35 Burst results for "Earth"

Akron Police Officers Fatally Shoot Jayland Walker

The Officer Tatum Show

01:29 min | 1 d ago

Akron Police Officers Fatally Shoot Jayland Walker

"But let's start with this shooting that happened in Akron, Ohio, you guys probably haven't heard of it yet, but you will hear of it soon because it's involved in a black man and white police officers. And celebrities are coming out. And I call them celebrities. They really not worth a hill of beans. But for whatever reason they're considered to be celebrities because they push this agenda that America is a racist place and black people should be afraid of white people every day they wake up in the morning, especially white police officers. Young man, Jalen walker. Keep that name in your mind. Jaylen walker, the fake black man, Sean king, who he's a white man. He's not a black man. I don't know why black people are giving him any credence of credit and him talking on black issues is absolutely as anonymity when they bash every other white person, but they don't bash on king just 'cause he got an edge up in a taper fade. Don't make you a black man. Now, I want to reach you what he said, and then we're going to read the facts surrounding this case. I'm going to reach you what he said, read the facts. And I don't know how on God's green earth, Sean king has been sued. In some form of a class action lawsuit, because all he do is peddle lies to create controversy and hatred in our country against police, literally I could argue that Sean king is literally getting black men murdered almost every other weekend by police officers.

Sean King Jalen Walker Jaylen Walker Akron Ohio America
Joe Biden's Unforgivable Failures at the Border With Chad Wolf

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:36 min | 3 d ago

Joe Biden's Unforgivable Failures at the Border With Chad Wolf

"The southern border and also recruitment of new people into border patrol is the great Chad wolf. Chad, welcome to the program. Yeah, well, thanks for having me, Charlie. So Chad, let me read a headline here, which is just it's so alarming when I read this. I said, well, I had to reread it because we have all these stories printed out. And I was doing so many different things. I said, what on earth? I said 46 people dead in a Texas tractor trailer. Now, I've been to the border a couple times. I'm far from an expert. I'm a layman on this. 46 people, what the hell is going on on the southern border? Well, it's pretty bad. And this is a particularly bad incident that occurred. It's just outside of San Antonio where what appears to be a number of illegal aliens who came across that border illegally were in the back of a tractor trailer truck and obviously the heat in South Texas is pretty pretty unbearable this time of year. And unfortunately, those individuals, some of those individuals passed away. But I think what it shows you is the incentive factor that this administration's policies along that border have caused, right? Where individuals from all across the world, but particularly in Mexico and Central America and other places are trying to get to the United States as quickly as they can under a Biden administration policies because they know if they get here, then they have a very good chance of staying in remaining here in the United States, despite having no legal reason to remain here because of this administration's policy. So I think unfortunately you're going to see more and more types of these incidents as we go forward. So here's what first of all, I just want to

Chad Wolf Chad Charlie South Texas San Antonio Texas Biden Administration Central America United States Mexico
Author Christiana Hale on the Concept of 'Medieval Cosmology'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:54 min | 4 d ago

Author Christiana Hale on the Concept of 'Medieval Cosmology'

"And if I was walking back I'm talking to Christiana Hale, who hails different spelling from Idaho. She's in Idaho now. I am not an Idaho. I want to be very clear. The book that she has written and it is wonderful. It's called deeper heaven, a reader's guide to C. S. Lewis's ransom trilogy. So Christiana, C. S. Lewis wrote so much. Some people know him from the screwtape letters. Many people know the Narnia chronicles and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. Very few people know that he wrote a an absolutely spectacular trilogy of novels for adults, often called the ransom trilogy. They are literarily magnificent and there's just, they're full of so much stuff, so much genius, so many levels. But one level, which is vital in which you write about in your book, which you clarify, is this thing called the medieval cosmology. So let's just break it down for the audience. The ancients believed, and the medieval world believed that the earth is at the center, now we now know that's not true, but it kind of doesn't matter. They believe the earth is at the center. And then they could see with the naked eye before telescopes, they could see the sun, the moon, and mercury, Mars, Saturn, Venus, and Jupiter. That's it. Right? So those were the medieval planets. And when you talk about medieval cosmology, first, that's what you're talking about, correct? Yes, yes, correct. So the 7 planets of their cosmology. But beyond that, they saw the planet says having very distinct personalities too, which is something that's very foreign to us. We just look up and we see them and they're pretty in the night sky and they're bright. So give us an example of what we mean by that. So for example, Jupiter, I would argue they would see as one of the most important planets. And so in the system. So he is and I say he because it's very connected to the Roman God Jupiter after whom it's named. But they would see him as the king of the planets. So as Jupiter is the king of the Roman gods, and so connected with kingly Ness and all of the all of the qualities that are associated with what we think of a king being like you can see also they could see with the naked, well, not quite with the naked eye, but as rudimentary telescopes were developed, they could see the spot in Jupiter's side. So he's the wounded king, which then draws connections to Christ, obviously, on the cross, his side was pierced. And so they're comes into all of these, then theological connotations as well.

Idaho C. S. Lewis Christiana Hale Christiana Kingly Ness
Is the GOP Winning Voters? Or Is the Left Just Losing Them?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:37 min | 4 d ago

Is the GOP Winning Voters? Or Is the Left Just Losing Them?

"You see, we talked yesterday about the 1 million voters switching to the Republican Party in a warning sign for Democrats. But I do not believe this is because of the brilliance of the Republican Party. I believe this is because of how terrible the left is. Now, the left is terrible for the time being. I've actually think we're going to have a generation of Democrats digging a deeper and deeper hole. Of policies and ideas and a worldview that is deeply unpopular because it runs against nature. You see, we're going to celebrate July 4th coming up actually on Friday. We're going to do our July 4th show in anticipation of July 4th next week because we're taking off an Independence Day. And when we do our July 4th show on Friday as we talk about the Continental Congress and we talk about what exactly was being debated when the declaration was being written, primarily by Thomas Jefferson, there's this beautiful line about the laws of nature and nature's God. We talk about that a lot on this program. So nature comes from the Latin word, which means birth comes out of the earth. Things that do not change. You see, inherent in being a conservative is you believe there is a certain natural law. You believe there's laws of economics, you believe that there's laws of thermodynamics. There's laws of physics. There's laws of politics and there's laws of nature. And so a conservative generally recognizes that men can not become pregnant. Generally recognizes that life is sacred. And so you kind of live within the framework of what we would call reality.

Republican Party Continental Congress Thomas Jefferson
Feminists Threaten to Withhold Sex After Roe Decision

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:49 min | 5 d ago

Feminists Threaten to Withhold Sex After Roe Decision

"I think the story of the weekend, it is related to roe V wade, but it is not that the roe V wade decision is such it is the threat by various feminists on the Internet to withhold sex from their. Significant other or for that matter, any insignificant other. That's a good one. You should ask that your daughter at college. Did you ever hook up with a significant other? Or an insignificant other? I like that. SL or Io. Anyway, or even husband. Until roe V wade is once again the law of the land. The reason I think it is the story of the weekend is that it reveals a great deal about an aspect of feminism, well, more than an aspect, but in this case an aspect. Of the profound irrationality at the heart of feminist proclamations. Are you familiar with any threat on the part of men after all, it goes back to ancient Greece, threatening men with deprivation of sex. Are you familiar in the history of the world? Of the earth, with its intelligent population, that is the homo sapien. Of men ever threatening withholding sex.

Roe V Wade Greece
The Seed and Soil Argument With Historian Bill Federer

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:00 min | 6 d ago

The Seed and Soil Argument With Historian Bill Federer

"1700s and all of a sudden Britain is in a little bit of trouble and they start to have to tax the colonies, expand more on the seed and soil argument that led us to the culmination of the 1770s. It's interesting so the British, the king of England, went on to become the most powerful king on Planet Earth. If he was a globalist, he was a one world government guy. And so in the middle 1700s, they controlled Bengal and Bengal India, Bengal, India, and they basically took over and said, okay, all this, you know, subsistence farming and stuff you've been doing working to switch it up. We know how to do this. And they change, they change their economy so much that there was a drought and it turned into a famine and 10 million people died in Bengal in the middle to late 1700s. And so the British East India Company has gone bankrupt and so they go to the king say, hey, we want to tax Britain and the people in Britain said no way. And so the king says, okay, well, you can tax the colonies. And it started to escalate and the king wanted to take away our ability to print our own money, take away our ability to appoint judges. So all the judges were appointed by the king and but he didn't realize that, by the way, king George the third went insane. He had porphyria, a blue blood disease. You know, you intermarry the preserve the royal bloodline. Uncle daddy. But anyway, so the king of England was a globalist and America's founders decided they didn't like this global as king telling us what to do. So they broke away and flipped it and made the people the king. So the word citizen is Greek, it means co king, co ruler, co sovereign. So kings have subjects who are subjected to their will, Republicans and democracies have citizens. And so if you're a citizen of America, you are a co ruler, you're a

Bengal Bengal India Britain British East India Company England Blue Blood Disease India Porphyria King George America
A highlight from Ears To Hear Are Created

