy asked this question but. It was it was such a mistranslation around this one word and because of this one word. Secretary Kerry seemingly. Totally. Misunderstood the question answered it. In this way that was very unsatisfying and the guy ended up taking a quite a great risk to to ask this question on Ethiopian state TV. For nothing but it was this opportunity to learn about this one word serious, which has such a different meaning in east Africa.

Gregory Warner Nairobi John Kerry United States Reporter Adela Afghanistan NPR Salt Salt Institute For Docume PBC Africa Secretary Founder Rwanda East Africa Ethiopia New York
Finding justice in the gym with Ben & Felicity

Together Podcast | A conversation about faith, justice and how to change the world

05:04 min | 1 year ago

Finding justice in the gym with Ben & Felicity

"Welcome to what in the world where we discussed the latest in news and current affairs cat what we talking about today. Yes I'd stay. We're talking about the explosion in Lebanon. So time of recording, it's Weinstein is the day after the explosion. So we don't Philly know the extent of it on the real triggers behind it. But what we nights die is that explosion in the city poor area has killed at least one hundred people and injured more than four thousand others. The president has said that two, thousand, seven, hundred and. Fifty tons of ammonium nitrate has been stalled on safely in a warehouse for six years and investigation is underway at the moment to find the trigger of the explosion. Of course, we don't know the exact trick is at the moment, but we know that law people morning low people are inferior it just because you know the experience is expected in Nollie, what happened but there's been a little reports of. Gloss. Flying Everywhere and even if people went close to the explosion that was property damage in our homes. and. Yet, just think it's important for us to lift them in prayer at the moment and I'm just think about the not just maybe physical implications but also mental implications and what does that look for our content found in offices there as well? Yeah. Definitely can't even have information as we recorded this a little while ago we can definitely be praying for those who lost their lives and their families and for those. Who are injured and you mentioned tiff do work in in Lebanon and so everybody's press for tiff and and their continued programs would be appreciated if you want to find out more about what if I'm does there in their response after the explosion, then do have our instagram at we are tear fund and we'll keep you up to date with the response back. But in the meantime press would be greatly appreciate it. Now. It's time to hear from Ben and felicitate in their chat with Chris about how merged fitness and justice. and. My. Wife and we run a gym called Bryson. In Brunton Loosen, we've had on locker magazine Online magazine featured you very recently and so like I. Know you guys like a little bit just a little bit. As me big begging friend but. If. You if we WANNA story just a little bit just before fit Brian. How did you guys meet? What was your? Passion is what your interest was. Johnny that got you. Yes Oh, you grew up in Sudan in east Africa So my parents worked. The Church that I've seen education programs join, civil war. Came emend the same boarding school didn't know each other at the medicine. was older. and. Then went to University of Sussex and studied international development and had a real hall. To work overseas go involved when in helped savage in on an island between Yemen and Somalia. Codes culture. which was just a random always love fitness and somehow opportunity came about and go on a boat from Amman that carried cement blocks and slept on it for fourteen hours and help these guys those incident, and then yet not was kind of really where the bridge between fitness on development came into contact and then I made a video about it on Youtube and And of slowly in vote but. was restored and say I say went same said Ben my life went to Sussex, Investi? Say. When school in both finished that. Actually did look like stuff with tear fund at my year out. And then. Three months. Yeah. So I was with tiff entrepot vet. Volunteering, and then spent some time in Greece out refugee camp. That kind of Maha Development was always there trying to figure out like area that was in and then started studying investigative Sussex Fan of. Yeah. That was great. And then I've just finished my degree say, Benon Michael married last summer and. Coming up. With very thankful for that. And then. I was just finishing my degree when I started getting both entitled kind of married into the title community. then. Start getting involved with them. An Abedin are opened a gym in. And then I just finished my degree last month. Great

Lebanon Bryson BEN Brian University Of Sussex Weinstein Chris Philly Brunton Loosen President Trump Emend Nollie Sudan Maha Development Yemen Sussex Johnny Benon Michael Youtube
The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

