35 Burst results for "Early Twentieth Century"

Andy Warhol's 'Marilyn' sells for $195 million, setting record for American art

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Andy Warhol's 'Marilyn' sells for $195 million, setting record for American art

"I I I I know know know know I I I I kind kind kind kind of of of of painting painting painting painting has has has has set set set set a a a a record record record record for for for for the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece of of of of art art art art by by by by an an an an American American American American ever ever ever ever sold sold sold sold at at at at auction auction auction auction it's it's it's it's a a a a piece piece piece piece of of of of artwork artwork artwork artwork you you you you have have have have probably probably probably probably seen seen seen seen many many many many times times times times before before before before Andy Andy Andy Andy Warhol's Warhol's Warhol's Warhol's portrait portrait portrait portrait of of of of Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Monroe Monroe Monroe Monroe the the the the nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen sixty sixty sixty sixty four four four four so so so so screen screen screen screen features features features features the the the the actress actress actress actress in in in in a a a a vibrant vibrant vibrant vibrant close close close close up up up up yellow yellow yellow yellow hair hair hair hair blue blue blue blue eye eye eye eye shadow shadow shadow shadow ruby ruby ruby ruby red red red red lipstick lipstick lipstick lipstick on on on on a a a a blue blue blue blue background background background background yeah yeah yeah yeah that that that that one one one one well well well well it's it's it's it's officially officially officially officially known known known known as as as as shot shot shot shot sage sage sage sage blue blue blue blue marlin marlin marlin marlin and and and and it it it it has has has has sold sold sold sold four four four four hundred hundred hundred hundred and and and and ninety ninety ninety ninety five five five five million million million million dollars dollars dollars dollars Christie's Christie's Christie's Christie's of of of of New New New New York York York York says says says says not not not not only only only only is is is is it it it it the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece done done done done by by by by an an an an American American American American artist artist artist artist ever ever ever ever sold sold sold sold it it it it is is is is also also also also the the the the most most most most expensive expensive expensive expensive piece piece piece piece from from from from the the the the twentieth twentieth twentieth twentieth century century century century ever ever ever ever auctioned auctioned auctioned auctioned off off off off the the the the buyer buyer buyer buyer was was was was not not not not identified identified identified identified I'm I'm I'm I'm Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar wells wells wells wells Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel

Times Times Times Times Andy Andy Andy Andy Warhol Warhol Marilyn Marilyn Marilyn Marily Ruby Ruby Christie's Christie's Christie New New New New York York York Christie Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabrie
'Jeopardy!' champ hits $1 million; talks fame, trans rights

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 7 months ago

'Jeopardy!' champ hits $1 million; talks fame, trans rights

"Jeopardy jeopardy champion champion Amy Amy Schneider's Schneider's reached reached a a new new milestone milestone with with Friday Friday night's night's winning winning wager wager the the final final jeopardy jeopardy clue clue in in twentieth twentieth century century nonfiction nonfiction involved involved an an author author from from nineteen nineteen forty forty eight eight who who mention mention Norwegian Norwegian independence independence day day host host Ken Ken Jennings Jennings reads reads Amy Amy Snyder's Snyder's response response who who is is hired hired yes yes that's that's correct correct nighter nighter wagered wagered ninety ninety eight eight hundred hundred dollars dollars and and that that was was enough enough to to put put her her over over the the one one million million dollar dollar mark mark how how does does a a mailing mailing like like what's what's it it like like to to be be in in jeopardy jeopardy it it pretty pretty good good she's she's the the first first woman woman contested contested to to do do so so in in the the first first transgender transgender person person to to qualify qualify for for the the show's show's tournament tournament of of champions champions Schneider Schneider ranks ranks fourth fourth in in consecutive consecutive wins wins and and says says she's she's tickled tickled she's she's fulfilling fulfilling their their prediction prediction from from her her eighth eighth grade grade classmates classmates who who voted voted her her most most likely likely to to be be a a jeopardy jeopardy contestant contestant because because of of her her skill skill back back Ben Ben in in geography geography and and spelling spelling I'm I'm Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn

Amy Amy Schneider Ken Ken Jennings Jennings Amy Amy Snyder Mark Mark Schneider Snyder Schneider Schneider Ben Ben Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn
Heat, no food, deadly weather: Climate change kills seabirds

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 9 months ago

Heat, no food, deadly weather: Climate change kills seabirds

"Researchers researchers are are finding finding the the planets planets warming warming is is taking taking a a deadly deadly toll toll on on seabirds seabirds comment comment related related losses losses have have hit hit albatross albatross is is off off the the Hawaiian Hawaiian Islands Islands northern northern gannets gannets near near the the British British Isles Isles and and puffins puffins off off the the Maine Maine coast coast and and sea sea levels levels rise rise some some birds birds are are less less able able to to build build nests nests others others are are starving starving unable unable to to find find finishes finishes the the ocean ocean heats heats up up extreme extreme weather weather is is also also taking taking a a toll toll turns turns living living off off New New England England have have died died during during increasingly increasingly frequent frequent rain rain and and hail hail storms storms while while hurricanes hurricanes wiped wiped away away nests nests resulting resulting in in fewer fewer checks checks than than years years gone gone by by researchers researchers at at the the university university of of British British Columbia Columbia estimate estimate seabird seabird populations populations of of fallen fallen seventy seventy percent percent since since the the middle middle of of the the twentieth twentieth century century I'm I'm Ben Ben Thomas Thomas

Hawaiian Hawaiian Islands Isla British British Isles Isles Maine Maine Coast Coast New New England Hurricanes Hurricanes University University Of Of Br England Ben Ben Thomas Thomas
How Spanish Composers Influrnced Latin America

Classics for Kids

02:03 min | 11 months ago

How Spanish Composers Influrnced Latin America

"After christopher columbus made his first trip across the atlantic ocean spain and other european countries began to colonize the americas. Spanish music had a big influence on latin american music. And so did the music of the enslaved people who were brought over from africa one of the first places columbus landed in fourteen. Ninety two was cuba. Nineteenth century violinist. Jose white lafitte had a spanish father and an afro-cuban mother whites composition that they yaqoob ana the beautiful. Cuban uses dance rhythms from haiti and the dominican republic on the island of hispaniola twentieth century. Cuban composer and missile. The owner was a pianist. That's lik wound up performing his most famous piece. My leg ania which is a spanish dance. Kunas family was full of musicians including his great nephew. Leo brouwer leo. Brouwer was guitarist until he hurt his right hand even after he had to stop playing. He kept on composing in fourteen. Ninety three columbus landed on the island. We call puerto rico spanish for rich port. The taino people who originally lived there called it. Land of the great lords in their language voted ken. Which is the title of this piece by. Puerto rican composer. Roberto ever

Jose White Lafitte Yaqoob Ana Christopher Columbus Atlantic Ocean Americas Kunas Columbus Spain Leo Brouwer Hispaniola Cuba Dominican Republic Africa Haiti Brouwer Puerto Rico KEN Puerto Rican Roberto
Ruth Wisse and Eric Discuss Liberals' Perceived Victimhood and Apathy