Live Behind The Veil

09:59 min | Last week

A highlight from Ears To Hear Are Created

"Welcome to live behind the veil and atmosphere where men and women of God speak his word to this age and bring his kingdom to this earth. Do you have ears to hear and eyes to see what God is doing in this hour? Let us join our host and the family's conversation as the Holy Spirit is unfolding. The word behind the veil hello, everyone. I'm Ron your host, and on this podcast, we'll be talking about hearing and speaking the word of God. Those who have a drive to bring God's kingdom to the earth. Must first have ears created in them to hear his word before they can speak a word from God. Let's listen in to the teaching of the Holy Spirit, and believed to have created within us ears to hear his word. What I understand of the early church is they did not expound scriptures, they believed and spoke by faith a word from God that changed people's hearts, framed in age, they had to listen to an apostolic word, had to listen to the prophet's speak, and then believe in the impartation of that and open their mouths and speak a word from God. Think about these people, what they were receiving had to come from a living epistle. Speaking the truth and love, that's the true thing of whether it's the word of the lord or not, is whether it's the truth, in love, and that authority of the lord coming through, and they could feel that. I'm sure they could tell the difference between somebody who was narrating just expose saying as opposed to somebody who was really sharing their heart with one another. Thing with Peter is so important because in X two he stood up with the 11, remember, and he started talking about Joel. He quoted from Joel too in the fact that he knew what the scripture said, but he also changed it slightly and kind of updated it for how it applied to their day. And that's the thing about what we call an apostolic word is it brings a live the scriptures for today. And that's what the true life is. I mean, you can read the word without the life without the truth in your heart, and it just becomes something you study. Just like any literature, but you have to have the life in your heart to get it imparted to you and to others while we're speaking about living epistles tonight, or speaking about the difference between what I would consider, I'm not putting down a scholar because there's nothing wrong with studying the word. And being a scholar of the word, but the spirit behind it without the relationship of Christ behind it without the relationship to the body of Christ and the members of the body, it's worthless. It's just a bunch of head knowledge and a pumping up of ego, like Paul, Paul is a perfect example, pharisee of the pharisees, but yet after he had his meeting with the lord. It changed his whole spirit. It changed his whole drive, his whole attitude, his heart, the relationship, that's where things are sparked. That's where things are alive. On that day of Pentecost, one word, save 3000 people. Today it takes 3000 words to save one. The word of God never grows old. Because it's always alive. Exactly, it should always be alive, no matter whose speaking it, they spoke a living word to one another. It was something that was alive. They shared an experience with Christ. Alan, were they better people than us? No, God, no. They had to be special. People because they were probably worse off than we are. They might have been more honest than the American person. Well, there's a truth right there. The point I'm making is we've been talking about the early church and then we're talking about today back and forth and we're talking about Christ. This is probably a controversial. I don't think Christ wanted to be put on a pedestal. Right. I think Christ wanted to be an example to people of how you can walk with God and how you can speak his word and have a relationship with the father to me without that, it's just religion, Christ is the first born of many brethren, and he is the example the pattern son that God sent to the earth to provide a way to be created into those people that God can use in the earth. I want to give a really good example and it's back in Ezekiel 37, but I want to emphasize verse four in chapter 37 again he said to me, prophesy over these bones, and say to them, O dry bones, hear the word of the lord. Now, in Amos again, it talks about there is a famine for hearing the word. What did Jesus do when he was on earth? He spoke what he heard the father speaking. That's what Ezekiel did here. That's what he lied to do. That's what he likes it did. They are not special, even Elijah himself says, you know, basically I put my pants on one leg at a time just like you do. There are people just like we are. What we really should be hearing from this is that the father is looking for people to hear the words, so we speak that word, lord, loose ears to hear. Lord loose the people in America to hear the word of the lord. Loose the people in Africa, South America, the 7 continents. My God, loose the hearing of the word. Right. And loose those who have a prophetic word from God who are like Elijah, I stand in the presence of the lord, and by my word, it's not going to rain for three and a half years, right? That's what Elijah said. Alan, your speaking something, there's a key before you can speak a word from God. You have to have ears to hear a word from God. And if you think about think about it, what Christ said every time you spoke after as he would say, those who have ears to hear, yes, let them hear a word from God. There are a lot of people out there that are preaching. A lot of people out there that are quote speaking a word from God, and it's not a word from God, God has to create ears to hear. Our living word from God, every one of us sitting here didn't start out speaking the word of God. We sat under mentors and they were speaking a word from God, and it created the capacity within us to hear a word from God, exactly. Which then enabled us to begin to speak the word from God. Lord loose people to hear. Loose the hearing of your word father loose the hearing, and the understanding loose the hearts to understand what you're saying. Even the disciples, what did you say? They didn't get it either until after the day of Pentecost. Today there are so many men and women of God out there that are in churches and they're anointed men and women of God, and their speaking and anointed word. So here's two people sitting in the congregation. One person has ears, and when that word spoken, it hits them, it changes them. They walk in it. The other person, it goes right over their head. Yep. Same place, two different people. Well, on this podcast, we found out that having ears to hear God's word is crucial if we are those who are called to speak his word and bring his kingdom to this earth. Experiencing the impartation of God's word through his family is life. As this time in his presence blessed you, then please subscribe to our podcast at live behind the veil dot com. If you would like to contact the family with questions or topics that you would like to discuss, you can email them to living epistles at live behind the veil dot com. Stay connected, tuned in and grow with the family as the lord unveils his word to us live. Behind the veil.

Scripture Word Family Christian Love GOD Joel Elijah Ezekiel Paul RON Alan Peter Amos South America Africa Lord America
Why Did Virginia State Delegate Nick Freitas Become a Politician?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:20 min | Last week

Why Did Virginia State Delegate Nick Freitas Become a Politician?

"Why on earth do you want to become a politician? I did it. I had a friend of mine. The first time I got asked to run for office, I was involved because from the time I was little, my mother had been the head of a Republican women's organization and she always impressed upon me that it was important to be involved. And so that's where I was involved on a volunteer basis and helping out with other candidates and things of that nature. The first time I got asked to run for office, I'm not doing that. And the second time, I got asked, my wife really sat down and talked to me and she goes, you know, you talk a lot about the various issues about the problems that are going on in the country. I had a philosophical level. She was if you're not willing to go in when people are asking you to. She says, that's not really the guy I know. And your wife always knows how to get you. But so ran for office had a really good friend that helped out. I still work with them now. And ran for the House of delegates and won that seat. And when was that? This was in 2015 as one of the election was sworn in in 2016. And then the last 6 years. It's been interesting. Kind of a unique thing. I represent James Madison's district. That's district. Yeah, and I tease my constituents that this district started off with James Madison, and now you got me. But no, it's been interesting on a number of levels. Not just to see what's gone on in the Commonwealth of Virginia because when I came in, we had a 64 seat Republican

House Of Delegates James Madison Commonwealth Of Virginia
Why a Little Luck Matters.

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:39 sec | Last week

Why a Little Luck Matters.

"Moses was a humble man. More humble than any one else on earth. It's an amazing thing. So I have an essay on humility. What is humility? Can you know your humble? I'll talk about that another time. It's a great subject. Can you can you know your humble if you're humble? But the reason I raise it is, one of the reasons everybody should be humble is that no matter how much you have attained in life, there was good luck involved.

Moses
'Until Unity' Author Francis Chan on the Gospel and Eternity

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:41 min | Last week

'Until Unity' Author Francis Chan on the Gospel and Eternity

"Back, I'm talking to Francis Chan, he's written a new book called until unity. So Francis is a huge idea unity and what you said when you spoke the other day in San Diego, I was very moved by it because you're right that we're supposed to love our enemies and when somebody says, I have Jesus living inside me. I'm a Christian. That's like a next level of what you just think, wow. This person, we may disagree, but I have to honor them and I have to talk to them in a way that takes that very seriously. But at what point, you know, because you have people now saying any Stanley wrote a book recently that kind of says we shouldn't be political, right? So on the surface of it, I get that. But then I think to myself, it feels to me like I kind of false posturing because you think, wait a minute, if I'm talking about truth, if I talk about the unborn, if I talk about slavery, if I talk about Nazis or fascists or whatever, like I have an obligation to truth, to speak on that, but there's some people that it's almost like they just have a dislike of that tension. And so they say, let's just talk about the gospel. As though you could talk about the gospel, but avoid some of those issues. So that's where I can't take them seriously. I feel like they're missing something big. Yeah. Well, you know, I recently read this book called bahn hoffer. And powerful, powerful book. I suggest it. And when you think about his life, how do you ignore human life? Like, I mean, that is the gospel. And so I hear what they're saying, though, because again, like I said earlier, there's things that we can get caught up in, and we're talking about eternity. I mean, we're talking about a person possibly spending eternity in torment a part from God or spending eternity forever, not these few years that you and I have left on the earth. We're talking about forever and ever in the presence of God and perfection, you know, for thousands, tens of thousands, millions of years, and that's huge. There's nothing bigger than that. We're talking about believing in a God who we can't even look at or we would die and him sending his son to die on a cross and suffering across so that we can be forgiven and spend eternity with him in perfect fellowship. And so that needs to be so high above every issue.

Francis Chan Bahn Hoffer Francis San Diego Stanley
Charlie Reflects on Our Collective Birth Certificate: The Constitution

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:19 min | Last week

Charlie Reflects on Our Collective Birth Certificate: The Constitution

"One of the course of human events it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands, which have connected them with another. And to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and nature's God entitle them. A decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness that to secure these rights governments are instituted among men deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. I'm reading, of course, our birth certificate. July 4th, 1776. The founding of America on July 4th 1776 is a profound and meaningful day. You see, America did not stumble into existence. It was summoned into existence. It was a moral claim written by Thomas Jefferson and signed by these incredible men from roger Sherman to William Williams to John Hancock that men deserve the ability to govern themselves. Let me read that again. Deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. This was and is the great shot forward.

America Roger Sherman William Williams Thomas Jefferson John Hancock
A highlight from Which Piece Of God's Puzzle Are You?

Live Behind The Veil

06:58 min | Last week

A highlight from Which Piece Of God's Puzzle Are You?