Short Wave

13:31 min | 2 years ago

The Congolese Doctor Who Discovered Ebola

"At the beginning of an epidemic, it's essential to discover the source of the disease. For scientists who do that work, it's extremely challenging and without risk to their own health. But the scientists who played an essential role in discovering bulla way back in nineteen, seventy six doesn't always get the credit he deserves in today's episode. We explore the history of a bowl and the consequences of scientific exploitation. It's part of our week of episodes here on the show celebrating and recognizing the contributions of black scientists enjoy. You're listening to shortwave. From NPR. Safai here with none other than NPR East Africa correspondent Ater, Peralta Hey there ater. Hey, Mattie, thank you so much for talking to us all the way from Kenya. I know there's like an eight hour time difference. I am thrilled. But I want to open with a quick question. Who discovered Ebola and do not Google it. First of all. How dare you asked me a question? I should definitely know the answer to, and don't and yeah I already, Google Bet. Came up was. A Belgian microbiologist, but I think you're about to tell me. There's more to this there. Absolutely, there always is right so. Cheated. What you probably saw is a bunch of white westerners like. Dr John Jack. Yembeh does not yeah. He was not one of the people that came up. Yes, so, he's Congolese doctor and today he's doing really important work heading up the response to the current Ebola outbreak in Congo, but back in nineteen, seventy six, we embed. First doctor to. COLLECT ANY BOLA sample. His crucial role in discovering Bolla is often just a footnote, a lot of the history of people. Has Been Written? Without your name. Yes but. You know this Yes it. Did Not quite. Today on the show correcting the record on a Bola, the story of Dr, John Jack Mugabe and what he's doing now to ensure African scientists are part of writing it's. To some in the medical community, it's a controversial move. Okay Ater, so we're talking about a Congolese Dr John, Shaq. And his role in discovering a bola. When do we begin? So when I sat down with him at his office in Kinshasa. He said we should start in. Hundred seventy three. We had just gotten his PhD microbiology at the Riga Institute in Belgium, and he could have stayed in Europe, but he decided to come back to Congo, but when I arrive via. The condition of work were not I had no lab have no. Mice for experimentation, so it was very difficult to work here. Yeah, it's tough to do lab work without a lab, you know. Without a library to instead he took a job as a field epidemiologist and just a couple of years later in Nineteen seventy-six. was sent from Kinshasa the capital of Congo to the village of Yambuku to investigate a mysterious outbreak. it's the first recorded outbreak of Ebola, but no one knew that at the time they thought maybe it was typhoid or yellow fever, and he goes to this local hospital, and he says he finds it completely empty. Why was nobody there? Local residents thought the hospital was the source of the infection and people had died there. But in the morning when they heard Giambi was sent from the capital, the thought he had medicine till they started to come back to the hospital, and we started seeing patients. So so, what's he seeing? When the patients come in, he was seeing. People who were very weak fever? They had headaches I started to to make the physical time. But at that time will have no gloves. And, of course he had to draw blood, but when I removed. They're the sit inch. Both continue to spread out. What I am to see these phenomenal. And also my fingers or with a bow. Wow. Yeah, so he says he he would wash his hands a lot, but really he says it was just luck that he didn't catchable. Yeah, definitely I mean. That's amazing that he's in there and there's no gloves and there's patients and they don't really know what's going on, and he was able to not get it in at this point. We MP he was startled. But then three nurses died that night and a Belgian nun who was working in the village, also got sick with fever. All the nuns had been vaccinated against typhoid and yellow fever. So at this point me MBA was like. Oh, it's probably not those things. Yeah! I mean in the severity to the deaths with this outbreak. He started to realize that this was something different, so he. He convinced one none took back to Kinshasa with him. So what happens next? She died at a hospital a couple of days later, but he took blood samples, and he sent them to Belgium for testing and the guy on the other end that was Peter Piot. Who at the time was with the Institute for Tropical Medicine in Belgium, the guy who turned up from Google search. Yeah. That's right, and so he and other scientists start working to identify the culprit. The CDC in the US gets involved and the realize. This is a new virus that caused hemorragic. Call it Ebola. They name it after a river by the village where it was discovered. So, what you saw out in the field, the blood samples guide all of this plays a crucial role in the history of right. It was huge, but it's PR who gets the bulk of the credit for discovering all up and you can tell this bothers John Jock membe. If you don't recognize the work done in the field, I, it is not correct. it is a team. You know it is a team. Pr Actually wrote a memoir no time to lose and he does mention. But just in passing as a bright scientist, whose constantly pestering him for more resources. Has talked about this well. Peter Pyatt, facetime video, so I got on the phone. He's now the director of the prestigious London, School of Hygiene and tropical medicine and I asked him if he felt at all responsible for writing. Out of his history of Ebola I think that's a comment, but my book less not an attempt to write than that's history of Boll and sold more. My personal experience is more biographies that sense. Was this kind of like an awkward conversation to have ater. Yeah I mean especially because he's Belgian and Belgium was the colonial power in Congo. Ultimately, he looks at it with a little bit of distant. That at the time African scientists they were simply excluded and white scientists parachuted in they took samples, wrote papers that were published in the West and they took all the credit he so he actually said he did. In that actually surprised me and I think. Part of the reason. I feel that he so comfortable. Talking about this is because he's in an academic setting. I think in universities across the world. Students are talking about privilege, so he seems like he is very comfortable having this conversation right now. I mean there's there's something very weird kind of about that coming from him right as a person who has admitted to taking part in exploitative science, absolutely and one of the good things is that he says that things are changing. We mbappe for example has received several international awards just recently for pioneering. The first effective treatment for Ebola reflects our stinky you. Say the politicians in global health in science, General. So okay. I want to ask you about the treatment in a minute, but to put it very bluntly. Have there actually been any concrete steps to try to change this power dynamic in the global health field? Because this is certainly not one of you know two stories. This is one of many many stories. There is I mean look. NBA has made a decision that many thought unthinkable leaving just a few years ago, he decided that all of the blood samples collected during this most recent Ebola. Epidemic will stay in Congo, so if anyone wants to study this outbreak, they will have to come to his institute. I bet that has ruffled some feathers though. I have I've heard from some American scientists. Who have privately expressed frustrations in the are really the ones who have led the way in studying Ebola, but peanut understands that decision when you think about how African scientists have been historically treated, and he says that Western scientists should just get over it. We have to wake up key things one. The world is changing too much endless Nah it's so weird to hear him say a matter of fairness, ater matter of fairness. Okay, so before we move on, tell me about the treatment that Mugabe worked on. So this is the thing that makes him smile right. We embiid calls it the most important achievement of his life, and it goes back to one thousand, nine, hundred, five during another equal outbreak in Congo. Eighty one percent of people infected with Ebola in this village were dying, and he wondered if antibodies developed bipolar survivors could be siphoned from their blood and used to treat new cases, so he gave sick patients transfusions of blood from a bowl of survivors. Too He injected Ebola patients with the blood of survivors. It vision. And seven survive, he says the medical establishment brought him off because he didn't have a control group. That's what they told him. But if this idea was accepted by scientists. We see a lot of life. Okay I mean to be fair. That is a really small group with no control among some other stuff. But on the other hand, it doesn't mean that he was wrong. You know that it should be totally dismissed, and maybe if more scientists looked into, it collaborated with him, maybe tried to replicate that data in some way, they could have learned something with him right because we now know that he was in fact correct about the antibodies. Yeah, I mean that's right in the context is important because I think what really eat set him. Is that maybe lots and lots of people could have been saved during the West. West Africa outbreak, which happened from two thousand, thirteen to two, thousand sixteen, and look just this year that science became the foundation of what is now proven to be the first effective treatment against the Bulla that is saving seventy percent of the people who are treated with amazing. Is He getting credit for that? At this point, he is yeah, absolutely okay, so how does look back on all of this week? What's what's his view on this is so he's he seventy seven, so he's obviously thinking about his legacy. One of the things that he told me is that he's always dreamed that big science could come out of Congo, and partly because of him, that's more likely happen. He got a commitment from Japan to build a state of the art research facility in Kinshasa and in the lab, just a few feet from his office where we talked US scientists were using advanced machines to sequence DNA of the Bulla samples that have to stay here in Congo Okay so moon bay, doctor and scientists who started in the Congo with no lab has a lab and is soon getting an even better one to do his work. Yeah, exactly, yeah, now I have my share. In. So I have my I have. A good subculture will bring joy. But he also has vice rate with micro biologist without Nice, I, asked myself that every day. And, so you know what he says, his biggest legacy won't be that. He helped to discovery or cure for it. It'll be if another young Congolese. Scientist finds himself with an interesting blood sample. He'll be able to investigate it

Ebola Congo Kinshasa Scientist Google Belgium John Jack Mugabe Fever Epidemic NPR Typhoid United States Dr John Jack Ater Kenya Mattie Dr John Africa Peralta
"east africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Me and across East Africa and the question the little people be pondering his options of mediums getting enough information from the government about the effects of coronavirus last time those in the official announcement of numbers of people infected diseased seized or recovered from the disease was one month ago at the end of April of this week a senior US diplomat for someone for saying that hospitals will be overwhelmed by corporate nineteen cases so what's happening let's speak to a colleague Samuel on who joins us from Paris alarm this morning somebody what do you make of all these items appear as worried about the lack of information from the government yes hello tons Indian so worried about and and and the and that's because they have no way to know what really is the extent of the spread of the virus in their communities in the country and most importantly what has been the impact of the virus you know in terms of lives lost like you say so there are many times Indians well what about that but within this month since the last time the government issued official either daily statistics the president and other government officials have been telling people that are the numbers of patients in hospitals easing some hospitals which were treating the patients are you know M. T. and that date that the any any critical patients and hospitals and then so they've been encouraging people sort of to you know to go on with that with that data lights in other words authorities have been suggesting to people that daily updates I read the fund and that are the only side to steal fiat among the public and you've been speaking to the president of the medical association of Tanzania I know to the news will call him doctor a leash others will call him Dr Elisha well sake was critical of the government what I can tell you that did that will sound he was to talk talk talk to was was secondly Cafu not to contradict the government's narrative he kept saying he can't give me specific figures for instance so Matt and I'd ask him because he didn't want to contradict what the government say but he he also referred me to cook with all those official suggests that the government has been H. he insisted that he was telling me what was simply based on you know he's observation and his experience you know working in the hospital and apparently he's experienced and observation matches what the government has been telling us but for those who have been following tons of the NFL's will appreciate that Tanzania can be an unsafe place for for for governments critique we we we not only have hospitals with regards to freedom of expression but authorities have been you know quite king queen full step and and so many government critics have got themselves in trouble so you're listening to occur that interview when I was speaking to he I could tell that he was being careful you know not to to contradict what the government has to say as a personal residence is this a number of communicating with with that with that I don't dress up clothes even those working in the isolation I put operations currently don't know the number of days and and it is very fortunate to not to know you know in our country we are seeing person with very minor symptoms where is your.

