35 Burst results for "Early 20Th Century"

Learn the History of Jacobson v. Massachusetts

Mark Levin

01:47 min | Last week

Learn the History of Jacobson v. Massachusetts

"Case in the case, known as Jacobson vs Massachusetts. Jacobson. His lawyers argued that the Cambridge vaccination order was a violation of the 14th amendment rights. Which forbade the state from depriving any person of life, liberty or property without due process of law. Question then was whether the right to refuse vaccination was among those protected. Of the personal liberties, the Supreme Court rejected Jacobs argument and doubt the anti vaccination movement is stinging loss. Writing for the majority Justice John Marshall Harlan acknowledge the fundamental importance of personal freedom. But also recognize that rights of the individual in respect of his liberty may at times under the pressure of great dangers. Be subjected to such restraint to be enforced by reasonable regulation, says the safety of the general public main demand. This decision established what became known as the reasonableness test. The government had the authority to pass laws that restricted individual liberty if those restrictions, including the punishment for violating them were found by the court to be reasonable means for achieving a public good. Bottom line. There had to be some kind of real and substantial connection between the law itself and legitimate purposes. The Jacobson decision provided a powerful controversial president. To the extent of government authority in the early 20th century. In 1922, the Supreme Court heard another vaccination case, this time concerning a Texas student named Rosalind sucked, who was barred from attending public school because her parents refused to have her vaccinating. Zach's lawyers argue the school district ordinance requiring proof of vaccination denied her equal protection of laws. Under the 14th amendment. The court disagreed. Justice BRANDEIS wrote in the unanimous decision long before the suit was instituted, and they cite Jacobson vs

Jacobson Justice John Marshall Harlan Supreme Court Cambridge Massachusetts Jacobs Government Rosalind Zach Texas Justice Brandeis
The 20th Century Was Shaped by War

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:40 min | 2 weeks ago

The 20th Century Was Shaped by War

"We'd witnessed the twentieth century. Shaped by wall is one individual. So wittily put it. The twentieth century began in the balkans and ended in the balkans it began with the facination of archduke ferdinand by governor low prank hip. An amicus serbian nationalist which through various ententes various arrangements of the earliest twentieth century diplomacy triggered will will won a war in which a whole generation was lost the fruit of europe america only involved in the last few moments of that war it was the european nations that lost the cream of the young men in the trenches of fair done in those no-man's-land filled with bob wire and machine gun nests with more than six million killed but it was the war of mechanized proportions in which predominantly the military's paid the brunt. It was the young men of the armies of each side. That were mowed down just a few years later. The great war the first world war was out don in a conflict that spans the globe. In which sixty million people killed and not just sold is in fact in most cities of that war it was the civilians that bore the brunt. Then came the cold war stasis if you will yes hot was. In the periphery and south asia in the middle east and africa but between the two polish sides between america and the soviet union between nato and the war so packed the birds never flew this strategic bombers never dropped their bombs on washington or moscow on london on paris.

Balkans Archduke Ferdinand European Nations Bob Wire America Europe South Asia Middle East Africa Soviet Union Nato Washington Moscow London Paris
James Ledbetter Wrote That Marxism Journalism Was About Propagandizing

Mark Levin

01:52 min | 2 months ago

James Ledbetter Wrote That Marxism Journalism Was About Propagandizing

"The 2000 and a book of Marx's articles for the Tribune. Ledbetter explains that quote the basic marks approach to his New York Tribune column was to take an event that was in the news, an election and uprising the second Opium War, the outbreak of the American Civil War. And sift through it. Until he could boil it down to some fundamental questions of politics or economics. And then on those questions, he would make his judgment. In this sense marks journalism, he says, does resemble some of the writing that is published today in journals of opinion. It's not hard to see a direct line between Marx's journalistic writing listen and the kind of tendentious writing on public affairs that characterized much political journalism. Especially in Europe in the 20th century. This marks his approached to journalism as I say. Says modern journalists do today that is, he was unencumbered by commitment to actual news reporting, instead is reporting, which shaped the news around his own opinions and ideology. Ledbetter, who went through all of Marxist Columns and writings. Said after 18 48 marks learned the power of counter revolution. And began to believe that existing systems of government economy could not be overthrown until a relatively informed and organized proletariat could be mobilized to do so. As became clear with every passing year, he writes, and many nations, such organization was decades away if it existed at all. So in other words, Marx understood the power of mass communication and the need to control it and shape it. The frame events and opinions. The purpose was to propaganda, not in the form.

