19 Episode results for "Early Nineties Late Eighties"

An ode to the cassette tape

Talking Tech

04:52 min | 4 months ago

An ode to the cassette tape

"Evola provides cloud based sales tax solutions for businesses of all sizes and with more than a thousand signed partner integrations avelar likely integrates with the er p and e commerce systems. You today learn more at attleboro dot com slash talking. Hey listeners. it's mike snyder and i'm brett. Molina and welcome back to talking tech. We don't think much about music formats anymore since so much of our music streamed online. That's right it but a titan of the consumer electronics industry past recently in the netherlands. And they think we should take time to talk about him Most of us wouldn't have known his name. But lou auden's the one time head of product development at philips electronics was an engineer. Who oversaw the creation of the compact cassette tape. Did you ever have any cassettes. Oh my gosh. Yeah i mean like high school and college. All the albums i bought. Were on cassette tape. And i also used to buy blank cassettes because if i wanted certain songs and a here on the radio i put the radio on and then i had like the boombox could record stuff so i would just record songs off the radio onto a tape and listen to it. That way exactly. I mean some of my favorite albums of all time. I actually heard played in their entirety on my college radio station late at night. Like pink floyd the wall. I recorded it onto a tape. And then eventually of course i bought it and then i bought it four or five or six more times depend on the formats over the so yeah i had hundreds of tapes and at its peak in the ninety s. Early nineties late eighties. Us consumers about more than four. Hundred million prerecorded cassettes each year. But like you said the big attraction for us and many others was the ability to make your own sets mean. I remember making mix tapes for my friends from my girlfriends and potential wife julie as a way to show someone you especially you or just a pass along some music recommendations you know. There are so many people recording tapes and trading them that some went viral. The suspect before we had the internet a tape could go viral. And this helped lead the things we see today like so-called official bootleg releases. Like those bob dylan does and pearl. Jam does in the mix tape function you get on spotify and other popular streaming services. I mean those are direct descendants of being able to make a mix tape but the good thing today you just click share instantaneously on twitter facebook text or email. However you want to share if you've made a mixon on spotify so anyway we owe a great debt to mr elton. And that's not all he did. He also helped create the compact disc. To which would go on to become an even bigger success so we pull out my dusty old tape deck this weekend and played a few tapes. I still have in honor of him. Oh well honestly. Now that i know that he also helped create the compact discs. I may have to go into my closet and pull up my big old book of cds. Ice to my old car used to have one of those Visors had cd's and just pull them from the top of the visor and pop them in and listen and yeah well we owe him in a huge debt of gratitude for all the you know just being able to create the stuff and help us joy music wherever we wanted. It's a credible exactly. I mean i even made mix cds and and until recently did make mix cds. But now i don't really have a recording. Most computers don't have a a cd deck ends them drive that you could record on anymore so unfortunately that can has gone aside. But i i have thousands of cds still so now remember. This is about my old pioneer cd car player memories listeners. Let's hear from you. Do you have any fond memories of mix tapes cassette tapes cds. Let's hear from you if you have any questions or show ideas as well. You can find me on twitter. At brett molina twenty three. And i'm mike schneider and please don't forget to subscribe and rate us or leave a review on apple podcasts. Spotify stitcher anywhere. You your podcasts. You've been listening to talking tech will be back tomorrow with another quick hid from the world of tech nobody goes into business so they can collect sales tax for the government people start businesses out of passion or pursuit of opportunity but sales tax. Not so much. That's where aval lara comes in. They've harnessed the power cloud technology to help simplify sales tax for businesses of all sizes and they affordably scale with businesses as they grow. Let's face it. Tax compliance is not a revenue generating activity so avalanche has technology is designed to help you manage tax compliance as efficiently and accurately as possible. So you can reclaim your valuable time and reduce risk in your business and with more than thousand signed partner integrations avelar likely integrates with the erp e commerce systems you use today find out more at avalon era dot com slash talking valera tax compliance done right.

Evola avelar mike snyder lou auden attleboro philips electronics Molina mr elton brett the netherlands mixon bob dylan julie brett molina twitter mike schneider facebook aval lara Us apple
11 Trivia Questions on Old School

Trivia With Budds

07:45 min | 11 months ago

11 Trivia Questions on Old School

"You're my boy blue because I got eleven questions for you on the hit comedy film Old School this is Trivia with butts. What he'd be and welcome to another episode of the Trivia with Buds podcast I'm your host Ryan Buds thanks for checking out the show and banks were watching old school i. hope you did recently because today's episode is all about that hit comedy which came out all the way in two thousand, three I wanNA say seventeen years ago if you wanna feel real old if you had a baby. When old school came out that baby can almost vote in this next election is crazy. That is nuts and I have a lot of fond memories of seeing old school back in the day. saw this at the the the what's it called value theater the bargain theater for a dollar twenty, five, dollar fifty something like that. It was called Bremen towne theatre. It's no longer. There I think it's menards now in the south suburbs of Chicago I think it's oak forest or Tinley Park it's one of those two. Used to be a mall and it used to have this old theater and we'd go there to see movies. This is probably one of the last movies. That was there I remember. I saw this there I saw super troopers. Saw this movie imposter with Gary sinise. Those were the last few from two, thousand, two, two, four probably. So old school came out and either three or four and I have fond memories of being able to drive and going to that theater and that mall that it was in which again, no longer exists used to have this little booth. You can climb into and put a quarter in and it would play a cartoon like a full length looney tunes. Mickey Mouse Cartoon, and you just watch it in the booth. Muscle. So my mom would pop me in there. I'd watch cartoon she'd go shopping, and then she'd come grabbed me when it was over or maybe she'd wait outside I guess she wouldn't leave me there although things were different back then I don't know I'm rambling but it was pretty cool. Let me know of anybody remembers these old school cartoon. Like nickelodeon almost from back in the day and this was this would have been early nineties late eighties when I was doing this so check it out. So you could find one online semi email or something if you know what I'm talking about. All right, we're GONNA jump into eleven questions on old school, the comedy film with Will Ferrell Right. Now here we go. Old. School Trivia Question Number One which character in the movie has the nickname of the godfather number one which character in old school has the nickname of the godfather number one. Question number two what is Frank? The tanks last name number two what is Frank? The tanks last name number two. Question for three, what is the name of the stores that Beanie owns? What is the franchise that Beanie owns number three? And number four finished the quote I see blue he looks blank number four I see blue he looks blank. Number five what song is the ban inserting swear words into Frank's wedding number five what song is the band inserting swear words into at Frank Wedding number five. And number six weaned sees mom told him she'd kill him if he screwed up college then she showed him a what number six sees mom told him she'd kill him if he screwed up college then she showed him a what number six. Old School Trivia number seven. What branch of the military did blue serve in in what branch of the military did blue serve number seven. Question Number Eight what Gifted Mitch Frank for his wedding that Frank then tried to give Mitch as a housewarming gift. What was that Gift Number Eight? Question Nine what store does frank say he and his wife might go to if they have time number nine, what store does frank say he and his wife might go to if they have time. Number, ten, what is the Dean doing when a car lands on top of him at the end of the film? And the bonus for two point Snoop Dogg did his cameo in the film as a favor to Todd Phillips? WHO NEXT CAST HIM IN? What film? As what character snoop dog did this cameo favor for Todd Phillips next cast him in what film is what character Those are all your questions for old school trip. We'll be right back in just a second with the old school answers. We are back with the answers to old school trivia. Let's see how you did on this comedy Quiz Number One, which character in the movie has the nickname of the Godfather that is Mitch played by Luke Wilson Number One Mitch the Godfather number two. What is Frank? The tanks last name Ricard number two, Ricard number three. What's the name of the stores owned by Beanie they are called Speaker City Stores Number Three Speaker City there used to be a speaker city in. Burbank which I'm sure that's based off of number four, finish the quote icy blue. He looks what glorious number four glorious number five what song is the band inserting swear words into it. Franks wedding is total a clips of the heart total eclipse of the heart number six weeks. He's mom told him she him if he screwed up college, then she showed him a knife showed him a knife number seven, what branch of the military to blue servant he was in the Navy. Navy number eight what gifted Mitch give. Frankfurt's wedding that Frank then tried to give Mitch is a housewarming gift. A bread maker nobody uses those number eight bread maker number nine. What store does frank he his wife might go to if they have time initially says we're GONNA go to home depot and then bed bath and beyond. But we don't know if we have enough time number nine bed bath and beyond number ten what is the Dean doing car lands on top of him at the Andes fishing fishing and the bonus for two point. Snoop Dogg that the cameo for Todd Phillips next cast him as Huggy bear in Starsky and Hutch Huggy Bear Starsky and Hutch those were your Answers for old school trivia. I had fun reliving this movie I really WanNa Watch it again and I hope you do too. We the fact of the day for you on the podcast we do that every day and today's factor. The day is Hershey's chocolate syrup, Ritz crackers, dumb dumbs, and Orioles are all Vegan. Those are all Vegan foods. So now you know if you have vegan friends, they can eat Hershey's chocolate Syrup Ritz crackers, dumb dumbs Orioles maybe all at the same time if you guys get together. All right, that is the quiz. Thank you so much for listening. Thanks for telling a friend about my podcast and we'll see you next time for more Trivia with butts cheers. Burn.

Mitch Frank Old School Todd Phillips Snoop Dogg Franks Beanie Frank Wedding Ryan Buds Bremen towne theatre menards Navy Gary sinise Tinley Park Chicago Hershey Andes Burbank Orioles Syrup Ritz
Self Compassion! Try it! It's Fun!

The Good News Podcast

10:33 min | 2 years ago

Self Compassion! Try it! It's Fun!

"I'm calling your host of the good news. podcast the other host the good news podcast is your source for good news funds stories auditory delight and Sonic Joy. We're bringing all of this goodness to you from the cards against humanity studios in Chicago. ooh. Oh Yeah so there's something we probably. I think we haven't talked about it but there's something we haven't talked about in person so I thought we would talk about it on the microphone fair so I'm on a journey right now. Sounds good yeah and it is a journey to have more self compassion. Oh my life yeah. Take care for yourself more yeah but it's so much more than that so yeah so. I'm I'm meeting with a therapist every week for whatever prisoner thought you were going to say every day. I sometimes I would like to meet with her more than once a week. I think those I find it super helpful and the whole reasoning is is because I'm really on this. I'm really dedicated to you like having more self love and more self compassion and it is a really really hard so that's what I want to talk about today. On this episode good great because there are few things I've learned through therapy and through the books that I've read that like is easy for anybody to do to help have self compassion out there in the world excellent easy right. I think that's good news. It's great news journey yeah and his tiny little things that anybody can do and some of these things has sort of like blown my mind a little bit grit okay so let me share it with you. So I'm going to start with Kristin neff. She's a psychologist and I'm reading one of her books right now and she's one of the first people to measure and define the the term self self compassion and she says self compassion is the kindness we show ourselves and by this that means being kind to ourselves in good times and bad times and even when we make mistakes so I think that's crucial all right because like we're all we all kind of mess up all the time and so it's really easy to have that dialogue in your head really stupid but that is not useful. There are some things things you can do to practice self compassion. and these are the things that I've been trying to do more of and these are what I want to share with our audience so the first pursing is treat yourself like you would treat your best friend. Nice when you with your best friend and her best friend comes to you is like I did this thing. What do you do you give them a hug ulysses? You listen yeah. You don't tell them their piece of shit. You tell them they are okay. You're good. You're good so that means. You should treat yourself that way. I totally agree right. I mean I'm not gonNA say after I say this. Everyone's going to be able to do it because it takes a lot of practice yeah well we're we. I think we are really good at being hard on herself so hard and some of that probably comes from society society and like marrying and what you see in and the media and what it means to be a like a good person big air quotes on that so I think that's interesting treat yourself like your best friend rather than sort of like berating yourself in an attempt to push yourself to be better yeah like for example if you came to me really is screwed up at work and I did this this crazy thing yeah. I wouldn't be mad. You know I would be like Oh Neil that I've done something like that to a problem solver or commiserated I think sometimes I skew a bit problem solving but I can commiserate. I'm trying really hard to be more of a composer. Yes it's I hate to generalize but it's a male thing to problem solve. I Ah Chafe. I chafe at that generalization as well that I for me personally. I'm just trying to commiserate more more. Yes for me personally. I know that I'm like Oh. You have an issue great. Let's face it. I know but sometimes you just want somebody to just want somebody to listen. I know it's hard. It's hard. It's hard okay so here's the second thing this hard especially for me. It's practicing mindfulness so when I when my therapist told me about this I was like well I'm out. I can't do that kind of a kind of a buzzword right. It is and explain it to me well well. It is mindful. I'll tell you so when you're practicing mindfulness. You're recognizing your feelings. You're you're saying like. I'm feeling this thing but you're not having judgment about those feelings. I'm feeling sad or scared. I'm just saying I feel this but I'm not going to judge that I'm going to it'd be non judgmental about it so sorry go ahead. No you got so that means. There's no self talk. There's no negative self-talk. So when you're you know if you if you're feeling like angry even anything you just say like okay. This is the thing that I'm feeling and then when we get into this next thing then it's really going to click when you're describing that I immediately think of Star Trek and I think of Vulcan's really remember like spock was half human yeah of course of course but vulcan traditionally kind of is detached from emotion even if they're feeling right so they put on this big front not feeling emotions but volkers of course they are feel love. Spock fell in love talk loved. He loved alive. He you could tell he loved that whale. Do you remember when that pool. Oh Yeah Start for the journey home yeah so that's my favorite favorite fever so like early nineties late eighties early really something it's a time capsule anyway. I feel like like that sort of detachment. I think it would be really really hard. Yeah did this to have that level of understanding and removal south it is this third stabbed to me. This is the one that I was like mind blown so this third step step is to remember that you're not alone. Being a human is super duper hard and it's important to recognize that like whatever feeling I'm feeling this is happening in the world other. There are people are feeling this exact feeling there's common humanity and I think sometimes I think for me I might be feeling anxiety or I might be feeling. Thank you know frustration or whatever and it feels so singular like I am the only one feeling this but honestly it's happening all over the world millions of times over Um and so I think then that helps to detach a bit from the feeling to then it doesn't feel so personal I think about that with the experience variance and the journey that is becoming apparent. It is the most it's the most universal experience yeah there. There are so many people throughout history we've done it ended at times. It fills visits like very strange hours. It's like you're trying to be loving and respectful of your partners. Maybe you're letting them sleep and you're like doing something completely alone at three o'clock in the morning and you're like. I'm the only person on the earth who has ever had to do this is it. I'm the only one and it it. I it can be super. Uh helpful just remember. Everyone was born yeah. Every person was born yeah yeah even if you think about like if you even make it even smaller. I think about on your street yeah. You've seen some babies out in the strollers so you up at three in the morning guarantee you. There's somebody on yeah even the same thing yeah. I mean even right next door. I know that the family right next door see it's an and the the painting things interesting you bring that up because anytime you go to a party or any social event and you meet somebody new and you both are like. Oh we're both parents like there's an instant recognition like Oh. You're going yeah. You've been through this. I've been through this like. There's an instant understanding of that's a life yeah which is good sometimes yeah absolutely well. Thank you for sharing those little tips for self compassion. Yes Sal keep you posted on my journey. Thank you please to working on it and if you bump it up to two days a week with your therapist no need to let us know but know that now so you have my support two days if you want to. That's a lot yeah yeah I mean you. What's your insurance like. I mean it's it's covering so much of it in Canada. Do you practice any self care self compassion because there's a difference I do. I think that I do things that I love. I do Improv yes and even when it's bad which it can be even when it's bad it's still like a creative release and it's like just something fun and lighthearted and the sometimes the quality of the product is less important than the experience of doing it so. I would consider that pressure valve like a pressure release. a self self care device yeah yeah I can see that Yeah Yeah Logistics Hyphen yes and if you you leave there feeling doing better than when you got there yeah so that's the whole point. I want to start playing the xylophone or the saxophone again. Oh great I would say xylophone the phone backfield's. Yeah Gosh I saw I saw a Marimba concert and it was a real game changer vibraphone vibraphone Marimba and I was like wow thanks for listening. Do you have good news incredible or maybe WANNA. Tell us a joke or idea excellent. Take us at hello at the good news podcasts dot F. M. or leave us a voicemail at seven three two one seven zero one five it can also at the Good News Pot and follow us on instagram too and if you love the good news podcast think about supporting us on our history on page must have our music is by Partington bearup.

Spock Chicago. Ah Chafe Canada instagram Kristin neff ulysses fever Partington bearup Sal two days
Perfection and YOU!

The Jamie J Podcast

08:47 min | 2 years ago

Perfection and YOU!

"Welcome back to another edition of JJ podcast. This is your host, Jamie. J and today, I wanna talk about an interesting contentious subject that subject is perfection. Do we need it do? We not need it. Let's dig in and find out. All right, up comes the topic of perfection. What's all this talk about perfection perfection perfection? Now, I work with a lot of clients, who are getting themselves up onto that social media. They're getting themselves onto that platform wanting to get recognized and the first thing they think they want to do is go ahead, put on that perfectly pressed, white lab suit, get up against that wonderful wall with all the diplomas behind them, and then go ahead and start speaking in this absolutely professional tone. You know what that doesn't work, and we don't need that. Why? Because people want to see the real world, people want to see the real you folks, if you're out there, and you're getting out there, and you're starting just starting on your journey to getting some of this information out there via video via speaking podcast, whatever it is just go for it. I'll use my own example, here starting this podcast if I was waiting for everything to be just perfect. You know that I. Went and took a whole bunch of speaking courses. And I went to Toastmasters and I did all these things if I was waiting for that, guess what? We wouldn't even be here right now. I wouldn't have yet started because I was always looking for something else outside of myself to be able to justify a hey, I'm at that level of perfection. Perfection is bullshit. What do we need? We need more reality in life. So a lot of people say, well, Jimmy, hey, professions bullshit? You're telling me I need this. I need that. So what's the standard? How do we have to hit this? How do I know when I've got something that's worthy? Well, number one, I want to suggest that anything you do, even if it's kind of silly or not, it's going to be worthy at some time as many of you knew. I follow Gary v. I follow him, a lot and recently over the last month or two. He's put out some content that was from way back in the day way back when he started and a lot of that content. Hey, it's definitely not what it is. Now he decided to go for it, though. He decided to step up and make that his standard because. He had to start from somewhere. I tell my clients. What's the standard? We're looking for. We are looking to hit eighty six percent now. What's all this talk about eighty six percent? Where'd you get the idea from this is actually a personal story? So I grew up in British Columbia, Canada. And in the school system in B C. There was marks, obviously ABCD f g hopefully not too many apps. Hopefully not too many DS or anything like that. But we had these marks and what I recognize as I was working away. I wasn't always the best in school. Hell, there was some marks rice sucked. I failed French eight. I didn't like French, French. Wasn't my thing, nothing against any francophones out there? Just French wasn't my thing. I didn't have that passion to lose that language. Yeah, that's one of those places where I got enough. I digress. Back to the story with the marks, I always strove I wanted to have some of the best marks, I could shop shop was my thing back in automotive class and all that. I loved it. I had an absolute passion. I was the dude, even though it was back in the nineties while early nineties late eighties. That, you know, here I was, I was that guy that had quintessential white t shirt on blue jeans, boots and all that. And I was the guy that was working away in the shop. Well, you know, for for those of you that know me right now and for those of you that are watching the YouTube I got the cap on. Hey, there's not too much hair under there. So I didn't have the slicked back hair or anything like that. But nonetheless, here I was I had a passion for shop. I absolutely Doug it that one came easing as were never a problem getting some of as and all that other sort of classes I had to work hard. What I recognize though is I could hit a minimum standard to get that. Hey, now here's the thing. I use the term minimum standard, but really, it's about getting the top Mark that I could as started at eighty six percent. Here's what's great. It didn't matter if I was getting eighty six eighty nine ninety two ninety eight ninety nine point nine nine nine nine nine percent. I was still getting the same Mark. I was getting the top Mark, I was getting the a. What I had to put. In was that eighty six percent. It actually freed a lot off of me. Because I'm not thinking, okay. I've got a hit this perfect Mark every single time. No, I can hit something at eighty six eighty seven whatever it is. And I can still get the absolute best, Mark. What I'm going to ask. Everyone out there listening today. Is this? What's your eighty six percent? What is it in your life? What's that minimum that you can hit to achieve the top level? Think about that. Really go deep into that. If I get out here to stumble on a few words if I make a few mistakes, don't say the right thing. It's okay. People are still listening people are still waiting for this content because what we share is valuable, that's just like that for you. I want you to be in that place where you are comfortable knowing that when you hit that eighty six percent, and you're real, people are going to be on board. People are going to want that information. Stop procrastinating. Stop setting an unreal. Listrik example. Right. If you're looking for that target of perfect, I would say, that's probably one of the lowest targets of all, because, in some people's mind perfection. It's unattainable. What I think is perfect. You might think is an absolute pilot shit. And that's okay. What I'm saying here is this is that perfection is in the eye of the beholder, and we don't have to get to perfect every time what we crank out what you put out, you might think. Oh, gosh. You know, I'm scared. I'm embarrassed to show this out someone might think that it's the most impactful most important piece of information they've ever received. Now what's better? You waiting for something that you perceive as perfect as magical as the best thing ever. Or is it more impactful more important to get your message out there even at seventy percent? So that it can go on and change someone's life. I really want you to think about that look, we all have knowledge, within us, and I have the belief that is our duty to share. Our skills to share our superpower. If you will with everyone that's out there. Take this is your opportunity. Take. This is your opportunity to step up make that first video don't worry if you stumble on words it's going to happen. Don't stress about that? We've got editing and all that sorta stuff one of the things that I'm now doing with Jamie J podcasts is actually recording it. And I'm throwing it up on YouTube on edited. You can all get to this point, you can get to this place where you're cranking this out. What does it take it takes taking the first step any of you that have looked me up that have taken the look on my profiles on YouTube. You'll see some early stuff on their here. I was I was trying to be that dude. Right. I'm in the fancied suit jacket, I got the button up shirt. I'm trying to be all fancy and all this look, we don't need to be fancy, what we need, and what people need is for us to be real and give our full truth be who we are. Because that message that. Message right, there, when we're truthful when we're honest, and we're not bullshitting someone that message is the message that's going to stick, thank you so much for your time today. This has been an absolute blast. I'm looking forward to catching up with you, real soon. On the next edition of the Jaime, J podcast. We'll catch you then.