East Africa
"east africa" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Anyone who's ever been out of work and a father who struggled to feed his family and the mother who's ever wondered where she'd find the money to pay the bills knows what a helpless feeling this is it's one thing to wonder where your own next meal will come from it's another thing entirely to wonder how you care for your children how will you feed them you may never have had to consider this but in poor areas around the world parents just like you and me are looking for a miracle one peanut is what's being called a miracle in a foil packet we're using this popping up in places like Ethiopia where you do have the severely malnourished kids and it really is amazing what happens for these children I I visited many of these centers on a child but you know one day looks like really they are about to die within a couple days is a completely different kids and so that's one of the programs that we're doing in Ethiopia Carolyn miles on saving lives in places like Ethiopia and East Africa places where families are facing a looming famine we've not seen in a generation what we're talking about today is really something quite simple there are children who are severely malnourished and we have a chance to bring them back from the brink of death it's true that no single one of us can fix the entire problem but what is also true is that each of us can fix it for just one person or two or three and while that doesn't change everything in the world it does change the whole world for the people and families we touch most of us will live our entire lives without having the kinds of concerns that we're talking about today most of us will never experience a record breaking drought that takes away so much more than water we'll never know the pain of watching a child slowly succumb to hunger and will never live without the many safety nets we have here family.

Ethiopia East Africa
"east africa" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Anyone who's ever been out of work and a father who struggled to feed his family and a mother who's ever wondered where she'd find the money to pay the bills knows what a helpless feeling this is it's one thing to wonder where your own next meal will come from it's another thing entirely to wonder how you care for your children how will you feed them you may never have had to consider this but in poor areas around the world parents just like you and me are looking for a miracle one peanut is what's being called a miracle in a foil packet we're using this popping up in places like Ethiopia where you do have the severely malnourished kids and it really is amazing what happens for these children I I visited many of these centers on a child that you know one day looks like really they are about to die within a couple days is a completely different kids and so that's one of the programs that we're doing in Ethiopia Carolyn miles on saving lives in places like Ethiopia and East Africa places where families are facing a looming famine we've not seen in a generation what we're talking about today is really something quite simple there are children who are severely malnourished and we have a chance to bring them back from the brink of death it's true that no single one of us can fix the entire problem but what is also true is that each of us can fix it for just one person or two or three and while that doesn't change everything in the world it does change the whole world for the people and families we touch most of us will live our entire lives without having the kinds of concerns that we're talking about today most of us will never experience a record breaking drought that takes away so much more than water we'll never know the pain of watching a child slowly succumb to hunger and will never live without the many safety nets we have here family.

Ethiopia East Africa
"east africa" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Anyone who's ever been out of work and a father who struggled to feed his family and the mother who's ever wondered where she'd find the money to pay the bills knows what a helpless feeling this is it's one thing to wonder where your own next meal will come from it's another thing entirely to wonder how you care for your children how will you feed them you may never have had to consider this but in poor areas around the world parents just like you and me are looking for a miracle one peanut is what's being called a miracle in a foil packet we're using this popping up in places like Ethiopia where you do have the severely malnourished kids and it really is amazing what happens for these children I I visited many of these centers on a child that you know one day looks like really they are about to die within a couple days is a completely different kids and so that's one of the programs that we're doing in Ethiopia Carolyn miles on saving lives in places like Ethiopia and East Africa places where families are facing a looming famine we've not seen in a generation what we're talking about today is really something quite simple there are children who are severely malnourished and we have a chance to bring them back from the brink of death it's true that no single one of us can fix the entire problem but what is also true is that each of us can fix it for just one person or two or three and while that doesn't change everything in the world it does change the whole world for the people and families we touch most of us will live our entire lives without having the kinds of concerns that we're talking about today most of us will never experience a record breaking drought that takes away so much more than water we'll never know the pain of watching the child slowly succumb to hunger and will never live without the many safety nets we have.

Ethiopia East Africa
"east africa" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Anyone who's ever been out of work and a father who struggled to feed his family and a mother who's ever wondered where she'd find the money to pay the bills knows what a helpless feeling this is it's one thing to wonder where your own next meal will come from it's another thing entirely to wonder how you care for your children how will you feed them you may never have had to consider this but in poor areas around the world parents just like you and me are looking for a miracle one peanut is what's being called a miracle in a foil packet we're using this popping up in places like Ethiopia where you do have the severely malnourished kids and it really is amazing what happens for these children I I visited many of these centers on a child that you know one day looks like really they are about to die within a couple days is a completely different kids and so that's one of the programs that we're doing in Ethiopia Carolyn miles on saving lives in places like Ethiopia and East Africa places where families are facing a looming famine we've not seen in a generation what we're talking about today is really something quite simple there are children who are severely malnourished and we have a chance to bring them back from the brink of death it's true that no single one of us can fix the entire problem but what is also true is that each of us can fix it for just one person or two or three and while that doesn't change everything in the world it does change the whole world for the people and families we touch most of us will live our entire lives without having the kinds of concerns that we're talking about today most of us will never experience a record breaking drought that takes away so much more than water we'll never know the pain of watching a child slowly succumb to hunger and will never live without the many safety nets we have here family.

Ethiopia East Africa
Does closing schools protect kids, and us, from coronavirus?

Coronacast

08:28 min | 2 years ago

Does closing schools protect kids, and us, from coronavirus?