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:25 min | 11 months ago

Ruth Wisse and Eric Discuss Liberals' Perceived Victimhood and Apathy

"Strikes me that the left in america has fallen in love with with with victimhood. And that they they don't like celebrating sometimes because it almost implies within we haven't suffered enough we want you to focus on are suffering as though something's gained by that you're saying that's not how people learn. It's not a good thing but you see that narrative surely in in american life in the latter part of the the twentieth century just kind of took over and people they wanna wallow they wanna be victims. They wanna remind you of how much they've suffered because it gives them some kind of perverse status. Well that may be true of some people. But you know what i saw. When i was teaching at harvard actually was something quite different. knowle's troubling but very different people didn't wanna fight and what surprised me most about harvard and all the twenty one years that i taught there i became involved in faculty meetings as i had never been before when i was at mcgill and And i saw that there was. They refused to let. Rotc the reserve officer training corps. That had always been at the basis of higher education. There was always training of the best and the brightest young people during precisely the age when you have to go into the arm right. That's the hr so with their. The there was for for forty years forty years right. The faculty of harvard kept rossi off the campus. They did everything. They kept changing the rationale for keeping it on campus so as not to allowed on campus. What is that about what they were actually saying to. These kids is forgive me but this is the way i understood it. America is not worth defending. Of course that's exactly what they're saying. It's worse than that. They were saying that. America is bad. And they're saying that. Any kind of militarism or i should say any kind of self-defence is militarism is a step away from the quagmire of vietnam and chest thumping Jingoism i mean. That's where the left has been for a long time. It breaks my heart but this is all through the culture. Obviously just places like harvard.

Harvard Reserve Officer Training Corps Knowle America Rotc Mcgill Rossi Vietnam
September 13th, 1922: The Straw Hat Riot in New York City

This Day in History Class

02:16 min | 11 months ago

September 13th, 1922: The Straw Hat Riot in New York City

"Day was september thirteenth nineteen twenty two in new york city. A group of teenage boys grab the straw hats of some factory. Workers stopped them flat on the sidewalk and then ran like mad later that evening. The boys did the same thing to some dockworkers but this time the hat wearers fought back. The ensuing brawl grew so large. It stopped traffic on the manhattan bridge and police had to be called in to break it up the following day. The new york times reported that quote scores of rowdies on the east side and and other parts of the city started smashing hats. Police reserves were called out straw hat. Bonfires were started and seven. Men were convicted of disorderly conduct in the men's night court. And here's the thing is a wild is all that sounds. The straw hat riot was just getting started by now though. You're probably wondering what's with all the hat smashing to answer that. We have to talk a little about men's fashion in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries at the time buildings didn't have air conditioning or central heating so menswear tended to follow a seasonal shift going from heavier fabrics in the fall and winter to lighter fabrics in the spring and summer. This changeover also applied the hats. Most men of the time wore hats every day typically felt once but they would switch to straw hats in the summer as a way to stay cool over time in unwritten rule. Emerged similar to the idea that you shouldn't wear white after labor day. In this case a man could only don his straw hat between may fifteenth and september fourteenth when the fifteenth rolled around it was time switch back to felt hats for another eight months. This became such an accepted norm that a tongue in cheek new york times article proclaimed that any man who wore a straw hat passed. The cutoff date was quote. A communal enemy and a potential subverter of the social order

New York City The New York Times Cheek New York Times DON
A Look Around Good Vibrations - The Antique Vibrator Museum

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:13 min | 11 months ago

A Look Around Good Vibrations - The Antique Vibrator Museum

"The good vibrations antique vibrator museum is about the size of a living room. And in glass cases around the walls arranged in chronological order are about one hundred vibrators dating all the way back from the late. Eighteen hundreds up to the early nineteen seventies and some of them are these beautiful lustrous jewel toned pieces of plastic others not so much they were super steam punk looking in the early twentieth century in and before they were definitely little machines. This is our tour guide carol. Queen carroll is the museum's curator has a phd in sexology and has worked at good vibrations for decades for a first stop on the tour. Carol wanted to introduce us to one of the oldest vibrators in the museum's collection. It's called the v. d. vibrio tori massager. And whether it was supposed to make you think of venereal disease. I don't actually know that's lost in the midst of time at least as far as my information. Sources are concerned the v. is old school. No batteries no electricity. It's got a hand crank. It kind of looks like an egg beater. If i'm honest and the museum has an old photo of a doctor holding a similar vibrator using one hand to operate the crank and the other depress the applicator end of it against a standing woman's back. Yes her back. In the late eighteen hundreds most people would have come into contact with vibrators in the context of a doctor's office in the vibrators early days it was seen as this kind of cure all for all kinds of medical problems and it was used at first in the doctor's office and then later in the home there is an nineteen teens book that was published by the hamilton dietsch company. Yes the same company that makes the blender that we make our margaritas on friday night which made vibrators and was one of the major vibrator manufacturers. There were many but they're one of the major ones in the nineteen so hamilton beach made a vibe and they published a book called health and how to get it

Queen Carroll Venereal Disease Carol Hamilton Dietsch Company Hamilton Beach
The 20th Century Was Shaped by War

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:40 min | 1 year ago

The 20th Century Was Shaped by War

"We'd witnessed the twentieth century. Shaped by wall is one individual. So wittily put it. The twentieth century began in the balkans and ended in the balkans it began with the facination of archduke ferdinand by governor low prank hip. An amicus serbian nationalist which through various ententes various arrangements of the earliest twentieth century diplomacy triggered will will won a war in which a whole generation was lost the fruit of europe america only involved in the last few moments of that war it was the european nations that lost the cream of the young men in the trenches of fair done in those no-man's-land filled with bob wire and machine gun nests with more than six million killed but it was the war of mechanized proportions in which predominantly the military's paid the brunt. It was the young men of the armies of each side. That were mowed down just a few years later. The great war the first world war was out don in a conflict that spans the globe. In which sixty million people killed and not just sold is in fact in most cities of that war it was the civilians that bore the brunt. Then came the cold war stasis if you will yes hot was. In the periphery and south asia in the middle east and africa but between the two polish sides between america and the soviet union between nato and the war so packed the birds never flew this strategic bombers never dropped their bombs on washington or moscow on london on paris.