YouTube Jamie J Canada Mark Jimmy British Columbia Gary Jaime Doug eighty six percent nine nine nine nine nine perce seventy percent
Miss Saigon! (W/ Chase and Jon)

Broadway meets Politics! (With Chase and Jon)

12:32 min | 1 year ago

Miss Saigon! (W/ Chase and Jon)

"Today's podcast is. Sponsored. By Anchor If you haven't heard about anchor. It's the easiest way to make a podcast. Let me explain it's free. There's creation tool that allows you to record and edit all your podcasts right from your phone or computer. Anchor. Will distribute your podcast for you. So it can be heard on spotify apple podcasts and many more. You can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. Everything you need to make podcast in one place. So download the anchor APP or go to Anchor Dot F. M. to get started. Now let's get into our podcast. Hello when and welcome to Broadway, in politics. Today on Broadway in politics we're going to talk about Miss Saigon. Miss. Guy. Oh My. Miss Saigon is what I call a sleeper hit. It was a show that was created by the creators of Les Mis-. and. It was actually a very successful show Um in has probably one of the best musical soundtracks of any show out there. Man. You're gonNA, challenge their chase. Probably, really you don't think it's good. It's good but I don't think it's that I didn't say it was the best I said one of the best. Still. Anyway. So Miss. Saigon. Played for many years and Broadway and had a successful revival recently. Yet. But because it was created by the creator of you know. Is. You know it's Kinda like the second child but I think it's successful in its own right and deserves to be remembered for a fantastic show. Anything Chase. Yes even though I didn't see it saw the movie a bunch of times, but the movie is staged version of the show. So you kind of saw the show. Yeah. Did you like the movie? Was Fine. I, gotTa tell you. I mean, this is a little off topic but as far as movie versions of shows go to me Miss Saigon the gold standard is by far the best staged movie version of a show that I have ever seen hands down and the second place runner up is like light years behind it. What do you think? Yeah. I have to agree with you on that one. was really good. And the guy who played the engineer John John or Bonmann got what his name is King John John. Anyway he was amazing. Honestly I mean I have seen Massana seen it many times. In the original cast no, he wasn't the original engineer actually this no I think he was in original. Sample Oh, he might have been could have been some other all I know that he was in the show Miss Saigon for many years, and then he finally got the opportunity to play the lead role, the engineer. And I mean I have seen the show I've seen Sargon many times and he is. The Best Engineer Out there, he's just amazing. So hands off to. John. John. very, very proud. The original engineer actually. Share. This is a very good story for the PODCAST. Was Jonathan Pryce. Those of you who don't know John Price. He is a very famous British actor he has been around for. Probably. Sixty years the industry's he's pretty old now he's. Probably in his eighties there was controversies on him, right? Yeah. So what happened was he was white. and. The engineer surprise surprise they wanted to be. Asian Asian. And they're Kinda right there. Right for show about Asians it takes place in Vietnam you know engineer is definitely not an American because she's screaming about how he wants to go to America to fulfill his American dream. But. You know the producer. Wanted Jonathan Pryce probably to sell tickets. They weren't really sure how successful the show is going to be Jonathan Pryce back then was equivalent of. Who you know like Evan, Platt Platt, my black Ben Platt like. I don't know who's WHO's The star of the star. On Broadway, these days. All right while the star of the store on Broadway that was kind of Jonathan Pryce back in the day in the early nineties late eighties. So, they wanted him to make sure that they were spending a lot of money on the shell. When they wanted to make sure they were gonNA make their money. So long story short the back in the British version, the show. Jonathan Pryce put on a ton of makeup to make him look Asian. How's that on? I I don't know how it was done, but it was done. And and It looked weird I'm not GONNA lie did look weird. But when they came back to America to do the American version of the show. Just. Let them like a white guy. A white guy and then they hired a whole bunch of Asians and of course, because they take place in Vietnam and make they did the role. John. Who? Played the role I think it was hinton battle played it in the original cast. Again, in England, it was some white dude so. He does not look I need. That's how they did it who Dobbin price that's probably the American version. Anyway. I said he did not they didn't put him and make up in the American version they only put them in makeup in the British version. He started the rolling the He created the role originally in England and then they moved the show. New. American. Going, back memory lane on the original cast of Saigon. They casted a beautiful young woman named Leeann Salonga. WHO Is Fairly. Famous. Now she's she's gone on to play a lot of roles on Broadway. She's been a famous actress she was from the Philippines. And she Had A spectacular voice. And she did a fabulous job playing the role. And you know? Quite said, hidden battle play the role John and that kind of solidified the original cast of Miss. Saigon. Was a quite ahead. It went on for like five six, seven years to show played. Chase maybe you can do a search and see how many. Shows play, but it went on for a long time and it was played in the Broadway theatre, which is a really, really hard fear to continue to sell out. It's one of the biggest ones. On Broadway. They King Kong show is there. Did you see it? Did you. Saw You saw King Kong. Where did you see King Kong Chase? Hot, I sort to. I mean aside from the puppet which was amazing. Yeah, the show and the music. Was Pretty bad pretty bad idea. Anyway, let's talk about missing i. what's your favorite song and Missing Chase If he's Why not? Why God Song by? John. Right. Kevin. I forgot. What is the leads name? John's John's the other Could Be Kevin is Dr King Kevin. Severly, Chris, Chris. Oh. My it's Chris Anyway the lead song by Chris. Basically, after he meets Kim laid. You know all of a sudden. You know he's legally marry. He's like an eighteen year. Old Guy you know I. had my laid. I'm fall in love with the girl. From one night of sex, she must have been really good. I'll tell you that. I agree why God Amazing Song. Song I like in Miss Saigon is an American dream. That's the engineer is big song where he dressed right before the end of the show and he's dreaming about coming to America. Hey. By the way that he ever make it. Now. I don't think he did they kind of dropped that story line you notice that Ending, sucked they didn't really say whether or not the engineer made it or not I. Mean Chris Kinda Kim Kinda killed herself at the end. And we have no clue what happened to the engineer or not or little chances are probably didn't make it to America. But now they got the kid at the end and the Christian his new wife. Allan Allan. Probably. took him to America right. The. Kid Kim, Kim sacrificed herself and killed herself. So Chris had to take the kids to America. You're kind of Miss, that Portuguese. Yeah The endings boring however she killed herself. Thinks. She killed herself and nothing else happened if. She killed herself and Ellen took the kid and they went back to America. Missed by chase I guess you're gonNA. have to watch it again. No. After the first. Half. Hour kind of guess. Show. Really. Good. Acting Watson. Beautiful. Women. Running around with no clothes on. A good show. What's not to like? Great Music Great Acting Great Story. Unfortunately it will be always be the number to show of Claude Michelle Miko bail because they are, of course, the creators of Les Mis- Lemus which and then in in the new contract. Which? We just saw the new concert. We'll talk about that. That was a little weird. You know I mean that was like a hybrid. They didn't really figure out what they wanted to do. But. Anyway. You know it's kind of interesting because for a lot of playwrights that would have been in fact, the best show they ever wrote I mean again, really was a good show. I think is a better. We many is in a different league. I, agree with that. It's much better but. You now that's because it's lame is. And we'll talk about Lee is another time you know when we talk about epic shows. Lay Mrs certainly up there as an epic. What else do you WanNa talk about four Miss Saigon before week tune off for the day. Watch Miss Saigon not sponsored by Miss Saigon Watch Miss Saigon, and again the. You know in these covert times ongoing you the the movie version, which is really just the show. Miss Saigon is. The gold standard. It is a classic is a phenomenal performance. Am I not be like how it is on Broadway Martine stuff but Anyway This is John Chase and this was Broadway in politics. By.

Miss Saigon King John John Miss Saigon engineer Jonathan Pryce Miss Saigon America Kim Kinda Chris John Price Vietnam Broadway spotify John Chase Broadway Martine Les Mis-. Dot F. M. Dr King Kevin Massana
11 Trivia Questions on Spongebob Squarepants

Trivia With Budds

09:23 min | 2 years ago

11 Trivia Questions on Spongebob Squarepants

"It's eleven trivia questions on spongebob squarepants. Yes that's right. I finally recorded a spongebob episode. This is trivial with buds <music> and welcome to another episode of the trivia with buds podcast. I'm your host ryan buds. Thanks for checking out my show. If you like trivia via you're in the right place and you can find out all about me my live trivia nights and everything i do at trivia with buds dot com. Here's a quick review for my friend. Amanda who i just hosted a engagement party for in glendora california she gave me a five star review on yelp. She said we've been coming to trivia for years and we really appreciate eight ryan energy and enthusiasm so we decided to have an engagement party. We knew we wanted to have him host trivia and bingo. He made the day very memorable and many of our guests wanted to hire him for their own events. Ryan was very accommodating and allowed us to come up with their own. Trivia rounds about us as a couple which got everyone very excited about our upcoming nuptials. We'll definitely be hiring him to host our cocktail hour or at our wedding. Thank you ryan. Thank you amanda and kyle such a fun party last weekend and very customized very easy to do. You can find out more on how oh i can do that for you at trivia with buds dot com today. We have an episode about spongebob squarepants everybody. This is one of my most requested topics for. I'm going to use use the word millennials people born and <hes> you know like early nineties late eighties early nineties. I'd say like eighty nine to ninety nine. People always always like when you do in spongebob and i finally did at alive week all my life events last week and i recorded those episodes. Actually it's two weeks ago and i recorded accorded those episodes at r._t. Rogers brewing and sierra madre california and <hes> took the audio and that's what you're gonna listen to today so with eleven questions on spongebob ten regular questions and one bonus question epi n if you live near sierra madre california and you love the office we're going to be doing an office themed trivia night at r._t. Rogers this saturday saturday from five to seven p._m. A little bit of a matinee show and there's a banner at the top of my website trivia with buds dot com. If you want to get tickets to get ten bucks you could have up to eight people on your team and the place this is pretty small seating wise. It only holds maybe forty or fifty people so it should be a really interesting and fun and tight knit group of office loving trivia players. I would love to see you. Are there okay. We're going to jump into today's episode on spongebob so get that notepad out right down the answer. See how many you can get out of eleven here. We go all right here. We go. This is gonna be spongebob squarepants number four lansbury ask you have not used your spongebob trivia question number one typically. What color are the flowers on patrick's shorts number one spongebob dirty out typically. What color are the flowers patrick sure. It's a good luck number. One question to and five meets the wrangler. What does spongebob have the man arrested for at the start of the episode is shoplifting littering loitering or dining and dashing ashley number. Two in spongebob meets this wrangler. What does spongebob half arrested worth. It started the episode shoplifting littering loitering or dining and dashing zoo do number two number three. What was the similar name of the crusty crab before mr cramps bought it number the three what was the similar name of the crusty grab before mr crabs bought it question over three hundred spongebob around three number four four which character lives at four five seven life drive is into surfing weightlifting and girls' number four which lives at four or five extended the drive ins into surfing weightlifting girls number four number five besides the word spot animal is the first stanza of the theme song number five is is the work sponge animal is named and the first stanza of the things on your list number five halfway through this rough question number six in the snail race episode who buys a snail smelly number six in the snail racing by the snake names nellie number six number seven the first episode of the series is call unhealth blank fill in the blank number seven. The first episode of the series is called help blank number seven help blank number number eight. What is sandy last name on the show number eight wanted sandy's last name on spongebob squarepants eight sandy's last name. What is your into sweet word typically way number nine. What instrument does we'd word typically number nine number ten and what sound is gary. The snail mail is the meow chirp of wolf world ooh and pretend to snail me how scherf move move number ten one question after this spongebob round rounding number eleven for two points the last question of the spongebob round for two points who is bir made man's side kid who is as mermaid man's side if you know it you'll know like all the other questions surround. They've got mercy on yourself. That's aranibar's force but von trivia tournament don. Thanks trivia with buds here. We go with the spongebob. Answers spongebob squarepants one of my most requested topics from youngins over the years so we finally did it for two thousand trivia number one simply. What color are the flowers patrick. Shorts purple needs to strangler with the spongebob. Episode is littering little does murderer number three. What was the similar name before. The raw seagrams muscle in four years lives at five seven light drive is into surfing weightlifting girls larry. The lobster provide is the words bugged by animal is named. The first of the fish lap like a fish is rhyme ever since emigrates now ray supervises is neil nellie wade word number seven series called help wanted why rate what he's saying is is leaving the show sandy cheats woodward typically play the clarinet adds that the sound is gary the snail a meow display all man sidekick barnacle bill barnacle michael dunn around there. It was spongebob trivia that one especially goes out to my friend ashley hagans who has been asked me to do that for a long long time actually if you listen to the podcast asked <hes> that one was for you <hes> today we have a fun team name which is bikini bottomless mimosas bikini bottom bottomless mimosas put them together for bikini bottomless mimosas. If you need a spongebob inspired team name next time you play there you go and the question of the day brought to you by funky monkey designs of sandy miss california. Go there for all your printing and check them out f._m. Designs inc dot com tell him buds sense yet. What nickelodeon show featured a family with the last name of pickles. That's your question of the day. Tweet me. Your answer at ryan buds are e mail ryan buds gmail.com to be eligible for a prize and <hes> yesterday's winner was melissa sir chester and her late husband david who was a huge superman fan. She got the <hes> the question right about superman a couple of days ago so thank you melissa sir and thanks for sharing how much of superman fan david was. We have a bunch of fun episodes coming up over the next few weeks guys lots of stuff recorded and ready to go and i'm excited to deliver some more trivia t at each and every day hit subscribe on your device. Make sure you never miss an episode and thank you so much for rating reviewing and subscribing over on. I tunes thanks for listening. Thanks for telling a friend who will see you tomorrow for more trivia with me cheers <music> <music>.

ryan buds spongebob shoplifting california Amanda sierra madre california Rogers nickelodeon sandy sierra madre california david glendora patrick melissa sir chester ashley hagans yelp kyle michael dunn
Kathryn Wylde - Finally, some good news. New York City is bouncing back after the pandemic.

CATS Roundtable

10:03 min | 2 months ago

Kathryn Wylde - Finally, some good news. New York City is bouncing back after the pandemic.

"Jay farner here. Ceo of rocket mortgage and rocket companies. Last year we saw historically low mortgage interest rates. What you may not know is that interest rates are already starting to increase and it's likely that trend is only going to continue our team of experts standing by to help you save before rates go up. Don't look back and wish you were taken action. Call eight three three eight rocket or visit rocket mortgage dot com call for cost information and conditions equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states and mls consumer access dot org number thirty thirty. Good morning new york. This is the catch roundtable. It looks like new york. Maybe making a comeback and with this off about it is kathy. While she's president and ceo of the new york city partnership representing many businesses. The morning kathy wild. How are you good morning john. Well i'm feeling much better about the city. I share your enthusiasm. well i'll tell you something Some of the buildings we own in brooklyn we have a a few thousand parts and maybe we were down. Twenty percent last emitted coverage crisis. We are now one hundred percent full but says you bet that. I'm hearing the same thing from residential owners that Said that sales are up that Rent is a rent rates asking. Rents are still down a bit. The new yorkers love a bargain so that's not a bad thing But in general they're seeing people coming back. People making signing leases people making commitments on the residential side which is terrific and I tell you. I i did something really fun this week and to knock which was to visit little island. Which is the island. That very diller and diane von furstenberg built on the hudson river. It's the aeko buying kind of looks like a spaceship but it's those are. Tulips are are supposed to look like tulips. And it's a wonderful new park about twentieth street on the hudson river on the far west side as part of hudson river park everybody visit. It's as exciting behind ellison where it is. of course i haven't seen it. It's on the. It's in the hudson river on a it was built on the pier pilings on the hudson river as an island at about twentieth street on west street. And so it's right. It's right in the hudson river park but it's an island that they built there and it's just wonderful. Sounds wonderful but let's move on with the new york. I mean The traffic reich came back. Lester on the long island. Expressway was with traffic as usual from the old days. The traffic tunnels was back into the traffic. But i i went out to dinner in williamsburg brooklyn Wednesday night at lilia which was terrific and it was packed in the streets of Around it In brooklyn were full of people. Many of whom on wednesday you know we took our masks outside those of us who were vaccinated which hopefully will be everybody soon so it was That was another indication to me and it impossible to get restaurant reservations after wednesday and they have fifty percent occupancy plus very good news the city is going to allow them to keep open their tables outside and that they've that they've set up during the pandemic and that's going to be a real boost for restaurants to expand their capacity and be able to earn some extra revenues and hire some more people so that industry has been among the hardest hit of any sector. And i think that there are a number of efforts to make sure they can come back. Strong restaurants are very very strong. I go out to restaurants every night. Kathy why i missed it. And i guess when we miss it we tend to overdo it a little bit. I understand that. Jp morgan is wanted people back to work. And i stand brank. America's followed but it won't be till july or or september a. What are you in the rest of the office workers. I'm hearing that there is Big into ti some about coming back to the office. That probably most of the offices are gonna start bringing people back during the summer but they won't be a requirement to come back until september and then it's probably going to be come back for a couple of days not necessarily the whole week. It all depends on how people react. Employers are concerned that the stress of the pandemic has been tough on their people. They wanna make sure that they don't put more pressure on them in terms of coming back and they're worried about this safety insecurity in the city and And so we gotta make sure that midtown is safe since we last spoke john The mayor has Take has put a former chief of patrol in the nypd terrence monaghan. He's made him in charge of making sure. The business district's the office district in manhattan are safe and have enough of security so that people will be comfortable going back there and also to focus on the transit system. The subways and make sure they're safe and so i. I was up by the new york times building yesterday. And i saw a team of Very heavily armed police showing that they were present and it made me feel better in times square. So it's unfortunately we have that we have to do this. But i think it's gonna take that kind of Firm stance about public safety for people feel comfortable coming back. I have made public statements saying that We have licked covert and its independence. Day right now that we licked it and the next conquest has to be Licking crime in our cities and on subways. Because a lot of people won't ride the subways if they don't feel safe. Let's say you're exactly the truth. Is that compared to where we were in the teen nineties early nineties late eighties that we are still the safest big city in america and we don't have crime rates anything like what we had then but we still see a change from you know and we're very sensitive to it because we got used to. Every year crime went down in the last year. Crime has gone up and and not only crime but the perception of harassment intimidation fear. And i think that's been partly because of the covert and partly because manhattan's been emptied. There's no nobody here and the subways have been empty so as people come back. It's gonna get safer. But i at least them am very confident that there's a commitment to public safety. It's just gonna take a few months for that to S people come back and as they see that there is going to be enforcement of public safety. I think we're gonna be okay. The that's been on people's radar screen is the lowest unemployment rates. People get to stay home and sit on the couch and watch television well. They unemployment in In new york is now down to about eleven point. Four percent unemployment. Almost half a million people are officially on unemployment in the five boroughs. This is down from the high of twenty percent unemployment last last june so We are certainly headed in the right direction. But the fact that the federal government is sending big check certainly has allowed people on a positive side to pay their rent on the negative side. They don't feel compelled to take a new job yet I don't think that that will change. Because as of september most of those federal Unemployment checks are going to stop so people will be back to work. Everybody's gonna just have fun summer We got a minute left. What else would you like to fill office. Well i just think that to feel confident. I i heard Great news that broadway tickets which started selling again on may six broadway won't open until september and some of the show's not until december but tickets are selling like mad. So people wanna come back. They wanna go to the theater They want to enjoy the city. It's restaurants and Museums and cultural events. So hopefully this is going to be a summer of celebrating. That new york city is back after a while. Thank you so much. And we both pray that the new york city does come back. We love this city and god bless new york. Always thank you so much john. I agree with you. This is the cats roundtable. Be right back.

hudson river Jay farner hudson river park kathy wild brooklyn new york brank diane von furstenberg diller little island terrence monaghan lilia kathy ellison john new york city Lester
GT MINI FAILS: Cop Rock

Ghost Town

13:07 min | 1 year ago

GT MINI FAILS: Cop Rock

"Hey everyone Jimmy and Josh here from the Command Zone podcast. I'm sure the show you're listening to right now is awesome. Don't worry we're GONNA get you right back to it but now that we have your ear ear you might be wondering what our show is all about your fan of magic the gathering the command zone. PODCAST is your weekly source for all things. Commander Superfund multi-player format where four players take legendary creatures into battle. Until only one victor remains we focus on all aspects of Gameplay from deck building strategies to set reviews to table politics so even if here at total beginner or a veteran of the game are show has something to teach you all right. That's enough from us. If you're a magic fan you won't want to miss out. Go subscribe to the Command Zone podcast and we'll see you on the battlefield breath. If you like weird and strange history as much as I do I have the podcast for you. I'm Jason Horton host of strange range year each episode. I break down the street history and cultural happenings during that year. Like nine hundred seventy seven the wow signal. Nine hundred sixty three three tramps theory eighteen forty four Miller lite right movement. One thousand nine hundred seven. The Phoenix Lights 1896 the shortest war two thousand four Benjamin Kyle fifteen eighteen. The dancing plague one thousand nine hundred five the move bombing in Nineteen seventy-two remote viewing should get your weekly weird history. Fix Pause the podcast. You're listening to right now and subscribe to strange year wherever you listen to podcasts. And fighting crime one song at a time. I'm Rebecca Lieb. I'm Jason Horton and this is ghost town. I'm you're talking to you like that would consider new a quiet because you son. He's not yet daddy. You made him mad with the bads called up a man eight and nine the real wit with a gun. It's an take it away he's shop. That's right top. Better do what they say nine but to get stuff through they you had to go all you were winning. Put you in a guy in ten certain cops me. Yeah Me Yeah I am. I am not the biggest fan of cops. Do you like to rock. I do well one to aim bed because we are talking about the famously ill-fated cop rock. TV show home. My God you know it I know it I would watch it on my AAC childhood kitchen there was a little tiny. TV In our kitchen. We'd Watch Cop Rock and even then you've mcdonagh was such a joke. It was like insane. How how how does this like? What part of the process? It's everyone greenland this. It's jarring yeah. I just went back and I've watched it before I actually did about ten years ago. Did a musical about cop rock the musical at the House. Shut Okay Yeah. It's a show that I created with somebody else but they ended up taking over a lot of the writing because I got very lazy and artists. Yeah she was an oh Oh yes she is yes she's in it's always signing Philadelphia. So she she played the mayor so we you know we were pretty the high on cop rock. Sure it's infamous. You probably know it if not there's plenty online. Oh yeah so I just figured we kind of were in the a new year this is the Internet is fully embraced cop rock it lives. They're ready for you to pluck it from the proverbial line tree. And if you if you didn't know anything about it start off two thousand twenty with it's the time is now take talk. Everybody lightening the load a little bit with content ten. Just take take a little break. Yeah take a mini Vaca- but cop rock was a police drama slash musical. Yeah Oh yeah it was on. ABC Nine Hundred Ninety. It was a network for two months. September twenty sixth to December Twenty six eleven eleven episodes. That's a lot of episodes There's a lot of episodes and you know it was kind of like hide is get made. I think was a couple of reasons as in Steven. BOCHCO is the biggest reason absolutely. He could have done literally any wanted to fritos bag burn and do a series on it but the the Frito bag is like an ex cop on the edge. They'd be like we're listening. We're we are all on cocaine and we're listening. Oh yeah it was a good time to be on cocaine early nineties but at the time video games very popular Arcade Games and home entertainment renting movies. VCR definitely you food. Huge at the video store and MTV was hot now playing video so the competition to for people people who watch regular television got pretty competitive. So they're like Oh boy let's I don't know if that makes it a better a better time to try something new but I think that's what it was. Let's try also think we I mean that at that point I could just talking to my ass right now as usual but like the different. The pushable between counterculture ultra culture. Like the idea of like indie video games or like different like you know these these different forms or like taking a preconceived achieved idea and like creating new forms with them again. I keep thinking about videogames but like cops you know. We had this very interesting relationship with police in the early nineties late. Eighties this establishment right very threatening kind of scary but like you know taking that apart and making it into a musical. Hey maybe okay maybe the not so. According to the AV club and this is from Stephen Bochco e kind of explains what happened. Venice's in the early one thousand nine hundred eighty s a woman who was a Broadway producer or associated with broad way. She was like. Hey we like to talk about bringing hillstreet blues which he was creator of uh-huh to Broadway musical and a pretty gritty show from the early early eighties. Pretty like dot like always remember it being a a bit of a dark show and we talked they love. The idea just wasn't practical so we know we can't do it but he's he's like I of the idea stuck in my head I thought it was really audacious and the cocaine said yes. Yeah everyone else said no now cameras like big yes and then when everyone was ok cocaine everyone. Yes yeah that's how it works. And that's how cop rock means like well if I can't take cops to Broadway maybe I can bring Broadway to a cop show. Oh that's not how you they let me do the inverse. That's exactly this is a horrible idea. What if we just did the same idea? So so he's a when I was given this remarkable opportunity from ABC and nineteen eighty-seven so this has been brewing. Yeah this is premeditated This is not. This isn't just showed showed up in your doorstep to get to get ten series on the air in nineteen seventy. We want ten series from you Because he had you know Elliott Law. NYPD blue similar is crime. Crime based things like a little bit on the loose on the gritty side dramatic side. He's like well. What am I going to do the right time? Cop shows or ten law shows. I mean if you have the guarantee of getting that many shows on the air and you know do something bold and adventurous and experimental than shame on you Rebecca. I mean he's kind of right right. Yes you're just because you can doesn't me new shoes. Yes but I like the spirit of that even if the idea. India was horribly I love people that are ready. You need to be a person with the the means and the EGO to listen everything I've touches pretty much turn to gold. Why not this? Yeah why not this turn to go. Yeah you wonder if everyone around him was like yeah or someone like this is a bad I even baby it will be a little fun fact. Randy Newman won an emmy for the theme song I mean how did he cut you to swoops in. And he's like you know Beautiful Rock Kerm Rock and you got a cop in me probably want to discuss some of the song titles no I do this is a classic. I'm not racist. But that's a lifestyle a cop is there. And he's at the bar and he's talking to a bar and you typically like it really tackling some heavy issues and then he's like hey so questions and he says somebody's like so what can you know. What color was their skin bartender? For whatever reason because it just gets into the song he's like why does that matter is Oh i. It doesn't matter. I'm not racist but also concern so you're trying to identify this criminal lyric. I think it was it was it was not I guess not. I guess. Whatever reason wasn't necessarily relevant as as the Song Longos at the bar and he's just lag indictment another another hit hit Song mm-hmm we got the power? That's true all every one of these early nineties about power the power. Yeah This one I don't know what it's about it's called he's guilty. You made this show had like eight seasons though we're writing he's guilty fourteen. Why are Calypso style? It's like I'm not racist but he's guilty. That's like a fun mash up now. This one is a deep. This is a classic baby merchant. When I think about cop rock I think there are just so much content on there and you know I looked at it like how the actors and then you know there was no like huge names one Barbara Bosson. She was on Hillstreet Blues. This is a total coincidence. She was married to even Baccio. So this is like what a crazy world and like totally random. But I didn't really recognize a lot of them. But it was not good a good actors Broadway Broadway so it would go from like this kind of typical greatest. You're watching it and then it just very jarring song and dance. Yeah yeah it gets baby merchant. They're like racquet caller baby. Sell real class it up a little bit baby merchant. The merchant of baby. If if there was is a show that you can be like it could be blanked musical. What would it be if there was a show? I mean we can take it and be like this the musical like you just make a musical. Oh my God I mean my having my first thought was like cheers golding designing women. That'd be amazing. I mean I would just be Dolly Parton Dolly Parton Review. I think would be making a murderer. Serious question you're like. Deep in MANITOWOC Wisconsin in fourteen abandoned cars while all imitate where. There's there's no musicals to be found Patriot dot com slash. Goes Town pod eighth place to go for mad free early access episodes bonus episodes soon. Yeah we're GONNA chase you. No one's going to sell you a baby. Yeah no cop unless you are shut in. Yeah it's chill if you are a company of money honey you're welcome also so it helps us you know submit to festivals and Barlow more quick. -ment things like a pop up shield and a shock thing. We don't know shocks blocks so you may lash blast. Help us with that. uh-huh begging you about have we finish things off with a little baby merchant. No I want it eight and Noel Baby Oh

cocaine Jason Horton Rebecca Lieb Hillstreet Blues Dolly Parton Rock Kerm Rock Broadway Benjamin Kyle Noel Baby Commander Stephen Bochco Miller Philadelphia Jimmy ABC Nine Hundred Ninety MANITOWOC ABC NYPD Wisconsin
10 Trivia Questions on MLB, Mexico, 21 Jump Street and More