"Federal government's pretty obsessed with schools. Victoria's taking a hardline. Wanted to get the Infection time to even lower levels because there still is virus circulating in Victoria and New South Wales. Probably less so in some of the other states can probably make more of the political fight than there is. But I think it's worth stating a couple of things about schools here. The Commonwealth is making a lot of the evidence that children don't spread this to the same extent as older people and therefore the we spoke about this last week with the New South Wales Schools Study of eighteen people nine students and teachers who were infected elsewhere and did the spread it in the classroom and yes the war spread however and therefore they say Scotia Auburn and some people say they should never have shots because the spread is so low. Well there is spread. It is low but it's not insignificant. Maybe two to four percent of deaths and other studies maybe ten percent of the spread. Some people say it's less than that but there are two other reasons and very important reasons. Why schools had to be shot early in this pandemic. It's very hard to go to. Extreme social distancing such as we've had which have really turned around this pandemic without schools being shot and that's not about spread is just that when schools are shots. Parents have to stay at home. Says very hard to stay at home when your kids are school. And so it's a very important part of the process and it maybe wasn't as transparent. Maybe that wasn't in the minds of people who actually shut schools. But it's a really important part of the strategy very hard to go to any degree of lockdown without schools being shot irrespective of whether or not their source of infection and the third reason that you shut schools is for consistency of messaging communication and consistency of communication is essential in pandemic and people. Just get confused. Why can my kids go to school and shoot if you know that it can spread? Okay maybe not as much as another age-groups. Why can kids not have any social distancing at all in classrooms when I've been told I can't go for picnic and I can't go mixing with people when that message got out before we had lifting of the lockdown people get confused and cynical about the whole lockdown social distancing process? And Those. Are the three reasons why you shut down schools? And you do it early so that you you go hard area to help control the pandemic equally on the other side. Which is where we're where we're at now. You actually do have to lift the restrictions on schools fairly early if you want the economy to get back going going again because it's hard for parents to get back to work if their kids are still at school so the very reasons that you shut schools also reasons why you open them up but you can only open them up when you're really confident that we've got the testing regime in place where the communities committed to. If they've got a coffin call they're going to turn up for testing and if you have to be isolated you will. We have to be quarantined. As a contact you will be unless we as individuals are all willing to do that for the community. It isn't GonNa work back where we started. It feels like we're inching towards that. Now we are and it's great news and we just need to monitor to one thing. Time Monitor. Small things at a time monitor. See where we're going. Make sure there's no outbreaks make sure we can control the outbreaks. And then keep moving forward and I think very quickly. We'll forget how tough this has been because we open. I think much sooner than we think. But we've got to be really patient for the next two weeks because the next two weeks really will see the infection rate. Go Down I think. Just don't forget how quickly this evolved. It's quick at the beginning of this pandemic and slow to resolve at the other end paying the price at this end of the pandemic for perhaps being a little bit late at the beginning. But we've done incredibly well is just a bit slower. We've just got to be patient for the next couple of weeks. Do things slowly. Don't go nuts and then things can be much more under control. Let's talk a couple of questions from the audience. We Betsy asking about Vitamin Day doesn't protect you from private infection or does it reduce the severity of the infection. Nobody knows the answer to this. It's all a bit. Theoretical one of the theories behind some viruses being commoner in winter. Is that our vitamin lead? D LEVELS DROP. I mean become more susceptible to infection and there is some evidence that your immune system doesn't work as well when you're vitamin D deficient. That is very different. Thing from saying does taking vitamin D potato against covered nineteen. It is almost certainly won't protect. You could maybe reducing. The severity of the infection is hard to know here. Vitamin D goes through. Waxes and wanes is a popular vitamin with a lot of evidence of great benefits a few years ago then the better of the studies. Where as time moved on didn't show much affect on bonds didn't show much affect heart disease and cancer which are the ones shown so I think the benefits of Vitamin D are less than people. Think it's a very important vitamin very important for health but with taking a lot of it makes a big difference. I don't know and in a country like a stranger. There are groups who are vitamin D deficient elderly people who don't get out much in the sun people with dark skin particularly from east. Africa who cover themselves up a lot in Melbourne is? There's been a lot of vitamin D deficiency children with problems when they're born into those communities because the these women are used to the courtyards where they cannot cover their skin quite as much but essentially. We don't have too bad a problem with Vitamin D. Having said that there's no harm and taking vitamin D if You want to and if it if it protects you that's fine just don't take a huge amount of eight taking it as a supplement or just getting enough sunlight. Fifteen minutes of sun on the upper part of your body near midday was it gets into winter. That's all you need if you want to take a supplement then you can. You can take one of the standard supplements at a standard. Does we've got another person asking about low blood oxygen and in the states. There's been anecdotes of people coming in To Emergency Department and they're actually quite got quite low blood oxygen levels and they seem fine. Can we test corona virus by testing the amount of oxygen in the blood? No but if you come in otherwise well with a low blood oxygen level of not very sick and your blood oxygen levels disproportionately low. It's a very strong sign that you've got covered nineteen and you do need to be tested. But it's not one for one you can't guarantee just because you go to low oxygen you've got virus you still need to test for the actual virus. So let's talk about a bit of Research Norman. What's what's coming out about recovered patients who are still getting positive test results. There's been a report from career. I haven't seen the paper on this yet but the news about reinfection came out of South Korea where people were saying. Well had gone negative van. They went positive. Where the REINFECTED COROLLA CAST? We got a lot of questions about this and the answer I gave at the time was well. Suspects have had the virus in them. It's waxed and waned the test. Isn't that that that accurate and come back positive. When the virus hasn't disappeared the reason according to this recession. I- stresses yet to be published. Is that the test. May well have picked up dead virus fragments in other words. The virus was still there in the throat but not alive so the remnants of the virus they are and because the taste picks up the genetic material of the virus. It doesn't have to be alive. Pickup genetic material and speaking of material and scoring positive. When in fact there's no live virus there and that's the reason they think it's not real reinfection. How Thirties then make a decision? As to whether someone's allowed to go back out and mix with society again really good question because that could keep them at home the answers. I don't know how they're doing. And but what I imagine is the cases that the median time in meeting the time that most people stay infectious for the last time. I loot these things change was about three weeks when you've had a good going infection so I imagine if you're still positive at three weeks in your otherwise well it's not a high signal then they might give you a pass on that. I'm not sure if there's a test for a live forest and this because you'd have to grow the virus

Vitamin D Deficiency New South Wales Schools Federal Government Commonwealth South Wales Victoria Africa Betsy South Korea Heart Disease To Emergency Department Melbourne
Travel to Senegal and The Gambia

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

09:20 min | 2 years ago

Travel to Senegal and The Gambia

"Welcome the image traveler. I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about West Africa. I like to welcome to the show. Brian Asher from the world hiker DOT COM. Who has come to talk to us about Senegal and the Gambia in West Africa? Brian Welcome to the show. Thank you thank you for having me. I know you were surprised that we had not previously done in episode of Amateur Traveler on this region and as we were talking about before we started recording. We don't get as many pitches but also there aren't as many travelers who tend to go to west Africa East Africa. Southern Africa tend to get a little more tourists in general. Why should someone go to that region before we focus in on Senegal? Gambia I think. West Africa's really vibrance several my friends. Who have been there for years in the Peace Corps? Said it's about the People? It's about the markets it's about the color it's about the way they treat you just the life that's on the streets of West Africa. I think we hear of animals. Safaris maybe eastern Southern Africa West. Africa's is really the beating hearts of the continents with some of the most populous countries in the fascinating region with lots of smaller countries grouped. In that you can visit In the whole region there will. We've chosen to talk about Senegal and the Gambia one. Because you've been there recently and we always try and focus on someplace. That wasn't a ten years ago trip. The you've been to all the countries in Africa. Yes four fifty four nations and Africa hats off to you. Thank you and people may be wondering why we're talking about the two of them. This is one of those very odd places where one country actually completely surrounds. The exactly the Gambia's inside of Senegal. So the Gumby has no other neighbors have Senegal to the North East. The South and the West is the ocean. So it's completely involved excellent. And why should someone go to Senegal Gambia? I think Senegal and the Gambia great introduction to Africa and especially to West Africa. They're safe countries. They're countries that are kind of a soft introduction. They're not quite as hard hitting some the other countries in west Africa. Very safe to visit for me. The the weather was very nice after coming from kind of more tropical and intense heat in the Sahara for example movement way across and the people. The people are very friendly. There's not vowed kind of lively music in the streets that you can listen to all the time and there is a decent number of Europeans between but a large French population. There's quite a few Lebanese. That live there a special indy car in the capital of Senegal. And it's it's very soft welcoming place that would not intimidate so I think most people when they think of Africa that would be a great place to start and by contrast. Then what you're saying is there's some of their neighbors. We're them might be a little more. You think twice about going because of poverty terrorism Civil war or disease. Yeah those those are the only reasons I can think of not to go to some of the areas over the last ten years at least in western Africa and I think the Transportation as well kind of infrastructure with having made my way of public transportation there are a lot of Africa can be extremely slow and the Senegal Gambia. Our little breath of fresh air to be able to get around quite a bit easier than the light of the countries in the region and I'm fascinated to hear about this. I have technically been indycar but really only in the airport. And they didn't let me off the plane so I really knew very little about the area. So what kind of itinerary would you recommend? I think that Senegal be the one that you'd want to spend more time in. The car has quite a bit to see in there quite a few beaches right there. Outside of the city I stayed in a neighborhood called walk. Tom Which is nicely placed next to the African Renaissance Monument which is the largest statue and all of Africa. That kind of looks down on the whole region there and Indycar and you can take a couple of really nice day trip south from the car so if you stayed there for two three or four days I think that would be an ideal amount of time to spend their most people like I went to a place called Goree Island which is very famous for being one of the biggest places that had slaves that were coming out to the Americas and you can learn a lot but the history. They're easy to walk around. There's a ferry that goes every couple hours to get there and place it almost everyone. The cousin Senegal visits during the first couple days sides stay for the car to three days with the city and the surrounding area and then a couple of days up to St Louis which is about four hours for five hours north by bus. Okay and you could spend a day or two. They're known for its famous. Saint Louis Arch known. Not that Saint. Louis Okay the other Saint Louis in Senegal. It takes a good six to eight hours going by bus. You could take a private car if you want. Or if you're on a tour to get down to the Gambia assume that's GONNA take up half or two thirds of a day and then I'd be down in Bonn Jewel and area right below it whether it's nice speeches and a monkey parking things for two to three days so I think you could easily piece together somewhere between eight and ten days which would be kind of a nice length of a visit between Senegal Gambia. Excellent so you started us into car and you mentioned going out to the island whose name I've already forgotten it's gory island heart ee. Eileen with just one of the biggest hubs for the slave trade and they have fairies that go out every couple hours and that's definitely Come a must do if you're in Dakar. I think almost anyone I've talked to has done not visit for half day or two thirds of the day and real easy to walk arounds. Thinks about a kilometre too long. And that's locals there with colorful art kids playing soccer in slave museums. That are there that you can visit as well and so I assume there's a fourth year which is where they keep the slaves locked up. Yes and what else are we going to do the two or three days in the car? How are we gonNA spend that you mentioned the monument and there's a couple of monuments there the country it's about ninety six percent Muslim and so there's several nice mosques to visit as well in the lot of fishermen that go out and I love think West Africa? One of the images of the coastal areas. Are these colorful fishing boats that you can see like dozens of guys sliding off into the water and then sliding back up with their catch from the day and there's a lot of seafood that they bring in so these real colorfully painted. Boats is one of the images that you'll see on the coast there in Indycar and their fishing from the there than rather than from okay and is there a place you would go to see that. There is a mosque called the mosque of the divinity which had a bunch of these colorful boats right next to it and it's right there in the car about five or ten minutes from where I was staying in the neighborhood of calm and I stayed AIRBNB. There's lots of airbnb options there for budget travelers and there's all different ranges of accommodation but there are inexpensive options for those looking for him as well and I stayed with a local man there and enjoyed always like state local people to give you all flavor of what it's like will what I usually find when we're talking about. Travelling in lesser developed areas of Africa is that we're talking about not an inexpensive flight to get in relatively expensive for the distance intra country flights inside of Africa. Compare for instance or a US but then really cheap food and really cheap housing. Is that right? Yeah that's true. And so that's the Pros and cons. I always way between local transport and the flights I think the flights between the Gambian cars forty minutes so in say but I just checked in it's still upwards of one hundred forty to one hundred eighty dollars for a forty minute one slight. It's not too bad for Africa standards. It can be a lot worse a lot worse or west African flights but bus. I WanNa say it was about eighteen dollars that took me there so you just have to pick and choose. What's worth more your your time or your money. Well and that is going to be an individual choice. Yeah another thing. A lot of people like to do is there's a pink lake there several of these in the world. There's one in Mexico unless Jerry I believe and there's one about Sarah outside of Dakar. That is is another kind of one of them. Must do things on the visit. That would take you maybe about a half day and so that is really really pick. Yeah if you look at pictures online. There's one called Rainbow Mountain in Peru or I don't know how much instagram or things put filters on it and this one depending on who's pictured is it's pink. It was quite pink but sometimes the pictures make it. Look even more amazingly think depend on. The season tends to be kind of lighter darker shades of pink. That has the salt miners. That are out there. And kind of local people selling artwork in tourist items. So and so this is Lake Ripa. Yes my GRANDPA Loch rose. I think in French shore the lake what it can go by. I would say gory. Islands and Pink Lake would be to half day trips. That would make sense to have with your day or so exploring around the car so to make it two or three days for the car and it strives. You might say