Marx Ledbetter New York Tribune The Tribune Europe
Adrienne Rich was One of the Most Widely-Praised Poets of the 20th Century

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:56 min | 3 months ago

Adrienne Rich was One of the Most Widely-Praised Poets of the 20th Century

"We're talking about one of the most widely taught widely read and widely praised poets at the twentieth century. Her burke brought the minute show of women's lives into the spotlight challenging the idea that to right from the female perspective was uninspired and undeserving of attention. Let's talk about adrienne rich when she was born in baltimore in nineteen twenty nine adrienne rich's parents thought she would be a boy they'd plan to name her after her father. Arnold a doctor. Instead arnold decided his daughter adrienne would be a literary prodigy by the age of four. Adrienne could read and write by six. She wrote her first poetry book by seven a fifty page play about the trojan war. This is the child we needed and deserved her mother. Helen wrote in a notebook. Helen had been a concert pianist and had given up her career for marriage. And motherhood as much as adrian's childhood was marked by long hours in her father's library her mother's sadness and lack of agency left a lasting impression to in nineteen fifty one while a senior at radcliffe college. Adrian experienced her first big break her poetry manuscript. A change of world won the yale younger poets prize. The prize came with a publishing contract. W h auden wrote the foreword and reviewers loved it. At twenty two years old. Adrian became a critical darling soon thereafter. She won a guggenheim fellowship. Which funded additional studies at oxford. There she met alfred. Conrad a graduate student from harvard. Despite her father's disapproval and married alfred. Nineteen fifty three

Adrienne Rich Helen Burke Adrienne Baltimore Arnold Radcliffe College H Auden Adrian Alfred Oxford Conrad Harvard
"early 20th century" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 3 months ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To fans and being somewhere where, like, you know. White woman would give up her seat for a black soldier on the Metro makes you think. Oh, this is how things are. It sort of takes away the universality of it. The French government even awarded the 369th Infantry Regiment, the legendary Harlem hell fighters. With special medals for bravery. And so the soldiers returned from the war with a very real sense of how things could and should be. In black publications across the country. There were more calls to fight against the violence and oppression at home. The boys wrote a powerful essay called Returning Soldiers where he's basically gives that clarion call for the militancy that black folks will need to feel this freedom struggle. Where, he says, you know, we return to a country that Lynch's and degrades and abuses us. We returned from fighting. We return fighting, and then he says, Make way for democracy. We saved it in France and by the great Jehovah, We will save it in the United States or know the reason Why? Mm. Which? Yeah, That's it that captures and it still gives me chills. It is a beautiful piece of the lyrical rating. I read it not too long ago, and I felt the same like Wow. When I was doing research on literally what was happening in the early 20th century. I wanted to know what was the spirit, you know that was being swept across the nation. Kimberly Ellis is a scholar of American and Africana studies. I found out about this group called the African Blood Brotherhood,.