Trivia With Budds

14:01 min | 2 years ago

10 Trivia Questions on MLB, Mexico, 21 Jump Street and More

"It's confidence round week. That's right. Every episode this week. We'll be ten question confidence round that. I usually close my trivia nights. Outwith? Let's see how many of these ten questions you can get right today. This is trivia with butts. Being and welcome to another episode of the trivia with buds podcast. I'm your host. Ryan buds in I am post wrestlemainia thirty five. That's right. It happened. We made history last night with if you were wrestling fan. I don't know if we made history, but I guess the wrestlers made history by having the first ever women's main event in thirty five years at wrestlemainia. That's pretty sweet is cool to be a part of it. Just watching it from home head six friends over my friends. Manny, Abe, Jeff, Kurt an Alex so five friends in me, but I can't myself as my own friend. So that's how that goes. But we had a good time. We grilled we chilled. We had beers. We did some wrestling entrance music. Bingo that I set up. So I made some wrestler. Bingo cards with their names on them. And then I played their entrance music in random order had the dabs and everything that I use it. My life bingo nights, and I gave away some cool prizes, including a Shinsegei nakimora poster and. Hey, Siham punk loose figure from about ten years ago and a movie called robo wrestlemainia. It's like WWE meets the Jetsons. It was an animated movie, and that was the top prize. So pretty good time over at my house for some wrestling nerds. And we had a great time watching the show. It was a really fun show. There were some really great highlights. I would give it a nice salad eight out of ten in terms of wrestlemanias as far as they go. And definitely better than some of the last few years, if he asked me, so that's how it went today is my brother Scott buds is birthday down in the Clermont, Florida area. Happy birthday Scott buds. If you happen to be listening, and thanks so much for being my brother and get me into wrestling at a young age if you are ever like why does this guy love wrestling so much? It's got buds his fault for whooping my ass on a Saturday morning. When my mom would go grocery shopping, and we would take over her room and turn it into like the Rosemont horizon. If you remember that it's now called the. Allstate arena in Chicago, and we'd just tear it up and all of the bloody noses of forgotten. My life are at the hands of my brother, Scott, the scorpion buds as he likes me to call him every so often and every so often I do for a joke now for any sort of dominant reason he's not better than me is stronger than me and the older we get the more. I can kind of catch him in the chin with a nice sweet chin music when he's not paying attention. So happy birthday old, man. Scott buds this week's going to be kind of fun. I thought it would be interesting to do five confidence rounds in a row, sometimes people write me, and they go, hey, like, the episodes that are just totally random questions. So I thought I'd give you nice little dose of that in the second week of April here. So we're gonna do a different confidence around from the last couple of months of my life trivia nights, or so I'll probably dive in a little bit deeper to into like two thousand eighteen in seventeen to make sure I haven't done those questions on the podcast recently. So we'll be doing ten random questions if you're playing along at home you can. Right down your answers. And then rank them ten to one ten being the most confident one being the least confident you have to use each number one time. So these these rounds, and I met my life nights. I end the night with them. And they prove which team is the smartest if it's a close game and they're out of fifty five points. So you can kind of score yourself. See how many out of fifty five you would get if you were playing live with me if you wanna play live with me, go to my website, trivial buds dot com. There's tons of great links and sections to click on that take you to our live events. And last week was my most live events ever. I had nineteen events with private parties and the the live events there were seventeen public events in to private events. So that was pretty cool. And that's the most of anything I've ever done in a week. So pretty neat stuff there. And in this week, I think we're at eighteen so it's another really busy week. And that's all thanks to listeners. Like you telling a friend going. Hey, this podcast is great. Hey, this trivia host is great. Hey, this is different than other trivia nights that I've been to it's actually fun. And thank you. So much for doing that. If you want to support this show in a review type way, you can leave I tunes review, we're up to one hundred nine of those and you can also leave a yelp review. If he play live trivia with me yelp trivia with buds just Google that and leave me a nice yelp review. That'd be very cool them. Also, if you are a patriotic of this show patriotic subscriber over I'm patriot dot com slash trivia with buds. I just mailed all the rewards today. So you should definitely have them this week stuff like shirts books are answer pads, magnets, postcards, stickers, all kinds of cool stuff. Coming your way, including people like Simon time Los trivia down in Florida. My friend Earl Clark in Arizona. My friend Alexis in Oklahoma. You guys be on the lookout for those packages. They should become very soon. And if you wanna get on get in all the cool rewards that I send all the supporters of this show every single month again, go to patriot dot com slash trivia with buds. We're going to be doing. A raffle once a week. So last week we raffled off a pair of shoes Zam tickets and Mona Bray one those and she's at the lower end of the donation spectrum. So anybody can win these things you don't have to donate a huge amount of money per month or anything anybody who is a patriot of mine is kind of equal when it comes to these raffles that were start doing every single week. So Mona thank you so much for your support and everybody else who's on patriot. Thank you for your support and be on the lookout for what this week's item is. I will probably announce it on tomorrow's episode. So again, we'll just do like a spin of the wheel certain amount of times, whoever it ends on on the time that we're looking for is going to win something very cool, something collectible, and I think I have something in mind that you will dig. Alright all the announcements are out of the way, and we're going to jump into this episode right now eight is all about totally random stuff. Let's see how many of these questions you can get out of ten here. We go. All right here, we go guys confidence round the first one of this week. And this episode question number one what MLB team that means? Major league baseball for all you non sports fans out there. What MLB team plays their games at SunTrust park. Number one. What MLB team plays their games at SunTrust park. Question. Number two winning an Oscar for the miracle worker. Patty, Duke offered what quick to words speech number two winning an Oscar for the miracle worker. Patty, Duke offered what quick to word speech. Question. Number three Dyonissis was known as the party God. And the God of what beverage number three Dyonissis DIO N Y S U S was known as the party God. And the God of what beverage number three. Number four, Tom Stemberg founded what office supplies store number four. Tom Stemberg founded what office supplies store number four. Question. Number five in two thousand eighteen you and McGregor played what grownup a Milne character? Number five in two thousand eighteen you and McGregor played what grownup AA Milne character number five. Question. Number six what country is the furthest southeastern border to Mexico number six. What country is the furthest south eastern border to Mexico number six. Question number seven Jewish character named Jessica says love is blind in what Shakespearean play number seven Jewish character named. Jessica says love is blind. What Shakespeare play number seven. Question. Number eight what four letter word means the process of flowing in or flowing out. Number eight what four letter word means the process of flowing in or flowing out. Question. Number nine. What network aired twenty one jump street from nineteen eighty seven to nineteen Ninety-one number nine. What network was twenty one jump street on number nine? And your last question of today's quiz. What state known as the equality state was the first to give women the right to vote and hold office number ten. What state? The equality state was the first to give women the right to vote and to hold office. All right. Those are the questions for today's confidence round episode. Let's see how you did with the answers in just one sound effect. Second. We are back with the answers to today's confidence round quiz again. We'll be doing these all week long. So if you had a good time with these totally random questions be on the lookout for forty more questions over the next four days question number one what MLB team plays their games at SunTrust park. That was the Atlanta Braves number one the Atlanta Braves. I'm not a baseball fan, but I might have been able to guess that one based on, you know, we're wrestling events take place near and things like that number two winning an Oscar for the miracle worker petty Duke offered what quick to word speech. She said. Thank you. They should all say that. Right. Wouldn't that just make things a lot quicker? They go up get the award you go. Thank you. And then you leave number three Dyonissis was known as the party God. And the God of what beverage wine? That's what I was looking for the God of wine. I feel like that would be like a rom com with Julia Roberts like the God of wine. I'd watch it number four times. Stemberg founded what office supplies store, he founded Staples. And he used to sell sell. Well, Staples out of the trunk of his car in the forties. That's not true. I couldn't even try and improvise something funny for that. But you get what I'm talking about. Number four, Tom Stemberg, Staples number five in two thousand eighteen you and McGregor played what grownup AA mill the character. That was Christopher Robin. Christopher Robin in the world of Winnie the Pooh that moves on net. If you want to stream it I heard it's kind of depressing, and I don't think it was a big fan favourite at the box office. But I'd still watch it who doesn't love PU number six what country is the furthest south southeastern border to Mexico that is the country of Belise number six Belise. Can you believe it number seven a Jewish character named Jessica says love is blind and what Shakespeare play that is the merchant of Venice pound of flesh is from that. Right. Pound of flesh for your face or some number seven merchant of Venice number eight. What four letter word means the process of flowing in or flowing out? People were mad about this one at the live nights. I remember I think I took this question from jeopardy and. The answer was flux FLU X, so like influx and people put tied. They put flow and the answer. I was looking for was flux, according to Alex, Rebecca the gang number nine. What network aired twenty one jump street from one thousand nine hundred seven to nine hundred ninety one the answer was facts. I had no idea about that one. I would have definitely guest like NBC or ABC or something. But it was FOX which is kind of interesting because when I think of FOX in those early nineties late eighties shows, I always think of like Simpson's married with children. And that's it like nine hundred and stuff like that. But it's interesting that twenty one jump street was on for those four years, and it's such a revered show, and they made those movies a couple years back that we're pretty good with Channing Tatum in Joan hill. Number ten what state known as the equality state was the first to give women the right to vote and hold office. This was a shocking one to Wyoming is the state in question, Wyoming is known as the equality state. And a lot of people don't realize that. Even though a ton of people don't live there that it was the first to do those things. So by omen was the answer. How many did you get out of ten how many points? Did you get out of fifty five again when you're playing along with these? If you want to do it for funds e some people like the the math nursery of doing this right down all your answers. You rank them one through ten ten the highest ones. The lowest you have to use each number one time in the ranking process, and you give ten to thing, you definitely knows the most right because then you'll get the most points for that answer if you're right. The ranked Amal and got them. All right. That's Amax of fifty five points. So sometimes people as these rounds sometimes they miss a few. Sometimes they are big bombs that this is ROY the entire integrity of the night because of how people just don't know these random things, but maybe you do and maybe like the rest of this week, again, just a little experiment to get some random trivia in your ears. So thank you so much for listening to today's episode if you want to play along easier one of the rewards over on my patriot page is some answer sheets for my live trivia nights, which are. Perfect for episodes like this with ten or eleven questions, and you can kind of just write your answers on the answer lines, and you can use those to battle against your friends or your spouse, your partner, whatever you want to do and check that out. I think that's over at the ten dollar level. I send you a packet of twenty-five answer sheets with every rewards box that I send out per month. Thank you guys so much for listening. Thanks for telling a friend about the show, and we'll see you tomorrow for more trivia with buds jeers.

MLB Scott Tom Stemberg wrestling Mexico SunTrust park Oscar McGregor Jessica yelp baseball Duke Dyonissis Florida Shakespeare Alex Wyoming Staples Ryan WWE
BallCourt EP 31 | The World Is Waiting | Lavar Ball vs Zion Williamson

BallCourt - The World of Basketball with Coach Drew

23:36 min | 1 year ago

BallCourt EP 31 | The World Is Waiting | Lavar Ball vs Zion Williamson

"It took hey welcome to ball court. I am coach drew and visit the world of basketball. I'm telling you still in quarantine but I'm still bringing you content right here on. Paul course this is the world a ball quote well go world of basketball ball court. I am coach drew. Thank you. I'm glad to hear everybody is safe in your homes. I'm in my home. We're going to be doing this. Social Distancing Bogor just for you so let's go ahead and get started now. I'm going to bring up a name in basketball. That you probably haven't heard from for a little while and that is the most amazing thing about this guy is one of the best. And he's now doing some news. Yes New York. You've heard it correctly far more berries back in the headlines. And he's doing stuff ball and things right now one little things that he's doing is he's actually bringing mask to New York. Know that you need it right now. It's been crazy with Rana virus Haiti and all of the United States and this pandemic hitting all over but Stefan Marberry. He's not he's not only a hero abroad. He's a hero right here at all to what he's doing and dropping ten million dollars. Yes you heard it correct. He's GonNa be actually donating ten million dollars to the cause and no get it out to New York to make sure that they do got some clean renewable mask and eventually he's GonNa have some people backup and there again and speaking of New York into next yes. It has been confirmed that James Dolan tested positive for the CORONA VIRUS FOR COVA. Nineteen so operators. I would you to Dolan family. We do hope that we hope for speedy recovery and hope that you envy you back in the arena zone. I know being a former Knicks Fan. You know the Dolan family myself I have said but please in things but at this point all make it through. We're all in this together as one family. So I WANNA see James Dolan get better so definitely go out there and get better speaking of goebbels. Yes Anthony Davis for the Lakers. May Join us of things right now. He's over helping out the staples Saturday employees. You know the local restaurants trying to help out the workers. You're doing all those little things to make sure that they get through this. See now this is one of the that I loved about. Anthony Davis come into the Lakers. Because when he was in New Orleans no matter what was going on even over those talks will come into the Lakers is coming up. He was still showing that he is for the Community. And this is no different in time of crisis came up. He stepped up. He's been doing it on every time. He's a big time situation. Anthony Davis adds up and he puts in work. And that's exactly what he's doing now so so long to you at the Davis. You keep on doing your Dang thing. I'm loving what I've seen. Oh Man -gratulations now I want to go ahead and jump over to the next segment. This one for the lay there is yes ladies ladies ladies and WNBA. Even though you know right now we have to practice social distancing. We'RE NOT INTO GYMS. We can't shoot around but guess what business has still been. Moving and a lot of people are taking their talents to a different place is especially with the climate that we're in right now. Yes you heard about my more taking some time off from the WNBA so she can fight social justice but Imani McGee Stafford. She's actually following along in her footsteps. Yes she decided that she's GonNa go ahead and for the next two years the next two years the WNBA so she could pursue a degree in law. She's going to southeastern university. She's GonNa follow that dream. Become a Lloyd. Don't get me wrong. I notice world has enough basketball players but we can always use another person in those courtroom also fight. I am that good fight for us so we really do appreciate you. Reminding we wish you all the best and basketball will be here. Hopefully we're definitely hoping that it will. As a matter of fact. I got some really good news about basketball. Stick around with me. My Name's Kadro. This is ball court man. This is the world basketball hang rally before a little bit. I will be here of course. Ibm staying at home. Stay home and be right here. Check it out Baltimore world basketball up everybody's game with me staying at home safe and I know darndest time. We've been wondering what is on the horizon. What is going to be next all? We're going to see it again. Are we gonNA win basketball going to come back well? Rested shore did a model that we can look at. Yes the Chinese Basketball Association with them. Look into actually start to league again and and April beginning may around that timeframe gives the NBA three much of really good Outline of what is GONNA be looking to do so? Here's what the Chinese Basketball Association is planning to do. They're going to start off the league in isolated areas. It's not going to be in every city every country they can keep it to where the pandemic was. They didn't have as many cases in having many outbreaks. So they WANNA start off like that. In that matter I nap. Of course wold Rozan heard about this and he started to find a house is GonNa correlates an Mba but let me tell you the NBA is actually looking at this right now and an idea of exactly how it's GonNa work so they're looking at it like you know what we're going to be able to put these things together. Put some off and test certain things out what the Chinese Basketball Association is GONNA. They're gonNa see if they can actually hold the rest of their season in a confined. It pretty much in a box in a way. So it's going to be a secluded area in which you're going to be participating if this works. This could actually be the plan that will be utilized for the NBA. So hopefully fingers crossed will looking at basketball problem. Four months from now five months from there and remember if you check out the last quarantine special you know that you know dead the possibility that we might be moving to season all together so they're asked up of things that's going on right now so there is some positive and I'm liking the positive and so at this point I want to go ahead and celebrate though I gotta celebrate today is March Thirtieth and if anybody grew up during the time that I grew up during the heyday of basketball which I consider the nineties. We know what today marks. Yes we all though. Today is the day March Thirtieth nineteen ninety five. That was the day Michael Jordan. Double double and it was. He wasn't even to start a show. Toni Kukoc dropped a triple double in that game. But Jordan dropped double double to go ahead as START OFF. That forty four game win streak that went over to the following year. And I'm telling I'm telling you today is a day now. If you're a Boston fan you know today is not a day that you're happy about this is not a day you live like all this days marking infamy for you but for the rest of the NBA and cargo fans. We were treated to an amazing day or basketball. I'm talking Toni. Kukoc kept that ball moving. He was hitting. He was getting into Scotty. Pippin at the top. He then hit Michael Jordan for a couple of moves coming down right down to lane. It was a an impressive to watch. Even at that time. You knew that only coach. Even though he wasn't a replacement for Jordan having fun that he would be when he came in he was definitely going to be an asset for the bowls. So I have to go ahead and give a shout out to that game. Yes one of the best games at NBA history and that was day in NBA history. Now one of my favorite segments is coming up so I want to thank Mr Lavar Ball. This segment has taken a hiatus for a little while. Keppel coming back with a little bit of things it's much shady genius segment. Yes shaking genius. Let me go ahead and break it down. How the things turned out at this point in time Lavar Ball. He is the golden goose he is the cash cow that keeps on giving to shady or genius. So let me go ahead and explain what? Lavar ball has done now. Now if we remember the last few weeks that we had basketball something was going on in New Orleans. There was this young man named Zion Williamson showing out. He was dunking on people bank. I remember Sportscenter. Used to be filled with these highlights. People started questioning. Does he deserve rookie year? People said man. He's making lots of really good. He name really good at the matter of fat my calls for leads kicking. Jt who is a Louisiana native was talking look Lonzo praises the way he was looking with Zaire Williamson so you would think to yourself. You would say self self would say what. How is it that you could possibly have something wrong as I said at this point? No no no no no the ball. Give me the ammunition. I need to give you another shave. Your Genius Lavar Ball set and this is what we're gonNA find out shaved set this moment. Lavar ball said that Zairean Williamson tiny to small now. I've seen him pretty much. Bully the Greek freak and that's supposed to be a freak of athletic major and he literally bullied him. He just snatched the ball from him and drawn to the ground. A little shot. You know like you know like what you're doing you get. Kids are planning something that's supposed to be playing when he snatches from him sit down. That's exactly what he did to the Greek freak. As a matter of that everybody said that as far as goes Lonzo will go so Zion is too small. If he's tiny if you're talking ill of Zion. And he was the only person that was able to resurrect your son's career. What does that say about your son now at this point is you're on the verge of Ligonier dream having three sons in the NBA. Even though one's going to be the G. League without them talk about that for three sons under receiving an MBA. Pagent at this time as my vice you from one loud mouth father to another shut up. Shut up your genius. I'll let y'all call it is that shady genie's so but that Huma volleyball I really needed you. I really needed you. This week I was thinking could be shared genius. But you'll have are. You might have read thank you. I appreciate it every single time. You come through to me. We're going to jump into the next segment. Yeah you can see the shoulders. Moving segment is is. Let's catch it. Let's get come on Y'all key. Hey by the way I want to let you know. My whole crew is my actual daughters and watch my shoulders move like this. And they started laughing but they don't know what that means that means less tickets about come on and we're about to talk about some flash shoes. That's why we're dancing like this. So if anybody at home right now watching night looking at Nike Dot Com and everything thinking to themselves. What shoes have either Iraq? The first day out of warranty. I'm about to give you are some floss up to look at first off ourselves. We have to talk about because you do know that just last week. We celebrated airmax day. All my Nike Fans congrats. Yes Air Mad Day and it was tough for me because usually airmax day. I like to go out where my ear. Matt's see which other air mats are popping. But I did it. I got to stay home. That's reflect my airmax as well as show off my airmax to those people who were just out there. Doing the thing so here goes air match. We're GONNA talk about the Air Max Ninety Five Pink Foam gaster. Og Ear Matt's has came back in a brand new color away was the pink fog color way and if anybody is a child of the eighties and nineties you will know this with a pink. Panther shirt will be absolutely amazing. Not because it's going to be the same bank is because it's going to have the same pink as his stomach. Yes the faded light pink to give it that pink full feel. I think this is an absolute cop. I know for one hundred eighty bucks if Michael was here right now. Here say that that is a must cop but that's GonNa jump on in the spirit of let's kick it. We're going to jump over to the Nike lebrons seventeenth now. I know what you're saying every single week. Why every week we gotta come back with another Nike but bras why because he keep one propping via color way. That's why right now I saw this call. Away is a throwback if anybody remembers back in the early nineties late eighties a lot of people who went to the park. A Lot fans White men can't jump those people down planning to depart. We played enforces. Played it the command forces and those were the thing neither neither Lebron seventeen command. Fours gives you a throwback to that feel and talk and he gives you the same colors. He's giving you the same look even the LBJ on the tongue is in the same pattern as you would with the command undertone Nike Commands. So it is something is something of a real rollback and I really appreciate the fact that Lebron is giving me shadow personally. I feel like he's giving my whole generation showdown so all the cast right after the salt and pepper and a little grazing and year. Trust me the process looking out for you. He still showing you that love. You know speaking of showing that love. May Tell. How excited have you been over these last year or two? That dunces. Really? They're making a way back and with dumps really coming back and all. It's like something that she just can't even control anymore now talk about the Jerry's Yes ben and Jerry. They actually released a new. Ducks called the chunky donkeys. These chunky donkeys are absolute fire. Extra lace if they bring with and this is a skater original so if you were part of the skater cultural or if you're part is getting a culture now this is something that you definitely want to have you know. I say a pair of a pair of jeans a chunk in donkeys to ride around. And it's going to be absolutely amazing for you so I really dig that and I love that flow about it so so low to the Ben and Jerry's that's going to be one that you're GonNa really like and I think that you're gonNa feel that one a lot also. I definitely going to have to say go out and grab what. Now they haven't been released yet. They're going to be released mid April but definitely Graham those command forces. I liked those those are those are something that I will probably. You'll probably see my arsenal and I'm thinking for summer I'm ages Jamais just keeping quiet for Lebron's teams go into the Lebron seventeen lows for the summa. So that's probably the way that you want to go. There are some lows coming out. As a matter of fact I want you to state some this week for you gotta be dropping a less. Kick it coming out this week and we'll be talking about couple of bras seventeen lows so definitely keep you. Keep Your Eyes Open for that. Keep the eyes peeled and go out and cut those three. That is less ticket before. Go ahead and take little plum wall. I want to go ahead and say actives day winning. Stay in the stay healthy but most of all stay in your home if you put me into work and you are and you're like man. I got I need to town. I gotta be able to dribble to do more trust me. There's tons of work as you're going to be able to do at home as a matter of fact. I have my daughter. Hey now you've shown couple dribble drills that you can do all this up see and that's okay to mess up even if you mess up. That's fine it's okay to mess up at eight and okay to give up. I appreciate tonight I appreciate you can stop now one more one more than you go good job anyway. So that's one thing that you can do at home too. I want you to see healthy. I want you to stay happy staying home plus me. You're not stuck at home. You're safe at home. It's all about a mindset but on that note we gotta think about something. What are you going to do after this? Are you going to go back to work? Or YOU'RE GONNA sign your own check. That's something that you really want to take a look at the mind God from Castro Check Dot Com. They got something to tell you about that. Check it out. Cashew CHICKEN DOT COM SLASH CASH. To checking is one of the nation's leading finance companies providing up to forty thousand dollars in unsecured funding for business or personal use. We have relationships with over. Two hundred fifty lenders nationwide through the use of our proprietary software. We are able to secure over eighty percent more funding for our clients. We help clients obtain funding for real estate investment business. Start-ups down payment assistance working capital medical legal education funeral expenses more dot com slash drew cashew chicken dot com. When you're tired of living their dreams and start living in rump checkout cash check dot com slash drove and yes yes in this time it is the perfect time to start over stop worrying about Bussan yet jetstar signing your own home with your family. Stay healthy stay safe and I want to thank each and every person listening to bowl court each and every week. I want to thank C. Wfan sports for giving me the opportunity to bring this concept to you and they keep on finding ways to do it. And I thank you thank you. I want to take my producers directors also. I definitely want to thank my at-home grew as well. Good job ladies I want. I want to thank the Sean Harvey Man Short Bobby Morning Show. I definitely have to beg them. 'cause they're still bringing you that content. I not started a little bit later this morning but still wake up every morning. And listen to them is a is a great show a level the blitz man. If you're not up on the blitz I don't know what's going on with. They give you know they're giving you politics. They're giving you jokes. They're giving you sports if you're not watching the blitz. There's something wrong with the way you're getting your information. Also you got me boy. Jc Let's kick yes but that'd be doing a quarantine special of let's kick it making sure that everybody's GonNa be rocking fresh. And matter of fact they got a special guest on special. So it's going to be extra special. Yes you heard it here. First out. Radio one subscribe. I mean radio DOT COM. I do apologize. Check Out Your Cup please. Go ahead and subscribe. No make sure you follow it all shows and they get all of the hot content and I want to thank you each everyone of you for inviting in your home every week around the world across the country please stay safe stay at hope and God bless this ball court. I'm code ruled. This is the world of basketball. I love each and everyone of you have a great great day. This is a CW in sports network presentation.

basketball NBA Michael Jordan Lavar Ball James Dolan Chinese Basketball Association New York New Orleans WNBA Anthony Davis Knicks Mr Lavar Ball Lakers Toni Kukoc Haiti Nike Nike Dot Com United States Lebron Paul
BTS And More: A Guide To K-Pop