Balkans Archduke Ferdinand European Nations Bob Wire America Europe South Asia Middle East Africa Soviet Union Nato Washington Moscow London Paris
What All Americans Should Understand About Black Lives Matter

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:17 min | 1 year ago

What All Americans Should Understand About Black Lives Matter

"Couple of questions black lives matter. What should all americans understand about black lives matter. And where does it fit into america. Organically is it some big plots of the democrat party. Is it just another race hustle. Ethno business also from a new generation of of al sharpton 's or is it truly something organic that is headless like an amoeba way. Does it fit in. What should all americans irrespective of their mellon levels. Think of this thing. I consider The movement behind b. l. m. not a real estate investment vehicle to ensure that the founders can get up home about the house multi worth multiple millions but instead the analog to the militant wing of the d. n. c. for the latter part of the nineteenth century and for the early parts of the twentieth century. The klu klux klan operated to make sure that all americans remembered the messaging the importance of separation the importance of weaken get you. Wherever you are. We can stop that job. We can prevent that opportunity. Black lives matter is working with corporations. It is working with the media. It is working with the academy. It works with government. The sad thing about the bill in movement is it was is able to do out in the open with the klan had to do secretly that danger is something that i hope that we start seeing a pushback. I want to start seeing. And i hope that we start. Seeing companies have to apologize for being willing to associate with racial separatist like the black lives matter

Democrat Party KLU Al Sharpton America
Who Is Shang-Chi? A Review of Marvel's Latest Blockbuster

The Big Picture

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Who Is Shang-Chi? A Review of Marvel's Latest Blockbuster

"Who is chunky. And why should we care about him so strong. She has like pretty unique origins. As as it goes for marvel characters he was created by steve englehart and gemstar. Lynn in nineteen seventy. Three james stalin's the same guy that Creative thanos who who were all very familiar with absolutely inevitable. He really came. This came at the height of the phenomenon as sweeping across america after the success of daycare. Deans kung-fu series on abc. Which actually was the inspiration for this character. And really like after bruce. Lee's enter the dragon calms in like that really skyrockets. His his popularity in shanxi capitalizes off of that but at least for for the characters origins well like it was really unique character because he was built around his father and his father was a character that was licensed property off of Sacks roamers fu manchu. Who is as you likely now. Very very problematic figure and one of the most prolific Really pulp villains of the twentieth century. So this character really grows From that origin from that kind of lens of being for like a white audience at a time when they're just trying to go off of this this really craze of kung fu.

Steve Englehart Gemstar James Stalin Deans Kung Thanos Lynn Shanxi ABC Bruce America LEE
Turning the Spotlight on Ballet With Author Chloe Angyal

Burn It All Down

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Turning the Spotlight on Ballet With Author Chloe Angyal

"Clothing angel. And i am a journalist and autho and the author of the new book turning point how a new generation of dances is saving ballet from itself which is a reported work about ballet and about the future of ballet about what has to change to make sure that bali is safe and fair and relevant an equitable off foam that can survive and thrive in the twentieth century. Yes steve written this new book that pulls a curtain back on the ballet world. And now i'm going to do the thing that i always hate when people do to me from doing it to you and i'm going to read the first paragraph of your book at you i can also i can also recite it for you. Buy hot. i'm not going to. But i could do to events so i think i could probably do it do verbatim. It's perfect. so this is. I mean you set it up really quickly for the reader. Write quote every day and dance studios all across america legions of children lineup at the bar and take a ballet class. This book is about what they learned. They're not just about dance but about gender race and power about the value of their bodies and minds about their place in the world. Both in and outside of dance. We're definitely going to get to some of that in a minute but first khloe. Let's get the tough question out of the way because you're here. Burn down feminist. Sports podcast is ballet sport. It doesn't matter this is a this is a debate that periodically royals. The dance world is dance. A sport is at an is it bones it somehow some of the food category and what i usually say is whether or not ballet is. A sport is kind of irrelevant because dances get injured like athletes and get paid as well as artists. They sustain the kind of physical toll that athletes do with none of the support and very little the cultural respect and resources that athletes get and so whether or not they full into either categories. Really irrelevant. I'm sort of more interested. In what their experiences are rather than what label we should be slapping on them

Bali Steve Khloe America
The Lost History of the Electric Car

Kottke Ride Home

01:59 min | 1 year ago

The Lost History of the Electric Car

"Electric car revolution is finally hopefully beginning to go mainstream but it turns out. It's taken even longer than i realized. The debate over electric versus gas cars goes back pretty much to the beginning of cars themselves and the reason gas cars one ounce. Here's a hint. It was misogyny well at least in part is asleep recently ran in excerpt from. Tom standards his new book a brief history of motion from the wheel to the car to what comes next and he dives into the development of electric cars all the way back in the nineteenth century so way back in eighteen ninety seven the best selling car in the us he says was the columbia from pope manufacturing company in electric model. Now it's lead wouldn't last long. As steam vehicles became pretty popular for a hot minute there and then by nineteen o three. The oldsmobile curved dash came out a gas powered automobile and it took the lead in popularity and even though many in europe had already become gasoline converts in the us. The debate was still ongoing through the first decade of the nineteen hundreds. And what exactly were the main points of the debate. Well as stanage points out cars. Were supposed to fix a lot of the problems that people had with horse drawn vehicles in issues like noise traffic accidents and the pollution and stench caused by horse manure now standard is well aware of the irony that the gas powered cars. That one out failed on exactly all of those points. Well except the manure in less. You were biff in back to the future. Your car isn't leaving any horse manure in its wake. But it is producing way more and way worse. Pollution in the form of carbon monoxide and dioxide nitrogen oxides sulfur dioxide and various greenhouse gases not to mention quoting standards reliance on fossil fuels such as gasoline and diesel has also had far reaching geopolitical ramifications. As much of the world became dependent on oil from the middle east during the twentieth century and quotes

Stanage TOM Columbia United States Europe Middle East
A Look Back at the 2001 Film 'In the Mood for Love'

Filmspotting

01:54 min | 1 year ago

A Look Back at the 2001 Film 'In the Mood for Love'

"Let's get to that review of in the mood for love the sixth and final film our world of car marathon. This marathon has been inspired by wong's recent restoration of seven of his best known films. All of which are included in the criterion collection's new world of car. Kawhi box set. Thankfully these are also available. They're currently streaming on the criterion channel. Right now in the mood for love debuted at the two thousand canned film festival where it was nominated for the palm door and start tony. Leon won the fess best-actor prize. It opened here in the states in march two thousand one to pretty universal critical acclaim. But maybe this is something we can talk a little bit about josh. My feeling is that its reputation has only grown over the last twenty years for example back at the end of the last decade in late. Two thousand nine. The guardian had in the mood for love as it's forty eighth best film of the decade fast forward ten years later for a best films of the twenty first century list mood and moved up all the way to number five and then in two thousand sixteen. The bbc pulled over a hundred critics for a best movies of the twentieth century. Lists and in the mood for love landed at number two right behind no real surprise to me. My beloved mulholland drive from director david lynch and other films that is probably only grown in esteem over the years quickly. The plot it set in early nineteen sixties hong kong sort of picks up where days of being wild left off josh. It's part of an informal trilogy with that film and wong's later film twenty forty six. Tony leon and maggie cheung our neighbors in a cramped boardinghouse. They're both married. They're both lonely and they soon realized that their spouses are having an affair with each other. Leon chung bond over this betrayal and eventually do get quite close but never act on their feelings for each other this being a one car y movie after

Wong Josh Leon Tony Mulholland David Lynch Tony Leon BBC Maggie Cheung Hong Kong Leon Chung
Ruth Wisse: Too Much Emphasis Is Placed on the Holocaust as 'Redemptive'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Ruth Wisse: Too Much Emphasis Is Placed on the Holocaust as 'Redemptive'