"Welcome to live behind the veil and atmosphere where men and women of God speak his word to this age and bring his kingdom to this earth. Do you have ears to hear and eyes to see what God is doing in this hour? Let us join our host and the family's conversation as the Holy Spirit is unfolding. The word behind the veil hello and welcome to live behind the veil. I'm Ron, your host, and on this podcast, the family talks about how God has created us all different with many different expressions. And yet, as we come together as one body, we are perfect in his sight. We're created in God's image. So I think that everybody is perfect. And I think that the perfection it is being unveiled as we mature in Christ, as we mature in our walk with him, is totally awesome. Because the ground is all level at the foot of the cross. The one thing that has caused astounds me, we are perfect. He made us that way. We're in his image, and now it's for us to realize it. Realizing who he has created you to be. I raised twins, you'll like this. I can't compare. You can't compare one child to the other, and you can't compare twins to all the other because they're all individuals. And thence that coming together of individuals that make one body. I think the perfection is the relationship. That you have with the lord and with one another, because I just flashed back on the prodigal son. When he came back and his father loved him. He suddenly knew who the father was. More than he ever had before. And as we get to know that the father loves us, and that we get to know that we love one another, I think that's where perfection lies. Because we all have those things in our hearts that protect ourselves from one another and from the father. But as we learned that love is the only thing that the father is, then we learn that we don't have to protect ourselves anymore, and that's where the perfection will lie. You can not be perfect without others. Yeah. They are perfectly what God created each individual to be are, but the perfection actually comes when there is a culmination or a bringing together a many membered body. As we learn to trust one another in a depth to where we understand that the heart that each of us have that God is speaking through that other individual, we draw the Christ out of each person and together that creates that perfection because Jesus is perfect, and if he's in us, each of us we might be a leg and I arm a finger, but altogether we make a perfect body. Amen. I would say this, the only entity that I'm worried about being perfect towards is my father. You're perfect right where you are. Right. God gave you a gift. And he gave me a different gift, and it takes a long time sometimes for us to find out which two pieces of the puzzle go together. You know, sometimes we try to make it fit, and boy, it just doesn't work, but boy, when you find that puzzle piece that goes with yours, oh my gosh. What a liberty in a freedom when those pieces come together and you find out that there can be blood flowing through the veins. I always love those puzzles, my little kids had the, you know, it was innate, but ten puzzle on the hat about 5 pieces. Exactly. There's an old saying simple mind simple pleasures. I went through chemo. Back in 2010. I couldn't be around people, because my white blood count was so low. So I got into doing puzzles, and it was one of my biggest meeting with meetings with the lord, just about that issue because I was doing a puzzle where a piece would look like it fits in with the three other sides already there. And it looked perfect. But then you found the foresight and you're going that piece doesn't go there. Right. It was so frustrating. But then you find out the true piece that goes there and it is so rewarding. It's true. Yeah, that's very true. And that's the joy of actually being different. Is because none of us are the same. Thank God. The worst thing you could ever do is homogenize people to where they're all exactly robots, right? We are individuals. Created that way by God on purpose, and as we come together in who we are, we become more than what we ever could have been by ourselves. On this podcast, we've seen that although, we are very different as individuals with many different expressions. As we come together under his lordship, we flow together and become the great many membered body of Christ. Experiencing the impartation of God's word through his family is a life. As this time in his presence blessed you, then please subscribe to our podcast at live behind the veil dot com. If you would like to contact the family with questions or topics that you would like to discuss, you can email them to living epistles at live behind the veil dot com. Stay connected, tuned in and grow with the family as the lord unveils his word to us live. Behind the veil.

Scripture Word Family Christian Love GOD RON
The Most Dangerous People Running Civilization Are the Ideologues

The Charlie Kirk Show

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

The Most Dangerous People Running Civilization Are the Ideologues

"The most dangerous people that are running our entire civilization are the ideologues. They have a thought this through and they have an answer for the chaos. And that's really disturbing. In fact, that should make you take pause. I would rather have the super corrupt person that doesn't really think it through and they just want to be senator this or congressman that. It's the person that actually thinks they're going to usher in an equivalent of heaven on earth through the destruction through the dialectic through the destruction of the American currency through the opening of borders through the elimination of gender norms. They think through all of that tension of the thesis and the anti thesis that they're actually going to get to something that will be meaningful and better.

The Theology of Marxism With Dr. James Lindsay

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:02 min | 2 weeks ago

The Theology of Marxism With Dr. James Lindsay

"With doctor James Lindsay a few minutes ago. About the theology of Marxism. And we're do you want to kind of sum up what you had just said, and then I want to transition from that into a conversation with Charlie, because Charlie serves at the front lines of everything that's happening. In many ways, I've been behind the scenes for a number of years. James, of course, is front lines, but boy, Charlie takes most of the arrows. So, but doctor Lindsey, could you just explain to us again when you just spoke about? Yeah, so we got another two hours. It'll be easier this time. No, it's really simple. There are two major components or three, I guess. Marx wants to throw down religion as a mystification and place of that he's going to take Rousseau's leftism, the idea of a social contract governing society and increasingly socialist way where we use we willingly give up our freedoms to achieve more freedom in the name of the greater good. And then he's going to tuck that into the hegelian dialectic as a process to transform society into its ideal state. And so man is the creative subject in this religion who doesn't realize that he is his own God yet, but can realize that through this process by understanding the nature of his suffering rather than masking it with the opium of religion. And in the long march of history can actually realize his true nature, which is transcendent of private property, totally communistic, perfectly social, and social man lives in social society with no difference between man and society any longer, and thus everybody pays marks as bills. And the way that we get there is that the conscious within the woke was in this religion, the born again within this religion, however you want to phrase it, seize the means of production of man society in the world and transform it into a more human form, a form more usable man before more suitable to man, which is essentially the Garden of Eden remade by men for men on earth as it isn't in heaven. Charlie,

Charlie James Lindsay Lindsey Rousseau Marx James Garden Of Eden
A highlight from Free To Love

Live Behind The Veil

10:02 min | 2 weeks ago

A highlight from Free To Love

"Welcome to live behind the veil and atmosphere where men and women of God speak his word to this age and bring his kingdom to this earth. Do you have ears to hear and eyes to see what God is doing in this hour? Let us join our host and the family's conversation as the Holy Spirit is unfolding. The word behind the veil. I'm Ron your host, and on this podcast, we are asking ourselves how we become free to love with God's love. You know, look at our nation today of young people, you know, they're not being trained up in the way they should go. Right. According to what scripture talking about, now we have young people who are not disciplined, proverbs, huge about disciplining children, so that they learn their way, and without guidelines, you know, what's a scripture without a plan, the people perish. What was the Steve covey, right? Back in the day, he said, imagine, climbing the ladder of success, only to find out when you get to the top, you're on leaning against the wrong building. He just wasted your whole life going the wrong way. God's love is not human love. Not at all. God's love has guidelines. God's love has restrictions because God knows that if you don't have restrictions and guidelines that you're going to go in ways that are destructive and so you're talking about the ladder against the right building of the wrong building that ladder is God's word God's guidelines, God's love. I agree with you. I don't think that the generations that are coming up, and I know that's a kind of a generic general thing because it doesn't fit all people, but it fits a lot of people. That it's against the wrong building. They want to be independent. They want to be self sufficient. They want to leave their own life. It was true. Again, that's the fruit. You look at the fruit, and we looking at the fruit of that type of thinking and that type of lifestyle we're seeing chaos and destruction and a mess. In the world, the fruit is the proof. If people live a godly lifestyle because they are open to the word and open to God's love, their lives will produce that fruit, and those that don't, their lives will produce that other fruit. So even without a word, if you have eyes to see and you're not walled off to the truth, all you have to do is look out there and see the truth. We want to lift the limitations of appearances. Right. Right. I say this because I have a friend and I've mentioned him many times very dear friend. I've known him for years and he is honest. He is caring. He helps people, and I couldn't stand it after a while I asked him, I said, what church do you go to? He was offended. He says, I don't go to a church and it took me back. I didn't mention it again. For a long time, and I told him I said, I want to apologize. You know a while back, I asked you if you went to church you just do so many of the right things. That I thought you went to church. And he still did not want to discuss it. But I got my apology out there. To make myself feel better because I didn't see whether he knew who he was, and how he was acting. The Rain falls on the just and the unjust, but who are we to judge which one's which? Yeah. I don't want to knock Christianity, but they've got a lot to learn from the people who are not sitting in the pews because God's love is flowing out there in all ages. It's amazing how he moves and the eyes to see is not looking around sitting in a pew. You go out into the world and say, lord, show me where you're moving. Right. You'll be surprised he's out there moving and doing and creating and bringing forth so much more than has been locked up. Once we learn how to love, then we're free. We're not bound by anything if you're free to love. Amen . And God has no rule against that. There's no rule in thou shalt not love. And there is no hesitation. There's no holding back. There is no waiting. It's one of the things we can do and just go crazy with. I love what Dale saying about breaking down the restrictions. You wall this person off because they're quote not a Christian or they're not reading their Bible or they're not going to church or they don't look a certain way. Right, they don't walk a certain way. They don't look a certain way. We're coming to an outpouring of God's love on this earth that's going to blow people's minds and it's going to lift a veil of deception that Satan's put upon the earth saying you have to be this way or that way to love somebody, it's not true. And you don't have to be a Christian and you don't have to be. You don't. You don't have to be those things. And that right there, that statement right there. You don't have to be a Christian to love. You can be crucified out there for that. Just the reaction to that statement proves the point. Exactly. If I receive hatred and resentment because I said you don't have to be a Christian to love with the love of God, that proves the point. It does. Proves , we're all human. Right. There are people who have so many concepts and wrong understandings of first off who God is, who Jesus is and what the scriptures say, they've been taught and it goes back to what we were talking about, how you teach children, too. You teach them how to love. These people have been taught how not to love thinking it is love. Yeah, I guess, kinda. Yeah. You are wrong and you're gonna go to hell because you don't believe the way I do. Right. Yeah. God loves all mankind. Does he like what's going on? No, he doesn't like necessarily. He doesn't like our adamic nature and stuff, but he loves who he created. You know, you think about somebody. Dale, you used to build race cars. You build a race car and you put something special into it. That's got you in that car. You love that car and you want to race that car and all these things is wonderful and one of the hardest things you ever want to do is get rid of it. Yeah, I know. Because it's yours. Yeah, we're not young anymore, right, Dale . No. He has his life invested in people and in this earth, he doesn't want to just give it up to Satan and let things just happen Willy nilly. No. He's got a plan. And that's a beautiful plan that he has. He only gave us one commandment. And he said so in the scriptures, you can throw them all out the window. There is only one throw them all out the window. There's only one commandment, and that is you shall love the lord your God. With all your heart with all your soul with all your mind and your neighbor as yourself. Right . Amazing. And Christ, our pattern son, walked that out for us. He walked out every step of that commandment, clear to the cross, and on the cross, he said, father forgive them for they know not what they do. Right. Father and still your love in us, let it be our DNA. Let me lay down my life. I want to follow in the pattern. That you have created that I can be pleasing to you. Well, on this podcast, we've seen that without God's love and discipline in our lives. Our lives become destructive. Opening up to his love and discipline ensures that our lives will produce the fruit that he is looking for, and we will be a blessing to those around us. Experiencing the impartation of God's word through his family is life. Has this time in his presence blessed you, then please subscribe to our podcast at live behind the veil dot com. If you would like to contact the family with questions or topics that you would like to discussed, you can email them to living epistles at live behind a veil dot com. Stay connected, tuned in and grow with the family as the lord unveils his word to us live. Behind the veil.