Pop Culture Happy Hour

22:51 min | 2 months ago

BTS And More: A Guide To K-Pop

"Last year the south korean pop group t. S topped the charts with a blockbuster earworm called dynamite. Now they've got a new hit called butter. But the story of k pop extends well beyond t s and it goes back decades with a huge array of styles and sounds. I'm stephen thompson and today we are offering up a brief guide to cape hop on pop culture. Happy hour from npr. So don't go away. This message comes from npr sponsor. Bourbeau the family reunion will be extra special this summer so checkout virgo to find a private whole vacation home with something for everyone. A private pool outdoor space a grill. Whatever the family is looking for. You'll find it on virgo and if plans change. You can cancel for free on selects properties. Download the bourbeau app. The time for getting back together is now. Welcome back joining us today. From seoul. south korea is hurry and kangxi is a journalist and the creative director of media. Ori immediate incubator based in seoul high hyphen. Hi stephen good to meet you. It's great to meet you too. So one of the huge stories in pop music. The last few years is the rise of cape around the world most notably the boy band bt s. Which is broken a lot of barriers in the us. But we wanted to go beyond. Gts and talk about some of the other artists who've contributed to k pop's legacy and commercial strength now. This is obviously not meant to be comprehensive. We're just scratching the surface here so hurry in one thing you've written that struck me when we're contextualising k pop. You describe k pop not as a musical genre but as a geographic destination. What do you mean by that. So there's not one musical genre ties k pop together first of all if you listen to all these different songs from hundreds of different groups that are all classified as k pop globally. It's a cacophony of sounds. Sometimes within a single song you would have different influences from latin america united states europe. Where have you and so musically to call something k. Pop really doesn't say a lot about what it actually sounds like. But also when we look at artists that come out of korea and who make globally like cy or bt s or girls generation we just tend to clump them together as popular music that comes from korea k pop so k pop as a word became popularly used in the late nineteen ninety s as the korean music industry started exporting itself globally most commonly when people say kay pot it refers to idle music which is studio produced artists from big entertainment agencies. So k pop doesn't refer to anyone. Musical sound is what we generalize as music that comes out of korea that becomes globally successful. You brought five songs to try to capture some of the history of cape and just listening to these songs even within a single song. You're hearing so many genres at once. And i think your your first pick really captures that. Let's hear it your genius a dumb as you can hear from the song. Nine hundred ninety two is all over the song. Yes so hurry and tell us about this song. That was her teddy boys. Debut called none at you and this is most often seen as like the moment. That korean pop industry changed forever. But this was something that was unlike wire. Most korean people had heard before because the early nineties late eighties was when korea was changing very rapidly. The military dictatorship had just ended civil. Society was springing up and all sorts of activism in politics and arts and culture even in music so whereas before you had more reserved music like maybe slower ballads or a genre called trot which is a popular genre and the older generation and then in the late eighties bands. Like fire. truck or coupons on. Start coming on with like much more visual and dynamic moves and dancing and that's hot techy comes on and he's like full-on we're influenced heavily by black music and hip hop and they're wrapping and this is what they came up with non audio. Was that debut moment when they introduced how dynamic music could be hot edgy on the boys the way they transformed phantoms and the way they transformed people to think about music. They're seen as like the precursors to the pop idol industry. It's really interesting listening to the song because we only can play a clip of it but throughout the course of the song. You're hearing so much like new jack. Swing which is very very popular in the early nineties. Shy you're also hearing hip hop and pop and like kind of boy band music and then there are these kind of hair metal guitar riffs and in a way you can hear. Echoes of that john redness in a lot of very contemporary pop music. Where artists like charlie acts or poppy. Who are kind of mashing a lot of sounds together into a single song that feels actually in some ways as much as you can hear the early nineties in that song you also hear a lot of very contemporary kind of mashing up of genres that i found really interesting. Yeah and i think really white pop. Music is an especially k pop. You just mix all of these different genres and different sounds together. Sometimes it works. Sometimes it doesn't and it's funny that you said you hear the nineties in teaching music. And i think you're referring specifically to ninety s. Us music sure that makes a lot of sense. Because south korea was is and was influenced heavily by american music. Well let's hear your your next fish except all right so this group is called h. Ot her and tell us about it. So asia show t is seen as the first k pop idol group. They were the group that were planned in advance produced and they went through a training system and they debuted into the world as a boy band aid not was produced by sm entertainment which is like one of the big three four agencies in south korea. This song that we heard just now is called descendants of warriors and his third debut single in nineteen ninety six and one k pop fans usually reflect on h. o. t. Nowadays they think of very cutesy bubbly songs like candy but this song is so different and it really shows how big black music was incapable and in cobb. And you heard this. Gm boys and not and like hip hop r&b rap. Like this is huge. In k pop especially want to talk more about like black music's influence on k pop because oftentimes cape pop is accused of disrespectfully appropriating. Black culture where sometimes superficially just using elements of it. It's a very complicated subject. There's a lot of instances where i think k pop still has a long way to go in really understanding. What kind of sounds up. They're using. But a lot of instances you see how deeply these artists respect. The sounds that they hear growing up. It also just makes a of sense. If you're just fed like a stream of music that has decontextualize from the world in which it was made that sort of bound to happen. And it's interesting listening to that. H not just trying to pin down exactly like okay. That sounds like the beastie boys that actually sounds like onyx like you can just start listing off reference points. They must've heard slam by onyx at some point when were making this song and i think it's awesome like you know a lot of these mixtures and up with really unique different sounds again. Sometimes they work. Sometimes they don't well. Let's hear the next song so hurry. Tell us about the artist b. o. a a boa. She is actually often called the queen of k pop so she debuted when she was eleven and i was i think nine at the time just two years younger than her and she came out with the debut single called. Id peace be and it's very fitting for that era the early two thousands when we're just starting to chat and use the internet and her single is about you know how she comes forward with this ide- called peace be and she wants to connect with people though is very important not only because she's such a long running artist with millions of fans and lots of artists that were influenced by her music and her dancing but also because she really sat the grounds for global expansion. She wasn't the first there was h. o. T. and others. Before who try to expand into japan china but boa made it huge in japan so boas sang totally in japanese and a lot of japanese fans didn't know until much later that she was korean. She set the groundwork in the japanese market. Which is one of the biggest music markets in the world and following her came. Younger stars like tv x q or kara or squirrels generation and so on and so forth and maybe a lot of listeners. Don't know this but before. K pop made it bigger in the us. In the european markets the biggest markets were actually southeast asia china and japan. Embo really was one of the pioneers. So when you talk about pioneers in the global spread of k pop. It's hard to talk about pioneers in the global spread of k pop without talking about our next artist. Let's this song. yes took. He became a da da text. Shoot scott i'm off so that is why everyone probably knows. Come them style. And when i say this name people are already visualizing the horace dance. I'm actually doing the horse dance. People can't see at home now. We can't see it in person. We can't talk about kapot without talking about aside. But i really didn't want to introduce condom style because it's such already a household name. The song that we just heard is called bird and is the title track from sized debut album in two thousand and one called sino from the psycho world which had rated r. songs in. Korean was very controversial at the time because of its racy lyrics and k pop idol artists even today typically wouldn't sing about and si- has an interesting musical world beyond kung them style. I think after he became successful in two thousand twelve with hung up style. Lots of the songs that he produce globally were similar as cognitive style. Like the catchy songs and the funny music videos and the funny dances and stuff like that. But if you listen to this debut album you see how heavily influenced by k pop. But yeah i find cy. An interesting figure not only. Because he's quite rare in the industry that he composes most of his songs. But also it shows how unpredictable successes after boa. Nhl not and the mid-2000s you had so many big name agencies with huge capital investing in stars that were specifically targeting the global audience. So you had one k pop act after another trying to make it and nobody became a household name like si- and cy was just the furthest thing you could imagine from a k pop idol poster. Boy he's not conventionally attractive nor is he skinny and fit like most of the k pop acts are required to be and he was known for songs like bird which were racy and kind of risky to listen to at least according to the korean public standards. Yeah i mean. It's really interesting to look at size career because i think most consumers of us pop music no si- from gone them style and are unaware that that one song is this tiny little dot in a pointillist painting of a twenty year career. That is really reaching in a lot of different directions. And like i think there are a lot of us pop fans who think of size a one hit wonder even though obviously like this is a very large and expansive career and it it kind of speaks to what you were saying about. So many of these acts are trying to reach the us marketplace. But when you do it can be a double edged sword because there's very little awareness beyond this one saw and that's why the next artists were going to listen to is very important. Because until bts consistent success seemed elusive siamese that big but it was condom style and then it kind of started fizzling out bts on the other hand. We don't know when it's going to go away all right. Let's hear a little bit of fake. Love says so fake laws. Is the lead single from third album called. Love yourself tear in two thousand eighteen. It's a blend of rock and hip hop and electro pop. And it's also the band's first top ten single on billboard and i could really do a number of songs from bt s because they have so many hits in the mainstream american market you know there's dna which landed bts in the billboard's top hundred and twenty seventeen for the first time and then there's dynamite which hit number one in billboard which is the first time ever for a korean artists. It's not the first time that korean artists have made it into the billboard charts. There's been plenty before. So it's funny like i watched the videos for a lot of the songs. Hurry on that. You brought to the show and i was watching these videos from like nineteen ninety two nine hundred ninety six in two thousand and then watch the video for fake love and i was like one frame from this video cost more than the budgets for all of these others. It totally makes sense right. Music especially pop. Music is becoming increasingly more visual. But it also speaks to something that you've said and written about before which is that. The independent music scene sometimes suffers by comparison to this idol scene. Where like bt s i love bts bts's very very well funded and this kind of enormous budget that goes into everything that bts does and so it can be harder to kind of break in as an up and coming artist without this kind of machine behind you. Well before i answer. I'm curious why do you love. Bts so much. I love just the sheer of energy. I think there is some real pop craft that goes into it a song like dynamite. I mean that is written by like hit makers everything about that song feels like just engineered to be enjoyable. And so i mean it's absolutely a pop song it's not necessarily like tapping into my psyche in some new way. It's just a deeply enjoyable song. And i think there's an enormous amount of craft and work that goes into making songs and videos. That are just fun and high-spirited and really energetic. While at the same time heartfelt. I loved that you phrased it like that that it's engineer to be really enjoyable while being heartfelt and i think that's why lots of k pop acts are about absolutely you are talking about bts and the amount of capital that there is in producing this band and branding this band actually. Ats didn't start out that way. When bts debuted in two thousand thirteen they weren't particularly famous in create took them some time to become famous boy band domestically but they hit. It's agency wasn't one of the big players like sm y. P. and so they didn't have the kind of capital that like big ban wore. Twenty-one black pink would be s success to me is kind of like size and that like you don't know where where the next big thing is gonna come from and be kind of exploded seemingly out of nowhere they're consistent. Success enabled american mainstream audiences to really pay attention to k pop. K pop is part of a larger national cultural export called the korean wave which generates billions of dollars in revenue every year and music is not even the biggest category but within music the majority of the profit comes from idol music and this doesn't reflect how diverse the south korean soundscape really is and i'm not talking about diversity in terms of like what's popular. I mean diversity. In terms of what even exists like how many different experiments and interesting sounds exists. That can't break into the mainstream music. Market internationally and domestically because the market is already structured or idols and these big studios with big capital. There's so many different types of sounds. And it's a pity that k pop which is actually such a vague general term specifically refers to such a narrow part of the korean soundscape. And as you say it's not an genre a country. Yeah so yeah. I mean we've talked so much about kind of the history in the context surrounding korea music. What does an artist that you recommend that you really want people to hear just to like broaden their perceptions of korea music like if it's a recommendation one band that i would love to introduce is called lead night she. They are a fascinating mixture of so-called western influences of music including rock and pop. Also they fuse that with a kind of korean music called panty which traditionally has one percussion and one vocal so inspired by punt saudi which was popular in the nineteenth century in south korea. They have four vocalists and three percussionists. So it's a very interesting mixture and if you listen to their sounds it strangely familiar but strange. And that's that's what makes music wonderful right when it's like recognizable but very alien. Yeah all right. Let's hear a little bit of lena. H. e. this is tiger is coming along bringing writing. That's nike with tiger is coming. We want to know what your favorite k pop songs are find us on facebook at facebook. Dot com slash. Pch and on twitter at pch. And of course thank you for listening to pop culture. Happy hour from npr. If you want more song recommendations make sure to check out some of the excellent podcasts from npr music like all latino in all songs considered that brings us to the end of our show. Hurry and thanks so much for being here. Yeah thank you for having me. This was fun. It's great to have you. We will see you all right back here next time. What happens after a police officer. Shoot someone who's unarmed for decades in california internal affairs investigations. How the police police themselves or secret until now listen to on our watch a podcast from npr and kick me.

south korea stephen thompson Bourbeau john redness us Ori japan virgo sm entertainment npr npr seoul asia latin america kay stephen cobb china charlie europe
Removing The Interference Between You and Your Health With Dr. Omid Farokhzad: CEO & Founder, Seer | #ThePlaybook 436

The Playbook

22:59 min | Last week

Removing The Interference Between You and Your Health With Dr. Omid Farokhzad: CEO & Founder, Seer | #ThePlaybook 436

"On this episode of the playbook. I have dr o. Mead for rogue saad chair. ceo and founder of the incredible company. Here and we're going to talk about identifying what interferes with what we already have our health. Join me learning about proteome. Mix and its platform here on the playbook entrepreneurs the each week i bring you some of the greatest athletes. Celebrities and onto appeals to talk about their personal and professional playbook to success in. What made them champions on the field in the boardroom. I'm your host david meltzer. I have an incredible scholar but he also rare enough. A serial entrepreneur omitted for chair and ceo founder of seer and he deals and i hope i pronounce rydell. It's pretty profile. Mix which is an entirely new space for me. So let's talk and dave meltzer's terms. I know they call it. Layman's terms. I call dave meltzer term because dave meltzer can understand this. Everybody will So if you could just give me a little bit of background including repr- enunciating protonix and give us some background on layman's term. What exactly that is short. Thank you for having me on support. You'll makes is the study of the proteins in the body. And i think most folks Readily see the big idea with genomics study of the jeans and dna. If you imagine the genes are the loose. Transcript of your information of the body. Has the proteins. Are those information in the context of their function. So virtually anything that happens in the body happens because one protein or a group of proteins coming together to former modules come together and they exerted function so for example enzymes that break things down or you know molecules that allow Different things to cross the cell membrane just about anything disease health changing in protein. That basically dictates how to body functions and the study of the proteome is to study the totality of this information in health and disease for clinical translational us. and you know in chemistry you have protons electrons and neutrons. I've always been curious With proteins is there Opposite to a protein proteins if you imagine nucleic acid or dna is made with up with four building. Blocks proteins are built with twenty different building. Blocks does our national occurring building blocks. You can't make synthetic building blocks if you would. I think that's what you mean. When you say opposite up them so he can make synthetic building must but the national building blocks of proteins are twenty amino acids that the dna coach for and then they come together to form a chain and that chain forms the structure that then has a particular role or function in the body. You know. I grew up with a mom that stressed education. And you know always said that. If i wasn't going to invest in myself what would i ever invest in. And if she said you know you've gone to the greatest schools in our country For so long she always said that. You know if you think education is expensive. Try ignorance But beyond that what. I found with hyper actual. Academic people is that they get discredited because it actually elevates our awareness and being able to understand things in process things in equipped ourselves with different perspectives in different Philosophies processes and information only elevates our awareness as a serial entrepreneur. Which i think is you know. Ultra conflictual a doctor in his scientist But you are incredible. Business person as well A great business per person solves a problem So with Onyx what problem does that solve. Yeah so david again. If you look at what. The pretty proteome makes enabled is just vastly huge. So take a look at for example therapies that we have today most nearly all of those drugs work by exerting facts on a function of protein. Were drug targets so those drugs talks very often approaching now. Proteins are complex so the more we studied them the more we understand their structure the variance of them in in the population the more effective drugs you can developed now for example take a look at diseases so in this spectrum of having being healthy having disease your body goes through a gradual process where progressively. You'd get sicker and sicker with an illness. Fewing every bit of that stage of progression of disease. What is actually changing. Are the proteins in your body so to be able to understand howard. Those proteins. Changing health and disease can help you develop much more effective diagnostics. You can even potential elite diagnose diseases before symptoms setting. I think were not many years away. David from being able to detect cancers at the earliest stages of disease development before patient even has symptoms. When in fact many cancers can be cured. Now geno mix in the last fifteen years. has scaled considerably fifteen years ago. With the introduction of next generation sequencing we were able to look at genomic content at a speed and scale than was previously not possible. What that enabled was that more and more genomes sequenced. So today we have now sequenced over a million different genomes over ten million different exxon which are the coding portion of the genome and a human body of data. That's being acquired has identified. You know nearly seven hundred million genetic variance at the population level now as subset of those variants are gonna vote for different protein variants. We have never been able to study the proteome at the sand speed and scale that today were able to study the genome. And what i hope. Our technology has enabled and it's now a commercial product of customer is that our scientific colleagues cannot access the pretty all in the same students they could the genome and identify any of those protein. Variants that dr disease identify hopefully many many new drug targets that can be used for treatment of diseases that range from cancer to neurodegenerative really just about anything and us only human health. David you can imagine any. Living organism has proteins so plants act vile to back by the microbiome field. We're obviously living in the world of the pandemic and so the viral understanding proteins in a virus and frankly understanding how does how. Why is it that individual response to virus may be different how come some of us get vaccinated and we do really really well. But let's get vaccinated that we actually got sick on very very small minority Again i think a significant part of those as irs lies in the differences we have in our proteome and to be able to study it as scale is gonna illuminated enormous amount of information inside. Maybe that i think will fundamentally change. The last day of science and medicine absolutely. What's so interesting. Is i got interested in your company because of my general philosophy of health. I believe that we are all healthy. And what we wanna do is focus or shift the paradigm into. What's interfering with our natural state of being healthy. You know what are we putting in nutrient wise not just food wise but you know energy wise and people wise and ideas wise all the things that i think interferes with our natural status of just being healthy. It seems to me that you know this science and this solution allows us to identify some of the things that are not as apparent as smoking in too much sun and not enough exercise and fatty foods or whatever else interferes obviously with our health today but in the same respect you know two hundred years ago you know. There's certain things that we through technology raise the awareness of which specific markets you think will most benefit from proteomics. Yeah i think you know. Transitional medicine basic research. We're going to basically catalog a lot of different protein variants. The pharmaceutical industry would drug development. Feel act bio diagnostics. We're gonna develop tons of tons of new approaches David in diagnosing disease and also You know using Does approaches as a combined diagnostic to see which patients may actually be better for particular treatments And then and feels like act by microbiome viral. I think just the universe and frankly was most exciting than it is the end markets that we don't even know today for example if i look back fifty years ago when access the geno makes at scale really became available i. I don't think anybody would have predicted back nam that the field of liquid biopsy would be one of the markets that would be uniquely enabled by access to geno mix and in fact. That is the case so today. The number of companies out there on the genomics space that are working at blood tests that look at genetic signatures to help diagnose disease including early stage cancer and so i just like we could not have predicted back then that that would be the case. I think there are some obvious and markets in the ones that i just highlighted for you but i think it's kind of like internet in the eighties david wright in the eighties. Could we have predicted today. And i met and what we do with it. I mean i think maybe there'll be some genius uterus. That could've done that back then. They but you know the rest of mortals probably couldn't have. I have to interrupt you because i graduated law. School to be oil and gas litigator with a great job out of law school to work for an oil company as litigator and my mom quote unquote in nineteen ninety-two. I got a job in the internet instead. She told me. David you're ruining your entire life. The internet's a fad. So and my mom's an expendable moment. I think the general sentiment because not everybody's as old as you and i. That's listening the general sentiment in the early nineties late eighties about the internet was that it was just a fad and may or may not even be around let alone what it represents today so i just wanted to give some perspective and share that david so my prediction is that look. There's some obvious end markets that are going to be radically changed by radio. Mix and there's a number of new edmark is going to be created entirely because of a radio mix and a substantial that are going to be grossly extended by x I think the opportunity again. David is huge. I'm just excited to see what the scientific community will do with it. Because you know the real creativity will come from the folks and alive who take the tools and you're really interesting things with it. Will we have made possible. Is that virtually any. Scientists can use an instrument that runs largely in an automated fashion. So it's an automated instrument. David that in a matter of about seven hours can run sixteen samples. And do you a deep interrogation at pretty all and then you then use that in a detector and then we provided data athletic sleet. That helps them go from that all that biological content which by the way. There's a lot to biological insights in bite size. Unit steady can actually grasp and understand. And so i think the the power of the platform is and i hate to use. The word is in the democratization of the radio. Mix and that it takes the the magic that only a few labs able to do it now out and really let everyone answer important scientific medical questions that could be unique women so that's quite exciting exciting and usually say control extent because i'm not expert iran amount of technology left. So i say if in matic knowledge is can use it and get good toward you'll make content then. It's become simple enough. If it works in my house it should work outside. I love that that matter. You know it's so interesting because you are kind of the ray kroc approach and compared to the mcdonald brothers who created the sir speedy system Which has had a significant impact on our world creating that Fast food type of system That makes your work even more important but taking things to market is extremely important. And there's a million great ideas. There's some great scientists engineers that i run into whose ideas have never seen the light of day. That would be. Earth shattering and have impact like Your platform as well. You are able to take your company public. It's on the nasdaq. What have you been able to accomplish since going public. I would say david across different dimensions right. So the first is that Having your well-capitalized company Can put you a bit in the offensive in terms of declined of human capital. That you can Can gravitate toward the company. So we've added significant Significant number of people to our team number one second is We formed a number of important partnerships with other companies into pretty on extremists who whose product are complementary to us so what sear uniquely does is it allows us to sample the proteome across its entire dynamic range and to do it with exquisite robustness. Once that is sampled it needs to go to a detector so we partnered with a number of important detector companies like thermo fisher bruecker sitex. Next is that We began to ship instruments to dance of our customers and we had become a commercial company. Right bef- hired to argue and and we had announced that we have this three phase. Commercialization strategy were in the first phase We formed collaboration with Academic size in the second phase we would allow larger customers limited released number of instruments and then finally broad commercial launch. And so we completed. The collaboration face of our commercialization having shipped to instrument to devote institute oregon health sciences salk institute undiscovered life sciences. We then shifted into the limited release phase already signed up a number of customers lombardi instruments. So that's also products side and then and then separately. I would say the next area has been that we began to increase our presence In terms of exposing our signs and findings and discoveries in conferences So that the scientific community action sees what becomes possible when you have access to large amount of content so we presented at a number of conferences and and beginning to shift our attention into publications both from our group and our collaborates as amazing Not that i'm gonna put you in the position. That i put my mom in but i am so interested in what you do. See for the future of sierre and how what impact your company's going to have none of. That's not a difficult position. I appreciate the question. Look when i started sear This is obviously pre pandemic Do i think we all do that. A pandemic would communist away I had said once that the folks at alumina Are the most impactful People in india century. And i said this once and and so much about you know. Let's say like steve jobs and apple. Las interesting okay. So maybe in terms of market cap your correct and incorrect. Because i think it's time to the aluminum. Fifty billion and alpha was was close to a trillion as it maybe in terms of market correct. But i said i'm not seeing that. Apple is all about the iphone but at the end of the day. If i didn't have the iphone. I could still be okay with the south song or something else. But imagine the world we live in without genomic context. How many cancers are we able to now diagnose and treatments of kansas fundamentally change diagnosis of disease. I said the world we live in is fundamentally different because access to genomic and i set to the folks that were coming around the table either. Be my partners. In terms of adjoining our management team were investors to invest in. I said look. Is i want us to look back a decade from now and having impact human impact that is on or greater than the impact the team alumina in terms of bettering the world and And so so my guess. Is that the future. David would be diagnosis of disease at the pre-symptomatic level enabled in large part because of adding for the cart better drugs. That are much more targeted on mush more personalized because will drug targets in a very different way that we don't today very personalized way. A lot of drugs aren't considered non-drug abuse. I think a lot of those may actually be possible to be drug once. We understand the differences in terms of the pro phones that are functional in hell and in disease that when god forbid the next and hits many many thanks to our colleagues to prepared us for it because imagine not being able to sequence and people. I mean a lot of our early detection is because we could understand the viral genome. Very quick these are we could develop vaccines and we could do these rapid tests. So i think the genomic folks really position this well to fight this panic. But i think our fight against the next pandemic having access to the put information may even be more effective than they wanted was with. Just genomic alone so they will. I do believe that the world won't change as as we begin to understand these functional unit of life at the level that we just don't understand today. I so and you know you can let your imagination go wild. Because frankly i don't see any boundaries i love it. It is limitless and existing in that instant between Infinity is really what to me represents the ability to identify the interference of our health before it actually interferes with our health in a simple laban's dave meltzer term Really impacting our future and only because of technology in the speed in which we access data and can process that data. We know that it only will get exponentially better and thank you so much for creating this platform. Thank you so much for coming. On the playbook and educating us on chrome or proteome aches. And i'm getting it done. You save tato potato either way. It's an incredible platform. That can help us all. Not only he'll but protect us from that which interferes with what is already existing our future and existing health. Thank you so much dr. This david meltzer with entrepreneurs. We'll play by hope. You enjoyed this week's episode of the playbook as much as me on a personal note. I just wanted to thank everyone for making the playbook such a success. Don't forget to continue it by sharing subscribing and listening to your favorite episodes. Dave meltzer with the playbook.

dave meltzer David david meltzer cancers rydell Layman Mead layman david geno mcdonald brothers exxon david wright thermo fisher bruecker howard oregon health sciences salk in iran Apple steve jobs Las
The Duke Deuce Interview