Senegal Gambia Senegal Africa West Africa East Africa Southern Africa Chris Christensen Brian Asher Dakar Gambia Amateur Traveler Peace Corps Pink Lake Sahara Goree Island Soccer Louis Arch Airbnb
"east africa" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Left fifty funding offense yeah what the funding low fat left the whole thing like I said we did all the work that the whole thing locked up let that be throwing rocks at five fifty fifty no time for people to that's not normal and the fifth angel sounded and I saw a star fall from heaven unto the earth and to him was given the key of the bottomless pit and he opened the bottomless pit and there arose a smoke out of the pit as the smoke of a great furnace and the sun and the air we're talking by reason of the smoke of the pit and there came out of the smoke locusts upon the earth swarms of locusts are everywhere billion of these doesn't insects a sweeping across East Africa destroying crops and livelihoods as the fly from one country under them was given power as the scorpions it was commanded them that they should not hurt the grass of the earth neither any green but only those men which have not when the cables on the hunt for technical innovation the local because the stuff to them it was given that they should be tormented five it was as the torment of a scorpion when he strike at the man and in those days the children find it chill desire to die to flee from ten million people in the region the local population is going the country's expense warning if the situation is not we are lucky to see crisis in the coming months what new ways you are listening to ground zero well the ninety seven seven seven three three one zero one eight seven seven seven three three one zero one one pastor Paul Begley with us tonight on the program we will be in.

East Africa Paul Begley
Behind the scenes at the humanitarian air hub dispatching COVID-19 aid to African nations

UN News

05:40 min | 2 years ago

Behind the scenes at the humanitarian air hub dispatching COVID-19 aid to African nations

"Face mosques a million of them just some of the precious cargo being dispatched to all corners of Africa by the UN as the continent braces for the spread of cove in nineteen managing. This huge task is Amanda Dowdy Senior Director of Operations for the World Food Program will WFP in online interview with you. An uses Daniel Johnson Jordanian national. Mr Dodie takes us behind the scenes at the agency's humanitarian hub in the European capital. Addis Ababa where a U N Wide Supply Chain. Operation is now in full swing. The flights game some came from China on some came from Dubai. It was a combined shipment of Jack Ma Foundation and who own supplies? They arrived in Addis on Tuesday and from there we are moving only consignments to almost fifty countries across Africa so far we have moved up to thirty countries and every day we are completing that consignment right so on the ground then from Addis Ababa. You've reached around thirty countries as you say what's the the final figure Africa now if we African country which ones have called for help. And how is the decision taken about which ones are helped look going to all the African countries in accordance with ovulation in accordance with needs? But the most in need are where the number of cases are flaring up. We have cases in west Africa in Senegal as well as in southern Africa and flights. Today just give me a picture of actually what's happening on the ground in Addis at the humanitarian hub. Everything is working. We allocate the basically parcel or or kit the cargo in accordance to fly throughout that we have so the lanes will depart at this angle to multiple countries. Come back and pick up again. Another would go to multiple vendors. Of course we're using several airplanes in order to reach a maximum. I think today the plan is for thirty countries to receive the locations today and what particular protocols are in place to prevent caveat nineteen transmission. We follow all the procedures in terms of the guidelines of w the national health guidelines. That are in place the social distancing but we also are in a way in even when we transfer Scott Every manager in place including spraying the planes in short that there is no cross contamination even from parcells coming so we follow according to a yet according to Keio we are abiding by these owes to the letter in terms of what happened today when it reaches the country in question. How is the aid distributed? And how you show that. It's getting to where it needs to go. It's the handed over to the Ministry of of the Spectrum Authority of the member states. It's not exactly going to UN agencies or NGOs this is going to member states and the government authorities W in coordination with the local government authorities ensures that all the aid or assistance in terms of medical supplies goes to work. It is neat. Could you say this is an historic sort of arrangement to show solidarity in terms of keeping supply chains going because the secretary general has expressed a lot of concern about global supply chains when code actually hits because yes African countries that have been affected already? But it's really nothing compared with what is going to happen. This was the first flight from Addis. Ababa it was the first test for the international hub as transshipment on to the rest of Africa but also in terms of passenger because as part of our response to call with is a neighboring humanitarian and the health responding to reach the countries. And we are going to be using episode for establishing passenger service again to East Africa would be establishing multiple bessinger services. Because as you know commercial air traffic is moralists suspended so we will be establishing these passenger services to ensure that responders humanitarian workers and all the personnel needed to mitigate a fight. This virus can arrive in countries where they need to and they can also leave where they need to go so we are enabling the humanitarian and responds. To be able to mitigate against this virus. This is Africa. Were talking about. So how is the World Food Program helping places like Yemen? Syria Wall Art of the hub. Will also be providing. It's not only for Africa. It we will be using part of the others as well or Yemen for example but this is not the only in Africa we would have one enact ca one in this above and one in South Africa we have a hop ensue bank in Malaysia for Asia and we have a hump in Dubai for the Middle East. And we have a hub in Panama for Latin American for Central America. So these are all going to be coming online as we speak and they would serve as the respective regions both in terms of cargo as well as in terms of personnel the eventual aim is to help ninety five countries in total all. Actually probably it's GONNA reach almost Henry Than Twenty affected countries so we have the capacity to scale up as needed of course if the funding is provided of course and. How much funding do you need? You're asking what three hundred fifty million dollars. How much do you have so far? We entered sixty was initial request. Now we are revising these figures depending on the data that we are getting supplies. As the sourcing and manufacturing increases we will be increasing our air assets in order to make sure that the supplies getting time to the affected countries enter the countries that needs.