Love God's Love Relationships GOD Christ Christian Steve Covey Dale RON Satan
The Purposeful Timing of the Jan. 6 Hearings, Roe Draft Opinion

The Dan Bongino Show

00:59 min | 2 weeks ago

The Purposeful Timing of the Jan. 6 Hearings, Roe Draft Opinion

"But they are trying to do is they're trying to distract you The January 6th committee has become a perfect foil the hearings were perfectly timed right around the release of row To disguise the leftist terrorist plans and their violent plans in light of what's going to happen with the road decision likely being overturned And it's designed to flip the script and make you to believe the most dangerous people on Planet Earth are Chewbacca guy That may be the worst Chewbacca ever That's the point Conveniently right around this time the January 6th committee and others are spreading around rumors about the deadly white Christian nationalist threat She noticed that happened right around the time the row thing leaked the road decision leaked Did you notice that You think that's by accident The media and the left in congressional committees including this star chamber now pushing this theory that the deadly white Christian nationalists so you can have a new enemy to account for right around row You think it's an accident they started pushing that narrative

Thomas Sheahen's Objection to the Big Bang Theory

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Thomas Sheahen's Objection to the Big Bang Theory

"I'm talking to Thomas Sheehan. What's that Greek? Thomas she and PhD, he's the author of a book every win. God symmetry in time. Thomas Sheen, when my book came out is atheism dead. A lot of people have emailed me because they have a young earth view of things they say that they believe the universe and everything was created only a few thousand years ago. I don't have a dog in the fight. My attitude is whatever is is and whatever scripture says is true. But a lot of people who have as high a view of scripture as I do yourself and Hugh Ross and others believe in the Big Bang. What is your most basic objection to the idea of the young earth concept? Well, the scientific evidence really is very, very good that it has existed for a very long time. I look at the first part of genesis as wonderful expression in Hebrew poetry of the fact that God was trying to communicate something to people, but whoever was on the receiving end couldn't get it all straight. And they did the very best they could and they've given us the best they could in circumstances where they don't understand fully all that God wants to say. Let me tell you about a certain 20th century guy. Well, actually, he's still alive. It's all from Brooklyn named Jerry Schroeder, grew up and went to MIT. I know Gerald Schroeder, he's in Israel. He's a genius. Go ahead. Well, he came to the table with a devout orthodox Jewish religion following a certain rabbi named knock commodities not to be confused with maimonides who were more familiar with. And he said, the universe was created in 6 days and that's what my faith says. Well, in the meantime, he's got a PhD in physics from MIT, so he knows what his science is. 13.8 billion years. And Schroeder said it's up to me to resolve what appears to be a discrepancy between my face and my science.

Thomas Sheehan Thomas Sheen Hugh Ross Thomas Jerry Schroeder Gerald Schroeder MIT Brooklyn Israel Schroeder
Three Takeaways From the June 14 Primary Elections

The Dan Bongino Show

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

Three Takeaways From the June 14 Primary Elections

"So last night I'm going into my three takeaways from the show From the election excuse me last night My three big takeaways opening segment was about takeaway number one how to handle the Trump endorsement or or the lack thereof Again don't lose your mind Don't do an Adam kinzinger at least Cheney Adam kinzinger again attacking the capitol police has worked today and the guy's just disgusting I mean he's just a chump in a coward Kensinger Cheney just as bad just awful people Don't lose your mind Take the Nancy mace kem approach and say I wish I got the endorsement I didn't I support the Trump agenda was and maybe going forward and that's how you stay and stay in office It's really that simple Take away number two The most important one The earthquake last night sent through the Democrats long-term election strategery is hard to explain to you It's hard to explain in words how important this is You know I was saying earlier in the podcast how I remember in these anthropology evolutionary biology kind of courses right I used to take that I love There was this concept of punctuated equilibrium not to get too deep in the weeds because I don't remember the weeds that well myself I just remember being fascinated by this It's this idea that species evolve gradually and gradually over time and you can see it in a fossil record right As you dig and dig and dig And then all of a sudden boom Some crazy event happens whatever A volcano explodes a Krakatoa like event and asteroid or a comet hits earth And next thing you know you see this massive change in species It's like this Ellie from that movie deep impact and extinction level event And it changes everything The species changed the composition of life on earth changes Now little dramatic that example but I'm telling you what's happening right now with the Hispanic voters You got it With the Hispanic voters thank you What's happening with Hispanic voters across the country Is that level of Ellie for the Democrats and extinction level event

Adam Kinzinger Cheney Adam Kinzinger Kensinger Cheney Capitol Police Earthquake Ellie
"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

08:08 min | 9 months ago

"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"Which we took it. Get the idea that throughout history. There's very short history. This industrial history. That no agency has really ever much said. No you think that somewhere down the road and agency would say would i be keyed in with developers and industry enough to be able to see what they're planning and and be able to come in and just say no. You can't do that. This only supports ten thousand people incrementally said yes to every single them even if we said oh well do a little bit better than that or you know you. Can't you know you do have to have a low flow release but we have incrementally said yes to so many things. We are so well past listening to what is being offered to us what the is offering us and if we could really put our ear to the ground and understand what's offered in use it in that kind of sustainable way m make those decisions make those agencies make decisions based on that but it's not the case we haven't we haven't made those kind of limitations on you know we We've we've let a lot of industries in a lot of development decisions. Go too far. And we're out of doubts were significantly out of balance. A no group would probably know that better than your own. If you were talking to farmer in indiana or iowa who had some riverside farmland and was actively working to Over the years and seen lots of floods and gotten washed out but bailed out by the government so it really didn't matter their flood plains. And they were telling you you you would like them to not farm in those areas. Is there any upside to them. Not doing so like. How would you tell that farmer. It would actually be good for you and more profitable if you if you did not farm. All of your flood plains. Well you know. I think i think there are a lot of farmers that do know that i mean they are tied to the earth. See these systems. And i think the big industry farmers might not see that as much but i think other farmers no the land well no that example flood plains are fertile areas but that round can only stay fertile so long if then disconnected with what made it fertile in the first place you know so i think a lot of them understand those processes and are looking for sustainable solutions. I don't work a lot with the agricultural side of things. But my guess is when you're talking to an individual who knows a lot about the land that they have maybe farm for generations. I think they are much more open minded to ways to make it available for future generations to and they remember things like the dust bowl and when we went clearly too far with things like that but i think when we start thinking about art at agriculture on an industrial basis. I think then they don't care the bottom line basically says uses much of it as you possibly can to make the biggest prophet right now and then move on go somewhere else or do whatever and i don't think we're looking at a multi generational views sometimes in industry and that saddens me. I think it's gotten us to where we are. And i think anyone the lick of sense who is not a complete narcissist cares about other generations and not just about their own pocketbook during this life and if that really is all care about that's a that's a sad delight they have. I really really believe him. Farmers do on him. You're proud of what they did for our country. I think the ones again that really have been on the land a long time. They know it and they do want to make a difference. So you're a professional. You're an engineer. You're in the nitty gritty of all of this stuff and you're not not you're not professionally an activist and a lotta people see people in the conservation when you put movement at the and they think. Oh everybody you're talking about is an activist or whatever but you are big into conservation like as big as people can be. And you're a professional and i want to give people tools if they think what you do. What you talked about today is really really cool. How could they find out more about being more like you. And i would say at the beginning of that conversation just on a. I don't think the two are separate to be a professional and know something about these systems. is also to be an advocate for for these systems and future generations. I mean we have to be the voice for what we know. River can't speak for itself so we have to be its voice and as far as than how to become What i've gone to work as a consultant right now but i did work as chief engineer for american rivers for quite some time to Again i do believe that this is all integrated into what it should be doing as an engineer. I have multi trained myself. I've gotta mix background. And i think a lot of people in my field do so. I have an undergrad civil engineering and actually focused more on structural back then but very quickly went into water. Resource did a lot of ecological design and water resource type classes and sediment transport glasses and then got my masters in environmental science and environmental management. So of are also taken a lot of ecology in fisheries classes contaminant transport classes. So you have to bring that all in and i know that are from one Wants to hire passionate people. So you're looking for someone with a passion but you also want to have these skill sets when you're doing what i do. It is nice if you get the underground engineering but keep it diverse. When you're getting it on and then bring in more sciences either. Get a minor or go on for a master's in more of the sciences as well. Something like fluvial geomorphology ecology or environmental management. You wanna bring in all these sides and we're never doing this alone. So engineer like myself is always working with folks who are straight out. Scientists biologists aquatic ecologist. Folks who really know a lot about contaminant transport and just the intricacies of the ecological system we create a team that works together in brainstorms on these things together to come up with the best solution and a team of just engineers alone would would never be the right choice and a team of just scientists alone sometimes is not the right choice or you need that professional engineer to do the plans in the construction side of it team together yet that whole group together and keeping your own education diverse. And then when you're out looking for a career in this neck networking with people find the people who are doing what you love and column and have lunch with them. And don't you don't even have to say. hey. I want a job. What you say is hey. I'm interested in what you do. Let me sit and learn more about it and when you leave that meeting if they didn't have a job for you then you're talking to the people that they sent you to as well so you're leaving any of these meetings with new names and a bigger network to draw from when you find that core group of people doing what you love is not even feel like work to you. It's going to be awesome. Networking tip almost anybody in your line of work can be bribed with tacos. I've people right people the people who would be good mentors anyway are fine. We spending fifteen minutes with you on a phone call to talk about what they do for. A living might even have lunch with you. I want you know almost once a month with people who have some kind of interest in this field. And i like that. It doesn't mean. I'm ready to hire them right now. But maybe they're going to go on and become the regulator that. I have to talk to in the future or maybe they're going to go to a nonprofit india a client of mine building our network just makes our voice. Louder makes us stronger. Laura thank you so much for taking the time.