Kimberly Ellis United States 369th Infantry Regiment France early 20th century Jehovah Returning Soldiers Lynch Africana French government African Blood Brotherhood American Harlem
"early 20th century" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:29 min | 3 months ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of Brooks and K part that is New York Times columnist David Brooks and Jonathan Capehart, columnist for The Washington Post. And they are in person here. Here. I can touch you actually in the studio. This is exciting. I've got to figure out how I'm going to get through this conversation, um, to be doing it well while wearing shoes. Beautiful accident instead of our house slippers. Um, so much to talk about. And Jonathan. Let's just quickly pick up with where Dan Bush left off Texas really important decisions for them to make about these new districts. They've got to figure out how to draw those lines. What is at stake it with the Congress so evenly divided. What's at stake here? What's at stake here is the majority for the Congress. Whether they're excuse me whether the Democrats will maintain their very slim majority, or as a result of redistricting, not just in Texas but around the country, whether the lines will be drawn in such a way that gives an advantage to Republicans going into the 20 to 2022 midterms before a vote has even been cast. And you're with Texas. Um, influx of people, their population growing a lot of them in the urban centers that went for Democratic candidates. And yet the way the districts can be drawn the that voting power very well might end up resulting in districts that would be drawn for Republicans to do better in. So what? How can Democrats counter this, David? I mean, how do you see this? Shaking out given what's going on. Yeah, I think prayer would help. You know, I think you know the Democrats. I talked to want to maintain the house. They don't expect it as I was David. Somebody said it would take a miracle. Miracles could happen, And it could happen. But you know, in midterm elections that when one party controls both houses of Congress in the White House than their records in these first midterms tends to be terrible. And then there's the population shift, which we've been hearing about that, by itself is probably enough to get the Republicans 4567 seats. And then there's the redrawing of the lines, and Republicans just control more state legislatures. I should say I'm more focused on population shifts that I'm gerrymandering, because while I think these lines these they Legislature, straw are gross and unwieldy. And it's the politicians selecting the voters. I don't think the effect is that big in the middle of the 20th century, you had a big effect where Democrats had a natural advantage because the way they drew the lines. Then in the early 20th century, the Republicans had a pretty big effect, maybe 20 more seats than you would think from their vote totals. But recently it's been a pretty small effect. It's been in the single digits so and that's in part because half the states It's not partisanly drawn, and so for different reasons. Well, what we have happening here is it's not just redistricting. We have what I call a perfect storm brewing. You've got redistricting on top of voter laws that have been voted into Georgia. Florida, Um, Texas Democrats did a dramatic move to keep their law from going into effect, but the special session will be called And those laws might well go through Iowa, Arizona. And so those laws are being put in place. You know, Democrats call them voter suppression laws. They will keep people primarily black and brown people the young from getting out to vote. Not every not every eligible voter will be able to vote and not every legally cast vote might not be counted. And that's what's that danger in danger as well. And all of this getting more attention. Usually we're waiting for census data waiting to see what each State does certainly in the spotlight. Let's turn David to our lead tonight. And that is President Biden in Europe, meeting with the British prime minister meeting with his counterparts in the so called G seven. What it Why does this trip matter for him? What does he need to do? Well, he needs to show that America is back, you know, and he back and cooperating with people and you know, I've traveled on delegations he's made to Munich to the security conference. They have there. And what you see is he's on first name basis with everybody like with the world leaders with the doorman in the hotel. He's been doing it for so long. And so I think there's a little that personal diplomacy. I think their proudest to the fact they got this vaccine thing done. I spoke to a White House official today and they said the last four weeks have really been a sprint. To get this so we could offer from half a billion vaccines and get our allies to do another another half a billion and that will all be done by the middle of the next year. And so they're surprised they could get to this. They thought we would not be in a state where we had so many vaccines. We would have enough to buy and then share with the world. And I think they want to show that we're in the generosity business again, and that American can be a generous nation in the world. A Little Marshall plan, and I think they'd love to get to a spot where it's not a nation by nation fight against Covid. It's a little more of an interdependent global fight against Covid. And so they're pleased with that. They are under no illusions that American European relations are going to go back to the way they used to be in the Cold War. That's not happen, but but they're very pleased. I think, legitimately self. How do you see the way what? What is at stake for for Biden and his and his agenda here and globally? Well, I think you know to your point. The president knows all of these people. He was a senator for 36 years, vice President for eight years. Yes, he is. On first name basis. His mantra is America is back. But you know there's a a piece and I think the Times of London asking the question, okay, you know, But do the words match the deeds. And I do think that there is some skepticism in Europe about whether the president's um focus on China whether that's taking attention away from them. Whether the president, President Biden is continuing former President Trump's policies vis a vis China think it Tariffs and then other things that President Biden is doing that former president Trump talked about withdrawing from Afghanistan. So I think what we're saying it's not going to go back to to the way it was, and I do think that the world now is like they're happy. The United States is back in the fold, but I think they figured out over the last four years we can't really depend on the United States. Especially when it comes to President Biden's mantra is also democracy. We have to show that democracy works, but those world leaders are watching what we're doing here. The last conversation we had about voting rights. How can you have a democracy if voting rights are at risk? So it's it's David. It's the pandemic that has shifted. Landscape, of course, but it's also the trump the four years of Donald Trump PTSD. They've got whether post traumatic Trump is, you know they they wonder if this four years as an interregnum, and then Trump will be back. I wonder if the trump like figure back and so they There's some sense. America's fundamentally less stable and then we are more America First. Biden is not as America first as Trump was. You know, you look at our purchasing decisions as a government. It's America first, and we're just living in a world where multilateral cooperation is less emphasized. Frankly, from a lot of countries all at once, and that has just been a trend of the last 25 years has nationalism has become a stronger forced in the world across the west than in Asia. And somehow there's just been a deterioration in our willingness to cooperate on a whole range of friends harder..