"That story As i was just writing it i realized that it basically Follows along the same path as the story of the jews in the middle of the twentieth century. And one of the things that me so much about the way that people tell that story is that. I think that there's too much emphasis that is placed on what is called the holocaust That event so cataclysmic and It's so it's so beyond belief that For many reasons it has become prominent and there many people who believe that somehow the story the telling of it is redemptive now. I don't know how you feel about that. I think that the idea that something like that can be. Redemptive must come from christianity that if jesus the crucifixion of jesus is redemptive then how can the crucifixion of an entire people not be redemptive. Now here's the whole jewish people kind of on the cross or worse Maybe we can use that as a redemptive story and somehow holocaust education is meant to suggest that by telling now i i. I'm not saying anything about of course. The story of jesus is completely different. But you see the analogy here being That the story of a of of this horrific in the sense evil right telling it can somehow keep others from going that path now. I've never been a believer. Well that's obviously different from being redemptive but it it's you it could be useful in other words that that the of course the whole idea at least in my lifetime you know we're never forget. Never forget we have to remember. And that's why we'll tell the story over and over and over and over and over and over years somehow saying that It's not redemptive but it's also maybe not so helpful there's an aspect of it that you are pushing

The Mind: A Factory of Fears

Spark My Muse

02:32 min | 1 year ago

The Mind: A Factory of Fears

"Today. I'm going to bring you something. From theologian and philosopher. Paul tillich he's considered usually an existential theologian from the mid twentieth century. And he has some fascinating and even prophetic things to say about our time. He wrote this book the courage to be in nineteen fifty two and even seventy years later. There are so many gems to be mined out of this book. I hoping to bring it to you in little bits here and there possibly over the next few weeks and months on page thirty six. There is a section called the interdependence of fear and anxiety. And i'm gonna read you pieces of this work anxiety and fear had the same ontological route but they are not the same in actuality. This is common knowledge but it has been emphasized and overemphasized to such a degree. That reaction against it may occur and wipe out not only the exaggerations but also the truth of the distinction fear as opposed to anxiety has a definite object as most authors agree which can be faced analyzed attacked endured one can act upon it and an acting upon it participate in it. Even if in the form of a struggle in this way one can take it into one's self affirmation. I'm gonna pause right here to say self. Affirmation is not any kind of positive thinking definition it is the acknowledgement that we as a human being are separated a separate sof or self determining agent in the world to understand that you are a self is self affirmation itself that tillich courage can meet every object of fear because it is an object which makes participation possible courage can take the fear produced by definite object into itself because this object however frightful it may be houses side with which it participates in us and we in it one could say that as long as there is an object of fear love in the sense of participation can conquer

Paul Tillich Tillich
Christians Are Being Persecuted and Driven out of the Middle East

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:55 min | 1 year ago

Christians Are Being Persecuted and Driven out of the Middle East

"Talk to us about the situation in the middle east the flip side of the global war on terror that really isn't adequately discussed either. What has happened in syria. In in other parts of the middle east like iraq in the last twenty years since september the eleventh at the tarnow the twentieth century across the middle east we had approximately twenty plus percent christians that were living in various pockets. Lebanon has right now per capita the largest christian community but you had him living in iraq. You had him living in syria In turkey and whatnot well as we progress through the twentieth century with the various wars and the uptake. In some of these terror groups christians began to leave and larger numbers Since the war in syria for example in two thousand eleven when it started there were three million christians living inside syria. Today we have less than two hundred fifty thousand take iraq for example in mosul. You have the tomb of jonah. The prophet joan on you have to of the minor prophets name. All of a planes is well known in the bible. So these are all old jewish and christian lands and Christians are being driven out Left and right not only by sunni radicals but also by shiite radicals why because iran wants controlled. They want that fertile crescent. Go an open door from modern day. Iran in through iraq syria all the way out lebanon. So in this in this divide you've got a sunni shia clashes and and and in these clashes. Not only. are they fighting each other. But they're also pushing the christians out. The christians always take the brunt of everything

Syria Middle East Iraq Lebanon Turkey Mosul Jonah Joan Iran
The Long History of Credit

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:06 min | 1 year ago

The Long History of Credit

"Idea of credit has a very long history. the code of hammurabi one of the oldest systems of laws in the world has sections on how to deal with credit it put maximum interest rates on loans of grain and silver credit. Was something that was usually done in a very personal basis. The ability to extend credit to someone was dependent upon your relationship with them and your trust in them. In fact the word credit comes from middle french and it was originally used to mean belief or faith. If you extend credit to someone it is literally a belief in the ability of that person to pay you back. This is the way the credit worked for centuries. An individual store would extend credit to individual customers based on their relationship and trust this sort of system might still exist someplace like a pub or a bar where regular might a tab that they pay at the end of the month. The system of individual lines of credit being established for individual customers by individual businesses was very inefficient. The process of making credit more efficient was begun in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries with major department stores like macy's wanamaker's their wealthiest customers didn't wanna handle money directly so they were given paper cards or brass tokens that they could present at checkout. The cashier would then make note of the purchases and a customer would then get a statement at the end of the month. This form of credit wasn't intended to be alone. Like many credit cards are today. The amount had to be paid in full at the end of every month. What this system had over previous systems is that the individual cashier didn't need to know the person who presented the token the store would issue the token and any employee could then accept it in one thousand nine hundred eighty five. The charger plate system was unveiled by the charger plate. Group out of new york. It was a rectangular metallic plate. That was about the size of a dog tag and like a dog tag. It had embossed letters showing the name and address of the customer. In most cases the metal plates were kept at the store rather than enhance the customer. They were then pulled out when the customer made a purchase. This certainly made processing paperwork. Easier and again. It wasn't advance but the system still only worked at a single store.

Wanamaker Macy New York
What Is the Tapeworm Diet?

Interesting If True

01:55 min | 1 year ago

What Is the Tapeworm Diet?

"The tape firm diet. Oh don't be real. Oh yeah see. The tapeworm diet works by swallowing a pill that has a tapeworm egg inci when the egg eventually hatches the tapeworm will grow inside your body and eat. Whatever you're eating the idea is you can eat whatever you want and still lose weight because the tapeworm is eating your quote extra calories. No no mall of that hasty lights. Yeah there's a few different times of tapeworms but it's the beef tapeworm or the tena saginaw data. oh good. it is usually used for these sort of quick weight. Loss schemes envy late. Nineteen th and early. Twentieth centuries advertisements touted quote easy to swallow sanitized tapeworms as a weapon against fat quote the enemy. That is short your life. Oh god as one to add recently showcased by the national women's history museum's website reads where things. Yeah that's super gross. Did they also cover the tapeworms and radium so you could find them in the night. Ooh you have like cool little disco parties in your belly. The nineteen teens truly the peak of human. Nope now this is the yeah. The nineteenth and twentieth century. That's still that's still that's reason. Yeah no no good can possibly come from any of this. Don't give yourself tapeworms. i can't believe. I have to say that out loud. So capsule solden pass by snake oil huckster and online today likely contain the microscopic head of the tangent. Saga gotta when people would order from snake oil medicine. It would typically be the head of this gross little tapeworm and it would develop into a thirty foot long tapeworm in your body. Oh that's so gross and not okay. It's not little hooks on its head and it would grab onto your intestines and start growing no and technically this is a parasitic infection called tan tan isis. It's called having well. It does actually cause weight loss. I bet because you have a huge worm inside your intestine eating all your food.