iowa indiana american rivers india Laura
"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

03:23 min | 9 months ago

"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"I'm still Just in the throes realizing how wild it is where i live and yet where i live is the most biologically altered state north america. We've converted roughly ninety eight percent of the state for ume needs farming mostly roads highways and cultural kind of things like that. And so. I feel like i've been really lucky. I have a numerous france that i still maintain visiting one. Those main couvert island and so for example. And so i get to go to these places still. But i really like teasing him in particular like wait. You left i with this front on it. We don't figure out here where we're gonna figure it out. I mean he wanted to go over. There was something left a lot of friends in that but it became clear to me. I go visit those places like going to wilderness areas. But really the wildness is about more my relationship to my place wherever i am and so i've really come to love. I will bear very deeply and lake. I love it a lot. Because of what's been done to in a very short amount of time and yet i see potential there that i don see other places and i think that's really how i got into the reviled and so here. I am with the re wilding nut connecting with the people. I know and so i met roger. Ross give for this process and we kind of formed a partnership and Ross is extremely important in my life at that time because he's very challenged to me. We both agreed on. We were following rewinding We at read most all the same odd. We read most all the same books in southern deep understanding the language of each other but we came from past history a whole different way as was a local agricultural a business And here's mine trying to work with all the different environmental organizations trying to learn every plant species all that kind of level and between the two of us. I challenge each other tremendously and that's I think would really Catchers be wild Wild ethic that we're trying to do. We're both trying to learn how to be wilder and what rewinding me. And it's changed me tremendously. I just keep reading and reading a read most of this stuff before. How do i apply that to my own thing about. I don't have to wilderness anymore. I used to go a lot and well supposed to grow up. I still love places. I still find that interesting. But i have never been a wilder place in one sense of the word than i am where i live now on. I and i'm surrounded by corn beans. Two thirds of the statements covered into animal species. It's absolutely frightening how that green curtain and what's frightening is how people look at it and see that as a agreeing healthy thing on the national level what was being addressed was wilderness series or what we have stuff that's left. Where can we

"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

03:23 min | 9 months ago

"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"I'm still Just in the throes realizing how wild it is where i live and yet where i live is the most biologically altered state north america. We've converted roughly ninety eight percent of the state for ume needs farming mostly roads highways and cultural kind of things like that. And so. I feel like i've been really lucky. I have a numerous france that i still maintain visiting one. Those main couvert island and so for example. And so i get to go to these places still. But i really like teasing him in particular like wait. You left i with this front on it. We don't figure out here where we're gonna figure it out. I mean he wanted to go over. There was something left a lot of friends in that but it became clear to me. I go visit those places like going to wilderness areas. But really the wildness is about more my relationship to my place wherever i am and so i've really come to love. I will bear very deeply and lake. I love it a lot. Because of what's been done to in a very short amount of time and yet i see potential there that i don see other places and i think that's really how i got into the reviled and so here. I am with the re wilding nut connecting with the people. I know and so i met roger. Ross give for this process and we kind of formed a partnership and Ross is extremely important in my life at that time because he's very challenged to me. We both agreed on. We were following rewinding We at read most all the same odd. We read most all the same books in southern deep understanding the language of each other but we came from past history a whole different way as was a local agricultural a business And here's mine trying to work with all the different environmental organizations trying to learn every plant species all that kind of level and between the two of us. I challenge each other tremendously and that's I think would really Catchers be wild Wild ethic that we're trying to do. We're both trying to learn how to be wilder and what rewinding me. And it's changed me tremendously. I just keep reading and reading a read most of this stuff before. How do i apply that to my own thing about. I don't have to wilderness anymore. I used to go a lot and well supposed to grow up. I still love places. I still find that interesting. But i have never been a wilder place in one sense of the word than i am where i live now on. I and i'm surrounded by corn beans. Two thirds of the statements covered into animal species. It's absolutely frightening how that green curtain and what's frightening is how people look at it and see that as a agreeing healthy thing on the national level what was being addressed was wilderness series or what we have stuff that's left. Where can we

tokyo japan
"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

02:33 min | 9 months ago

"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"You you're listening to the wilding earth podcast immune The rewinding earth podcast Supported by businesses such as patagonia tula and bio habitats as well as the weeden foundation and listeners. Like you if you love.

"earth" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

PODSHIP EARTH

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"earth" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

"I think you can have the most influence the as i say the tip of the spear to make a change so i mean in some ways that's predictable given given the pace of journalism like we're on news cycles that a you know now in the minutes not in days and and you get the time to still sink one of the things. I noticed And you did this. Yo thaddeus animas serie show your own almost spiritual focus on the interconnectedness of life and nature and whether it's the concept of by filial just your own sense of of way you are in new hampshire. Now tell us about about how you view your place in the world. I think that is important for us to not see. Our satisfaction is to how high are pile of money is as to how well are we fitting into what some would call creation some call nature our place here and i think it's interesting by the way that some folks the most extractive folks put focus on money and yet money has no value if it's outside of society right you're in the middle of the desert and you have you know like a huge gold bar and there's no water. I mean how you going to drink. A lot of people have woken up to the existential threat of climate. That understanding that Just blind extraction for economic development for the few is not gonna be helpful to us and fortunately the notion of environmental justice puts a spotlight on on things simply being done for the few things need to be done for the many really for all of us have a right to be here all of us and not just to survive but to thrive and sometimes i feel uncomfortable at the level privilege that i have. I can walk out my back door in the summer. I can ski out my back door in the winter and enjoy the bounty of nature. And i want everybody to have that privilege because that's out in nature where you really get to feel truly human..

new hampshire one Yo thaddeus
"earth" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

PODSHIP EARTH

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"earth" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

"Two thousand nine. And i think the the american clean energy and security act which is you mentioned. Also called the waxman markey bill after its two primary authors and and it proposed his cap and trade system for the us and was amazingly approved with the help of speaker pelosi by the house but never got brought to the floor of the senate for a vote the cokes particularly. We're really smart about how they organized this. They said don't worry about the house will just make sure that we can stop it in the senate And he just made sure that the were the word went out though among republicans on the house. I don't vote for this thing. Because waxman markey was straight democratic vote so by the year twenty ten. It was very clear that had been organized on a democrat versus republican basis. Very smart tactics by the way by the fossil fuel industry to set it up that way and just do you think of subjects and then find great guests. Do you find great guests then lead to the subject. How do you think about the evolution of the narrative that you'll trying to project in this business. There's a soon nami of information coming at us all the time. We have an editorial process. Will we really try to do some critical thinking about things that we might go after and you know we obviously have to pay attention to the news but we're not a daily show and we can't do breaking news one way. That's the people do. Connect to the natural world in a fun way so we spent a fair amount of time looking. We'll call an animal story right outside story planner because they provide some relief from sometimes the doom and gloom what i initially went to the corporation for public broadcasting. They told me you're going to run out of story stephen. Six months you'll be dying on her and so funny.

american clean energy and secu two primary authors Six months pelosi stephen twenty ten waxman markey republican waxman markey bill republicans Two thousand nine one way senate democrat
"earth" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

PODSHIP EARTH

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"earth" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

"We're not awfully friendly to that. And i always love hearing from the more conservative types. Who are asking questions about. You know trying to verify something that they've heard because then i feel like we are doing an educational job. That's really powerful. Because we need more people to get on board for this because it's a fundamental change. We're asking people to make huge and to that. Point is the that is a big difference between radio and podcasting podcasting kind of concentrates people on the things that are already interested in but you are able to reach people who just listening. They're driving home cooking and radio. Still kind of a great equalizer. I don't know what the answer is in the podcast world. Hopefully it is to have enough. Podcast have enough visibility that are across a spectrum of things so that somebody's curiosity can be peaked about this. So then they'll wanna go deeper. Okay so go comes as the vice president. Did it feel at that time. Like there was a lot of hope. It was still a very bipartisan. Sense what happened in your estimation over that ten. I ten year period to make more of a polarized political issue. One of the things that happen though that al gore felt that it was too risky for him really to go heavy on the climate inside the clinton administration. Al gore found himself in a very difficult position so in one thousand nine hundred seven. The kyoto protocol comes together. And it's clear from the maneuvering that was done by robert burdened chuck hagel in the senate That could be no agreement that would put the us commercial disadvantage and be. The developing countries had to go first which was such an insult to the developing countries. It's hard to accept a treaty to this day and so half of half of what needed to happen under. Kyoto also didn't happen that day. It got kicked on the road to a later session in the year. Two thousand unfortunately. The clinton gore administration moved forward with wanting to claim. All this credit for the at forestation we're growing trees like crazy in the united states and we should have credit for that well not only the developing countries. The brits and much of europe threw up their hands really want the us to get credit for growing trees. When you guys have got smoke stacks and all this kind of stuff. Give me a break very hard to campaign at the national level. If at that time at the fossil fuel industry hate you but then what happens at the fossil fuel industry said you know these democrats are dicey and so you get people like charles cope and his brother david but they started actually organizing to make sure that down the road so by the time we get to obama and the prospect of what we call waxman. Markey happening was well organized. It was well organized to make sure that it would fail..

david charles cope robert united states waxman Two thousand ten year Markey One one thousand nine hundred seve Kyoto obama first clinton gore europe clinton administration things ten kyoto protocol brits
"earth" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

PODSHIP EARTH

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"earth" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