David Brooks Jonathan Capehart Dan Bush Jonathan Donald Trump David Munich Asia Congress Cold War 36 years Iowa Europe eight years Brooks half a billion Democrats Republicans 4567 seats 20 more seats
"early 20th century" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:19 min | 4 months ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Logan Heights in San Diego. What lessons could may provide. She wasp, whether it's on the city level, the state level or the national level. For me. It's really important that Boyle Heights has always found a way to incorporate newcomers into what I would call kind of democratic practice at the local level. It has found a way even for newcomers who are undocumented to participate in the community to participate in defending the community and making sure that it prospers and survives. One of the things that really interests me is, you know, we have this discussion of 11 million people in the United States for undocumented Bull height is an interesting history of incorporating them into the local politics in what I would call non electoral democracy. Have a right to speak out as a mother as a resident. As someone who cares about the community. Those things have been really important. I think there's a lot to learn from that kind of a politics, which, of course, goes back. The very origins of the Boyle Heights in the early 20th century of incorporating all people into unions into other political organizations. That really defended the neighborhood. So Boyle Heights and other neighborhoods like it become kind of a I don't know what you call it, a stepping stone and the Americanization process or It's It's a stepping stone into the kind of multi racial democracy we're going to need in the future. There's no way to look at the demographic transition in the United States as a whole and not realize that you need communities like Boyle Heights with the tradition and a history of incorporating newcomers and diversity into the very fabric of democracy at the local level, So few communities have that knowledge of that history, Boyle Heights does, And I think if that people can learn from the history of Boyle Heights It's it tells a national story of how do we create? You know one society out of so many different kinds of people. You do it at the neighborhood level. You do it in with local institutions. You do it with a sense of belonging. At the local level, No matter what status you have no matter where you came from, and I think Boyle Heights is a is a great story for that. All right? George J. Sanchez, author of Boyle Heights, how in Los Angeles neighborhood became the future of American democracy..

George J. Sanchez Los Angeles United States Logan Heights early 20th century Boyle Heights San Diego 11 million people One one society American
"early 20th century" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:42 min | 4 months ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Meteorologist Ryan Waldron says dry vegetation, offshore winds, low humidity and high temperatures led to the extension feel they're kind of acting like an early July fuel economic certainly made so in terms of should people be worried. They just need to be smart with their ignition sources and what they can to try to prevent that. Bay Area. Firefighters spent much of the weekend battling small blazes across the region. The situation isn't likely to improve as we head into hotter, drier summer weather. Very service to Angel Island Historical landmark since 1997. It's also a popular state park is at risk of ending. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors is expected to vote on a resolution tomorrow. That would reaffirm the importance of public access to the island, where immigrants from Asia and elsewhere were processed in the early 20th century. Many were held on the island for months or years. Visitors can read poems that detainees carved in the walls of the barracks supervisor and resolution sponsor Gordon Mar in July, when immigration station is very important to the history of of our nation's Asian, American and immigrant communities. And it's deeply meaningful to former detainees and their descendants. Like my family. The blue and gold fleet provides very service to Angel Island now, but filed a request to discontinue it last year because of economic pressures. State Park board is reportedly negotiating with another ferry service. I'm Brian what? Thanks for listening to KQED news. Support for NPR comes from Charles Schwab. Charles Schwab is committed to offering a modern approach to wealth.

Asia Ryan Waldron Bay Area Brian July NPR Charles Schwab early 20th century San Francisco Board of Supervi last year Angel Island KQED Gordon Mar early July 1997 tomorrow State Park board Asian months American
Biden to Officially Recognize Armenian Deaths as Genocide

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:18 sec | 5 months ago

Biden to Officially Recognize Armenian Deaths as Genocide

"Today to officially recognize the massacre of Armenians by Turkish forces more than a century ago as a genocide U. S presidents have for decades avoided using that term. One Turkey rejects, but historians widely viewed the killings as the first genocide of the 20th century. Southeast Asian