Africa Addis Addis Ababa UN Dubai East Africa Yemen West Africa Daniel Johnson Mr Dodie WFP Amanda Dowdy Senior Director Of Operations South Africa Jack Ma Foundation Syria
Prioritizing Problems and 100 episodes

Talking Machines

09:27 min | 2 years ago

Prioritizing Problems and 100 episodes

"You are listening to talking machines. I'm Katherine Gordon Lawrence and from a closet during shutdown of the universe this is. This is how we're talking to each other this the for this episode. Neil and this is our one hundredth episode a very auspicious episode. Eight a marvelous case. I just want to be very clear. I'm not in a closet with Catherine. That would be infringing physical distancing rules. I think as we're now calling it. I am physically distant from Catherine but Katherine is in a closet and I can see the coats hanging on her head. Riches a good. Look actually a hundredth episode. That is exciting. Is it my hundred episode? I think it's just one hundred episode episode. Neil I'm sorry one hundred. I think I'm very healthy. Fifty eight or something like that. I think you're I think I believe you. Actually you're at fifty nine. Wow that was great. Guess Look at me and my capability in a summation very good. Yeah I guess the first question I wanNA ask you really is. How are you is everything? Okay where you are. How are things going before we talk about what we usually talk about? Let's check in with each other as people. Yeah what Crazy Times. So things are fine but obviously naught fine in the UK at the moment. And you know I think is going to be something that plays out over a long period of time but My wife's Italian things a a a bad in Italy And they're a bit further down this road than we are so they could become quite bad hair and I think there's a lot of apprehension about them but I also noticed that different groups seem to have different different levels of concern about this. I don't fully understand those different levels of concern but you certainly see the sudden people out in sort of light touching each other and then the rest of us going. Ron Ole giving them know what we do is we give them dirty looks because we in Britain. And that's how we in fools Social distancing which as I was saying I think perhaps physical distance things the right thing because we need to be social we dole out dirty looks that seems to be how we dealing with corrupt. I'm not sure as a sufficient response but I don't suppose it surprised me but you notice how widespread lack of understanding of exponential say is which I think is natural someone was. I watched a video. Where an Italian guy who named forgets me name forgets me and I forget his name actually in this case. I've forgotten how to speak so it touting I think Delana is his name was talking about how difficult it is to express an exponential in normal times that it's concept that is difficult for our brains to handle and I think perhaps many of us in machine learning much more used to thinking about quite used to it but I was really reflecting on that and thinking. Yeah it is hot and I think the difficulty of handling experts specs potentials combined with uncertainty around. What's going on? Is You know. Really at the heart of the challenges facing for this epidemic. Yeah absolutely is there. Been any interesting work by anyone that you've seen about predicting the impact or the. I think the modeling work is is very interesting. I would not want to be doing it. I was would be but I don't envy those that are having to do it. Because I work. In galveston proceeds occasion. I worked with the Padilla millages and was organizing conference in Sheffield and I remember one of the speakers because we were recording everything for the cameras to be switched off for period. Because they were about to. Present some speculative results on malaria. I think in East Africa and they didn't want those results to be broadcast until they confirmed that modeling because the implications for those people who are funding say mosquito nets and other interventions Quite serious so they didn't want misinformation to get out there and I think that this is a really interesting challenge for the machine learning community where our instinct is to sort of share things very widely quite early and that's a good instinct but this is difficulty the sharing Wash conclusion people are reading and interpreting this and of course that is going on quite a widespread level. So I think it's very interesting around open science like festival you use. It wants to understand the models people using and how they're doing things but secondly you don't want people to get the wrong impression by misusing model models only exists with the context and I think that's one of the biggest challenges of modeling is. Is You have to deeply understand the limitations so tools. I Actually Matthew House from University of Manchester shed a tool that was just stimulating. Effects of changing. All our is the number of expected number of people you expect to transmit the disease to and it was a differential equation model and he shed. It's on python is quite simple model and actually the conclusions you could draw from playing with similar to those of very if people are interested in this for the UK and us. Imperial College has released. A model is being widely looked up and has in theory changed the strategic approach of the UK government. But I'm really uncertain about whether that's true or not. It's whether it changed their approach or whether the the circumstances change their approach. It's so hard to know so people are calling clearly for openness and so the parties in favor of that pardon me then on the stance that some of these models need to be used within a certain context and I think the thing that never fails to impress me as how Cetin so many people are about what the right thing to do is or what the right conclusion is. I just can't be certain. I I feel that you look at these things in the decisions we're making They're gonNA have serious downstream consequences You know for a long time from now. Not just in the here and now the next month's but they have very serious downstream consequences riddled with uncertainty because the major events. Like oh it turns out the drug. Kills it straightaway? Awfully changes thinking. It turns out that you know. Well vaccines I think. The best batches eighteen-month very difficult situation and I almost feel it's dangerous. Even you're talking about in some sense. He's also hard because if you talk about it then your risk of spreading your own misunderstandings or it. It really does make me happy. The we have some understanding of uncertainty a lot of us in the community. Because you study that and I it's always interesting to be to what extent you can try and deploy that in your own decision making people you know Being faced with pretty serious questions like they may have An elderly relative with conditions who live some distance away from them and they've got to make a decision about do they visit or not because the potentially endangering that relative by visiting by increased risk of transmission but simultaneously by being isolated themselves and that relative being isolated at a time. When in some sense you kind of want to be close to family. That's not really a trade off and I think that you know in in machine learning and we all these folks Walker. What's the cost for? That doesn't really work. You know and actually way even when you look at these models they are trying to look at things like so the big trade off I think in these models is the threat to health in the short term versus the long term economic damage by being shot down and some people seem to claim that. That's no trade off that you have to save as many lives now as possible and other people play well. Actually you have to think long term about downstream effects. And I think you can make arguments both ways. So I don't think there's any pure ethical correctness here but I think What actually has happened is the world seems to have gone for the last one and you can't do the former on your own. Because downstream economic consequences will happen at a worldwide scale. So I think that that basically we've the default position has ended up from some. How game theoretic way that we attempt to minimise Nieta impact. And that certainly not a wrong decision as far as we know now but you know events may prove things to take different very challenging. I think what's also very interesting and has a big effect on the way the community will end up looking at things in the future. Is the difference with the capabilities. You get in countries like China where those much will and actually Israel. My understanding is. I don't know the details you will you have the security databases in Israel and in China. You have much more fine grain data collecting capabilities which of the things that we will worry about and it turns out in these situations. They may be quite simple tool. It's actually always interested me that tension between how do you maintain the liberty we expect from not having a data overseen

Katherine Gordon Lawrence Catherine Neil UK Israel China Imperial College Sheffield Ron Ole East Africa Padilla Millages Delana Italy Cetin Matthew House University Of Manchester Britain Walker
What are Kenya and Somalia really fighting about?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:25 min | 2 years ago

What are Kenya and Somalia really fighting about?