"Because if you don't have an informed public you're not gonna have an informed electorate and when i began to understand that climate disruption could be an existential threat. I said this much bigger story than the usual thing. If we don't get the climate thing right nothing else will matter for our civilization there many many many important things so as a journalist. I said i gotta do this story because nobody was doing it when you started. This show was at the very beginning of people's consciousness about climate. There's another aspect as journalists of the drew this to me when i saw how little people are paying attention to it as a black man in white america. You get used to the establishment trying to marginalize and say. Oh it's not important. There's certain rules that they need to follow just as black people. Well if you follow the rules you will do nothing so you have to break the rules. And i knew the covering this stuff is not going to be popular in terms of ratings or getting underwriters. But i knew that the truth will set you free so that if we could get it this truth and do it in enough time that we free ourselves from the trajectory that That we were setting ourselves up for him and did did the votes the higher ups. Npr with a twisted like a hod celt had worked for a while at mpr. And so i knew people. And i said we're not going to do this as an npr show. We're going to do this as a as a show acquired by npr. So i'll go out and raise the money. And i'll get the people together you distribute the show for us but otherwise you're gonna leave me alone. The actual meeting that. I got permission to develop. The show was very simple. One i said. Hey this is what i wanna do and he said. Hey this is yeah sounds good. Do it go ahead. I mean it feels like there's been such an intentional blindsiding of environmental issues in in mainstream journalism and loudly that made the newsroom where hurricanes aren't really connected to climate change facility rates on connected to disruptors and so to have that support at the beginning. I mean sat you kind of on a good course. I deeply appreciated the this vision and even though it was hard for. Npr itself at time for example when during the second bush administrate the white house. Lean pretty hard on on npr to include the skeptics the scientific skeptics in the coverage and that was a pretty rough period of time. I if i've been in house they would have killed the show at that point but i ended up changing distributors at that point went to. Let's call pri now pr ex. It's amazing how many have you done on living on earth..

america earth white house One bush second
"earth" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

PODSHIP EARTH

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"earth" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

"Guess. I have to go way back. My mom academic College professor single mom. My dad died pretty young and I was the the last two children. So i was on my own. A lot on the college campuses. Antioch college. And i read a lot. The library was my home was my friend when i joined a boy scout troop and they asked. Could somebody write a little report about what troop is doing. I said yeah and they literally would edit it with a pencil and set it at the line of type and that will come out of a machine. I was totally fascinated. Oh my goodness this is so much fun. They also got involved radio as a kid. There was a public radio station. There they had some to radio drama so by the age of twelve. I had a wall inside recorder. I was dragging around in interviewing credible at twelve. So yeah it was twelve. I think what. I did my first round of interviews. I got hooked. It's amazing because if you think about the continuity of your career sound recording as a medium that transcends all other mediums had incredible lasting power it is a sound is the basis of much of our species. You hear something when you're inside your mother's tummy long before you see anything. We pass cultural long by singing. And speaking writing is just a representation of the spoken-word word then when it comes to television It can only see like one degree in front of you whereas sound is three hundred and sixty degrees at twelve already carrying around record a and observing the world around you and as a young boy of twelve kind of coming into the newsroom you whether role models of of folks they mental. Do you like how. How did that happen. The antioch college campus was a very interesting and diverse community and the music director on campus. Was african american by the name of walter anderson. I walked into walter's studio one day. And they're at the piano is eddie fisher. So i dunno husband number what who is taylor. I'm trying to remember it. Was that kind of community. Kereta scott king had been there as an undergraduate just before our time. Systemic racism is everywhere. So if i hadn't been in in a place like that. I certainly probably would not have been encouraged and then you had incredible success in your career you wanna pulitzer for the what you did on education you've done shows on opera. What would the threads that then led us dev's in ninety ninety one to to come up with a show living on so i was fortunate enough that when i was involved with npr. I became aware of what was going on in in the climate. Probably the summer of eighty nine. I went to visit george woodward who was researching this stuff and when he told me that if we allowed this to get out of hand the high arctic would start to warm. It would release methane that will make us warmer which would lead to more methane being released. Which would make us warmer. We'd be in a runaway reaction and having been a journalist to work to the boston globe under. Tom wind ship who i think there were seventeen. Pulitzer prizes on. Tom's watch as editor of the paper. It's pretty amazing record. Who said the constitution mentions the press..

eddie fisher taylor three hundred seventeen one degree walter anderson Pulitzer Kereta scott king boston two children first round george woodward ninety african american sixty degrees single mom twelve eighty nine studio Tom
"earth" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

PODSHIP EARTH

05:58 min | 1 year ago

"earth" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

"Long long time ago in a land where very few people had even heard the word climate change so much. His mattered from the sony. Walkman radio's steve cohen. A pulitzer prize winning journalist began his first broadcast of living on earth a groundbreaking inspiring and information packed. Environmental radio show. That was in nineteen ninety-one the same year and amateur videographer captured. The horrific beating of rodney king by lapd and the samia. Exxon was forced to pay one billion dollars to clean up the exxon valdez. Oil spill in alaska. In other words it was the beginning of a whole new chapter in american history. And steve cohen has through more than fifteen hundred episodes. Been our collective environmental chronicler and conscience today. Living on the broadcast through three hundred national public radio affiliates in the us and is expanding into podcasting in the early days living on earth was like an underground pirate radio station. 'cause the content was so radical compared to mainstream environmental coverage. Nine hundred. Ninety one was only three years after the full of the berlin wall and it felt like the secret. Police was still very uncomfortable with what steve was saying. And for steve. That was nothing new from an early age. His single black mom and quaker faith instilled in him a quiet forceful willingness to question authority and pursue the truth before radio. Steve cohen was a print and tv. Journalist i start by asking steve about a story that he broke in which the outwardly progressive polaroid company was selling the south african apartheid government. The camera and film equipment.

Steve cohen steve cohen steve alaska one billion dollars more than fifteen hundred epis Nine hundred first broadcast Exxon south african apartheid govern -one berlin three hundred national public Walkman Ninety one american lapd earth single nineteen
"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"The current state of life on earth dictates all hands on deck approach to mitigating the worst of what's coming due to the climate and biodiversity emergencies that includes businesses. It can no longer just about conservation organizations and government regulations. And what we've accomplished and failed at up to now is the result of conservation historically being seen as a mere special interest. We've obviously gone as far as is possible with that model alone. Companies also have to step up and go well beyond what is required by law to contribute to environmental and social good. So what happens. When of conservationists starts accompany find out about a new wave of businesses that wear their missions on their sleeves missions focused on doing good in the world. Is it possible to get a return on investment while also positively impacting conservation issues and communities find out on today's podcast with bio habitats founder. Keith bowers You're listening to the wilding earth. Podcast commute The wilding earth podcast is supported by businesses such as patagonia tula and bio habitats as well as the weeden.

Keith bowers today earth wilding earth
"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"Why humans do the things we do how we react in situations how we use technology to dominate our environment around us and technology to see so culture and technology and all these things combined with a very very old soul called a species that has evolved over millennia. Long longtime long periods of time and The body the deep body the subconscious even seems to want to do. It's procreation thing. And just like any species on the planet wants to do and his biologically driven to do and then we have this awareness this consciousness of ourselves and what we're doing and then we have then we throw in our culture around that which is kind of like. Here's the man of station. Here's how we language how we procreate like crazy and how our mission seems to be from another planet looking down would be like well all these guys wanna do is just grow and grow and grow and grow and grow. That's that's plainly The outward thing that our species is giving off if anything else. It's just weird to watch. All of these. This very old biology combined with this culture stuff that we the the religions that we used to to procreate and grow and everything. I'm not saying it as well as you will. But is there anything to what i'm saying. Yeah absolutely i i think. All all religions just to cite one part of culture are pro-nato list that is encouraging their members to of their fella greases as we would say in spanish to go out and to How does it go and multiply and replenish the earth as in genesis. I believe it is in the bible. And i think pretty much. Everyone is the same way because they wanted to have. As many followers as possible in a world that is often hostile to them and filled with other religions or cultures a villages tribes trying to do the same thing so and there is something to be said for power or strength in numbers right to appoint until you start to exhaust the resources it takes to maintain those numbers..

earth one part millennia spanish
"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"It's the perennial question for conservationists, why are hunters and Anglers almost solely in charge of wildlife management decisions where science is almost always ignored in favor of producing Wildlife crappie for the hook-and-bullet community to harvest on our public lands. How much is this affecting the biodiversity crisis and what can be done about it? We get into all that and more today with my guest Kevin Bixby. I'm sure it's Jack Humphrey and you're listening to the rewilding Earth podcast. You're listening to the song Wilding Earth podcast. The rewilding Earth podcast is supported by businesses such as Patagonia Cotulla and biohabitats as well as the Weeden foundation and listeners like you if you love the work that the rewilding Institute is doing please consider donating a truck loading. Org and be sure to sign up for our Weekly Newsletter while you're there Kevin Bixby is the executive director of Southwest Environmental Center the son of a naval officer Kevin grew up all over the world, but the American West has always been home while attending school in Oakland. He began his activist career by volunteering at the Berkeley Ecology Center after graduating with a ba in biology from Dartmouth College in 1978. He returned to the San Francisco Bay area and began volunteering at Friends of the Earth where he rubbed elbows with the late great David Brower working to save condors and Wales by day. He made a living by driving a San Francisco taxi cab at night off realizing that more education might be useful Kevin set off to the school of Natural Resources at University of Michigan in nineteen eighty-five where you're in a master's in natural resources policy, but the west back end and in nineteen eighty-eight, Kevin moved to New Mexico with his future wife Lisa larocque and started the Southwest Environmental Center in nineteen. Ninety one seven. Thanks so much for being on the rewilding earth podcast. Oh, thanks for asking me really happy to be here. Well, you have to be here because you created quite a stink with your recent article why hunting isn't conservation and why it matters we had more traffic on that day. Then we've ever had on a single day at rewilding. Org since we started but I know that all that traffic wasn't from fans some of it quite a bit of it I think was from people that God has feathers you may have ruffled let's start with just talking about the article. Why did you write it? What's it about? I didn't write the article to pick a fight with hunters and I am occasional Hunter myself. It's not that this was an anti-hunting screed by any means. I just wanted to start a conversation really about wage. How we managed wildlife in the United States and some of the problems with the system that we have in place in in every state wage and how we can fix those systems how I think we should and so that's that was my intent. And and you know, I tried to take a a broad look at the issue. I tried to put our current system of state wildlife management particularly at the state level, but also at the federal level tried to put all that in a historical context. I tried to identify the politics a lot of times. I know it's having spent a career as a wildlife Advocate. It can be somewhat unfathomable why certain points of view are so delicious diligently excluded from Wildlife decision-making wage. I've been.