Turkey
"early 20th century" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

06:31 min | 6 months ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"In the early 20th century San Francisco's Fillmore District Woz, a vibrant community for middle class black Americans. Since urban redevelopment in the 19 fifties and sixties, the African American population of San Francisco has fallen by nearly half. Where do you go when you're homeless? San Francisco. That question is at the heart of the Sundance Award winning film The Last Black Man in San Francisco. The movie was a debut effort of director Jo Talbert and actor Jimmy Fails. Long time friends joined me during their Atlanta visit to promote the film in 2019. Here's Joe Talbot telling us how they first met as kids. Well, there was a park that's sort of lived right between. Our two houses are where Jimmy lived where I lived called, Proceed a park in San Francisco, um, sort of hugged the line of the Mission District and Bernal Heights. And it was a park where a lot of different kids would hang out. Play sports in my case, more run around with the camera so we would see each other around and you know, sort of silently acknowledge each other. And then eventually Jimmy came over to my house. Who's friends with my younger brother Net and we had a conversation that went long into the night and kind of touched on it felt like everything. And so much stuff. It went on for hours. And I think that was the The basis of the friendship. We have announced the beginning and just kind of the basis for our friendship, which you know this is a lot of talking and being Open with each other. How long ago was that? When this is all man, it's his very blade for us. But I would say over 10 years for sure that some of the you were teenagers. Yeah, I was even younger than that. I feel like I was probably It might have been like 12 13 years. Now that think about it. I mean, but well, how long have you been talking with each other about making this film? Clearly you had a lot to talk about it. Very beginning. I mean, we always have a lot to talk about. But, you know, it was an idea that came from again talking, having a conversation and came very informally. And just sort of started to get developed. Once other people that just showed us a lot of support and you know we had other conversations with other people and told them about This sort of idea That kind of came and it is very blurry. How Start to get developed, but well, basically not mean we. We shot a concept trailer. That was the first thing we did, you know, Having never done this before On this level we had made movies together were younger. And that concept trailer became a calling card. We put it online. It was Jimmy skating through San Francisco, telling the story of his grandfather inspired, You know this film we want to make. And we started getting emails from people all over the world, actually saying, you know, these same things are happening in our cities were seeing our cities change and become unrecognizable. It was the first time I think that I realized this is bigger than San Francisco. And so we also got emails from people closer to home in the Bay Area, saying, You know, how can we help make this movie and so given that we had never done anything on a large scale? Had just been our ragtag productions with friends and family. And whoever we could sort of, you know, give a pair of headphones too. And a microphone. It was like we all learned to make a movie. Together with these thieves. People who reached out became our film family. And so it got bigger and bigger, But for a long time it was A small group of people. We called our long shot family. That was the name of our collective because it felt like it was going to be a long shot to get this movie made. Well, nothing about the film seems ragtag, including the Beauty of its production Just Or just lighting and dreamlike sequence is and anti acting is superb. Jimmy. This story is based Your family's Victorian the home. Would you talk about the significance of the house itself to the story? Uh, well, the house is everything to the story of the houses with what draws me to the city in the first place. You know, the houses was for a very long time. The only thing You know, driving me to stay there for for reasons being The only place where I've had my full family sort of together, you know, And since we lost that house, I haven't had that. Family feeling. It's also my grandpas legacy. He owned several properties in the Fillmore so represents, you know, black ownership represents my grandpa, who was my idol. I thought he was Superman. Growing up so It just represents that. That's what it represents. For me. Most importantly, just a family. Many people did come from the south. That was sort of. You know the migration to seven Cisco for a lot of African Americans who worked in the shipyards during the war. And that's when the Fillmore area of San Francisco became known his Harlem of the West. Yeah, I was hoping you would talk more about that now because this was such a vibrant and Interesting community are some of the West. Why don't more Americans know about more? Seven sisters and also session? You know, we had Is like you. You grew up. I think we're all deeply aware of when you grow up in San Francisco, the music that came out of the sixties Jefferson Airplane and Janis Joplin. The films that came out of San Francisco from nor films too, You know Coppola's movies and the sixties and seventies and so on. But you're not taught necessarily about the Harlem of the West, about the jazz scene that took place in San Francisco on about many of the.

Jo Talbert Joe Talbot 2019 Bernal Heights San Francisco 12 Fillmore Jimmy Fails Mission District early 20th century two houses The Last Black Man 19 fifties Jimmy Atlanta Coppola Janis Joplin Superman Bay Area over 10 years
Avatar Set to Beat Avengers: Endgame as Highest Grossing Movie After Re-Release

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:14 sec | 6 months ago

Avatar Set to Beat Avengers: Endgame as Highest Grossing Movie After Re-Release

"With the re release of the 2009 blockbuster avatar in China. Disney wins Either way it acquired Avatar is part of the 20th century Fox Film Library from the Bloomberg newsroom I'm Larry Kaskey on W T O Pay. Still to come.