No Jumper

23:51 min | 1 year ago

The Duke Deuce Interview

"No Jumper coolest podcast on the world. Today I'm here with Warren Duke. Deuce hyphen a good. It was going up. You WanNa talk to the world right now. I feel good on me. You are big. Song is Sir. It's going down. I was a fan before that song. Just for the record. Thanks I remember seeing it and I was like man. I like this guy legs energy. I like what he's got going on so tell us a little bit about about Your Cup where you're coming from. I'm coming from Memphis. Tennessee moves course. You know saying the come up salon. Look up you know saying. Hey a hangar. And she was a young Duke. Deuce like stubbing irresponsible. So you're running around. You're in the streets I was I in and out like I wonder if no one hundred percents street nigger knows now one now. I have time for dishes really so I was always trying to do something. So are you doing all right in school and show? You were managing balanced both sides of your life e pretty much What did you find yourself gravitating towards and storms of school and Shit? Like what would you find your natural aptitude for music really long really all kinds of shit? All Day candidate helped me. They kept me out of trouble. You know what I'm saying. Okay so memphis for you growing up. Did you feel like you always had that right in your face that there was always like people trying to get you to believe in an illegal lifestyle and whatnot? There was always right. There is right there you manage to stay detachment for the most part because I always had my own. I always had all mind lying. Never really I never was a follow. You know saying I always do my own. Damn thing I gotcha so when you actually get into making music. Was it just wrapping with your friends at school and shift for a long time? Oh Yeah because I. I used to like get heisman. Fogel was round high school Chinese foot with my homeboys. We should be on the block. Just freestyle rap initiate. Just smoking smoking he went on the pills and shit. Now all right now either but you say hi as I make that mistake. Sometimes say hi fucking people just assume that it was crazy now. We you know. Spend a little time she. Yeah being from Memphis. Oh what were you listening to? What was what was influencing Three SIX MAFIA. So you weren't. You are superintendent from our early age. Okay Good Shit I think but I got crazy with this shit like I started going hand with the Mersey light at the high school when I started like when lifestyle here and I'm like Brag got through song you know what I'm saying had stopped bullshit so you didn't think about going to call. Is You get a job right out of school? They're going cottage so I was going to go to college to ship. She the music she ended up popping. Nassar Fook this. She was it the kind of thing where you felt like everybody was sort of looking at you like. Oh you got to actually do something with this. Like she was sounding good enough. I feel I was looking at myself because I had I got. Dan had a little girl. You know saying once I was like so you had a kid. Didn't make you think like a lot of people have a kid. Just give up on the artists dreams. Hail this crazy. She's got to grow up. You gotTa Take Care. You know what I'm saying but ninety nine point eight percent of people who are never gonNA make money out of it. There's no waste money on it so you can see how a lot of them will fall back at that point. Was The kid right right but you have the confidence right I. We knew it. I knew I was hard. You know what I'm saying. That's the guy was missing. Is the key to the sheep right so wound when you say when you think about Cronk Music? Do you think that you remember? Like two thousand four two thousand five and that she was like the wave. Was that something that in particular stood out to you a lot like I remember. She really she. The crunchy was way before adding images all also like the the early nineties late eighties. It was already given blue. Cross came from getting book. There was some issue okay. But so when we think about three six and then you see the direct stylistic connection there in terms of the three six like there's a lot of music that was really important. It's time then doesn't affect anything going forward. It doesn't have a huge impact with the weird thing about three six and a lot of that memphis sound that it was underground pop ten twenty thirty years ago now. It's mainstream now so many pop songs and shit our borrowing parts from three six months. Right right I just feel like people actually giving a props now like because they really influenced a lot of a lot of this shit crazy when you say when you came up with that. Song particular game. Where where's that coming from? Where was your mind? Would that correspond should really? The core is one even owner. It was really supposed to be like I had A. I was calling jagged for Memphis. Jacob Beats got like a bunch of songs from city and I just started smashing all beats and for some reason the current guy did song actually stood out the most so I say fuck this year. She Hard. So that was somebody else's beat tomorrow Crunching data the original beat was like somebody else's song for a while for my project. Oh right right right okay. Yeah I took they took the other songs off and kept that one and I added. The core is on Saying so that's how they came about like. Did you feel like the industry are like the rap world needed like some different energy? 'cause that's like that hype the Cronk Hi-fi like attitude like people want to be slumped up and just says leaned out no energy or in his mouth. Yeah that's weird. I feel about it because I'm GonNa Clo had then getting sleepy anymore for the light you know. I had to make a chain and I felt like I feel like I was being slipped on like a motherfucker. Like muscled is just one gravitate to this shit. Quick enough so the current guy is really me just really leading my shit off like really going crazy John Right. Just sorta like putting out a different energy out there. Sometimes when it feels like everybody's going in a certain direction you gotta just switch it up if you they want to grab people's attention right right right. They've been sleeping on. Beat folks Sleet Nomo right when you decided to a little. John and Project Pat Juicy J on their Was that your dream lineup. Or what was your thought processes when it came to the lineup I was going for project Pat Juicy J or I will get shop on in the League but you know saying he had a little situation so there wasn't enough. P was praised. The gittler John on the mall you know say I feel like it was a good idea so she we ran with it. Do you ever have you met them before. Like in terms of people like being around Memphis share. Was that somebody that you had ever had a chance to meet before. No I only made project pet before. Ohka interesting what do you think about how they were perceiving? You did you get divided. They were appreciative of the fact that you were utilizing their sounds a fucking with this. She they they to me. It's like they feel like they in my in my age bracket again. You know what I'm saying is is happy that that is she going on. Somebody keeping it alive definitely. So how did you? When did you actually become wire in Duke through the migos conversation take him? It was like after I don't know if you've ever heard my single whole lot of yeah. Yeah it was after that it had a little of it went viral small viral. I'll say he ended up saying bomb he ended up giving me showed me out to La. We kicked it and then he believes in the talent. You're Y- it and eventually they signed me. Why Damn that's crazy. It'll feel like a big change to the three letters in front of your name. Or what was the thought process on the decision? It is my is to be honest. Everybody from our city usually go see geo paper out. I'm all into one. Yeah it went why ran. Qc were you having those conversations with other two camps Dane now I handle offset kind of got to like early on maybe before God. He wouldn't necessarily been thinking about it right now. They probably thought about it as is probably move fast enough. I don't know how it went. There's almost like there's so much talent coming out of Memphis right now that it's like it's hard for the for anybody to grab everybody for a while it was like it'd be popping rabbit from Memphis every couple of years now is like every couple of months we find out about something new is time. Yeah definitely you. You have relationships. Have you got a chance to meet Guardian them or Dolphin them? Have you gun chance to sort of up is the top level Guy Shot Youngster in the Dow reached out to me a few weeks ago. Saying we supposed to be working issues. There's don't you don't feel like there's any kind of all kinds of weird conflicts between people in Memphis you feel you're on the outside cassirer that. Shit. Losing a ninety do trying to get these motherfucking money may right what's offsets attitude on signing artists. Or what have you seen so far in terms of what he's trying to do in terms of your career citing you in terms of your career. What's offsets mentality on what it feels like? He's trying to do for you or where he wants to help. Develop your shit. I mean I feel I imam light. He come like office the Big Brother you know what I'm saying. He give me a lot of game. You know saying let me know lots to do this do they? Watch out for the she. You know what I'm saying certainly Shit I don't WanNa get into but you know. Yeah he just really be giving me a lot of gaming appreciated. Yeah I mean. He's he's seen a shallow ups and downs in terms of a career. So it's like if he's but does it feel like he's fully like invested in like it's got to be tough for him because he's so successful and he's moving around crazy. All the time is kind of hard for him to necessarily be able to put much effort into don't busy can you know what I'm saying. He Know Me. He Nama Workaholic. Anyway so she weird seems. Kinda crazy like you have had song popping off and you haven't even necessarily gonNA him and be like Yo. Can you get to make the SOMPOP off yet now? Only oh they won the mall right right. Okay but nauseous. Really been grinding it out right. And that's what he believes. He believes in making me grinded out like their way even Pe- a lot of shit a lot of my work. She a Lotta sheet happen. Because I did you know what I'm saying right definitely. Yeah like in terms of your work ethic. What do you think is the most important thing for you to be putting your time into doing a shallow shows right now? Are you more focused on doing video? I feel like one thing with you. Is that you have been pushing the fuck out of this one song over and over and over which. I think is smart because if you have a son is really a hit. You gotta just pound that Shit into people's brains before you go putting out a million new songs. Why I feel I. I'll focus more on different focus on work by the time in like right. Now it's time to focus on guineas backings in Focus zone put releasing these projects. You know since coming out on the nineteen so this is all about the time line before I was in a studio a lot right. I'm trying to you know what I'm saying. Get my shit together for the tape. Now focus on guineas breed now. That's always a tough thing to figure out. You need to just be being creative for then you also have to be the the marketing guy pushing out of the shit you created. Sometimes it can be hard to like do both at the same time I think. Marketing is was really being. We've been really focusing now more lately. Yeah because it's kind of like we all know people who are dope dope music and stuff but it's hard like when you can't just focus on one thing. Just push that shit really like for you to have one really really. Big Song is like so much more important than to have. Ten decently popular songs. Yeah a lot of times when people are thinking about. Cronk they think about getting fucked up down with that or I thought that when I make these damn song really. So what's what's a typical protocol you be drinking and smoking or are you going to be on that reliable in Martell. Blues with my tail is my sheet. Oh okay that's good guys feel like a lot of times when people telling me like. Hey Molly in studio my God. I know that might be all right for right now. But the long term shelf life having that kind of habit in Right you gotTa keep your clear. Once you get familiar with all the other drugs appear to be doing and then all of a sudden drinks like fucking total safe. Good things are record doing because it's so much less addictive I feel like it loosens. You will have you gotten a chance to like being the fact that you were torn and doing all these different shows and stuff is is it kind of wild for you. Having not had those experiences previously now she is expected. I already knew what I had to do and what was going on. I've been waiting on this. Show you my. I'm just proud. Real crazy is a while for like your family to see. Are these changes taking place and everything as well like I'm barely home and your San and my pops you know. This was his dream. He see me doing it so she laid down so he wrapped he used to. He actually make beats. He gets them songs on on my tape else really is so he makes beats any can still make like current bts. He's stuck on some old school all but really crazy go crazy. Wow that's exciting. Is that kind of like a weird feeling. Those like if your dad hands you a tape and you don't use one of them. It's like damn I brought you into this. One Damn beat the my policy like the heat. Heat real he'll one hundred. You know what I'm saying like this. He happy life for me. He knows gone. Ripped this shit. You know other sheet what it is. I'm artists not because he was he. Put you onto a shallow to wrap from early on your life or other music as well. I mean I used to like I just usually go to the studio with me growing up. I had no choice. You know what I'm saying. So embedded in you right. He was wrapping to so and beats. Well it's interesting because it's like a Wada like younger artists. They don't seem they know about fucking anything so it's like for you to even have a song that references a style of music. Those pop really you know ten fifteen years ago. That's pretty out of the ordinary in the first place because so many people that feels like shit before Travis Scott. Right no spread shop Travis. Guys there's sometimes you feel people. I don't really have that much of an understanding of music and all Krung sound like all that shit like all that stuff is super relevant right now by definitely so you do not daughter out of that issue was great great urges and he was turned up on the Dan saying hypothermia two hours. Wow that must have been exciting book to just play like a birthday party at. Somebody's house or something. I wanted to house. It was a actual clue. Oh so his daughter's old enough that she was actually in the Clever Bertha then so you get to build with him much or how does that mean ti? We always we stay connected. You know? Psa Abi hit normal. He hit me up no salaries running on one time oh one of the bounces clue was giving me a hard time. He may shy getting it. Do you feel like a lot of people end up thinking from Atlanta. I'm from just because of who you're around Shit Yeah they use to nano motor mouth. Often you feel like Memphis is. Is that a big party. You in terms of like why you feel like you're doing you're proud memphis resonant. I'm really putting off for the like one hundred percent. Yeah it is. It's been a while a couple of years and you think of all the talents. We'll come on in Memphis all right. What about the dancing journal? Because I know there's something that you take a lot of pride and you've been dancing since you're She'd been doing this shit since middle school. Our school me. A couple of my brothers is in his wrong. Right now is how we met each other guys walk and shoot. You know what I'm saying so when you got into the dancing though it was more of like a gang related thing or non non gang related she. This word come from like okay so against walking. Come from come from Memphis. You know what I'm saying back in the eighties and she guys pimps and she just used the council they used to do the she in his became thing for us to really be the CL- finding you know saying from guys to walk in light. It was just a thing. Feel kind of crazy because it felt like for a long time it was like not really cool to dance and rap right and that has all gone away over the past couple of years right. It's all about how you do it too. Yeah did you have like years in the club or you just do you? You weren't GonNa Dance. You just didn't feel comfortable with it. Didn't seem like a cool thing to do and now should change on top of the Shit in the studio dance and that was his we wanted. I wouldn't even do their first. 'cause I actually was done shooting the video then. My homeboy lime. I do this shit she had to do. I hopped up there. Initiate went crazy. It felt like that helped with the minimum element of that Song Right. So if I would enable detail until you talk Yeah you do have have posted on it or might have posted a few things. But I'm not consistent Ohka because it feels like that's where while the labels at the very least they're trying to use that to help break off like make a lot of songs popoff and everything like using the whole tick tock way. Have you thought much about that? Song is used on there all the time. Finnegan more intuitive though because it is a good way way to promote now definitely them anybody Are there any other like like when you're making music now you ever thinking about the dance element or about the promotional aspect like how it might spread on social media something? You're thinking about out of time saying this because I'm always like trying to find ways to go our nose in when it comes to the editing like always made sure I keep in touch with them when they come to the video like I told them. I don't shop the dancing part on the table. I told him not to chop it up. You should me because I feel I did a take away from me so I feel I did. What made you go by when you don't shop. This shit up is much this one takes you. They WANNA THEY WANNA see the full actual dance moves right around it. Yeah I mean it's like nowadays is kind of like people like music. That's a little bit Simpler Lis having those songs that are simpler. Because it's like you want all these kids at home to be able to relate to your song enough that they wanNA dance to it and they want to basically help you push the song right weird mentality they have to get into. So what do you plan to this point in terms of working on a specific project or more or videos to his mask? Goto is away February. Nineteen in Which is finished the day? Remiss video videos ready is is ready altogether in it technicalities. Who's who's who's the person that was hard to nail down. Neither one really do suggest you got a busy schedule do but we made it work humane work should should they video these days to make? It look like everybody was together. A that's what's up so you're working on that video. Do you have any idea like what the project are? You trying to do something different with it. Doesn't mean more of the same type of Shit you've been bringing into the table Honestly I feel is going to be more like the first one but better. You know saying it's going to be better. It's going to be she. Crock is for but then it science versatile swish it up a little bit you know. Can we have your conversations with drake? No you haven't seen them like and all your fucking postseason topic. So he's a fan but isn't necessarily touchdown right interesting so that's the come weird smile yard on an issue could definitely have a anything else. We should know anybody that you WanNa shut out or thank or anything. My shot through the whole tripling family my Charlotte to my family. The House all sad to the city so I said to me go south. Qc's shots wiring salads. And they'll jump or to appreciate that What else you got going on here was like poverty now for your dog got more interviews to do. Just pretty much working. You already did a bunch of now. Fires one the first one? I'm wondering because usually some he's done a few interviews. They know what they don't WanNa talk about. I'm wondering what the ship is. GonNa fuck in make you jump up and start dancing on. The table is going to be. Oh I WANNA find a list of questions. Don't ask me about this. La figure it out overseeing fee. Yeah all right makes sense to me. Well do DEUCE keep killing. It is Appreciation Jabber podcasts. On world took us on Youtube soundcloud itunes.

Memphis John Right Qc Dan Tennessee Warren Duke Pat Juicy J superintendent La Jacob Beats Youtube Nassar Fook Fogel Sleet Nomo Mersey Clo Cross Duke dancing journal drake
Episode 40A  Brooke Davis  Adventures of an Urban Homesteader

Discovered Wordsmiths

20:10 min | 5 months ago

Episode 40A Brooke Davis Adventures of an Urban Homesteader

"Are you working on your other career? But struggling to get that first book published does the goal of being in awe Thursday through Thursday or responsive having multiple books and making a full-time living or as Fantastical is living in Cinderella's Castle welcome to discovered word. Smith's a podcast where aspiring authors can be heard join Stephen Schneider is he finds and talks to authors? You may not know but authors that have gotten their foot on the author career path here what they've done to get there and off they want to go now settle down it's time for a bit of inspiration and advice, listen to today's discovered Wordsmith. All right. Well today on the podcast. I've got Brooke Davis and so welcome Brooke to the podcast. Thank you very much for having me. I'm excited to be here. Great and Anna know is it snowing where you are? We had snow lately. You know what we did get just a little bit of snow, but it's supposed to be warmer and its melting off very fast as it always does walk in the Rocky Mountains. It seems to snow and then go nice. Yeah. Well, we've actually had more snow this year than the last couple so that's I like snow. So it's good. I do too and and a little bit more but we'll get take what we get. Right. So Brooke before we get started talking about your book. Tell us a little bit about yourself who you are what you like to do besides writing. So I'm originally from Southern Indiana and I grew up there and I went to school there. I actually have my schooling was in business, ironically enough grew up in the country. Love to be outside Edge Photography hiking travelling in the west. I've been in Colorado over twenty years now and just loved it loved going around in the mountains Yellowstone Park is a favorite song. Anna is a favorite as well. So you're an outdoor person mostly in the fall and the spring not so much in the summer. It can get a little warm but it is it is beautiful beautiful here in the West Palm of the time. So yes, I like being out with a lot with with all these activities. Could I ask is writing your full-time or do you have a day job, you know writing is dead would I would like for it to be my full-time? It is not quite full time yet. I also have a certificate in Wellness coaching. So that's what I do along with writing several things together. What made you decide to start writing, you know writing is always been an outlet for me just really of thoughts and emotions. I have been journaling for a long time. And I know that writing a book is is very much not the same but it was really about getting thoughts and feelings out to work them out. And then I really started wondering, you know, could I write an entire book off? Is that something that I could pull off or would it be horrible or could I actually make something into a book that I would be proud of? And it kind of just went from there and I because I am so very creative. I think that's where it came from. It just really was an outlet for that creativity that I wasn't really able to express thoughts as part of someone who was doing a more analytical job in finance. And so like a lot of authors using writing to get your thoughts and feelings out and kind of felt a pool towards writing. Absolutely and I think it has to do with the story time. That is one of the most important things in writing is that that ability to tell a story and to not only like it yourself but to say wow with somebody else benefit from this, you know, could they be amused or transported or whatever regardless of genre? I think that storytelling is the most exciting part in putting those pieces together as a writer. It's just become more fun and more engaging to me as I've gone along. Okay, I like that and I think a lot of writers share that Viewpoint did you say how long have you been writing? You know, I've been writing off and on probably for about eight years now, I think I wrote the very first draft of something that may never see the light of day in twenty. You know, we have those sometimes it's like that's just going to go in the back of the desk and stay there. But yeah, I think it's really been off and on for about eight years. So it's been quite a while. So you came in when things were really heating up with Kindle and e-books and all that. You know, I will Wish I had come in a lot earlier before they had changed some things they still offer such a wonderful service now, but because I didn't get published until last year. I still consider myself really should be since it's my first book and the first time going through that process. Typically I was writing when it was new but I didn't actually get in the game until last year. Okay, so you still seen some changes over the last couple of years and still been able to get your book published. Yes. Also, your book is called The Adventures of an urban Homesteader tell us about that of what the title means and what the books that book is about. So the adventures of an urban Homesteader the Diary of Kendall Whitney is about a young woman who really needs to figure out how to adult and she's twenty-eight years old. She knows from San Francisco to Montana. She's moving to Bozeman Bozeman is not a super small town. It's about fifty thousand people and University. So it's not the super small town, but it's not this super big city either and she really launches herself on this quest for Independence. You know, what does she want as far as a career? What does she want in a relationship? And then she has some really fist on forehead faceplant humor stuff of how to live alone. So she's trying to figure these three things out during the book along with a very funny and endearing cast of characters that are trying to help her along the way and you talked about a couple of things wrote before this what made you finally want to write this book and get this particular book out there. So I think I had to think about that for a while when you had you had studied that question. I'm like, hey, I did this happen really what happened was the first thing that I wrote that probably will not see the light of day was very heavy and very serious and pig Emotionally draining to write and I realized afterwards I'm like, I need to write something fun and lighthearted that is going to make me laugh that it's going to make people laugh. And so that's how they came about and I've been to Bozeman many times. I've been going up there with my family and on my own since the early nineties late eighties, and I'm like, I think I can write about this well enough to know the town and also from this point of view of saying these are some things that can happen along the way that could be really fun and educational and enlightening to this character. So like a lot of wage authors you wanted a book that resonated with you which would then resonate with others. But also if it wasn't out there then you might as well be the one to write it down, right and I knew my writing it in Diary form, which it is in it would be a little different but I I also had that concern of this cannot be Bridget Jones diary and it's not so that wage. Now is definitely a consideration of saying this needs to be different Kendall. Whitney's journey is different than British journey in many ways. And so I had that in mind as well, but mostly it was about tell fun and light-hearted story that moved along with relatable characters. People are like, oh yeah, that's probably happened to me that was embarrassing that again type of thing in this is traditionally published or you published it yourself. I did self publish this one. Did you consider trying to traditional publish or did you always want to publish it yourself? I always wanted to self publish this one. I think in the future, I would consider some type of a break publishing with traditional and stealth we'll kind of see how that plays out. But for this one, I really did want to self-publish this one. Do you have plans for a follow-up or is the next book a table? then completely different next book is something completely And the current book have you gotten any feedback from readers? What are people saying about it or telling you you know, what for the people that it's really speaking to? It has been very relatable very funny mostly positive reviews and some people it truly is not their cup of tea, but for the people that are really kind of into that and are getting the humor they are really enjoying it. I would say it has some pretty good reviews out there on Amazon and Goodreads right now. And you said it's on Amazon. Are you just on Amazon or do you have it available elsewhere? I do have it available elsewhere. It is also on Kobo Apple Barnes and Noble and Google and so the the Nextbook, can you tell us a little bit about that one? Yes. The next book is a micro Memoir it was I hope to publish it sometime in 2021. The working title is without you I would be nothing and it's none. Fiction as a micro Memoir and my interpretation of micro Memoir is short Memoirs and I kind of mash two books together. So there's an author name fan assembly. She had a micro memoir book called Heating and Cooling and she had 52 and then Grant Faulkner had a book of stories called Fishers not Fishers with a fishing pole Fishers as in fissures and each of his stories were exactly one hundred words, and I thought what would happen if I took out 100 micro Memoirs that were exactly one hundred words each and yes that is as daunting as it sounds. Wow, so nothing like you could challenge exactly and it really was but it forces you to be really smart with language and emotion and what you want to convey and that book right now is in the Baton Rouge. Your stage so it's moving along. And again, I hope to have that out. I do plan to self-publish that one as well. Hopefully sometime in late summer, maybe early fall even though it's nonfiction just from what you're talking about. It sounds like your style of writing. It will be very similar to the quirky humor from your first book Is that sound accurate, you know there there's definitely some quirky humor in there. It does take on a little more of a serious tone. It's about really talking about how Place experience and people move through your life and it talks about the aging process. It also talks about me losing my father to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's and how it kind of moves into that but there's definitely a mix of that quirky humor as well the adventures of an urban Homesteader. How much would you say is like a reflection from your experience in life compared to the Memoir? I'm trying to I want a dog Sure that I understand your question. I definitely think there were some reflections of things that did happen to me and Adventures of an Urban Home stutter because we're going from fiction to non-fiction. I mean clearly as a memoir is very very personal stylistically. There will definitely be some things that are similar but because everything I chose to make everything 100 Words and that micro Memoir obviously thought was that was more challenging is is that's kind of what you were wanting to know. Yeah, I guess a lot of times when we write we we write a story that is not based off our life, but you know, we put a lot of ourselves into it and obviously that's what a memoir does. I was just curious if your fiction book was a bit of a fictionalized account of some of your life or experiences, you know, I would say in many ways know it really was Kendall's experience. I definitely think there were bits and pieces there, but I think really Kendall The main character in Adventures is her own person because she comes from a very large city and I did not I did not have that experience growing up. I also am an only child and Kendall has siblings. So I would say there are a few things but not not too too much. She really is her own woman in that book. And are you finding any challenges? I'm going from fiction to non-fiction luckily enough. I didn't probably because I have been working on this micro Memoir project and in all honesty. I told my editor I almost didn't do it because I would like who is going to want to read this and I'm like no the more I got into it. I'm like they're they're nuggets of wisdom here that I think are useful and valuable. So I went ahead and did it and she's she's giving me some really good feedback on the book. So I'll be very excited to see what the beta readers have to say. I think it will have been a good use of time in the end. And when one more question on your book, do you think you might write a sequel to the fiction book? Urban Homesteader, you know, I don't have plans to I think I could but I don't have plans to at this time. Let's put it that way. I find interesting because there's so much of a push nowadays for everything being a series that you you read three books of anything instead of just one right and I think that that's going to be fascinating because I I have writer friends who very much right in the series. Please I tend to write my ideas as single stand-alone books. So yeah, and and that's completely valid I think too often people get stuck on. Oh my God, everyone saying I have to do this and you don't necessarily have to there are plenty of books out there by authors that are stand alone without being in a series that are very very popular. Absolutely. So let's let me ask you when you were growing up. I assume you've been reading for most of your life. What are some of your favorite books and authors so they said I did have some in childhood. Um, most of the authors that I've been reading lately that have come to be my favorites one is Kate Morton. She wrote the distant hours also block makers daughter. I read the distant hours in one day. I literally could not put it down. I had the Olympics on that recommendation. Yeah. I have you Olympics on mute. I had I talked to my mom for 30 minutes and I'm like, I gotta go cuz I gotta finish this book nice MJ Rose also is one of my favorites Eleanor brown one end. She wrote the weird sisters. And then also I tend to not read a lot of fantasy books, but I'm becoming more interested in them. One of the authors. I read recently was Tessa Groton and she wrote the queens of Innis clear and I have her latest one called lady Hotspur, but I have not started it. So yeah. Those are those are some of the authors I've been reading that I really do. Enjoy. Great. I'll have to make some links to those. I haven't heard of most of those where and you live in the Rocky Mountains. Do you happen to have a local bookstore that you enjoy going to be? Absolutely. I live in Suburban Denver. So the local bookstore that I go to is Tattered Cover. And it's been on the scene for like fifty years here in the Denver area. Nice. I love bookstores that have a quirky little flavor to them. Yeah. It's kind of an institution here. Okay. So Brooke to finish up our talk about your writing tell people why you think they should get your book The Adventures of an urban Homesteader if I'm not really looking for a laugh and you enjoy romantic comedy focused really on a quest of is she going to achieve the Independence that she wants in the areas of her life and is quite she's quite frankly going to survive living in Montana after having lived in San Francisco. Really? It's just a light-hearted way to find beachy read that will transport you for awhile, and hopefully leave you just really satisfied with the ending. Nice nice. This just popped into my head. So do you would you pictures This book as being a movie or a TV show. Oh, wow. That's an interesting question. I would say. Off the top of my head. It strikes me more as a movie versus a TV show, but I could see where things could be episodic with her various quests in life. But yeah, we around just hilarity of adulting really. Well, you know, you could always push people that if they like Bridget Jones Diary read this. Yeah, it's just different in in some ways. But if you like diary forum and you're really on that quest for Independence and trying to see if she actually pulls off the trifecta in trying to adult life definitely so yes, well tell us again the name of the book where to get it and if you have a website where people can find you. Yes, so the name of the book is Adventures of an urban Homesteader and my website is w w w Brooke Davis rights and Brooke is spelled. With any you can get it there. You can also get it on Amazon Kobo Apple Barnes and Noble and Google and I do have I appreciate I do have both print and wrote a book editions available. Nice. Let me ask a lot of people don't do print nowadays. Why did you choose to do print I think because I'm one of those readers who likes them look in my hand if I'm reading generally I'm reading from a paperback or a hard back in all honesty. And I also think that as a new author I really just wanted the experience of holding that hot little bulge in my hand and saying I did this because it's a big deal. It takes a long time. It's quite the journey and at the end of the day you really sometimes just want to have that thing. You can hold in your hand and say look what I did and that's a very valid. I think a lot of authors liked that tactile. Hey, I have an accomplishment. I agree. It's it's not as fulfilling birth. Put up a digital bunch of zeros and ones. It's really not. I mean, it's it's so awesome and amazing that we can do what we do now as writers, but there's still something about holding that book in your great. Well Brooke, I appreciate you taking a couple of moments to talk about your book today and we are going to continue in a moment with the second half where we talked about getting it done. So thanks for being on today. Thank you. Thank you for listening to discovered wordsmiths come back next week and listen to another author discuss the road. They traveled and maybe sometime in the near future. It might be you.