"For obvious reasons the idea of an old fashioned cross-border dust up between two neighboring nations seems right now almost quaint and perhaps the kind of thing likely to prompt replies in the circumstances along the lines of at this point who cares or not now leads where a bit busy nevertheless despite the best efforts of covert nineteen the world will keep turning and its constituent countries will continue to but against each other from time to time in East Africa in recent days. Somalia and Kenya have gone very close to going to war with each other and may get close. Astill the battlefield is jubilant. One of Somalia's five semi autonomous states. It lies just across Somalia's border with Kenya. Kenya regards drew ballooned as a vital buffet. Between it and Al Shabaab the fanatical Islamist militia which wreaks most of its havoc in Somalia but has also been responsible for large scale outrages in Kenya including the two thousand and thirteen attack on the West Gate Shopping Mall in Nairobi and the two thousand and fifteen attack on a university campus in Garissa accordingly Kenya has cultivated friendly relations with Jubal lands regional government and with jubilant president. Ahmed Mohamed Islam known colloquially as adobe Kenya has trained Madonna obeys militia and has troops of its own stationed injury bowland as part of the multinational African Union mission in Somalia and is also believed to have many more still camped under Kenya's own flag. This is a continuation of sorts of the invasion of Somalia Kenya undertook in two thousand and eleven in order to chase al-shabaab further north. Can US troops injury ballooned are not seeing as style occupiers? However indeed President Mugabe's regional government seems to get on better with Nairobi than it does with Mogadishu. The most recent unpleasantness appears to have begun with fighting between drew balloons own forces and Somali government troops the jubilation soldiers retreated over the border into Kenya and the Somali troops followed them. At which point. Can you took an interest? The fighting appears to have centred on the town of Mandera a town wedged between the Kenya. Somali border and the Delaware River which delineates Kenya's border with Ethiopia attorney casualties on both sides left people. Each data to save bullets. Were one succumb today. A diplomatic exchanges between Kenya and Somalia. Since have been terse verging on abrupt. Kenya has jumped about an unwarranted attack on its sovereign territory by foreign soldiers and so forth. Somalia has retorted to the effect that this is a bit rich coming from a country with thousands of its soldiers parked more or less permanently on the other side of its border. Kenya's desire to put physical distance between itself. And the PESTILENTIAL MARAUDERS OF AL. Shabaab is reasonable enough but it may not be the only or even the main reason why relations between Arab and Mogadishu have deteriorated as far as they have excitingly for fans of obscure maritime territorial disputes and. Come on who isn't the two countries are also at odds of a sea border. Exactly is the area in contention the border of the two countries when it comes to the seats and the only way to explain where the disputed portion of Indian Ocean is without incurring angry correspondence from either Kenya or Somalia. Although to risk inviting saving emails from both is to say that it's either off Somalia's southern coast all of Kenya's Northern Coast. It will come as little surprise to listeners that the stretch of Ocean in question abounds with oil and gas deposits. Nineteen outbreak may focus Kenyan and Somali attention elsewhere and or it may offer a party to this argument what it perceives as cover for decisive action. There has been some suggestion. That Kenya has consented actually annexing portions of southern Somalia both to deter Al Shabaab and to further its claims on the ocean of what is presently the two countries shed coast or there may be the option of mediation by Ethiopian. Prime Minister and Nobel Peace Laureate Abby who has facilitated talks between Kenya and Somalia before I also accept this award on behalf of Africans and citizens of the world for whom the Rim of peace has often turned into a nightmare of war. Today I stand here in front of you talking about this because of fit I call them my way to pay through the dusty training so four years ago or international justice may yet prevail. Somalia has for some years been seeking an adjudication on the maritime boundary from the International Court of Justice in The Hague the I. C. J. is presently due to rule in June. But that like just about everything else may. Now be

Kenya Somalia Mogadishu Nairobi Indian Ocean Somali Government Al Shabaab President Mugabe Ahmed Mohamed Islam East Africa International Court Of Justice Mandera Adobe West Gate Shopping Mall Delaware River AL Garissa African Union Shabaab Prime Minister
"east africa" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

03:29 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on No Agenda

"Big threat is the biggest threat much as we. We'll say drought is much as we say that floods can be a threat to rank them. I think they're all threat but does it. Because this is an unprecedented security a single square kilometers warm can eat as much food in a day as thirty five thousand people and the FAA warned last month. That left unchecked. The number of locusts in east Africa could explode by five hundred times by June when as they have been doing. Recently in Kenya's arches post the young locust or hoppers our earthbound for two weeks and a more vulnerable to spraying but this month Kenya. The region's wealthiest and most stable country ran out of pesticide for about a week and a half leaving residents and farmers to watch helplessly as the crops. They count on to feed their families. Were devoured. Yeah. I have happened. Find this a little bit but only when you turn on Pluto. Tv. Will you see this report anywhere? Yeah this is unbelievably horrible. Nobody's reporting on it. It's good at me if I was a news. Director it's good material. Rate is grill. Horrify people the good fabulous. Let's play part to threaten disturbing because you've never seen anything like this. And also when they land on vegetation they eat everything even the grass. If this continues they will eat all the vegetation in neighboring. The military has been deployed handspring trees in the morning before locus take flight. Somalia where the infestation was first reported in December can't provide security to exterminate his European. Needs five hundred thousand litres of pesticide for the upcoming harvest and planting season but the country. Single pesticide factory is struggling to produce. Its maximum two hundred thousand liters as foreign exchange shortages have delayed the purchase of chemicals decides available decides require financial resources before they can be released. Fao says contain. The plague will cost at least one hundred. Thirty eight million. Us dollars so far. Donors have pledged fifty two million at. Where's Bill Gates whereas Bill Gates all these always writing about it? Thirty eight million which is a lot of money to kill some bugs one hundred thirty eight million Bill Gates. I could put Munich name him. You could name Bezos all guys. This is like no shop chain. Because they're Black John. They don't care the racist. I don't know if that's true but it sounds sounds good. Let's look at the ten plagues of Egypt of which the locus is one. Water turned into blood. I don't think we have an example of that yet The FROG BOLA EBOLA. Okay frogs the FROGS LICE OR NATS. Licensed definitely all over the place. wild animals yes Pestilence of livestock boils thunderstorm hail and fire dark darkness darkness for three days and death of first born babies. Now we're ahead of the game so far. I think we're doing okay doing okay. Yeah it's it's.

Bill Gates Kenya FAA Somalia east Africa Director Us Bezos Munich Egypt
"east africa" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