National Women's History Museu
"early twentieth century" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"But it's also possible to abuse it. I think that you can only steal man. Good faith argument and the problem is we now know that we have not been engaged in opponents were wheeled in good faith arguments because privately their emails reflect their own doubts and what they were doing publicly was actually a punishment a public punishment for those of us who spoke up with i think the purpose of either backing down or more likely warning others not to engage in the same kind of behavior and obviously for people like you and me who regard science as are likely best hope for navigating difficult waters shutting down. People who are using those tools honorably is itself dishonorable. So i i don't really i don't feel it is. I don't feel that there's anything to steal man. And i also think that you know immediately at the point that the world suddenly with no new evidence on the table switched years with respect to the lab week. You know at the point of nicholas wade at published his article and suddenly the world was going to admit but this was at least a possibility. If not a likelihood we got to see something of the rationalization process that had taken place inside the institutional world and had very definitely involved the claim that what was being avoided was targeting of chinese scientists and my point would be. I don't wanna see the targeting of anyone. I don't want to see racist of any kind on the other hand once you create licensed to lie in order to protect individuals when the world has a stake in knowing what happened than it is inevitable that that process that licensed to lie will be used by the thing that captures institutions for its own purposes. So my sense is it may be very unfortunate. If the story of what happened here can be used against Chinese people that would be very unfortunate. And as i think i mentioned heather and i have taken great pains to point out that. This doesn't look like chinese failure. It looks like a failure of the international scientific community. So i think it is important to broadcast that message along with the analysis of the evidence but no matter what happened we have a right to know and I frankly do not take the institutional layer at. Its word that it's motivations are honorable and that it was protecting you know. Goodhearted scientists at the expense of the world that that explanation does not add up. Well this is very interesting question about whether it's okay to lie institutional air to protect the populace. I think both you and i are probably on the same. Have the same sense that it's a slippery slope even if it's an effective mechanism in the short term in the long term is going to be destructive. This happened with masks. This happened with other things. If you look at history pandemics there's There's an idea that panic is destructive amongst the populace seem you want to construct a narrative whether it's a lie or not to minimize panic but you're suggesting that almost in all cases and i think that was the lesson from the pandemic in the early twentieth century that lying creates distrust and distrust in institutions is ultimately destructive. That's your sense that lying is not. Okay well okay you know. They're obviously places where complete transparency is not a good idea right to the extent that you broadcast technology that allows one individual to hold the world hostage right. Obviously you've you've got something to be navigated but in general. I don't believe that the scientific system should be lying to us. In the case of this particular lie the idea that the well being of chinese scientists outweighs the well. Being of the world is preposterous. Mia right as you as you point out..

both early twentieth century nicholas one individual Mia Chinese chinese
"early twentieth century" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

Artificial Intelligence in Industry

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence in Industry

"Different is its details. So you might. You might say you talk about super intelligent things like this. I think i'm gonna nonsense idea. Was i think. I mean the best boss. German the Just look down your nose at those schmucks thea. The sort of fundamentally higher level of intelligence. I don't think that makes any sense in humans. Well then the computers we have the humans you know yes you can have a higher clock speed. You can have the neurons running you know. It was once just algae on this planet. You know what i mean. What we fundamentally in the same place. Just because of this computational idea within sent places the weather is the same places geology. Where the same places as all these different things you know. We are very proud of the fact that you know we've built all these different you know constructs and so on but but think about geology. for example it's built plenty of construct. It's got all these elaborate rocks different shapes. It's got all these things going on. It's a piece of kind of the human exceptionalism story is a story made up by humans. So to speak i proud only being part of the spewing fecundity that will spill into something astronomically beyond myself. So i share. None of what. You're articulate but i think many humans do as i'm sure if horses could talk. They would have their horse superiority that they would articulate. I think it's a question of people still wonder you know do. The whales have a civilization so year. We don't understand we don't know it's something which is the only thing we know about is what we humans have made. We got to kind of define what i mean when we look at it through the human lens of the humans of the early twentieth century we see certain kinds of things and if we say what will the quotes humans of the twenty th century so to speak much of what they will be doing will be to us. It's just some random computation..

twenty th century early twentieth century German
"early twentieth century" Discussed on AI in Business

AI in Business

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on AI in Business

"Different is its details. So you might. You might say you talk about super intelligent things like this. I think i'm gonna nonsense idea. Was i think. I mean the best bonds german the Just look down your nose at those schmucks idea that the sort of fundamentally higher level of intelligence. I don't think that makes any sense in humans. Well then the computers we have the humans you know yes you can have a higher clock speed. You can have the neurons running you know. It was once just algae on this planet. You know what i mean. What we fundamentally in the same place. Just because of this computational idea within sent places the weather is the same places geology. Where the same places as all these different things you know. We are very proud of the fact that you know we've built all these different you know constructs and so on but but think about geology. for example it's built plenty of construct. It's got all these elaborate rocks different shapes. It's got all these things going on. It's a piece of kind of the human exceptionalism story is a story made up by humans. So to speak i only being part of the spewing fecundity that will spill into something astronomically beyond myself. So i share. None of what. You're articulate. But i think many humans do as i'm sure if horses could talk. They would have their horse superiority that they would articulate. I think it's a question of people still wonder you know. Do the whales have a civilization so this year we don't understand we don't know it's something which is the only thing we know about is what we humans have made. We got to kind of define what i mean when we look at it through the human lens of the humans of the early twentieth century we see certain kinds of things and if we say what will the quotes humans of the twenty th century so to speak much of what they will be doing will be to us. It's just some random computation..

twenty th century early twentieth century this year german
"early twentieth century" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"An interesting way. Even though congress doesn't build an informational platform when asked directly it ends up happening through thin forcement of these federal criminal laws. Let's talk about the car. Because when most people think about federal ism in policing the white supremacy angle is kind of intuitive timid. The car is less. So talk to us about the role of the car in the history that starts with policing being entirely a local matter and ends at least for now in the floyd justice and policing federalization so a lot of this joint research. That dan i idid started from my research into. How cars transformed policing. I looked strictly how it changed local policing and to kind of really evaluate the law enforcement and at the early twentieth century that they needed to modernize and professionalize and to hire more police officers because they were proactive. Crimefighters i i looked at what they were actually doing day to day and i realized how much of what when they were talking about crime. The sensational accounts were about catching murderers and Bank robbers but day to day what they were really doing most of the crimes that they were dealing with were auto theft crimes and audit theft constantly required police officers to have a.