Brooke Davis Brooke mountains Yellowstone Park Kendall Kendall Whitney Bozeman Bozeman Anna Stephen Schneider Rocky Mountains Amazon Southern Indiana fan assembly Grant Faulkner Bridget Jones Parkinson's Alzheimer's Montana Bozeman Smith Colorado
The visual imagination of Steve McQueen

Le Monde diplomatique - English edition

24:35 min | 1 year ago

The visual imagination of Steve McQueen

"Hello and welcome to this april twenty twenty podcast from on diplomatic. My name is george. Mela and my guest on this program is john bird who is an artist. Writer curator emeritus professor of art in critical theory at middlesex university and the apron edition of the paper john rights by the artist and filmmaker steve mcqueen who had a major retrospective at tate modern in london until the gallery was suddenly closed because of covid nineteen mcqueen who turned fifty last year had an immensely successful career by any measure since winning the turner prize in one. Thousand nine thousand nine for his early explorations of the moving image. He's gone on to direct four feature films the most recent widows and twenty eighteen and and twenty fourteen twelve years a slave for which he received the oscar for best picture becoming the first black recipient of that award but mcqueen has by no means abandoned the gallery for the movie theater as you'll hear and has his recent exhibition showed before we got onto that. I asked john to fill in some background about mcqueen's korea before the nine thousand nine hundred nine prize. He was an all student. He was a chelsea first of all chelsea school of art and then he went onto goldsmiths college university of london in the beginning of the nineteen nineties student at goldsmiths from ninety to ninety. Four as you know the goldsmiths is the school that is most closely say. Cat who became known as the y. b. as young british artists it produced quite of quite a few including damien. Hirst so he comes out of a background of officials practice. He became interested in photography and film and video work at school and that became his medium expression. I think for quite a lot about at that period of the early nineties late eighties and early early nineties. It wasn't just the film and video offered to some extent to come different way. Don't for a new way of working. It was a break with the more traditional pass activities of painting sculpting so. He did that. He had a brief period in new york. Where east of the university. But then he. He's interesting that he's work was picked up actually really quite early on. I mean i think not only when he was college but very soon afterwards in in the early nineties he was in a way noted as one of the most original most interesting students coming out of that that goes miss background and he started making black and white videos one particularly which is cool bad which is nineteen ninety-three where he filmed himself naked wrestling with another nude male. And in a way that very early work indicated i think themes that were occurring throughout his practice because it is the the black male body and mail buddy which is the focus and has been the focus of his practice throughout over the years and is also course that interest in in the body and the body in extreme states. You know the exhaust general violence or eroticism is in a way of kind of signature style. You so another work deadpan. Which i think is probably one of his best known works. because he's also quite amusing. He took a bus. Keaton stunt where keating stands and look house collapses around him and his left standing a hamstring. Forty in the position where the open window is mcqueen repeats that so you also think through his practice get a constant reference to send them all those one of the film's In the in the exhibition a coup charlotte where he. It's a ten minute film of the actress. Charlotte rampling with steve. Mcqueen is stroking her face with his fingers and they're kind of coming very close to the eye that tracing the i lead the eyelashes and at one point actually who might seem to make contact with the eyeball and of course if you know about film then that's gonna make a connection to welles film Sheyanne onto do a slitting of the eyeball so there is that dialogue that goes on. I think which of course is the case with any artist. This all comes out of all influence will always find its way through into practice. But we steve I say there is a constant reference to both mainstream but also independent cinema and new in them all in preparation for talking to you today. John i was looking at some some interview material that steve mcqueen had done through the years and i saw him talking about back in the early days of syncing furstration about being unable to make feature films. I was quite surprised at that that even even quite early on in his career. I had always seen the use of film in the art gallery. It's been quite a sort of separate demane from the making of feature films. And perhaps i was my perception but to hear him. Enunciate that rather surprised me. Well i think in a way significant that he did say that. And i think significant that he's one of the very few to filmmakers who has made that step through into mainstream cinema. I'll use of film and video is quite different to filmmakers where different aspects oh the kind of materiality of film i mean has it to. Dean is another artist. I guess who comes to mind Who i think in some respects is similar to stephen her interest in the materiality of film yes and the process but is somebody who i don't think will she hasn't really tried to step into mainstream cinema and i'm not sure she'd be that interested in doing it. I think. steve. I was probably offensive. You have a much bigger audience. It's a very different audience. Yes and i mean that suggests that he yeah that there was a strong desire on his part to reach an audience and beyond that to communicate a message that is pushing things too far to see him as having a sort of sense of of something he wants to get across to mainstream. I don't think is an artist with an agenda right And i think his film the narrative very much comes out of the process of working with the material to some extent. I mean obviously not entirely. Because if you do go into mainstream cinema then narrative is pretty importance. You know you need to engage in. Hold your vote for for you know a particular period of time but even those films i mean with with hunger the very very long sequence of bobby sands in the jail talking to the priest and ninety is all happening in a way and that seems to me that very much an artist take on the kind of almost like a soliloquy or two personnel was like conceptual art work. In fact. i think you get it a bit. In twelve years a slave as well the kind of interaction between the characters particularly in the kind of violence that goes on. There's almost a sense of what happens to bodies come together in a confrontation sure. Of course they are carefully scripted. And i don't think he's somebody light. I know ken loach somebody like that. Who who just you know. More or less allows actors to improvise. I think he's pretty tolerant torio in his role but it still you know if we create this what will happen. And that's very much the kind of sense that you get you know with the with the autism films yes experimental in that sense even when he is apparently working in the mainstream. There's something remember that scene in in hunger way. It's a fixed camera for. I think a good thirty minutes and there's something mesmerizing and rather fearless on the part of the filmmaker. Isn't that yeah no absolutely so. I think you know the if you know about all his films in the kind of you know over the last twenty thirty years And you see mcqueen major movie one of the four movies Then i think you do get a sense of this is visual artist. Who's making a film at the same time being because he is an artist. Who is able to deal with the mechanics of mainstream cinema. Are you'll you all carry it along by by a very powerful narrative of course yes and so not not a toll contemptuous of narrative. This may just be my prejudice. But i often get the impression that video installations and art galleries don't really have a great deal of interest or time for narrative. I think it depends on the mak- i very much depends on the make but i think you can get a great deal of film and video. His film video work over the last sort of thirty years. Or so. you know which doesn't It doesn't convey that Gency that movement. That doesn't even seem to be that much interested in the measles and things like that it's more or less. It's almost like conceptual out in front of the camera. But yes he's his difference in that. That was the case. I think even with his you know with these early films. I mean he. I started introduced found in the late nineties where he was rolling these tin drums around st new york And you get the sound of the rolling drum coming through but and he had this you know he has an exhibition Leon the i see a of Kind of mini retrospective. Which was very early really. I mean you know still still relatively young in terms of a major major career given what he's achieved in spirit and looking at a piece like western deep which is in show that that's been at the tate modern into until it was closed because of the coronavirus design. There is a very important part is a descent into the deepest gold mine in the world. And i guess it's imaginable to have it as a silent film but when you hear the signed the rumble is in the squeaks and the the machinery it's a very very powerful part of the whole impression that makes isn't it it. May it does do that and it is. I mean i think. I taught in the piece about his very confess phenomena logical filmmaker that he's very interested in the tactility of seeing and you get that particularly western deep because when it's blown up from you know super eight to the large screen then you'll very also aware the pixel ation and you have to strain really both in terms of sound in terms of vision to kind of make out what's happening. These murky figures kind of emerging out out of the darkness. And the way in which the the soundtrack subtly goes silent as they stagger around and they stop again. So you you you know you do identify. Think very powerfully with the claustrophobia. The experience of going down you know over two miles in this cage to work the coal face to extract the oil. You know. I almost sort of felt your hands. Switching the hinge of seeing too. Because you're sort of on the edge of your seat looking looking at the the the image and it's yes i mean. It is a body experience as well as you know a a sort of the visual experience and again you've got bodies of mainly black men in a precarious place play an environment. Which is which is threatening which is hostile to them. Yes it's a place of restraint you know they They are entrapped in that. And the course behind. It is the whole complex. History of colonialism sexually goes to wise people do certain jobs and new though i mean in a way that's why i think he doesn't have an agenda. I mean i think an artist who was more interested in you know the kind of in the old various political message would have gone into that mall whereas i think with mcqueen to some extent you have to work it. You have to work to get the movie to get the to get the narrative but you also in a way to work through the different layers rule there because they're in in the narrative there in the missiles and van in the different component parts of the image at anyone sort of moment on the screen. But you have to kind of uncover it. You have to pick it apart. So saying he doesn't have an avert agenda is it is nonetheless possible to say that there are recurrent things which fired his imagination as a as a filmmaker i And i think we've touched on them. I think certainly you know that the that history history of the slave trade. What paul gilroy refers to as the black atlantic of the incarceration oppression and violence downto- to the body. I think those are very much there and of course that's twelve years. A slave is is the most obvious example of that. But i think also the ideas you know both the extreme of of bodily sensation. You know everything from. I said the early the two figures wrestling where you feel the tension the weight of the body sweat coming off the bodies the way in which one is trying to you know sort of throw the other one that sort of sense of interlock figures you get it with the touch of show rambling on the You get it with the The physicality of western deep. I mean you even get it in the you know the sort of something. Well of course in the one of of marcus who shoots his brother where you'll faced with this skull. This recumbent figure where the camera is placed shooting directly onto the the skull which is the head which is filling the screen with the skull. Going across it. you're constantly thinking. How did that happen what. What was the pain that was involved in doing that. How did he come out of it. Life how do i relate this to. The story is being told about the accidental. You know act that ends ends alive. So i think yes i mean. There are definite themes or a definite tropes definite images almost repeat but i think the body in pain the body of the body and pleasure of central to to his practice. Do you think that that steve mcqueen himself makes no distinction between his more mainstream cinema. And the films that you see in galleries. Does he see it as all of a piece. Or how does how do you know. He would characterize these different modes that he works. And because it's clear from what you're saying the recurrent themes and approaches in in. Both i think from you know from looking at the work. I don't think it's a complete disconnect in any means. I don't think it's a matter of saying okay. You know use project of making a hollywood movie. And that's what i'm gonna be alright and then now you know got an exhibition coming up. I'm gonna make three films. I think is like that tool. An i think so i would imagine An one could probably if you really studied the where you could see how the experience of mainstream cinema benfica's back into the making of this film. It's a two way process. I mean any kind of practices. The same person doing it. I think that also they're very different kinds of activities. You know an artist films. Even you know kind of quite big budget films. I someone thinks if somebody like bill viola. You know doing some some of his films. It's mostly a person with a camera and the subject you know you may use. The kind of others may help the sound technician. He's going to basically. That's what it is once. You're into mainstream cinema. You know a team. It's a big big team and you are part of that and you take you know mu- very much a kind of overseeing director or role rather than the intimate makers role that. I think you get us an artist. Making film made an oscar winning film even before you and the oscar. There's a lot of money riding on. Isn't it there said there are people who feel very much that they need to have a view on what you're putting out. Yeah yeah very much. So and i think equally full for women for you know like Tests the black filmmakers. Easter always been a tough cool. So you're up against those things as well. I mean i think. Certainly the fact that he'd won the turn. He had that reputation as you know as an artist who could do you know major projects that would have helped but even so he still a huge jump to go from that to you. Know a big budget. Production john before we finish. I want to talk by it. An exhibition which was running at the same time as the tate. Modern one which was on a tight. Britain is called year three. And there's a little bit different from the film projects we've been talking. Can you say something about that. And how you sort of see it fitting into mcqueen's is different. He spent a year with assistance going around london schools both in and great great to london school primary schools to take photographs of children in year. Three which is basically children who around about eight years old He said he chose that age. Because that's the point at which an anyone who's had children will no. This is the point at which children are starting to in a way separate from the intimacy of the family and stop to encounter the baroda world. It's like their horizons. The beginning to change the intention really was to investigate the diversity of one of the world's great capital cities through his children. And that is the thing i mean. They're all things. I think one could say about the last. I mean he's at the tape britain rather than tate modern It occupied the galleries. Which all the major galleries on the ground floor. In in britain it's photographs displayed in great form throughout the whole of of of the being galleries. in that respect they're all things about it but i think also make reference to aspects of contemporary conceptual photography. I mean you think of the role of the greed in contemporary art. You think of People like bernard hill. Becker who did those endless series of shots of jones industrial sites. Things like that so it has those kinds of connections there but it is about these children and their everything from quite smooth groups to large groups. Mostly they have a teacher or a couple of teachers and assistance in the group summer in school uniform summer just in you know the the everyday clothes that facing their face to camera so they engage with you. It's stacked high because know seventy six thousand reduce. There is an awful lot of pictures. But it's adult kim and the diversity over london. I think it is a powerful powerful statement. And i think it's a hopeful statement. You know what is the utopic side. -education education is for everyone and when it comes down to you know group of kids eight years old and a cloth. The potential is there and they all the same. It is a remarkable work. I say i don't think it's great art. In the way in which i think some of his other works so i think there will always stand say you know the cliche the test of time but i think as an imaging of londoners a truly cosmopolitan city from his youngest attack inhabitants. It is a wonderful look. Do you see the the infants of mcqueen everywhere. Not so obviously I think off to this exhibition more so because bear in mind. I say his last exhibition with the in the nineties the so we're major exhibition with quite a long time on for that. The are a lot of Students who of course have continued to going to investigate the moving image either through film or video now increasingly of course through the digital media. I mean have some students. Whom is you know. The digital media is the area to go if you want to work with the moving image in a way. That's a tough for future historians to plot the queen's influence but there's no doubt that he has had an influence and serve me as a wide public and and he's been able to reach through his step over into mainstream cinema a very very large audience so i would hope that people who have seen is main films might well don't know but anyway might have been encouraged to wonder what else is done and similarly those who you know just know him as an office filmmaker. Would i be better check out. These moves to there is a huge amount to explore some very rich body of practice. I was talking to john bad about his article. In the april twenty twenty edition of le monde diplomatique and titled looking without blinking. John's article is also available in the website at monte plus dot com. If you're a subscriber you can read every edition of the paper going back over twenty years as well as exploring other resources such as maps images the podcast archive and online exclusive content. And if you're not yet a subscriber this plenty of content online to entice you to become one and full details on how to go. Buy it in the words of the late. John birja why redel. Md to make sense of what's happening in the world behind the misinformation. I hope you'll join me again next month for another interview with one of our contributors and tell them thank you very much for listening and good evening.

mcqueen steve mcqueen twenty fourteen twelve years goldsmiths college university ten minute Sheyanne steve john bird twenty thirty years middlesex university oscar Gency st new york tate modern Mela twelve years goldsmiths wrestling Hirst bobby sands
Remembering Stan Lee

This Week In Marvel

17:58 min | 2 years ago

Remembering Stan Lee

"Uh-huh. Hi, Margaret, I'm Ryan, aka agent host of this week in marvel, and I'm Lorraine sink from earth's mightiest show, as you know, the world mourns, the loss of Stanley this week, you can read tons of stuff about his career has work. But the, and I have been a marvel a long time, and we figured we'd just talk about some personal remembrances about STAN we both interviewed a bunch of times. Yeah. I think we've both been super lucky to have that experience. But when I found out, I was going to interview STAN, it was a sort of last minute thing. They just happen to be able to fit in time with us at New York Comecon and Ryan is like you good. You got this. And I was like starting to tear up, and he's like, you're not gonna cry during the interview. Right. And it was like, no, I'm just very excited. I'm gonna be cool when he gets here. And I ended up being cool when got there, and he was so. So lovely, and so fun, and he's just so funny and charming whenever you talked to him, and it's just constant like when the cameras rolling or not. He's just as charming and fun. Yeah. I remember one of the interviews of interim a bunch of times one of them was in two thousand fourteen four seventy fifth anniversary he was by the office, and he was visiting and stuff. And so we did an interview in our hulk room here convert that the whole groom, it's really cool. And we're in there, and we talk about versus some other stuff. We actually have the interview on on YouTube. You guys can check it out. But we finished the interviews five ten minutes where it wasn't very long camera. Stop rolling. Everybody starts breaking is like boy that was good. You're great interviewer something like it was along those lines. And that was it that was like that made my year. I remember that so much and like, I know he's been interviewed probably. Hundred thousand times, right like seventy five years in the business and every day at it every day, and they probably told us to most if not all the people interviewed, but it meant so much to hear Stanley say that was a great interview. That was a good job basically saying, you're a good boy. I love you. The best that was the way I perceive it it's always in my no, I've had a very similar experience where he when I've talked to him. He'll be like thank you for interviewing me, you did a good job or that was so great. And there's something about it that does just feel like you've been blessed? Oh, okay. I do remember that that first time I interviewed him. Also, at the end of the interview, we usually, you know, off stage off camera we get kind of like last question rabbit up on them producer. And I was just like my last question is can I hug you which I don't think is necessarily like an appropriate question. But I like didn't if I would ever get to interview him again, and he had been such a part of my life. You know, I think you feel such intimacy and closeness to people where you read their words every week. And you know, that was the thing was so magical about all of the divorced of all the amazing characters he created and his amazing writing contribution was the man that he was in those back pages talking about the bullpen and making you feel like you worked there, and that you knew those people, and they were your friends, and they checked in with you every week and they cared about you, and it was a conversation. So I did feel like I was like we've been having this one sided conversation. My whole life. And now you're talking back to me, and you can hear me when I talk to you. It's not just me. Like that was great close the issue. When when he came by the office in twenty fourteen when we have this video, which was really so special. He's walking around. He's making jokes. We have photos is great photo of him holding you'll MIR. And you know, this is almost five years ago. So he's still in his nineties, but he is so sharp, so cool and funny. He's making jokes. He's talking about. Well, this office is so great and what we had back in my day. All this other stuff is joking with Nick Lowe, who when I shared this with Nick he was saying how that was the day. He took over Spiderman, and he had the man who created Spiderman walk into his office and like just Chit chat with them. Like what that means to someone is incredible. And like Bill Roseman showing him like Hairston, this is you created as a LEGO figure and in the video the best line is like so we had an artist draw you as LEGO and says like, oh, that's good. I'm glad it wasn't a like a bricklayer or Plummer. He's like instantly making jokes. So good. God. I two there's something about him. That is so honest. I remember asking him towards the end of another Comecon interview. What's like one thing that you would do different or do more of it? Because I can't imagine a thing he would do different because he's done so many amazing things, and he looked me so square in the eye, and he kind of I can't remember if we were still rolling at this point because he just turned to me made such direct eye contact with me, and he's like I wish I would have written more women. And I just it was just such a like if felt so special for me like he was saying it for me. But also that he really meant it. And it was just a a moment. Like, really treasure. And at the time. I was like, Ooh, I hope that was an okay question. And I'm so glad that I did. Yeah. So I was looking when I was going down YouTube rabbit hole because I was looking for we were at senio Comecon. It was twenty twelve or twenty thirteen you and I were trying to figure this out. I oh, yeah. We do this interview with STAN. Great good interviews. He's always wonderful. He's always easy. I think he was in the middle of us, and he was happy whatever. And it's done, and he's like great, and he jumps off our stage, and it's not a stage. But it's it's two to three footstep up. So this is still he's in his nine runabout ninety two eighty three. And they were like somewhere in early whatever. Yeah. He's an older gentle that Eddie gingerly hops off a stage and just goes off on his way. And I remember you and I slow MO like. Like. He was perfectly fine. You know, there's a picture that exists somewhere because our cameraman Jason Chung at the time with standing there holding a mono pod, which is like a singular tripod, hence, mono pod. But he was standing there and stand kind of like touch them on pot as he was jumping down. And you have this picture Jason one where he's looking out. And then what we're stand grabs it and he's going. Just completely shocked. He jumps down like, it's nothing. So good, so good. The first time I met on it was Comecon two thousand eight so think about that in time, and where we are now ten years ago in the back of the more of a booth and he's just sitting like you. I think he's about to go on stage and do a signing and he's sitting there, and he's like kind of holding court. He's like people coming like giving him a murder and incense and franking Franken. He is a wise man, they're giving them gifts in his one like talking to me, and I was just like million former editor of marvel dot com. Mark strom. We're just like excuse me, sir. I'll be we have a photo picture with you. He's like oh come on. He's great. Any like he's asking me. What I do. He's asking me like about me in the thirty seconds. And it's like, but you don't have to be so nice. And he was he was so nice. And so generous, and I remember the smile I had my face shaking. I was so happy nervous. Like just that first time meeting them that was that was wonderful. You know, one of the great things as we he comes to all the red carpets from the marvel studios films and on the red carpet for Infinity war. I continue to be on read it for this. I did nothing but show up, but I asked and towards the end of our interview just is there anything you want to say to the fans, and he infamously now said, I appreciate that. Everyone comes to see Mike cameos. And then they stick around to watch the rest of the movie. Because he is just the funniest most off the cuff, and he said it like it was nothing, you know, just effortless. And then he got on his jazzy scooter and just got out of. Yeah. One of the years that come come. We had the Odin thrown from the first film like we brought the whole thrown that was booth and it was amazing. Everybody had pictures of everyone. And I we don't have any actual pro photos like dirty Stevens who host of women. Margaret was our main photographer that point she was out shooting some 'cause player, and we have a stack of Taga for who for some reason, he's like six and a half feet tall. He's wide wider. The me. Ryan, I'm talking to you. Ryan Russell, and he didn't get close to the action. So I have photos from behind like forty people. But I am somehow right next to the thing. So I have these photos of STAN sitting on the throne just like looking regal. Majestic. There's one of him giving up like, whoa. Oh, it's great. He just he little room. And then I have another photo of him walking down and signing books for people in wheelchairs, and you can't all you see is stand signing and talking to like these people. Well, and that's going to say is I love going to his signings. Just to see him talk to people because there's something magical about the way that he knows he's important other people, and that his words have power, and that what he says to these people is going to be something that they take into their life with them. And he does such a beautiful job of making everyone feel so scene and so- cared for. And I think that is so evident in his work, and what makes him so amazing. He's so willing to tell these different stories of people may be different than him in this really heartfelt way. And it makes everybody feel so included iron heart writer viewing. She tweeted out a picture of one of stands so boxes for. Back in the day which ties into right now. But how marvel- was getting letters comics should be escapist Boba like all those media. But if the comics aren't saying, something, there's no soul there. And so he wanted his stories to mean, something to say something to people which I think is so important resonates, and you think of a marvel character like they're not perfect the marvel villains. We always talk about, you know, like the villains in the heroes there so layered, and that was not the way it was when he started. No, well, and I love that story that he tells about his beloved wife Joni when he was wrestling with how to write the fantastic four, and it was this sort of like big escapist sort of stories that people were telling and he was like, I wanna tell family drama. I wanna I want people to have real emotional stakes and I don't want it to just be titans. I wanted to have heart and Joni just being like, well, write the story that you want. All right, and what happens happens, and because of that, the marvel universe assists. And I just love that about him. And also them like his stories about Joni Ernst. We were couple months ago you and I were talking about poor games or something. And so I went home, and I was going through like my spin Iraq of late eighties early nineties comics that I have on display. I was looking through them just to look at the old ads, but I've flipped through. And there are a couple of old San soap-boxes, my favorite one was just like some random month in like ninety one or two or is just like go in Hollywood. Is this whole thing about how they were gonna make all these movies. And he was just like we'll it a deal, and it was just like you were saying before like this insight into something. And you're like cool, my friend is going to make movies. This is so neat. You know, just sa- best. Well, just thinking about the sort of cannon. He created not just in comics. But in fiction is mind blowing a lot of the concepts that are now sort of like how does time travel work in nerd world. Like a lot of that is based on stands work setting up sort of like. But a fax and things like that like none of that existed before STAN. And just the imprint he's left on science fiction is crazy. And I mean, and that all echoes into film and TV, and obviously other comics, but just the whole world, it's different than it's Dan, you tell us to someone recently when we were kids, the marvel comics of the early nineties late eighties would have sort of like a three sentence biography of a character at the first page tell you exactly who they were what their powers were at it would be like, you know, Peter Parker was normal teenager, Bobo, blah. And then it would say Stanley presents ellipses the amazing spider. Whatever was every month. You would see Stanley presents Stanley presents Stanley presents. And that that was a very early thing was like stands, he's ushering us into this wonderful world, and I had a friend when you know, we were so. Oh young. We would make up our own stories, and we would make our own Stanley present. So like, we would go to our local pool. And like there's this one dude who had a lot of back hair. Like he was one of the characters that we created like out of we had a name for. We'd like wrote Annely presents this guy from the pool with back hair hundred percent like there was a woman with nails all the stuff. We have written these down. These were the store we were building stories based on what we knew stand his thoughts. Like that was what we were conveying. And so he's always been in my head. I mean, it's still just so mind blowing to me that comics kind of went from this like entertainment, medium of just you get a nickel. And you you buy some pictures. But you know, you think about the X men in sort of allegory for civil rights, and the just the immense sort of mental like, the width of everything that you can encompass in that from not just like the emotional experience sort of like the relevance of it in society and just how rich it is. Whether it's kids like at a pool. Or an allegory for the civil rights movement. Even if you start thinking about the sixties, right what they just those stories route attack like all those things going on between sixty one and sixty five the amount of characters that he co created is insane. It's wild. Don't cry. I'm not good. I'm good. It's incredible. Yeah. We can't really cover wouldn't even try to cover his entire career. It's an very long. Yeah. I think we would just get more Ramle. But we love for you guys to let us know your favorite Stanley stories or memories, or even as I was posting pictures and stuff on Twitter's like this one reporter is like I remember the first time I met him. And I I don't have any photos of it on this thing. Like, just those. What are your remembrance is let us know on Facebook, and Twitter and all the places we do whatever we do. I don't know if you have a favorite stance soapbox, please share it because they're so excellent. And I feel like everyone should be reading them. Heck, yeah. Thanks for listen to us talk about Stanley. He was the man I'm Ryan, I'm Lorraine.