Kevin Bixby rewilding Institute rewilding Southwest Environmental Center wildlife Advocate Lisa larocque Jack Humphrey Patagonia Cotulla David Brower San Francisco Bay Berkeley Ecology Center San Francisco Dartmouth College Weeden foundation Oakland New Mexico Weekly Newsletter United States executive director school of Natural Resources
"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"They would play in figuring into that half nece. You have a very very pure idea of what wilderness and I share that we all do of of what wilderness really truly is, and in order to get to half I, hear a lot of the people in the half, Earth Movement talking about including many many different types of protections to get at least on paper. As close to half as we can get how to national parks figure into that in your mind. Well absolutely and I agree with with what goes. People are saying that you know. We're not GONNA have fifty percent of the land, every load of the lower forty eight states as inviolate big chunks of wilderness. We're already beyond where that's possible. but national parks are certainly a part of the equation and when I. When I talk about you know a third of the United States is public land. Managed by one of the four federal agencies, the national parks part of that when I when I calculate that about ten percent of the United States, could be designated wilderness, because it's still fix definition under the Wilderness Zach various chunks of national park back country that qualify for wilder, says nation very much a part of that. And I'm of the opinion that National Park Backcountry areas need to be designated wilderness every bit as much as four service. Areas which have gotten the the bulk of conservationists attend attention just because those areas are I, mean those two agencies for service in the B. M. or are so much aligned with the timber mining oil on livestock industries that conservationists field getting those lands protected our top priority. But. We ignore the national parks. At great risk to biological diversity and and to wilderness in general I don't know if you remember when during the Bush Cheney Administration there was a proposal to move in the direction of opening national park backcountry to mechanize vehicles starting with mountain bikes and snow machines. And that was beaten back. Of course 'cause it was a very unpopular proposal. But if they'll straits the need for wilderness designation in the National Parks, because there's no guarantee that we're always going to be able to beat back proposals like that. And, in some more subtle ways, there are a lot of incongruities in the the National National Park Backcountry that that really doesn't Jive so much requirements in the Wilderness Act. So you know you hear a lot of Park Service. People talking about how we're managing for example in my home area here the yellowstone backcountry as as defacto wilderness, even though it's not formally designated but they're not really managing it as defacto wilderness there, manipulating the habitat using chainsaws for clearing trails. In some national parks, they're allowing structures to be bill in so-called out wilderness areas, and of course as the population of the United States continues to grow, and there's more and more demand for for mechanized recreation, not to mention resources that can be extracted I think it's safe to assume that as we move forward into the. Mid Part of the twenty first century that no Lancer, safe, even national park backcountry lands without that added layer of protection provided by the Wilderness Act of nineteen, sixty four. Another another example that just recently came to mind.

National National Park Backcou National Park Backcountry United States Park Service Earth Movement Bush Cheney Administration yellowstone wilder
"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

14:30 min | 2 years ago

"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"Its twenty twenty. I was wondering if you'd give a little perspective on how you've been at this quite a long time. And how do you feel about having to have this conversation? Did you imagine that you would ever get to twenty twenty and this is what you would be still talking about. Fifty years ago in the nineteen seventies when Greenpeace was star. I was involved in the early days of Greenpeace and early days of the Ecology Movement. And it's hard for people to imagine but at that time there really wasn't an ecology movement like there is now there were certainly some ecologists and scientists we're talking about ecology and and Rachel Carson had written her book silent spring in sixty one but there was no ecology movement and we were talking at that time about. We need an ecology movement. That's why Greenpeace came into existence in the nineteen seventies. We need an ecology movement. We have a peace movement. There's a women's movement there's civil rights movement we could even if we saw all those were still hooped. If we don't have an ecology movement now I believed at that time in one thousand nine hundred seventy s that ecology was going to be like civil rights or it was going to be like the women's movement. It's obvious of course. Of course everybody should have the same rights. Of course women should have equal rights to men of course all racist should have equal rights. It just seemed so bloody obvious and I thought that he called. You would be equally obvious. But it's not and I think it's not equally obvious because there's no human constituency necessarily That is prepared. That's fighting for themselves. As there is with the women's movement or civil rights movement where you have a natural constituency the the people that are going to be the harm from ecological destruction is the harm to other species who have no vote in our system. It's the harm to future generations of humans who have no vote in our system and so- ecology is a tougher nut to crack in terms of getting humanity to turn around because we're talking about long term benefits and benefits for other species and benefits for wild nature itself and benefits for children. It's very difficult for people to wrap their heads around that And again I go back to evolution. Evolution honest look after ourselves and our immediate needs evolution. Didn't teach us to necessarily to be able to think two hundred years into the future or a hundred years into the future and protect other species and protect the unborn children. Evolution gave us the instincts to look after ourselves and our families our communities in the in the immediate timeframe so we are a little bit trapped or locked into dislike. The people say you know. We're the only species it's aware of what we're doing first of all my first question when I hear people say that is. How do you know reading? You know what a what a wolf is aware of what a whale is aware of. Or what a what? A bumblebee is aware of for that matter So don't presume that you're the only species that that is intelligent and in his web your existence in. It's aware of the fact that you might die. Wolfson a pack guarantee. You aware that they're of death for example and so our Wales and other mammals that we we observe them in their rituals around deaths and eight and they know what death is. They know that this all comes to an end I would. I would summarize the challenges this we need to learn how systems work you. Don't get out of a dome of bind with a sort of linear engineering Problem Solution mentality that were used to and comfortable with. We think if you have a problem that you look at the problem you you'd think it through you come up with some you engineer some kind of plan and then you the plan and you solve the problem double binds. Don't work that way when you try to change a large-scale system that see the problem. What a double bind is essentially as the conflict between a larger system and a part of that system which is US humanity and our assumptions and presumptions and expectations which the larger system doesn't have to honor so it's this conflict between levels of existence. We talk about freedom we have. We want civil rights. We want freedom but ecology nothing has the freedom to live forever. Nothing has the freedom to have whatever they want not in an ecosystem you have to negotiate with that ecosystem so double binds are not solved by our linear engineering mind. We have to learn to think the way systems operate. If you try to change a complex system you have to be prepared for the fact that there may be unintended consequences. You have to realize that the system's not gonNA respond the way you want it to respond societies over time throughout history have learned. It's over over again. I mean very complex. Societies have collapsed throughout history. You can go back to mess. Taymiyya Rome Easter island the British Empire for that matter complex societies. Do Collapse. Because they they don't understand how the larger system that keeps them alive that is the ecosystem how it works so part of our challenge if we are in fact as smart as we think. We are as intelligent as we think we are. We have to be intelligent enough to understand how large scale living system works. And what are places in it and if we want to go about changing that system we have to understand how that system works. We don't know half the stuff we think we do when it comes to nature and what it really does you can only put things in pieces in proximity to each other and you very much need to let nature finish the sewing. Finish THE RECUPERATION. The restoration and that humans have never really restored anything at all ever completely. We can only move the pieces on the board around a little bit like I think swamp was here in this kind of water system was flowing in this way and we just get it close and then we have to rely on something. We know nothing about at the end of the day and how that actually heals itself. And yet we're making phones and cars and and all these oil-based products and everything else as if we do know where everything goes the full cycle of all of our decisions all of the things that we produce all of the things that we do. But we don't we. It's kind of scary when you start adding up the things we don't know yet were carrying on the way that we do you. That's very well said Jack. We that is precisely our dilemma. We go at these things with the tool that were used to. Which is engineering. Maybe we can put everything on a spreadsheet and figure out what to do for example with climate change. We look for engineering solutions like. Can we build a smoke stack? That cleans the carbon out of the smoke. Can we put little sulfite fight? Umbrellas up in the sky to shield the sun to keep the earth from heating Can we switch from Carbon to windmills and solar panels. Yeah we can sort of do those things but what we cannot do is predict precisely all of the unintended consequences of this for example when we set out to build windmills. Did we really think about the whole supply chain? Did we consider the fact that to make? Cement requires a tremendous amount of fossil fuels when we make steel foss. We need fossil fuels when we mind all the resources for windmills and solar panels. Have we really thought about the mining and manufacturing and shipping process? We keep coming up with these engineering solutions rather than learning how the system works and thinking on the large scale and realizing hey we're in overshoot every solution that's actually going to work is going to involve. Us getting smaller smaller number smaller in impact smaller in consumption habits and so forth. We don't like that. We think that there is no problem. We can't solve with engineering. But we're wrong about that. And so we continually find ourselves back in the middle of the double bind because we're not willing to accept the the genuine solutions and if we don't address human population numbers if we don't address consumption capitalism profiteering our obsession with with productivity productivity is essentially turning the wild world into products. If we're obsessed with being productive and you you talked earlier about the fact that all these jobs every job on earth is trying to be productive. It's a push to be more productive. The benefits of non being productive. We should learn the benefits of being inefficient. Not necessarily using every waking hour to to make more money or more important or be become a star would ever be a success. There's nothing wrong with success. There's nothing wrong with trying hard but we just we getting it wrong to think that we're going to come up with some Silver bullet solution. This is going to allow us to carry on business as usual the problem that we continue to face as you just said very well is that we don't how complex the system is and we don't understand all of the Unexpected consequences of our actions so we set out to build renewable energies. And we haven't really looked at the supply chain impact on the earth to build it energy system for eight billion people in which everybody has all the energy that they need You really have to look at the supply chain and you have to look at every step of that supply chain and how do you get all those materials? And how do you put it all together and ship it all over the world and install? Where do you get the land-based to install all those windmills? And all solar panels. What if I had the ability to make you the next witness at a congressional hearing and they were they? Were actually all ears about that. This isn't an engineering problem that we're going to have to limit ourselves. Let's let this man talk. Let's just hear him out for the first time ever. Lets you know calm. Our little industry buddies that support us being here as politicians and everything. It's just let's hear him out. It's not an engineering problem. We have to learn these bigger systems. Do we really actually have to learn everything about the system or do we know enough now to know that we have to dial back because we don't understand and we may never get to an understanding of this big system before we've caused so much damage we can't turn back. We cannot understand everything about the system. That is one of the first things that you learn when you try to learn how to systems work. No part of the system can understand the whole system therefore we have to take a much more humble approach to living in this larger system than we have in the past. We're not going to create a better life for ourselves by understanding the entire system because we will never understand the entire system we have to learn to respect the system. It's just like respecting. Another culture is just like respecting another gender. A person in China doesn't have to understand everything about African culture to have respect for that culture a male human doesn't have to understand everything about the way women think in order to respect women and we don't have to understand everything about earth's ecosystem to respect that ecosystem and in fact rather than try an engineer and manage that ecosystem and understand everything about it. What we need to do is become an apprentice to that system. You know what the Dallas they had it right. Five thousand years ago the way to fashion human action is to observe. The wild world observed the way things happen in nature and fashion human action and human society after the ways in the in the methods and the and the patterns of the natural world. That is the secret to understanding. Systems are understanding everything about them and then again. That's just the engineering. Mind leaping in there and say oh we understood everything about the system. We could write a pro ground. Fix It all now wrong. Approach we have to be way more humble. Look we call it mother Earth for a very good reason. She nurtures US. She takes care of us. She's bigger than us. She she bats last. She knows what's going on. We don't and because of our intelligence. We've become very arrogant and we have to lose the arrogance. That's what I would tell. The Congress lose our arrogance become a student of nature become the apprentice of nature. Learn her ways and be respectful. It's it's a humbling process..