congress early twentieth century
"early twentieth century" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

The Bill Simmons Podcast

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on The Bill Simmons Podcast

"The ones where they freak out. And there is no I guess you the sixty minutes piece on it. Yeah yeah i watch. That too is deeply disturbing well. Oh this is why disturb it just that sixty minutes doing a piece on it made. It seem more real to me. Even that already sebrle there was do stories. Written about at boeing six. I mean sixty minutes has been kinda the real paper record for a lot of different reasons. Since i've been alive so they were like we're going to do you like oh shit really happening okay. So you believe in goes. Do you want goes to be real or would you prefer find out you were wrong. That's a great question. I kind of like having. I like the idea of ghosts. Brought goes if goes but like but you seem to be saying. You've definitely don't want aliens. Well think about how we grew up they. Ufo know alien culture as existed way before either of us were elaborate. It goes back to the early twentieth century. And then it kinda has cut a boom in the fifties people get excited about it. You see movies about it and then as our entire life. I remember going to close encounters in the theater was like nineteen seventy seven lands. And it's like oh my god and then. Et was another one and superman and then clusters but all the examples you just gave the aliens or great no man. Crates even the blockbusters in the nineties. It was like what if the aliens weren't nice. And it's like all right now. The only declaring war on us and that became a cottage industry but aliens had been in our life in this pop culture. Way that it just seemed like. That's what they're going to be like this goto for pop culture that the people loved. I never thought we would actually have to deal with them. Heard there actually. We have to come up with a plan for the weird aliens that are flying around. Oh but it seems as though like i mean. I don't know this might be like like. I often say this. Although my politics are all over the place. I feel like in some ways fundamentally conservative person that i kind of want things to stay as they are very hesitant about i just it seems like like life is changing faster than i can accept it all the time so by that argument i not want because if the of aliens delay enter into our world it's going to be some significant changes begin. We know we're going to have to you. Know i have some weird conversations however gets hurts me does want if if there are aliens i wanted to show up in my lifetime like if if if they came one hundred years yes i would like it.

early twentieth century one hundred years sixty minutes nineties six nineteen seventy seven lands fifties people
"early twentieth century" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on The Book Review

"Never complete but you notice that there is a reason for human pity here and then a small part of you guys but this is fascinating. Let's talk just for a second about that initial leap from nonfiction fiction with golden. Hell why did you do it. I've always been a very narrative focused story shaped nonfiction writer and every book nonfiction written contained. Some sort of close to the line flirtation with novels do but cowardice kept me a nonfiction writer for a longtime knows. I didn't take it very seriously in vitry temps and still think it's something you can be very ambitious in. But i've always been most of all a reader fiction. And and i just waited and waited and waited until i felt i had the very very slowly maturing stills required to get me over the line and stop writing the kind of fiction i wanted to make exist. It's not that different in some ways for my nonfiction. Still a preoccupation with how things work which is up in light of petrol in the form of long perhaps too long descriptions of how early twentieth century hot metal newspaper composing machines work and of a slightly geeky things that i enjoy about the very natural subject to be interested. I think but. I'm aware that other people may not be quite as grabbed bias as me. So there's a pleasure in in system and how things work which continued from nonfiction and there's also a sense of my imagination being most activated by the contact with the kind of crack broken high friction surfaces at the real world. What gets me going as a writer. Then and now is the sense that there's something to be understood and something that happened preferably something which is kinda resist being described funding. The story is challenging. But also i had a very basic fiction. Lovers desire to stop doing the thing that fiction does which no other kind of writing or indeed off form could really do as well which is to do the leap of empathy into the minds of real people..

early twentieth century a second book
"early twentieth century" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"Me. It's accident beata. it's joan last name first name something. Naughty which was parents kind of fashionable direction at the time of mine breath. Now i'm working as what's not show name longer looking actually since navy so it's kind of bidding right so okay speaking of childhood and parents. I'm always interested. So you're the director of museum or kunsthall to be specific and a curator and writer and all this. How did you even get created so where your parents creative like. How did you even come into this or the arts industry not through a parents. My mother was very interested in culture but more into antiques. Didn't travels to italy to france to see remnants of from openness to culture an interest in history but i was kind of like early on drawn to like classic among modernist album like data and writing the king from the early twentieth century.

italy france early twentieth century joan first navy
"early twentieth century" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"And i think that. So so glamour would be to express themselves rather than manifest itself but self rather and i think nuts if that's right if that's right then it's not so it's not so much a relational property. I think it's it's something one has one has its in oneself and so but you're right. I mean there is a sense in which were inclined to sing but if nobody sees it. If it doesn't have something to do with that i like to just go k if we can go back to tina psychoanalysis and hysteria for a moment which i mentioned when i talked about history on personality If you think about a person who's not a pleasant thing to think about but imagine in person is partially paralyzed said and it might be a because of a physiological reason or on the other hand it could be a hysterical conversion and hysterical conversion. You know what i mean by that. You know some kind of trauma or perceive trauma that person manifest bodily which was it still occurs although people think it only occurred in the early twentieth century late nineteenth. But it's it's always been around Historic will conversion. But you see. I would say that the paralysis would be a manifestation or expression surrey a manifestation of the self because that's just the way things are it's illogical problem for whatever reason there's a physiological ideology to it to express the self the historic is expressing itself to set clarify it. Yeah you know me. So if i thought experiment. If i put a true dramas person in a world of no other people. Would that be glamorous. Well i was thinking about there because it was such an interesting question I hadn't thought of in quite those terms but If the person. I mean obviously person. I think it's obvious But a person who has had no exposure interaction with others have much of a language or sense of anything. I mean they wouldn't really be in the world. I'm not sure people can develop a notion you know anything like self in that context but suppose they had lived in the world. You know they were. They weren't raised. You know it and in a forest animals but.

early twentieth century late n tina one
"early twentieth century" Discussed on Can We Health You?

Can We Health You?

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on Can We Health You?

"At your so another coveted item that is thrown into the crowd. Is the zulu coconuts. So that's why. The cruise is zulu krill. Which is a predominantly african american crew and they began coconuts in the early twentieth century. Because the mostly working class group could not afford the expensive glass beads. I mean they do the glaspie they gone. They would never nothing bloody light enough that it wouldn't break. Yeah you know. Yeah as we could just went and got they were cheaper cooking. Yes. they're tossing. Cook national people so by the nineteen forties date started to decorate the coconut. So initially toss in harry round coconuts people junkie like.

early twentieth century nineteen forties african american
"early twentieth century" Discussed on Beyond Your Wildest Genes

Beyond Your Wildest Genes

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on Beyond Your Wildest Genes