Stanley Ryan Russell STAN YouTube Margaret New York Comecon marvel studios Joni Ernst marvel Jason Chung Nick Lowe Mark strom Twitter Comecon senio Comecon producer titans murder Plummer
Standing Out

The Jump

24:45 min | 1 year ago

Standing Out

"Today new problems need new thinking with. Ibm retailers are turning to the cloud to restock shelves more quickly teachers working with ai to rethink the classroom. Let's put smart to work see how. Ibm helping IBM DOT com slash. Gg ovid nineteen welcome to the Alpine Rachel Nichols joined by a few of the two thousand eight World Champs from the Celtics Kendrick Perkins from his home in Texas and the finals. Mvp Paul Pierce Cooler than either one of US Kendrick. He's in Las Vegas. We can only hope coming up. Guys we're GONNA take an in depth. Look at one of Kobe's most legendary playoff moments from this date in two thousand six when he beat the scones at the foster place. That is to come later in the show. I though I don't know if you guys out there heard but apparently. Espn on Sunday nights. Is Airing something called the last dance? No it's true clip now. This is a Jordan's last game as the ball at Madison Square Garden. He decided to break out the ones his old pair from the eighties but it turns out his foot had grown half the size since. Then take a look at what happened. Feta bleeding but I'm having a good game. I don't want to take them off players. Who are laughing Michael Jordan? Now that's forty points. Only one guy has this level of the parts spanking spike. Lee is over Michael Jordan and Michael has a few words by way of retort. Just tell them that could guard cake. Arvin you come out here. Aspects of money to an f. This was Michael Jordan's final game not a square garden. He leaves no doubt whatsoever exits justice. I couldn't take those shoes off fast enough and we took shoes off. My sock was soaked while Paul in that particular Nj Hudson she still dropped all kinds of baskets on the knicks. Anyway shoes the part of the key to what became an unprecedented level of fame for him. The shoes the gatorade commercials all of it. Paul what would you say is the significance of Jordan's impact the four? Oh my gosh. You wouldn't even better believe I mean especially shoe game. I mean he had me going to McDonald's more. I want to even work at McDonald's but I'm GonNa tell you a story especially with the shoes. Well I remember being a sixth grade and I remember selling candy for at least two months. Soi can get a pair of Air Jordan Force. One hundred dollars at the time I sold candy for like fifty cents dollar and I WANNA get into pear and I'm telling you when you had a pair of Jordan's in the early nineties late eighties. You was the man so I remember when I got those. I kept him clean ought to breast scrubbing everyday. Man This is off the court presence. Everybody wanted to just watch Jordan. What was he doing chewing gum? I even had? I bought these because of Jordan. I had these posters because every week these box came to Jordan poster man it it was just this impact not only did people want to be like on the core but off the court you just want to be closer to him as you could you speak in the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Rich Paul Yeah. I remember that song be like bike. That WanNa be I WANNA be like right. Listen no no disrespect. No disrespect the grace before him. You know that would Chuck Taylors the verse. You know you know Kevin McHale Larry Bird Isiah. Thomas Magic did that converts commercials that were kind of like the circus. You know you go to the circus. You could see the clouds and and move to win. Jordan came along. Joy came along as the game. He was like Disneyland. World Magical Roller coasters like he bought a whole nother swag to the game by think about this still to the still to this day. Lanza wrapped around the corner at every mall in a miracle joins the band released lice. Unheard-of like don't know any other guy could put out a shooting. There still have some stock not join me join laid the foundation for now only gas today but even his shoes would know. Mj's wouldn't have sickness shoes like Penny Hardaway's Tawes Barclay advisor warns even sing to sue. But like think about it. Michael Join laid the foundation for athletes today like Lebron Kevin Durant Steph curry to get two hundred three hundred million dollar shoe deal so you know you gotta give Mike his his roses because you know he designed and this Sunday I mean man guys cannot get here soon enough. We've got episodes five and six it's going to be. I mentioned nine o'clock eastern on Sunday night but the stories in this great. It's about Marketing Air Jordan. They've got Dream Team Stories. That got the fulls battles against Barkley in the sun. All stuff is in there and the cultural impact of Michael Jordan. And we'll be talking about that more in the days to come. Espn AND ESPN APP. Have the uncensored version must be nice to be able to swear on. Espn no one's let me do that. But ESPN two editor for mature language version. Just say coming up. A recent poll saw Luca. Danni gets out of twenty four th place votes for the player that front office executives would want to build around our Diane Johnson trae being overlooked. We will discuss I though. It's time for our distant replay. This date nineteen ninety-one featuring Michael Jordan dunking on Patrick Really Hard Jordan. Try to shake off starch. Oh this is an ego problem. For Patrick Ewing first of all Jordan on the beautiful dismissal of the defense storms only deception back away from the GEICO. Has the insurance industry leading APP that lets you manage policy anytime anywhere. Which means that Geico is always there for you. If only everyone was always there for you like animal control when you're cornered in your garage by an angry possum me again. You said you would be here about an hour ago. And I think the POSSUM is starting to get angry. Listen I thought if I felt it would go away. But now it is ripping holes in the drywall. And making certain nest. Coming back. Geico always there for you with savings in the industry leading mobile APP just because the game we love is on hold. Doesn't mean it leaves us talked so remain when you're saying you're never alone miss you again. We're in this together the NBA on ESPN. He's ready to take over this league. They have a bona fide stall and just to. He is a special young man. There's no question about it. Saying chess can stop talking about his age because it obviously that big a difference. Espn survey twenty NBA. Scouts coaches and front office members. One of the question was which of these young men you're seeing and you're frameworks rising star. Would you want to build your team around? Luga dodgers guy's got seventeen of the twenty first place votes the list included in Zion. Trae young John Moran Kendrick. Would you rather build around Luca? Then all those other guys listen right. Sir? No disrespect to trae young job. Mirant Zion we've all of these guys are generation generational talents and going to be special. But if I had to build the team around the guy it will be leukel. We're talking about the guy that has been playing against grown men for a long time last year I mean before he came into the NBA. We'll talk about what he did as professional sees MVP happiest ship the MVP then comes over his first year in the NBA. He average twenty one. Six and seven wins rookie of the year and then carry out to this season. He's averaging twenty eight nine and eight and he got the Dallas Mavericks in the playoffs in the whizz. And also when we talk about a lot of conversation has been bothered throughout the season of who is arguably the greatest twenty year old sale come into the NBA and that's argument and that's just speaks volumes. Because you put in a minute. Same category were greats like Lebron James and Magic Johnson. So I'm taking Luca all day man. Let me tell you some I mean I think Zaire is GonNa be Great. He's already shown he could be great. John Moran trae young but Lucas got a head start so far headed them that I don't even know if they could catch up because we talk about guy who's only in his second year and the scary thing is he's not even in his prime he can give better every money. All these talents are GONNA get better. How much better is Luca? GonNa get? It's hard to we know he's GonNa get better he's going to. He's going to learn the game more he's going to get stronger. He's going to get smarter. I just what I'm disappointed is in no disrespect to the other guys. How do they only get seventeen? I think if you're starting to team to oh he's seventeen folks come on only think that it should have been a unanimous decision. I got a feeling that those other three boats came from those teams organizations. Not Black Dockage. I mean look he's he's an. Mvp Conversation before season ended. I mean we were talking about him. Possibly be an. Mvp candidate alone there with John. Lebron James Harden these guys that's that's almost unheard of guy in the second year. I mean come. Obviously his skill level has versitality and I know people say oh. He's not athletic. And the way like say Lebron is because by the way nobody is but he is is physical and his position and I think people want to see him. Play person realize the physical advantages. He has over some of the guys. He's going up against my only reservation. Isn't about how good Luca is because he's clearly exceptional. It's just Zionists still such an unknown package. We've seen him play so few games. I can't even really judge him yet. Right I mean there's a there's a game where he hit you. Know What Four. Five threes in a row can do that regularly. I don't know how would we know? He's barely played twenty games. So I just think that it's hard to have this conversation about Zion. Because we don't know what do we do know what. Luca can do so far. It's amazing so I'm not surprised that those seventeen those other three Paul. You're always going to have someone that's all I can say about covering the NBA. For a long time I wanted to get to the Miami taped comments from Pat Riley. They released them Wednesday. These were riles quotes. I want to build a championship team. I don't have much patience. Were close. Maybe we need another player. Maybe we need less. I don't know but we're right there. We are a contender. So Paul do you agree with the Great Pat Riley? How close is this heat roster from another ring if the Miami Heat on clothes that means every team in the NBA is coast? But he the only when you're close. Let me tell you when you're close. You're close if you had a top five player playing or your team. That is the main ingredient. I said this and I always say this with the exclusion of the Detroit Pistons. Who won in two thousand in the early two thousand so think about the contenders today? We say the Lakers Pecan we say Houston Rockets. James Harden a top five player. Those three guys are top five players and they are continuing to the clippers. Li they got. They got KUWIAT. Paul George Top five and a top ten player. Those are the only four teams. I believe they can win the championship this year. Because that is one of the main ingredients and you can go back and sports twenty thirty years and see every championship team or team that has been a championship has had a top five. Adp candidate on their roster. Those no disrespect to Jimmy Butler. He's good but he's not on these other guys level you know. I hate to go against the grain man but I got a ride with Pat Riley on like when you think of the Miami Heat and you think about this team that they have right now. This season the first thing comes to mind is two thousand and four Detroit Pistons. They didn't have a top five. Mvp candidate on team. And that's that's that's okay. Cool Boo Bam. Saying when I'm looking at this Miami Heat team issue. Nobody would have been surprised if they would have came out of the east this year. I would ask me SURPRI. I would not me not me. I don't think you're not just right so I wouldn't have been surprised that they would have beat the books in the same game series like that would have been. There would have been a fun match up to see on a close yes? I think they're close. I'm a big explosive fan. I think he's one of the best coaches in in the league. He's one of my all time favorites in my in eyes. And when I'm looking at this Miami Heat saying like Paul said you do need that leap clear. Do you need a top five player job but I think they need? I think they need a league score like they could pull off trade and keep Bam Jimmy and get back a dame lillard that gives them over the hump. That's just my every Detroit Pistons part. They're all time. I'm not talking about one year. Great Team there are times one of the greatest defensive teams. We've ever seen in Miami Down the arms was incredible. Guys what I always say when someone says there are player away say well. Who's the player right depends on the player? Could be some guy off. The street could be a top five guy. Then you really are closed You know if you're a Joel. Embiid away and there's been rumors of that. Maybe maybe we're talking about the different conversation. I do think the Bucks Will WanNa word though and they. We will discuss them coming up. This is the anniversary of the bucks first and only NBA title. So we'RE GONNA discuss. How close this team is winning their second chip and how much would be lost for them. If they can't finish this season stick around for that. Coming up later is sportscenter. Five o'clock eastern with the PTI guys joining the show and we tap today with another sportscenter at eleven eastern but all of that is after the Game Michigan. Ohio state from twenty sixteen. Now though I wanted does the classic from the Hardwood today is the anniversary of Kobe. Bryant's legendary two thousand six performance against the suns take a look and be amazed cold-blooded means that stable to take those shots in those moments. One point second you even get the game to overtime and I play certain point game with seven point nine. I've been in the playoff series saying the wrong things after fixing right now these do not force a pass to get into his hands and they do stone faced goal. First Time at one point dash to file looking title by New Lucas. Control tip my calculations looking at clocking just kind of play in the moment over my head point. One remaining the Lakers. No timeouts it. Once I got it I just took my time that I would see every victory in hand and all of a sudden. You may be shy later. Be The play as cold blue. Kobe Bryant is very very good basketball. All right on this date also in one thousand nine hundred seventy one. The Bucks won their first and only title in franchise history. They were led of course by the Hall of Famers Oscar Robertson Kareem abdul-jabbar in the eight season. Since forty eight years guys. The franchises only had one more vinyl appearance. That's it that potentially could have of course changed this year. The Bucks Best Record in the League certainly the favorites in the east and guys. This is really a walkies window. Think about this. It's before Jaanus even has to decide about the supermax it's before Kyrie and Katie. Come back with Brooklyn next season next season. We're also expecting the warriors to be a force again right Steph playback other teams in the West Perk if the NBA doesn't come back to finish the season in some way. How costly could this be for the Milwaukee Bucks? It's going to hurt the Milwaukee Bucks Rachel the Milwaukee Books. This is their window. This is their time. In my opinion this season I think they would have a heavy favors for sure to come out of the east and they're the only team in the NBA. That has all the pieces in my opinion so win a championship. They have a deep bench to have shoot and they have stopped blocking. They have a store. And Yon is to have a Robin and Chris Miller and I think they had all the pieces will coat and if the NBA. Does it come back? It's going to hurt the Milwaukee Bucks and it possibly could hurt the Milwaukee books and resigning extension and Maybe losing him someone else in free agency. Yeah this is devastating. I mean because you don't get these opportunities Like you said the window is right now. But a Milwaukee box because you have to remember like right. You're like you said make sure. Brooklyn's going to be better with hybrid and Kevin Durant. Who knows who knows what's going to happen through Free Agency? Whose knows what's going to happen through trade you can see the Celtics you know. Get to that level next year Miami Heat. You know. We talked about them. Or EVEN THE PHILADELPHIA. Seventy sixers teams are going to get better a year from now. If we assume that the season starts back next year there's going to be very traits Various sinus teams are going to try to improve to make that leap. And might you say who knows what's going to happen when you honest free agency coming up bloom and this is this is. This is if I'm youngest. I'm devastated if we don't have an opportunity to continue to season because like you said these windows. They don't come around too often championship windows. And there's now who knows what might happen next. You know you wanNA title you understand this. It's so many different things that have to line up doing stuff about Janas contract on the screen right now. I can hear all the bucks fan saying he's GonNa stay. He's GonNa stay he. I guess if I had to guess this is not based on any reporting. It's a guest. If I guess I would say pupo will be Milwaukee Buck next season. That's not the only issue there are other teams that are going be in the race are just as much of a factor is. Who's on your team? So many different things have to fall your way. Injuries have to fall your way one way or the other health esta lineup. So the fact that things were churning so well from Milwaukee Jaanus dealing with that pesky little thing but not a big deal going into the playoffs they were lined up this year to really dominate. And I think it's going to be a big deal for them if they don't get to play it out and they're not the only ones. I WANNA move onto a tweet from Lebron James. This is what he just put up this morning. Yes he said. Saw some reports about executive agents wanting to cancel the season. You said absolutely not true. Nobody I know saying anything like that. As soon as it's safe we would like to finish our season. I'm ready. Our team is ready. Nobody should be canceling. Anything and perk. Lebron is thirty. Five years old Lakers at the top of the West. You can see right why he is also so eager not to let things slip away. Rachel broad villa some type of way. He's shoe when we talk about their window. His window is very small right now for them winning another championship or championships and each season madams. And when we were talking about Lebron James and the Los Angeles Lakers they were just hitting their stride. They were plan at a championship level. Lebron's plan and the MVP level. And I'm we brought out. Won't he wants closure at the end of the day? He's thirty five years old. He's not getting any younger so he's no. He knows that opportunity is getting swallowed by the by the season and he wants to finish the season out. So I'm with Braun on this one. No one is counseling. Nuts and right. Now let's be optimistic. I agree with you know the is definitely clicking Especially for Lebron as he gets older. He doesn't want any of these legacy seasons to go to waste. The Lakers have opportunity there in prime position to possibly win a championship. In you know this being Lebron's thirteen and win a championship. We might be talking about him and Michael Jordan in the same breath you know. Especially these millennials. So the clock. Click ticket for Lebron Lakers. And he wants closure. He'll be turning thirty six next season. It's a lot harder to start all the way at the bottom of the mountain at the beginning of the season again and get up there now I will say I understand his concern because look you hear different things every day just this morning. The CEO of the San Antonio Spurs are Cebu for told reporters that he had just gotten off a call with the presidents of all the NBA teams and the sentiment. There was they want to continue to try to see this thing out as long as they can. So the official word I guess from one of the heads of one of the teams in the NBA is. Nothing is cancelled yet. No one is talking about cancelation yet. And my conversations with League officials. I heard that too that they say why. Do we need to make a decision now when you have some time? Let's see how things play out. We will see you guys tomorrow on the jump that I know for sure.

NBA Michael Jordan MVP Miami Milwaukee Bucks Espn Lebron James Luca Los Angeles Lakers Lebron Lebron James Harden Paul Kobe Bryant Lebron Kevin Durant Steph curr Pat Riley John Moran Kendrick Rachel Nichols Zion suns
27. NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN)