Fox Film Library Disney China Larry Kaskey
FBI Warns Of Groups Calling For ‘Storming’ Of Courthouses Nationwide And In Washington, DC If Trump Is Removed

WBZ Midday News

05:16 min | 9 months ago

FBI Warns Of Groups Calling For ‘Storming’ Of Courthouses Nationwide And In Washington, DC If Trump Is Removed

"And FBI bulletin obtained by ABC News said an unnamed armed group called for storming State capitals, government buildings, courthouses and the U. S Capitol. If President Trump has removed from Office before Inauguration Day, The Homeland Security Department said it would implement the inaugural security plans six days earlier starting Wednesday, when the House could take an impeachment vote. The FBI said the group is planning attacks in D. C and there have been specific threats against President elect Biden, Vice President elect Harris and members of Congress. Aaron Carter SKI ABC NEWS New YORK In Boston, the FBI here says it does not currently don't have any plans. Armed protests at the Massachusetts statehouse over New Hampshire. Rhode Island, Maine Governor Charlie Baker says there's nothing law enforcement. Is aware of here. There are currently no known threats with respect to the state House or any other public building. At this time in Massachusetts, and on we will continue to monitor and track the information that's out there on we will be appropriately prepared for anything that might happen. President Trump meantime, today, taking aim at the prospect of being impeached again, The president calls it ridiculous. This impeachment is causing tremendous anger. Speaking to reporters for First time since the Capitol attack, which Democrats blame on him, the president said the impeachment push is dangerous, but we want no violence, never violence. The House will begin debating impeachment tomorrow, charging the president with incitement of insurrection in urging supporters to March on the capital, but the president's taking no responsibility for the riot. Saying his remarks to backers were totally appropriate. Soccer Megane Washington's president Trump visits section of the US Mexico border wall today on way to celebrate the completion afforded 50 miles of fencing this year. Hidalgo County Democratic Judge Richard Cortez wants the president to stay away in order to prevent large crowds that might bring more positive covert cases. We just modified order to ask all our hospitals not to do elective surgeries because we're 18.8% of our hospital capacity in Texas, the Legislature opening up today and Austin ABC is Jim Ryan says. Talk of Unarmed demonstration and lingering threats of covert 19 of rattles Some lawmakers nerves. Even images of the riot at the U. S. Capitol might not be enough to keep Texas 181 legislators from attending the opening ceremony at the state Capitol. With the specter of a novel coronavirus infection is a different matter to Democratic state representatives from the Dallas area plan to skip the event for fear that it might be a covert 19 super spreader hand there's a B C's Jim Ryan. The first U. S execution of a female inmate and 67 years was supposed to happen today. Right now, though, a court has put that on hold. The judge granted the stay late Monday, citing the need to determine Lisa Montgomery's mental competency. The Kansas woman got the death sentence for killing Bobby Joe, stand it and cutting out her baby. She was planning to raise the child as her own. That girl is now 16. Montgomery had a history of faking pregnancies and tricks dented into believing the two were meeting up so Montgomery could adopt a puppy. Montgomery's lawyers have argued that sexual abuse during her childhood lead to mental illness I'm Julie Walker, Boston native Casino mogul and GOP mega donor, Sheldon Adelson has died of the disease. Jim McKay has more on his life. Adelson was born in Boston and grew up in Dorchester. He rose to become the chief executive officer. The Las Vegas Sands Corporation, which owns casinos all over the world. Adelson was one of the early casino executives that look to spearhead American based casinos and Asian markets. In his later years, he became known for his major political donations him and his wife were known as the biggest backers of President Trump's re election campaign and 2020. He had been suffering from a cancer related illness recently in the past week. He had taken time off for surgery, his wife confirming this morning that he died of a long illness. Sheldon Adelson DEAD at 87 Jim McKay WBZ Boston's news radio in Massachusetts. Raised filmmaker has died. Director Anna Rose King died January 3rd after losing her battle with lung cancer, family says King died in New York City hospital She directed a total of seven films. One of which was inspired by the passing of her broadcast executive Father Roger King, the movie titled Good Enough Centers on the New York City based flight attendant who seeks to find a lost relative after her father's death. Popular television hover Syria's soon we'll be making its way to the tip of the Cape for filming of their 10th season. WBC's Kim Tunnicliffe takes a look selectman in Provincetown have approved 20th Century Fox is request to film the American horror story anthology in town from February 1st through March 6th selectwoman Lease, King says This could be a big boon for businesses in the area struggling because of the pandemic. It's off season. You're talking about bringing a lot of economic activity town at a time when businesses Could really use those dollars. King is a bit concerned about large crowds gathering due to the popularity of the show. She's seeking assurances that crowd control measures will be in place which enforce existing covert 19 rules and regulations. The cast of 100 will include Kathy Bates, Sarah Paulson and Macaulay Culkin. Kevin Tonic, Left WBZ Boston's news radio. Listening