06:06 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Dive Monday through Friday for more news without the noise an interesting science story that we covered this week East Africa is facing a locust swarm of biblical proportions it is the worst it has been in decades and could get five hundred times worse by June the swarm certain farms and crops and could cause a food shortage in that area there's a scary science behind these huge swarms of locusts change colors they eat toxic plants and even grow extra muscles as they band together to wreak havoc for more on the story we spoke to Matt Simon is a science reporter acquired or talking about specific species here called the desert locust and Lucas are actually about twenty species with in the seven thousand species of grasshoppers that undergo this transformation into gregarious that's as they call it and the scientific community when they are kind of isolated together perhaps in a patch of vegetation of biological switch books in their bodies as they're crowding in there they decide okay I'm gonna be less of a solitary and more of a essentially a pocket humble slang in these giant formations swarms as you might call them and when they do you make that switch their bodies as they transform they go from this dole tan color to a yellow and black and that's the signal that they're beginning to eat vegetation it's toxic and that makes themselves toxic ascent of the predators do not eat meat or you'll get sick as well their muscles grow and that actually prepares them for the journeys that they're about to undertake and what happened this particular situation where you had a couple cyclones hit the same spot in the desert of Oman and that through a bunch of vegetation due had these populations breeding and those vegetation in the desert and then all taken off in search of devastation elsewhere that means going south into East Africa north into Iran and really just exploding their numbers as the sequential cyclones comes there to give them the perfect conditions not only for breeding but for having a lot of vegetation to fuel the swarms they can move something like ninety miles and a day which is pretty insane consensus size it's pretty fascinating to think that when they are solitary the I can dull brown color and then once they start gathering up in these larger swarms they just completely transformers like there's no need to hide it anymore we're gonna be out here we're gonna add change or colors of the predators think we're toxic and the muscle growth and their transformation so they can make these along kind of migrations but why do they gather in such huge huge numbers I know it a lot of it has to do with reading and all that and the like moist soil to put their eggs and all but how does he get to such a crazy numbers were there in the billions and billions of locusts it's a very hearty desert species that can go many weeks without water but it does of course need water from time to time when the cyclones come through it and dumped a bunch of water on the desert the female looking slash the prod the soil with their abdomens to check its moisture when they find that it's okay they lay their eggs that hatch in about two weeks time any stay moist that whole time or the eggs will on desiccated and be destroyed but what you can have happening is getting within a cubic meter of soil something like a thousand headaches and expect crossed entire landscape you're talking about an extraordinary number of babies hatching and when they do they come into the world where there is a bunch of vegetation from the recent hydration if Dave burn through an email as are crowding around there go under going to switch to Gerry's ness and when they get through all that process and they say we are moving along now and they do so on mass unfortunately often into populated areas in East Africa yeah and then that's where the big problem comes in because they start ruining crops they love grains they load up on carbohydrates so they can make these long trips and really that's where they're announcing its emergency outbreaks happening there in Africa and and there's food and security because of things like that when they start eating all the crops and settling in on farms I they're destroying potential food for people at that point there after carbohydrates much less so than protein actually some researchers did some really interesting work feeding these locusts a high protein or low protein diets or high carbohydrates are low carbohydrate diets and found that they actually grew less when they had low carbohydrate diets so when the time a carbohydrates and high carbohydrate diets worth of course talking about brains that they're finding right now in East Africa and and really decimating not only the crops on the field but all the stuff in storage and we could make to a good amount of surcharges in East Africa especially considering this is probably the very beginnings of this warm they may increase the numbers by five hundred times by June again because more rains are going to come through and give them these breeding grounds and they have so much vegetation to tear through and the only way to really get it under control is using pesticides right in Kenya they have about five planes that are spring the area and that's the only recourse they have or the researchers I spoke to about this really compared it to the outbreak of wildfires so the ideas you have a small fire breaking out you stepped out immediately and you don't get a larger one typically what these monitoring networks throughout East Africa North Africa in India are doing is the people on the ground actually driving around four by fours looking for any signs of locust because if they can catch an outbreak early they spray them with the pesticides and kill them off before it gets out of control the issue being with that the pesticide that it is it's dangerous it's very effective but you have to have trained professionals doing that so it's not like folks on a farm can have their own supply of pesticides these are big star to beginning a forecast where these locust my start to move and in this modern era the mobile I still say to Kenya okay this is going to be and your doorstep and a couple weeks or couple months you know mobilizing Kenya will do things like pull the sides out of central repositories and and spread it throughout the country to be used Matt well so it's a really robust network and it's usually very good to catch nice but this was breaking out in such an isolated part of the desert of Amman that nobody saw it coming before it got too late it just really got control of the good start using it as the sides with the very much affect mess match Simon science reporter at wired thank you very much for joining us and.

East Africa
"east africa" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on AP News

"Most serious outbreak of locusts in twenty five years is spreading across East Africa posing an unprecedented threat to food security in some of the world's most vulnerable countries the Associated Press reports climate scientists say unusual climate conditions of partly to blame the swarms of tingling insects hang like shimmering dark clouds as they devoured crops ones warm reported in Kenya measured sixty by forty kilometers according to the Kenyan government an average swarm can destroy as many food crops in the day is is sufficient to feed two thousand five hundred people the further increase in locust swarms could last until June as favorable breeding conditions continue according to the African trade block the intergovernmental authority on development a pigeon wearing a tiny sombrero has been spotted in Reno Nevada according to city manager and this follows earlier sightings of pigeons with cowboy hats in Las Vegas hello TV says Reno city manager tweeted about the bird thing is quirky and fun but still in humane animal officials in Las Vegas they a pigeon with a miniature cowboy hat glued to its had died earlier this week people who see the bird with a sombrero in Reno are encouraged to call animal service dispatch officers dogs cats birds and even turtles hamsters and ferrets have been blessed with holy water by priests outside a church in Madrid people brought their pets to the church to celebrate the feast of Saint Anthony the abit Spain's patron Saint of animal the Catholic traditions meant to bring.

East Africa Associated Press Kenya Kenyan government Reno Nevada Las Vegas Spain Madrid
"east africa" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Carried out by Java, east Africa ISIS, Somalia. A dissident al-shabaab splinter group. I want to go on with this. We make no defense. No defense racists of any sort. We want to get to the bottom of these facts. Who is doing the most killings terrorist killings out there? I'll be right back. There's no doubt that many Americans are having a hard time affording their prescription drugs. But while Democrats blamed drug companies, they ignore that middlemen are keeping discounts intended for patients. That's why I've been telling you about pharmacy benefit managers PB M's and why they wanna keep prescription drug costs artificially high. Finally, Congress's investigating this issue. Senator Chuck Grassley head of the Senate finance committee brought in the CEO's of the largest to shine a light on their practices and folks get this just three PPM's control eighty five percent of the market so much for competition to drive down prices. So I'm glad Grassley is asking tough questions because I don't know what the hell do except get themselves rich at the expense of patients. President Trump wants to eliminate hidden drug rebates and give the discounts to seniors at the pharmacy counter. I couldn't agree more. Which is why I'm speaking out. Get the facts, go to true healthcare, facts dot com. True healthcare, facts dot com. That's. True healthcare, facts dot com. Purchase underway at the homeland security department with secretary Kirsten Nielsen stepping down correspondent, Pamela Brown reports secret service chief Randolph Alice's also leaving. I am told by a source that a couple of weeks.

Senator Chuck Grassley Democrats Somalia al-shabaab President Trump Senate finance committee Kirsten Nielsen Africa Randolph Alice Pamela Brown Congress secretary CEO service chief eighty five percent
"east africa" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"east africa" Discussed on KCRW

"To American exiles in east Africa, the story of Pedo Neil in Charlotte hill on and their fifty year exile from the United States. My name is Felix Lenzi O'neil junior. My nickname is Pete O'Neal. Compete O'neil. Seventy eight year old elder black, man. Who else could I possibly be our stories picks up in nineteen sixty nine when Pedo Neal was the chairman of the Kansas City, Missouri chapter of the Black Panther party in that year. The Black Panthers were at the height of their influence with chapters all across the United States, and they loomed very very large in the American imagination for people in the counterculture who revere them and for their opponents who demonize them FBI director, j Edgar Hoover declared. The Panthers were the greatest internal threat to US national security as far as the government was concerned people like Pedo, Neil were enemies of the state. Our producer kala interviewed on Neil in Tanzania where he's been living for nearly fifty years. Pete was a prominent member of the Black Panther party. But he wasn't always a radical person bent on ending oppression. He has a fairly checkered past and he's tired of talking about it. But of course, our Preston. I came up on Wall Street where the great jazz giants were and everything all the hustlers pimps and the prostitutes, and these people from the age of nine or my professors, they inculcated in me a way of thinking. I don't even really need to be talking about this. But nonetheless, they inculcated into my psyche. A manner of thinking that is very street oriented this square people just don't think that way they really don't from a fairly young age. Pete was primarily a street hustler and small time pimp. He had just two concerns in life making money fast and staying far away from the police, but he had an argument with the wife of a police officer and the law caught.

Black Panther party Pete O'Neal Pedo Neil United States Felix Lenzi east Africa Pedo Neal Pete Edgar Hoover Charlotte hill Missouri FBI Tanzania officer Preston chairman Kansas City producer kala director