"That was employed in continental philosophy starting with Hagel moving into high gary in philosophy, and then more into phenomenology in the Early Twentieth Century and late twentieth century, and we originally employed Herman, Unical strategies to read Biblical texts, and to look for authorship, and to really try to ascertain. the various themes that are coming out of this tax and and sort of the genealogies of those kinds of text it's it's often applied in legal settings as well when we're talking about doing legal analysis, and we're analyzing laws and Catis and things of that nature, looking for scaffolding to make legal arguments it really its core is interpretation. And the reason why? I have decided to employ and kind of work to. Create. A methodology which terminated isn't strictly a methodologies and interpretive sort of phenomena logical approach, but I'm sort of trying to organize it more as a method. Because in medicine we are evaluating text and when I say texts, what are examples of tax well, the person's narrative about their life that they come to the clinic presenting with. The family tree that they present with type of tax that genetic document that we or genetic information that we retrieved through the twenty analysis isn't as textual form the. Types of lab data that we get are taxed, and there's different types of texts that I look at and I call them narrative There's the machine sort of language tax of of our of our technologies. MRI's xrays lab equipment things of that nature, and then there's more Fluid tax, which the stories that the person tells the family narratives that they tell and things of that nature, which for me often have the most richness, and they allow me to make meaningful clinical contributions or interventions, because that's where I find a lot of the hidden elements that are driving pathology is in those kind of tax, but the other reason why light to consider medicine as a textual practice is. As a practitioner when I work with clients, there's something called a Herman Unical Circle and that's when an interpreter..

Early Twentieth Century Herman Unical Circle Herman Hagel
"early twentieth century" Discussed on Disorganized Crime: Smuggler's Daughter

Disorganized Crime: Smuggler's Daughter

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on Disorganized Crime: Smuggler's Daughter

"Walking downstairs to meet my friends and have breakfast second-floor from the second Florida onto the first floor onto the big circle to center is sort of event stairway Half a flight and then a little landing and then another flight going now as walking down the first flight towards the second flight going down at that landing in the middle as I'm walking down I see a picture of living about an old hero of mine. He was he was He led the Mexican Revolution the Early Twentieth Century. But he's a hero of my and I'm walking down the stairs. I'm approaching that picture hanging on. The Wall of the body is a famous pictures pot. He's got his bullets bundy euros across his chest. He's got his Sombrero on his head and he's holding his rifle walking down the stairs approaching the picture. Really strange weird feeling comes over me. I can't figure out what's going on in my body in my head and as I come to invite him step and standing in front of the picture I realize the wall. That picture is hanging on the wall. Against which the pot is standing to have the picture taken. You turns out to hotel. We were staying in used to be a pilot is headquartered. He used to ride his horse around at inner circle inside the brick wall for me. This was even more of an adventure then to smuggle itself. You know I stood whereas pot of stern is blew my mind even now I get. I get the chills rainbow. Valentine this is disorganized. Crime.

Early Twentieth Century Florida Valentine
"early twentieth century" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Upper East Side sanctuary stretches almost two hundred feet and the end of the ceiling soars seventy feet overhead marble and granite walls and pillars are going to make Shattuck clears voices rang throughout the space the moods of the program are going to vary from serene to swinging but it begins in joy with this from early twentieth century Britain short Perry's icing the birth and it's not he the to see a little not also and a the gentle rocking rhythm underneath the old German Carol sue sunny and that expression of inward joy hi ya idea there makes the refrain so tender and that beautiful it opens.

Shattuck Britain Perry
"early twentieth century" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Early twentieth century shell shock itself and help to reveal the connection even earlier in eighteen ninety nine the interpretation of dreams and that to provide a shift in thinking among other things dreams contained inspiration for art the idea that an artist could access a dream that the real information was now thought to be inside rather than answer changed everything her friend Marcel Duchamp talked about the transformation in an interview in nineteen fifty eight is observation was that art up to that point had been what he called written that is you look at a painting for what you see what comes on your rates in add nursing intellectual about it nothing else than the visual side of the painting analysis of a painting was absent an estimate then you should look and register with you I would see that's what I call them Reginald then the shift what is your least did change a bit of that by saying why should we be only interested in the visual side of the painting there may be something else the something else was the dream the unconscious mind the surrealists look to their psyche to put their inner impulses and dreams on canvas and naturally they had a manifesto nineteen twenty four written by Andre Breton we are still living under the reign of logic it said but in this day and age logical matters or applicables only to solving problems of secondary interest Freud wrote very rightly brought his critical faculties to bear upon the tree you're listening to W. N. Y. C.'s shell shocked nineteen nineteen considering how art and culture changed after the great war coming up the surrealists make a movie Harlem seems new and then there's a jet I'm surface go back after a break for veterans day your stories of transition from military to civilian life very very hard to jump into the real world for a long service it took me a couple years after getting out of the military to find my footing managing my mental health many years a significant moments in military history and how they resonate today I'm tens innovator and that's next time on the take away weekday afternoons at three on ninety three point nine FM WNYC.

Marcel Duchamp Reginald Andre Breton Freud W. N. Y. C. Harlem WNYC
"early twentieth century" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

03:50 min | 3 years ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Early twentieth century and this is this is not even about a crisis for this is not just about D. immigrant communities being held in concentration camps being a crisis this is a crisis for ourselves this is a crisis on it America will remain in America it is actual principles and values I I really I can't again I'm not really but you guys through that anymore never again was something that was said after the the Holocaust so she completely denigrates the suffering and the the mass massacre that was the concentration camps were you are stolen on your home your sent to a a work camp where you work until you die you get little or no food the women and children are just gassed and killed Lee the mentor worked until they can't work anymore than they die with road a hole and covered on our southern border the kids of Xbox is and internet nice place to sleep air conditioned soccer fields the recreational facilities we're paying for free tutoring for these children their parents or whoever the adults are we have no proof of the Riemann related are being held in a detention facility which is nicer than most county jails and they're being held there because Suzanne crazy they broke the law nobody watch fifteen hundred miles to get to a **** concentration camp he talks about how Japanese people were worst were sent off and rounded up and that these children are being held in the same place with their their their their military bases the military bases still exist these kids are being treated so well which you can talk about what it came the Japanese interment was that was FDR you know the guy who did the new deal she was good a green new deal after your seven round them up and sent them to internment camps of course a Democrat yet she wants to sit there and make such a discussing comparisons are just called out by just about everybody separate few left wing idiots or supporter on she's called out she doubles down she acts as if not only is it okay or not what I said I'm standing by it that's how nuts it is that's where we are in this country right now this person represents a bunch of people in the Bronx and queens New York me that's nuts later in the program I have a guy who says he's running against possibly he's examining whether he should let him on his name is rich Valdez from New York I think that he should seriously consider it and I think he's got a good chance of winning why because people can't possibly want this city to continue representing your district same for she's the same person who said I'm the boss now we're in charge now no you're not you're a representative of the people there the boss very charge you're lucky to have the job one eight hundred five zero one seventy eighty one eight hundred five zero one seven zero eight zero.