Ecology Movement US Greenpeace engineer Rachel Carson Taymiyya Rome Easter Wales Congress Jack Dallas China
"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

16:28 min | 2 years ago

"earth" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"We've had this living green engine that has produced everything that life needs. And right now we're going into the engine or just removing one part here one part there one part there and we remove apart and everything seems to be fine and so we keep doing it but one day you wake up and you find that the functionality of those incredibly essential systems is is no longer there who came up with the idea of half. Where's the science behind fifty percent? Hey So let me just acknowledge that. I think that there's been a lot of Indigenous groups and indigenous peoples who have for decades and centuries been essentially talking about this holistic idea that we call nature needs half. But is this idea that we are embedded in a web of life. We have to act with respect and reciprocity toward nature. Nature has needs. We aren't just the ones with knee. Nature has needs and we have to live respectfully in that That that framework In terms of western science it really started in the nineteen seventies With the the the Odem they were the ones who first published research and it was. It wasn't it wasn't about the entire planet it was It was about Ecosystems in Florida I believe I may be wrong about that but They they basically observed that after about half and this berries by ecosystem by the way there are some ecosystems that are very fragile like the rainforest that require seventy five to eighty percent But there are other ecosystems like grasslands that maybe only need forty percent but but what what the owners of served is that after approximately half the ecosystem hit a tipping point where functionality began to decline precipitously and that ecological services from the ecosystem whether that's producing oxygen whether you know purifying water or preserving topsoil that those ecological services basically just began to evaporate after half Later on in the nineteen nineties it was read knows who really began to Research this and applied these conclusions at a planetary scale and began to Say you know it's not it's not just one ecosystem here and there it's the entire biosphere that this applies to because of these ecosystems are interconnected all of them serve each other whether their neighbors or from a distance in in different ways migrating species genetic flow climates rainfall. All of these systems are interconnected and so we have to start thinking about this sort of planetary level in two thousand nine at the Ninth World Wilderness Congress and Meriden Mexico Harvey Locke and Vance Martin and Cyril Cormo of the Wild Foundation launched. The nature needs half network for the first time and the goal of this was to essentially get people in conservation talking about this idea and prioritising the protection of half and I think it's Harvey Locke says that they just said what everybody was saying privately to each other but that many didn't feel comfortable or safe thing publicly and nature needs half. Was this agenda building activity that we're going to make a safe platform for people to come out and say this publicly and we're going to start agenda-setting and getting this on the conservation agenda and later on the Public Policy Agenda So we've been doing that for ten years and it's been very needed because initially we received from conservation leaders around the world and I mean we have some of these letters framed in our office but but what they were telling us is that of course. I agree with you privately but I would be crazy to come out in public support of this because I would be laughed at and you will be too and in the last ten years that's changed. We're no longer laughing about the idea of protecting half in fact. I think we're skram willing to figure out how we do it And E O Wilson in two thousand sixteen with his Book Earth. Really helped Move that forward on the agenda and so that's kind of the evolution of this idea. It getting to the level of prominent that it is at now you know win coalition start to form around anything. It makes me feel better because I feel like resources are being used better that leverage of of synergies between organizations. There's not a Lotta waste there because they're no longer in isolation and I think it came to a head for me when I started looking at you guys and seeing the coalition that was forming their around this because as we talk about umbrella species keystone species. And we're talking about reloading connectivity projects giant projects small projects. We talk about those for read and Michael soulet informant and everybody would talk about those so that we could organize around something and we are heads. Wouldn't pop off because those species were meant to represent everything that falls under the umbrella and it was an organizing factor. And I'm starting to see and I have for years started to see you. Guys as a an organizing factor of the organizers and organizing factor of the organizations in this big total voice and it's been incredibly refreshing as I said before I refer back to it to get my energy back up about all of this so that it doesn't feel like it's just a million little battles and there's really no line drawn. There's no frontline it's just. It's all the lines and it can feel overwhelming to conservationists. Well thank you for saying that and I can totally relate to the the overwhelming When I'm meeting New People and they're like what do you do and I'm like well. I work on an international team. That's trying to protect the planet and in ten years It can be a little overwhelming. But but but here's a let me let me make a comparison here back in the early nineteen sixties. Jfk and you know the cold height of the Cold War. Everyone's worried about everyone else nuking each other etc and JFK comes out and he says we're going to go to the moon in ten years we're going to do what's never been done before. And we'RE GONNA. We're GONNA beat the Soviets to the moon and because he said that and because he made his objective society began to mobilize all the different industries and technologies and support staff that would be needed and the the innovation that would be needed to reach. What in the early nineteen sixties wasn't impossibility. No one could go to the moon in the early nineteen sixties but because that became the goal by the end of that decade there. Was the technology needed to do it. And it's the same thing with training tough to imagine in this. This is a porn allergy for a lot of different reasons but it should have the same kind of emotional urgency that we this is the new Cold War that the the struggle that we're engaging in right now which is really a struggle within ourselves about. Can we live respectful respectfully and sustainably on this planet as a species and individuals? That's the new Cold War and it's urgent and.

Harvey Locke Ninth World Wilderness Congres Meriden Florida Wild Foundation Michael soulet Mexico Vance Martin Cyril Cormo
"earth" Discussed on Earth Rangers

Earth Rangers

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"earth" Discussed on Earth Rangers

"Hello and welcome to the earth. Rangers podcast. I three hundred Emma, and I haven't even read ably adorable animals story for you today. Earth rangers. Before we get to our main topic. I want to introduce a brand new quiz Saguenay. It's called true or false. And I think it's name pretty much rid cell. Here's the jingle. True or false, Paul. Okay. Here is your question for today. True or false camels store water in their humps. We knew the Campbell's have big humps on their back that drain camels have to and dromedaries have one. But did they use them to store water? What do you think quick true or false? And the answer. No, they do not. The actually store fat in their homes not water. And while these hums might not Quinta. Campbell's thirst, they're still really useful that that they strip provides the same amount of energy as three weeks worth of food, which come in pretty handy in a desert habitat without much to eat, in fact, as Campbell's go longer and longer without food and use more and more of the fat, their humps, actually shrink isn't that? Interesting. Did you get it? Right. Let's do another one of these at the end of the episode. Earth rangers. You know, winters one of my most favorite times of the year when it's cold outside. Fires a crackling inside definitely gives me a serious case of the warm fuzzies, speaking of warm fuzzies that reminds me I heard the most amazing story the other day and it seriously melted, my heart. You guys wanna hear it? Christian. Of course, you do comes snuggle up with a mug of hot chocolate and prepare for cuteness overload. Our story begins off the coast of northern Quebec. Where researchers were studying a pot of beautiful beluga whales to see how they are being affected by all of the ships passing through their waters. The pod was spotted swimming around in playing with each other having a whale of a time and every look normal until a keen researcher noticed something peculiar one of the whales. Different wasn't as white is friends, and it looked like he had something funny. Growing out of the brunt of his head was this a new species of beluga closely linked to the mysterious and magical unicorn were these Wales evolving into some sort of deep-sea mutants with an amazing ability to play ring toss what was this mystery creature? Researchers continued to track the pot and the eventually realized that this new beluga wasn't a beluga at all it wasn't normal. What in the world was an Arctic mammal doing this bar south with a bunch of beluga, buddy. Best guess is that his nor wall somehow got separated from its family. So it must have pulled Dory. And just kept swimming and swimming in swimming until finally came across a pot of belugas who took him in like one of their own. But the story doesn't end there. Scientists continued to track the whales, and as of this recording the naral has been part of their group for three years now they swim together play together and the narwhal was even spotted blowing bubbles to playfully imitate, his beluga friends. Scientists expert opinion say this is a great example of compassion and openness, can my expert opinion says this is pretty adorable. Thanks for sending in your best animal jokes, by the way. I've had some really good laughs already. I'm gonna keep collecting your submissions until we hit season to an until then here's another one of mine. Why don't you ever see hippos hiding in trees? Really good at it. Okay. Okay. Okay. Fine. I'm still working on finding the best animal job of all time. Don't forget to send me yours. Just go to earth. Rangers dot com slash podcast and click on the green button with the megaphone and leave us a boy Smale.

Earth rangers Campbell Rangers Emma Paul researcher Dory Quebec Wales white three weeks three years