Your Space Journey

23:59 min | 11 months ago

27. NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN)

"Hi My name's Dylan. Attorney began I'll probably when I was just a little kid I've always been interested in in space and rockets and such as you would be as a little kid and nowadays that interests me most of just The amount of. Information there can hop onto youtube and and watch different videos every day. any any different subject. What I'm most excited for is is where we're going I'm. Forty years old and I love to still be here when we finally put on another planet. the stuff with tapping right now with spacex interesting and You know the cost of going on and I, think that. you know the future is closer and closer really. Would love to see. A human, but on another planet. Welcome to your space journey where we venture into the future of space exploration and the incredible leaders who are taking us there. Here's your house chuck feel. Hello, thanks for joining me today today an please introduce my guest Tom. Kesse. I was fortunate to travel to NASA. Glenn Research Center earlier this year to interview. Tom The advanced. Communications. Program Manager for Space Communications and navigations or scam. Now Scam provides communication services that are essential to the operations of NASA spaceflight missions. In fact, coming up with Artemis as go back to the moon by twenty twenty four, you're going to see better video and audio quality for this mission. Thanks to scan. Nasscom provides communication support to NASA and Non Nessa missions by managing three networks the deep space network the near Earth. And the space network now tom of course has an amazing background and amazing award winning history. So of course, I asked him how his passion for space began. Here's Tom Discussing that. So, since I was born right at the end of the Paulo time. So I actually got to see them land on the moon and I was only six, but it was like can still that's ingrained in my head and all the excitement of the Apollo era and we had somebody in our hometown and astronaut named Paul Whites who was on the. Skylab, he was on the second Skylab. So there was a lot of press Pennsylvania in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three when he was on the Skylab and so that that's always been ingrained in my mind and I also went to the Kennedy Space Center around the same time. So right after the moon landing, they were still doing the Skylab missions. There's a lot of excitement in the country when we were doing those moon missions and so that's always been ingrained in my head. Sure and so when I went to college I, I had an electrical engineering. Degree where I went to graduate school was called Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and they do a lot of research for NASA and so when I was there in our labs, you could see all the different research things. So that was kind of ingrained in my head and so when came at job opportunity in order to work here at Cleveland at the NASA Glenn Research Center I, took it because it was you know it just that fundamentally was something that was exciting to do. Now as I mentioned earlier, scan stands for space communications and navigation. Here's Tom Giving an issue. Of the skin program. So the SCAN Program Space Communications, and navigation program as that's an acronym for all the the work that we end up doing here for doing communications work. Okay. The scan compasses, lots of different things that they do. They do work with the different networks in order to provide communications to our space craft that are orbiting the earth as well as a spacecraft that go out further, and they also do the research for the next generation systems as well. So it's an all encompassing program from the technologies that make it up to having systems. That are maintained that provide the communication networks. So it's a fairly healthy program that the scan program is now the amazing thinking about scan is actually has its roots all the way back in the nineteen fifties. Here's Tom Discussing that when they started doing the first spacecraft. So think about back in the mercury days in the beginning of the whole space program the in some way to talk to the the rockets that went up pretty when you were doing just a sub orbital flight that just went straight up and came back down, they'll simp- systems are pretty simple. But. We started going to the moon. Now you have very long distances. I mean the rough distance it's it's it's it's a quarter of a million miles to go to the moon. Okay. So now all of a sudden you're thinking, okay, I, need to make a system that's going to be able to talk to think about it if you need to have coverage all throughout the. Earth because the earth is rotating, the moon is going around the side having those systems that could support that. Now, you needed a much more intense system in order to support it than what the old systems worth just could support a a simple thing that went up a couple of hundred miles and came back down to the difference was a huge difference and so those were. The initial systems that they bill, they had built system, and if you think about it back in the day when you saw the Apollo missions okay they didn't there was not a lot of coverage that they had. The coverage was fairly minimal and even when they landed on the moon, those were pretty grainy images. Okay. You know in this day everybody you know it's all it's. All visual right and you see the Internet, you see the power of capability. Now getting a lot of the science information back down to the what did they do when they first started going from the Moon missions where it was kind of a dedicated mission in having lots of spacecraft that went into building a system that they called the tracking and data relay satellite system are tedious. Tedious. And they built a number of of satellites which are orbited at fixed places around the earth and they call them geosynchronous and you synchronous means they appear at the same place always for a fixed point on. Earth and. So now you have systems that are set up that as the spacecraft orbit, the Earth they can use that and they can talk back to the to the earth, and we can get all the data back from all the different spacecraft that we have and most importantly, we can control the spacecraft as well because we you know it's very important to be able to keep track of our space craftsman, get the data back because that's a big function of NASA is all that science stated that we create? We want to get that back in the Hands of the investigators they're the ones that will do the science with that, and they'll do all the understanding of it and that our communication systems that we build, they're very important to getting that science state of back to those researchers. NASA. Mentioned before scan has three networks, the near Earth Network, the deep space network and the space network. Here's Tom discussing those networks in more detail just three networks that we have because we've got some unique things that we have to take a look at. We've got satellites that orbit the earth because there's a number of different. Science, spacecraft that we have out there whether the observing the earth or whether they're doing some sort of control of of some different things they have out there as well as they have spacecraft out there that are doing kind of next generation research like our space station. Okay and so when you look at those platforms, what do you need to do to get that data back down to the earth? Some of it we send actually direct down to the ground. Some of it we send through art RT dress network. So those are two of the networks we. Have our T. network space network. We have drifted ground network for some more simple science space craft rather than going and having all the burden of sending that up all the way up to a geosynchronous satellite has twenty two thousand miles up in space. That's a fair distance, and it's easier to send it down directly down to the ground. It's only a couple of hundred miles. It's a lot less burden on the spacecraft every pound launch of it's a lot more expensive. The simple we can make some space craft the more science we can put on those spacecraft. One of the other. Networks that we have is an interesting one. We call the deep space network. Okay, and the Deep Space Network has a unique problem with it it. It's one thing to be able to collect the data from going from satellites or spacecraft that orbit the earth. They're fairly close normally typically within a couple hundred miles of the earth but you start going out to the moon or out tomorrow you start getting some really far distances even Pluto when you start talking going out to, we just had a mission to Pluto here. It took eighteen hours for at traveling at the speed of light for the date for the radio data get back to the criminal. Okay. And one of the challenges is because you're so far out at that point. Okay. Those signals that come back very weak. So we need to build some systems on the earth that have antennas that can collect that data. Analogy to to give to your your listeners is that you know think of an antenna. What is an antenna and one of the unique things I look at it as like bike your nozzle on your on a sprinkler. So if you have it in a way that you have at that kind of a wide gentle sprint is very gentle right and it's kind of wide pattern. Okay. So that then you don't need to have you get A. Kind of pattern associated with it, but it doesn't necessarily have force to it. But if you squeeze that nozzle now of a sudden, it's very directed and so now that that's what they do. They come up with very directed antennas which are tend to be very large. So you can collect energy from those far distances and then we can get that back amplify that. So we can get those signals back from those distance places that. NASA standing there spacecraft to now the NASA Glenn Research Center is an integral part of managing these networks. Here's Tom Discussing that. So the gun research centers a little bit different than some of the other NASA centers. Okay. So when people think of NASA, the instantly think of think of Houston where they have our main control centers down there or they might think in Florida the Kennedy Space Center where we lock launch a lot of. Rockets, we have some other places like Goddard space flight. Center they do a lot of science missions and JPL does our deep space missions where we send things out too far planetary bodies K.. So the Glenn Research Center is is a little bit more unique. It's one of the older research centers that that are part of the NASA umbrella of of research of NASA centers. What they do is that they are more research and technology. And so rather than operated network or actually build some some kind of key spacecraft what we ended up typically doing is kind of do the innovated cut cutting edge kinds of things. We will build new kinds of technologies that have never been done before a big part of it is we research those technologies build up kind of fundamental next generation kinds of things, but then also testament fly him and do those for the first time. Kind of a broad range of activities that we do here, we look at the, we do work in the communications area be do work in rocket research. So there we have a lot of fundamental rocket research that we do in terms of the engines ourselves to a Lotta air nautical research. Here we have wind tunnels where we still test airplanes in wind tunnels in. Order to test them out to make sure you know how they will go. We do icing research, and then we also do power propulsion. So we do the electrical power, which is how I ended up started working here. We also do the rocket power lot of next generation engines whether therefore spacecraft or whether they're four the next generation airplanes to kind of research here. I mentioned earlier that Tom is award-winning I. I really enjoy my visit as a matter of fact, Tom Telling me in more detail about how he was recently inducted into the space technology hall of fame back in about ten years ago we were tasked to take a look at next generation radios. And the task that we were given was we were had tasks that said Hey. We're seeing that everybody's kind of buying their own radio and we're seeing now that they're all re-programmable radios don't look like radios anymore they look more like computers and so why is that that everybody kind of doing their own thing and if I buy a radio from one manufacturer, I can't be use it with anything in either software that from other radios. So we started putting together an architecture that really kind of like your your Windows operating system you know think of radio kind of radio platform looks like computer. You've got some sort of operating system on. It like windows or the apple operating system that's associated with it. You've got all sorts of applications that fit into it and so on a radio our applications are way forms. K.. So if you're looking at like, for example, AM radio. Okay. That would be kind of wave form or an FM radio. They have a different unique wave form that they would have. There should be no reason why you cannot put a few by an AM radio put the FM wave form on it or vice versa put the FM form on the on the AM radio. When you started looking at a lot of the radios at NASA uses we do have voice radios that we use for for the astronauts not talk back to the earth over, we use a lot of radio at seven data. and. So when we do our science data, big reason for a lot of the research that we look at is. Improved ways in order to get that science date back to Earth and lot of times it's image data, which is basically a lot of BITs, okay. It's a lot of data and how do you get your back down to the earth and so one of the things that we were looking at was we were looking at doing what we call KABC radio okay. So K. Ban radios direct. TV. is off shoot of. M.. Radio. And the K- Ben. Radios, that technology that you using your receivers for your television right now, that was really invented here at the NASA Glenn. Research. Really. We did what we called the axe satellite that was back in the early nineties late eighties early nineties worthy demonstrated essentially the the fundamentals of how they would do the the broadcasting k-band radios, and they use that for TV they use it for a lot of images all that was formulated here at NASA. Glenn Research Center along with our industry partners. And so now we took a look at that technology that we were finding for the next generation of radios and saying, okay, let's let's combine the the next generation radio technology with the higher bandwidth capability so that I mean everybody wants higher bandwidth. Seven more and more with can't have enough of it, and so NASA would like to have the same thing too. So what we did is we partnered with a number of different manufacturers to build next-generation radio. So we did one with the jet propulsion lab out in California. Be didn't other one with General Dynamics and we did a third one with the Harris Corporation and it was a new kind of. Radio. There's really was K- being radio, but it was software defined. Okay and so your cellphone is software defined. But one of the big challenges we have is that if you're GONNA fly electronics and space that you would use for a radio, fortunately, it has to be very radiation tolerant those if not radiation taller and all those particles that are out there, they'll basically corrupt the aradio pretty quickly and they'll. Destroy it if it's not built properly. So we built the next generation radio. We demonstrated it on a payload. We called the scam testbed. We put that up on the International Space Station and we flew it for seven years. Okay and so this was a big accomplishment for us. It was a fairly large effort in order to put up platform together that on the outside of the space station tested these. Three new radios and all tests, how to reprogram them, how to send the data through 'em, how to basically do a number of different things that would show how those radios would operate for our next generation of missions. But a key part of it was was that we flew this next generation K., a ban radio, and this was the first one that had ever been flown is a software defined radio. Okay. and. So when we as we started, do that tested out and operated for a couple years we were nominated for the research and development top one, hundred innovations of the year. So that was back in two thousand fourteen. And then in two thousand and nineteen, we were nominated for the Space Technology Hall of fame, and the reason for that was was that not only what we had done in terms of flying that I k being radio, but all the spinoff applications that had come on that afterwards. Now. One of the aspects of NASA has always amazed me is just how many spinoffs we get from the amazing innovative technology. Here's Tom. Discussing. The NASA spinoffs and so you've when you think absence enough number think people think of Velcro and Tang exactly that. But there are a Lotta of innovations that go on because Nassar's really plugged into a lot of the the fundamental technology that that this country is built around and so when we start looking at what they did with our KABC radio after they, they used it. So the first thing that they did is they built a system that they could track airplanes with. Okay and so the when you look at airplane tracking typically you see at an airport, you see the the radar spinning around okay and so they didn't now looking at space base radars. Now you can see things that are much better than what you had before. So our K. being radio, which we had used as a data radio in order to send images back from the space station. Now, all of a sudden, it can also serve not only as the radio, but it can serve as the sensor that can do all the imaging of all the airplanes on there they put them on they put actually they put. Eighty one of them on the iridium satellites that we have out there, and that's basis for the for the basically worldwide tracking of airplanes today. Case that was the first thing that they did with that grow. Then they built a number of different spin offs of that that that kept going even further because they use that same platform that we have are we flew on the space station for seven years and they looked at being able to track greenhouse gases. So there was a Japanese payload they use that for they built another payload that was a series of. Satellites that they flew that do shipboard tracking because before that the only ship tracking that they had for all, the time stuff was that they had was was was basically landbound, and so they had nothing looking at any of the ships out there other than a few US satellites at weren't designed in order to do that to do the tracking. Now, all of a sudden, they had a dedicated system that could do shipboard tracking. And if you think about some of the benefits of things like that, for example, with the system that they use for the aircraft tracking, we had that Malaysia airplane that was lost here a few years ago have they had the tracking system in place and there then they would've added had active tracking and so odds are that they would not lose airplanes like they had just a few years ago. So there's an there's a number of things at the change of just a a basic computing platform that we can fly in space. The Spin Offs they they've used it for a number of different things and right now we're we've kind of come full circle because now, the next thing we're using this for as they were launching, we're working with the the DOD to launch a new satellite and that'll have a optical communication system on that. Okay and so the the benefit of an optical communication system is, is that remember I was talking about the nozzle being able to concentrate very fine the team on this the. Are Radio Frequency based one you can get it pretty fine. He's not tickle system you can get even finer and so that the data rates that you can get optical systems are are are much higher than what we can get out of some of the are systems we have now, but the our systems are still going pretty good now. So we actually are putting an system on that and we're GONNA put a latest and greatest version of. Our Paris radio and we're GONNA fly that on there and it smaller it's lighter but it has more features and what we just had just a few years ago trying to look at a number of different applications that we're using this terminal floor as well as we go forward now, Roy excited about artists the plan to return astronauts to the moon by twenty twenty four while scans going to be an integral part of that. Here's Tom. Explaining how? Like, most of the agency right now, we are gearing up for doing the next generation systems that we needed to land the man on the Moon in twenty woman on them, I on the Moon in twenty, twenty four. So that's very exciting and so a lot of the the systems we're looking at these next generation systems in a big part of it is, is that having improved communications from what we had with the Apollo missions mean having fulltime coverage. You know being able to send all the data back in real time and be able to observe all that. That's a big part of what we're trying to do here at NASA Glenn. We're also building the basically the system, the gateway system that we're building the first module that goes on the gateway that will have a communication system associated with it but also we're looking at some of the relay satellites that will go around the moon so that when we have either astronauts on the moon or some of the the assets on the moon, now they'll have some relays right above the moon so that they can talk to those relays similar. Heck. We have them around the earth put that infrastructure in place that'll support or communication needs as we go forward. That's a big part of what our next the focus is for scam. Now. Of course, going back to the moon this time, we're going to have hopefully a lot better quality than a nine, hundred, sixty s black and white image on TV screen. Scan is going to help get better audio video this time here's Tom explaining that. You mentioned at the beginning program how? At the young age of six seven years old you remember astronauts on the Moon. So this time around. If we have. Quality video coming from the moon and probably Nice audio where we won't question the words that are being said exactly what would be able to hear clearly, that will be due to the efforts of scam will be due to ski and they. It is a good feeling in order to see. It's always nice to see tangible efforts come out of it, and so a big part of the work that we do. There's a lot of work behind the scenes in order to put any any space. But when you have opportunities like that, the be in the public guy in the see something like that. See it happen I mean it's fifty years since we've basically been on the moon and so now to see that happening again and see that excitement. I see a lot of excitement out there when we had the fiftieth anniversary last year of the moon landing there there was an excitement about NASA that I. Haven't seen Weil and so taking seeing that happen in terms of now we're seeing the commercial side at this and people are flying things in space. You see universities now fly payloads that you never saw before, but now take a look at it and look. At now to the moon and beyond I, mean, the goal is not just the moon right but actually to go to Mars and be able to continue on going forward and so we're actually seeing a push now to and in order to continue that vision that was started some, you know a number of years ago when NASA was I started and that's going to be incredible right pictures from the himself pictures from Mars. Tom I want to congratulate you and your team on just the awesome works so far I want to thank you for taking time to really appreciate it because it's a really a team effort that does this is not one person when you see a couple of people that are out there you know that there's a huge team behind just about every effort that's something that flies in space, and so that is greatly appreciated. Excellent. Thanks again for joining. Your Space Journey. Why really drew on my trip to NASA Glenn and I just want to thank their entire team for welcoming out there WANNA. Thank Tom for joining today and discussing the scan program fill to learn more just go to their website at. NASA. Dot Gov slash scan. Again. I want think NASA Glenn for the Hospitality WanNa, thank you for joining us today. We really do appreciate it. If you could share this episode at the friend we'd appreciate that too. We'll see you next time. God. Bless.

NASA Tom Deep Space Network Glenn Research Center Kennedy Space Center NASA NASA Glenn Research Center Tom Discussing Space Communications Rockets Space Technology Hall of fame spacex youtube International Space Station Nasscom twenty twenty
The Life of an Immigrant: Guest  Dhenu Maru

James Miller | Lifeology

26:10 min | 1 year ago

The Life of an Immigrant: Guest Dhenu Maru

"Welcome to life. Algae I James Miller your host and a licensed psychotherapist. I'm looking forward to spending this time view as we learned some pretty amazing life lessons. Let's get started. Thank you so much for taking time out of your busy schedule to listen to the show when you're done listening. I hope you take a minute and write a quick review on whichever radio podcast platform. You've heard this show. Your insights will help others to be inspired and encouraged. I have a great show for you today. I help you find even more compassion for people who are different than you. I'll be interviewing immigrants and immigration lawyer. Donald Morrogh who shares her story of moving to the US when she was ten years old and how she now helps. Immigrants successfully complete the immigration process for more information about Danu please visit swaggie to USA DOT com. That's S. W. A. G. T. U. S. A. DOT COM or inner facebook group at USA immigration. Experience thank you so much for listening to I follow. I would love to connect with you be sure to follow me on all social media platforms under the name. James Miller life algae except for twitter. Which is James M my folly? I also very active on instagram. In Crete mini videos with quick tips and tools. You can immediately implement. Be Sure to say hello and follow me there. If you're anything like me you'll love to read life allergy audible dot com have partnered to offer you an incredible opportunity audible is offering you one free book download with a Free Thirty Day trial. This is perfect for those of you. Who Love to read but often. Don't have time to enjoy your favorite pastime. Go to James Miller Life Ozzy Dot com forward slash audible to start your free trial. They have over one hundred eighty thousand books from all genres. So I'm pretty confident. Your favorite authors books will be there go to James Miller lifelock dot com forward slash audible and start listening to your favorite book. Today once again go to James Miller lite follow dot com forward slash audible to get started today compassion for others. If we were to see someone being bullied of course we would stop them but there are other times in life when we see situations happen that we don't advocate for now of course there's a time and place for everything but it is important to be on the lookout to see. How can you show compassion to others? We often forget that our experience is different than other people's experience. So what you may. Experience in life may be normal unusual for you if they were to do the same type of thing. That may not be usual or normal for them. When I was a boy I lived in between Canada and United States. Five months was in Canada and seven months was in the US. So I would always start school a month later than everybody else and then I would finish school a month earlier than everybody else so I could go back to Canada and because we moved around so much. I ended up going to multiple schools. And there's nothing worse than going into a school not knowing anybody and trying to decide where you're gonNA sit for lunch. That was a very stressful time for me because had already been made because the school started so what was normal for them. A lunch was not normal for me because it was my first experience. We often forget what it's like when something is new for us or sometimes we take things for granted because that's how things have always been and there's nothing wrong with that but it is important to remember that our experience is different than others. The lesson for today is simple when you are in any environment and you see someone who may look different than you for someone who just doesn't seem to fit in when we find compassion and reach out to them it removes the stress author experiencing in that situation. Because remember we've been in that same situation before and we know how it feels so I challenge you today wherever you may go look for somebody that need your assistance. Look for someone. That need your compassion. A simple smile answering a question for them or directing them to someone who can help them goes along way. You're going to hear fantastic interview with down. Oumarou who shares her story of being an immigrant and how that shaped her into being damaged lawyer she is. I wanted to take just a quick moment to thank you. All who continually support and listen to James Miller life allergy. I haven't been so blessed and honored by your continual supports however. I want to make sure that you don't miss anything exciting. That's happening over here. So good. Or James Miller lifelock dot com or DOT TV and sign up for the Free. Weekly recap each week. I will send you an email. Which has all the latest radio episodes youtube episodes magazine articles and self help products specifically for you once again go to James Miller lifelock dot com or a life allergy DOT TV and sign up for the free weekly recap. My guest today is down new morrow who was born in Mumbai India and emigrated to the United States when she was ten years old. She is an immigration lawyer who protects the rights of fellow immigrants and understands the struggle that many people face when moving to the US. Welcome to my show. Donoughue James is such a pleasure to have you on my show militias. Don't know this but we had recorded before where there's some technical difficulty so I really appreciate your time in coming back on my show today. Yeah sure I'm excited to talk to you and your listeners awesome now you move to the United States when you were ten years old. How was that for you because from what I remember? Originally that wasn't something you had newer parents told you that you're going to be doing. Tell us your journey. It was kind of interesting So my Uncle had filed an application for my parents in In around when I was born and then when I turn ten that's when we had our interview come up and so it was. It was kind of out of nowhere because you know ten years go by living their lives And then when the interview came I think my parents were a little cautious. There were like re. Don't know if this is going to work out. We tell our children that this permanent just in case it doesn't so they told us we're GONNA go there for some time. We're going to visit your cousins and you know we'll be back. Is it a normal process to ten years from when you originally filed to wait that long for that much time well for brothers and sisters It it it actually mounted longer than ten years right now shows around fourteen or fifteen years but that is expected to increase as well And that that depends on the country to sometimes he's like some countries like Mexico and Philippines. Actually have a much longer so the shortage is fourteen to fifteen years but some countries have even longer than that. Oh my gosh I had no idea. That's especially if you're people who can't wait to migrate or they're wanting to start a new. I mean that would seem my opinion. That would just seem kind of daunting or too little defeating For some people yes it it becomes a very very long wait and Almost undoable especially if you're talking about longer than fourteen or fifteen years sure. Everything has changed by. Then wow so for you when you came over at ten years old and obviously growing up in by and experiencing the world over there and then coming here at ten years old was what was different for you. I can't imagine well I didn't really know what to expect as far as how the US was going to be different. All I knew is that when my cousins came home they always brought us candy and so I always just had this like weird image of Americans all having rotten teeth because my parents will tell me too much candy. Yeah if you to Iraq and as a child you just kinda take things very literally and then and then I knew that it was cold and you know the other thing that I remember that We we would always bring water bottles to school and I remember my cousin selling me that they had juice boxes that they would bring in my little brain. I thought it must be because it's so cold. Aisle THE WATER. Ice adorable is really funny so when you got to school. I mean obviously culture shock realizing that not everybody is rotten teeth. I didn't realize the extent of the differences that we would face. You know people here. The kids here Just were a lot more advanced in terms of social knowledge and I feel like we were very naive in India like we. Didn't you know people knew what sex was. They knew? I mean we didn't know at that age at all when you have that culture shock as far as the social setting completely changed. What did you do because all of a sudden you're thrust into secular world and not really knowing how to do it. How did you navigate? Those waters Well you know I was just thrown into them and so I had no choice Initially you know. I felt quite bullied when I first joined school. I think people would make fun of know the way I dressed the way I spoke. I had an accent That you know the kids found funny. Of course they were kids as well and so You know I think kids. Just don't know how to deal with these kinds of different Differences and they don't quite understand what they're coming from and so I had a lot of people asking strange questions You know everything was a why. Why do you do this? Why do you do that And people would ask me. How do you translate Jessica Jessica in Indian first of all Indian is in a language and then you know and then and then we don't translate names? That is funny actually I. It is funny though because I there's a comparison between what your interpretation was of America and then I suppose would. There's this as well so there is a parallel process of everyone learning now. Did you speak English when you arrived? Oh Yeah I I. I went to an English speak English medium school in India. And it was yeah. It was a Catholic school. That's the interesting thing about Indian languages is that you know after after being colonized by the British for two hundred years. English has become part of the fabric of it in a way. Oh Wow okay. Now it's interesting. You went to a Catholic school. That is not your religion. How did you navigate that? That's actually that was a in those days in the early nineties late eighties. That was a very common thing to have. You know these church sponsored schools that taught English and a lot of the local schools would teach in their local languages and so When somebody went to an Indian English medium school many times it was a Catholic school. And of course you know. Catholics in India are living amongst Hindus and Muslims and even the religion is taught in a way that is respectful of Hindus and Muslims and sell screener here and then when you arrived here. Was there a difference in the I guess the religious aspect as well. I'm not really at because I. I arrived in Connecticut and I don't think religion was something that was a public thing in Connecticut. Now leader I moved to Kentucky and religion became publish in Kentucky. Yeah there's a difference. There in the meantime was great places to live but I understand the cultural differences there from there when you graduated high school. What happened for your next on so you know after I graduated high school in keep in mind ahead moved to Kentucky by then After I graduated high school I decided to go back to the northeast and I went to Tufts University to study philosophy and Child Development And so those are my majors and it was. It was a great experience is very different. Obviously from High School in Kentucky and You know it was nice being back. I think to the northeast I had kind of wanted to explore that. But at the end you know it just it just made me realized That I wanted to be closer to home And I decided to go to law school and law school. I came back to Chicago which was a little closer to where my parents were and I think learning that I wanted to be a lawyer was a significant Development because nobody in my family At the time you know was lawyer I had a cousin who actually went to law school but he wasn't a practicing lawyer in the sense of you know the way I am now. What happened in your life that you said I want. I want to focus specifically an immigration law. Well I I actually. I actually stumbled upon immigration. Lots it's funny. How you know you find yourself in these ways but what happened is generally I always? You know when you immigrate. There's a sense of disempowerment that you feel like I don't know what's going on here. I don't know how to navigate How To you know? Get what I want Done over here because the systems are different because people you know. Expect different things from you and you. You may be perfectly competent in your own country and feel perfectly incompetent in new country and so it's Instill when that happens. You know that sense of disempowerment. I think that left a mark on me and I had always looked for some way I think subconsciously that I would get that Empowerment back and that's what actually led me to law You know it was it was I had heard someplace you know. If you really want to win at a game you need to learn its rules and so this was the this were. These are the rules of the country. And so you know that That's how it got into law but when I got into law I was really good. Science student really good at math and I kind of wanted to explore Healthcare Law and I thought you know I have a lot of. I have a lot of physicians in my family. Like this seems very you know. logical right and But when I got into healthcare law I or you know I started studying it and I started internships at the American Medical Association and I realized that I didn't really enjoy Because I because a lot of it had to deal with working with the insurance companies working with hospitals and I needed something that worked with people and that makes sense you know and And that's how I kind of explored immigration. Law Went When I worked at a firm that did multiple areas of law and I had immigration law cases. I realized I really liked those cases And I liked working with You know people who had had similar experiences where they had you know Come from different Background whatever country. It was but they all experienced that emit immigrant experience Wow you said something very powerful the whole aspect of can be very competent in your own country and then incumbent in the United States. How do you think that takes a toll on people's self esteem I think tremendously affect self-esteem I think you know your whole world is shaken? What your identity shaken So yes suddenly. You're thrust into a place where you feel like you don't know how to get things done you. Don't nobody knows you hear a lot of times. People come from a place maybe in their village or maybe where they lived in there. How people would know them as something right? They were creating an identity. Oh you're right and then they come here and you're nobody as you know thinking that my own life. I can see how that would really affect me as well. Unfortunately not everybody is a healthy person. Meaning I'm sure then there are people who would take advantage of immigrants who come here and pray on them in some way in fact. That's true and I I see that and I saw that happening You know unfortunately in the field of law as well and I saw some lawyers who were unscrupulous with you know gaining the trust of their immigrant populations in and not really giving the kinds of services. They deserve so absolutely. I see that happening in in a lot of different fields. I mean sometimes I come you know. Immigrants come stories of various employers taking advantage of them because they didn't know the labor laws and You know So much absolutely Wow what would you say is the biggest? Maybe the number one difficulty that most immigrants have I think what really is common in that immigrant? Experience is this sudden suddenly being thrust into an unfamiliar environment And then you know trying to navigate and figure out how to how to get your life back together in in this new environment and in what that really creates is this difficulty of of assimilation of Understanding sometimes there's language barriers of course And you know and and suddenly being treated differently because a lot of times. You're you're not different in your own country and you're not used to being seen or noticed as being a friend that's a really good point especially if you're maybe in a more rural place in the United States who doesn't have a lot of diversity and again be much more. Maybe more focused on you as far as how you look how you sound how you dress unfortunately does create some stereotypes for maybe for some people which is when you work with immigrants. What is the biggest advisor most powerful advice? You give them to to help them navigate these waters. I tell them when they're working with any kind of professional whether it's lawyer whether it's an accountant always look for the signature of the professional on their documents Because that's how you know that they're taking some responsibility for what they're doing. Yeah I mean I just you just took that for granted not realizing that there are so subtle ways in which people really can take advantage of you do as an immigration lawyer. You know today. There's so much happening in the world around us. And how do you help? People really encourage them to stick stick with the process of immigration. Even though it may take a long long period of time it does and you hit a you hit the nail on the head. It takes years. Sometimes it takes years sometimes even just getting an answer back from the government takes a long time and sometimes the answer is really not in line with common sense because you know oftentimes these papers are mailed in. You can't go and talk to somebody and explain what you mean you know. And so it. Really frustrates. Immigrants Undoubtedly And what's really awful about this process to is that there's not a great level of customer service Even when you call their customer service number eight amazed you can't really figure out how to talk to a human you know and and You know even sometimes when you do. It's not a very helpful conversation. And so so one thing that I tell my clients is that you have to understand that this is going to be a fight and I'm with them in the fight and scratch if if you know if they need You know we understand. Of course that they go through emotional cycles and we see it every day in our you know in our office where somebody is in in the waiting period and that waiting period is excruciating and You know they get frustrated. Sometimes the lash out at the attorneys and they'll cry. They'll cry on the phone you know and and in that happens but but it is a fight and it's really one that I think makes Immigrants Stronger after they come out that adversity really can make make you stronger. Things can be a stumbling block are steppingstone even pauline. You said even calling immigration office. I can't imagine even if you don't speak English well or don't understand the the grammatical syntax of how to really express yourself. I'm sure that in itself would just be so hard to to get your questions answered. Well that's that's absolutely true. One thing that I've seen and you know in every immigrant community is the Strength of the community. The you know when people don't know English they've find somebody who speaks English well enough to talk on the phone with you. Know what I mean Seville. They'll find solutions out out of the box solution sometimes to So that that spirit I think is also Something that helps them survive that difficult that resilience that resilience absolutely and that's a beautiful thing you know thinking about that because some people you know if you're not emigrant I mean you'll have different trials and tribulations but it's a beautiful thing that you can connect with like minded individuals or like minded people from your own culture and finding them in a different country and as a community really being able to help each other to help each other thrive and I think what a beautiful beautiful sentiment when you look at your own your own practice. I know you reach out to a lot of different type of people specifically on facebook. What is your facebook group about? Essay created a facebook group Usa immigration experienced Because I wanted to create a space where immigrants can ask these questions without having the fear of approaching an attorney And they can they can ask these questions community but the but the space would be moderated by an attorney so that we can ensure that you know information is accurate and Not outdated and you know and a lot of times. So that's the goal of the group. I hope that people join and Definitely would love to see more engagement from our members. I always posed updates on some of the new rules and laws that come out so that people can have the most current knowledge That's wonderful well speaking of that if my listeners like to find out more information about you to work with you to join this facebook group where they find this information online short well. Our law firm website is called Swagger USA and it's spelled S. W. A. G. A. T. U. S. A. DOT COM And for facebook. If you look up the Group USA immigration experience you'll find that we also have a swagger USA website in both of those places are great places for people to get information about current updates And to reach us they can also call on the phone. Three one two eight five four seven zero six five if they have a question about their own immigration experience or if they're an employer looking to hire somebody. Who'S A non-citizen Feel free to reach us in. We would be happy to help wonderful tomorrow. Thank you so much for returning to my show with your fantastic wisdom. I'm sure this is inspired and helped many of my listeners. Today thank you James. And it was a pleasure talking all. I also want to thank you my listeners. For Tuning in today please subscribe this radio. Show through whichever portal. You join me today. Also please go to my website. Were you may sign up for the free weekly. Recap Watch my youtube episode. Read the articles I've written specifically for you. Purchase my previous guests self-help products. If you'd like to work with me. Be a guest on or advertise on this show visit. James Miller life policy dot com pressure following all social media platforms under the name. James Miller lite policy except for twitter. Which is James M Life? Algae once again. Thank you so much for your support and I'll talk to you soon.

United States James Miller facebook India James M Catholic school Donoughue James twitter High School Donald Morrogh Canada Danu DOT TV S. W. A. G. T. U. S. Kentucky Mumbai