"early twentieth century" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Comic with all the early early twentieth century design so i went in there and then i started paying a lot of attention to the bios started looking at you know these are deco illustrations of the twenties and thirties and the whole world of international style all that stuff and i think that really expand my horizons license emi drawing style became quite linear simple but during that same period as also starting to recede and really understand what what's good and what's going on in underground comics in us rating harvey peak are looking at and then berry we are spiegelman blah blah blah by the time i got to like where i'd done six or seven issues i felt like that's not the kind of comics i want you to do because at a certain kind of new irish side fi adventure thing they were charming but ultimately i wanna do something with more meat on the bones you know quitting or being fired whichever it was that was the right timing so at this point where you than consciously aware that you wanted to create comics differently than had ever been done before no that would be overstating it what i wanna do is i want it to make comics in league with see ambitions of other cartoonist i was recognizing appearing on scene younger cartoonish coming up at that point we all grew up in the late sixties and seventies we grew up with a mishmash of pop culture stuff mad magazine superhero comics whenever they underground but i think that generation of then i'm part of now people like dan klaus or peter bag or just around i think we all thought we wanna do adult comics and i think as time went on a kind of generalized steady extorted the farm and i think really they only a static that you could say what's it's common was that there was a literary ambition to it to try and make something that was likely underground so very interesting but they were mostly artist shock value like here's comic books meant for kids here's we're gonna throw in a lot of sex and drugs and it's kinda like people say what these are comic books but i think the big thing with can you make along comic story and 'em can you write it with more ambitions and just usual comic book how did you first meet chris oliveira's be publisher of drawn in quarterly yeah drawing quarterly was literally like one magazine i think they had one magazine published when i met griselle aveiro seed started this magazine called drawn in quarterly which is terrible title oh i love the great it's a great title if he ever put out a quarterly magazine but i don't think that magazine even came up once quarterly anyhow i met chris very early on he just started publishing and i was just putting together the first issue of my comic lucasville this is very shortly after the misdirect stuff we met at a i think it a little comic convention in toronto and i was thinking of shopping to the two major underground cartooning publishing companies then which would have been santa graphics and kitchen sink press and they've been around for awhile and they were they publish the people i respected but i rented a chris and he was just really smart and really great and i said i'm working on a comic and he's like would you be interested in defy published it he knew my work a little bit and something just made me think like it was a smart move rather than go in retrospect i don't know why i mean should have gone defense graphics but it was the right answer trusting chris and we became friends and i felt like those early ten years of drowning quarterly anywhere like definitely being part of some kind of artistic movement absolutely the village voice eloquently described polluted ville this way political tells the story of what the past was and it's rape possibilities that were never borne out and says i wanna talk with you a bit about memory i already mentioned luke chamberlain's wonderful documentaries sets dominion in that movie you say this memory is a blueprint of sensation you have in your brain and.

ten years
"early twentieth century" Discussed on HistoryDojo

HistoryDojo

15:41 min | 3 years ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on HistoryDojo

"Lesson of eugenics this dark lesson from history teaches us to beware racist the ideals parading as progressive institutions and sciences. The eugenics movement alone was responsible for the creation of schools for quote defective children unquote institutionalizing. Realizing hundreds of thousands of children for life this is only surpassed. It's evil by the forced sterilization of young women who became pregnant before marriage who suffered this punishment on the grounds of their moral defectiveness after all who could forget the case of buck the bell when the most famous famous jurists Oliver Wendell Holmes agreed that Carrie Buck should be sterilized against her will because as he said quote three generations of imbeciles is enough off the story of Carrie Buck is one that we need to remember because it's not only a lesson in the danger of government power over our lives but also the danger her of a racially motivated and violent movement to defend an imagined white identity Kerry buck was a young girl who became pregnant before marriage orig- this was considered immoral by the white majority running the Protestant Movement of the Early Twentieth Century there answered to any group that was unacceptable in the eyes of this white majority was either incarceration institutionalization or sterilization so they argued that this was acceptable and appropriate easy to pseudoscience claiming that it was in the public health interests to take actions to protect the people from morally defective or criminally insane minorities. Obviously none of this is scientific but the parallels to the current alt-right movement.

Carrie Buck Kerry buck Oliver Wendell Holmes Early Twentieth Century
"early twentieth century" Discussed on Don't Worry About The Government

Don't Worry About The Government

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"early twentieth century" Discussed on Don't Worry About The Government

"That's one slant. Maybe read about it somewhere else as different slant. The radio opens up these media markets, and so all the sudden all these choices this is also just coincidentally appar. Gently associated with period of time for about nineteen hundred to about nineteen seventy where we're we're thought of it as having very weak party system that the differences between the parties are actually not pronounced. There's actually some pretty key internal disputes within the parties in the early twentieth century that the divide the is completely the progressives. Are this group of people that they're Democrats and Republicans? They're basically, it's almost what you're talking about. In the previous show with age based stuff. It's almost a young Turks versus the old guard kind of politics, and it's not really Democrats and Republicans. So this emerges precisely at the moment that partisan echo base echo chamber base. News kind of goes on the decline for a while. And then now we're living in a world of polarization. Again, we see this uptick pretty steadily from nineteen eighty to two thousand eighteen in what happens during that period. CNN? You get the rise of twenty four seven cable news networks us incentive now is less. Let's pick a partisan base. And really give them what they wanna hear. Now. I'm not gonna credit CNN with them. No, no. I think in order to have that conversation. So the the nineteen hundred and nineteen seventy aero. Let's call it the Wall Street Journal era because I just. And this like really coincides nicely with the rise of the Wall Street Journal, which was made in eighteen eighty nine but really starts kind of rising to influence empower starting in eighteen ninety nine and then to get into the CNN era, and then I'll handwrite back to you. I think you can't you can't talk about it as CNN air though. I think it's important CNN shows up in the nineteen nineties and Chris the twenty four hour news network. You can't talk about it without talking about proto FOX and help proto FOX and nine eleven in particular created the real medium of twenty four hour, as we know it now, that's totally right. I think what saying ended was realized that there's enough coverage out there that filming news coverage filming more specifically, filming people talking about news coverage not actual investigative journalism, which is very expensive or on the scene journalism, which is also very expensive to get people on location. But to just film people talking about the. As events in a room. It's very cheap. And to get regular guests on they're very cheap. They figured out that there was basically a cost trip structure for putting together a news network. What they didn't do what Fox News did which was to the actual move that I think was the polarizing move at takes us from a world in which you get twenty four seven news. Just whatever the hell is happening in a bunch of people yelling at each other to you get twenty four seven reinforcement of your worldview, and everything you think I think Fox News is the first group of of news people that they looked at their audience and said, we're lean into them make that that's actually making and we need to. Yeah. And it's a strategy that had not happened before. And it was from it wasn't what early MSNBC was. I mean, if you remember early MSNBC you had this show called Scarborough country which actually back at high school. Remember, Ted, Hench me and Ted? We would y. Watch it on lazy summer afternoons are junior year and kind of laugh at a very very right wing. Joe Scarborough boo string, the Iraq war for all. He possibly could the early. The other networks were still doing this balance thing on CNN at that time you had crossfire but FOX decided no, no, we'll save fair and balanced..

CNN Fox News Wall Street Journal Ted FOX MSNBC Joe Scarborough Iraq Scarborough Chris twenty four hour