President Trump FBI Homeland Security Department President Elect Biden Vice President Elect Harris Governor Charlie Baker Jim Ryan Massachusetts Judge Richard Cortez Boston House ABC Aaron Carter U. S. Capitol Montgomery Abc News Lisa Montgomery Jim Mckay Hidalgo County
Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines arrive in Los Angeles

All Things Considered

03:24 min | 10 months ago

Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines arrive in Los Angeles

"Cherry Gwai. Oh, so, yeah, the first doses of a covert vaccine of finally arrived in Los Angeles, and there's been a lot of talk about who should get them first. And, of course, the fear that some people have of getting vaccinated at all. One of the folks who has been helping to make the rules for vaccine distribution is Dr Oliver Brooks, He's co chair of California's vaccine drafting guidelines Work group, and he's also the chief medical officer over Watts. Health care, Dr Brooks. Nice to have you back on. Good to be back in here with you to the first shipments of vaccines will be given to front line health care workers. It's already happened. Other health care workers are next in line, but but from what we just heard, even some health care workers air wring their hands and saying, Well, maybe I'll wait a bit to see if it's safe. I mean, Do you have workers at Watts, who were hesitant to get vaccinated? I'd say that I've had conversations with people everywhere. Health care workers and not that do have some hesitation. Yes, Health care workers are human, just like everyone else. Those those human patients who are hesitant about the vaccine. We know there are a lot of folks who are we just heard numbers from one poll that found only just about a third of Latinos trust the vaccine to be safe and only 14% of black Americans that that's a national poll. But those numbers Must give you pause. What do you telling patients to try to overcome? That kind of Ah, I mean, my gosh. What a barrier That is. Well, the approach that I take, which has been studied in his A reasonable approach is first and foremost acknowledge their concerns. Don't just blow them off and say, what do you What do you doing? You know it's the vaccine is safe, effective need to get it. Have to understand where people are coming from. There is a mistrust of the medical community in the African American community. There, it's there's some grounds for that. I mean, Slaves were experimented upon. They were sold for experimentation and to turn of the 20th century, there was sterilization of African American women. There is the infamous Tuskegee study where 600 black men were allowed to have syphilis progress to see what the complications were. So I mean, it's not like this is coming from nowhere. However, I have not known any first of all this. What else I'll tell them. I've known no bias. Or concern, as relates to experimentation issue with any vaccine. The second thing I do is I give them knowledge, so I will tell you this. It is an emotional psychological response that they're having and not One that can be solved by numbers and data. So it's important. But you still need to have him and then a circle back and say so, you know, have I addressed everything you're concerned about? That works. Some don't work for everyone, but it does work. Have you been vaccinated yet? Yourself? No, it hasn't come to my clinic yet. But I will be first in line assuming that's not considered selfish. S O I I am eager and willing. I do not want Cove in 19. So another thing I do tell people it's the vaccine truly is safe and effective. It's been scrutinized. So have the window. We heard a vaccine so well scrutinized in the public eye, so there has been clear

Cherry Gwai Dr Oliver Brooks Dr Brooks Watts Los Angeles California Syphilis
"early 20th century" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

06:45 min | 10 months ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"So in the early 20th century, European nations were becoming increasingly isolated and jingoistic. It became a point of national pride to champion. The various advancements and inventions each country could lay claim to. I think of it a lot like the way we treat the Olympics at times how some people will reduce the Olympics to a discussion of Our country took home 12 gold medals and your country only took home eight. It's sort of a one upsmanship tendency, which I think is pretty darn tacky cause it takes attention away from the actual accomplishments. But that's just my own opinion. Whiles tensions in Europe built toward World War, one more nations were getting involved in kind of this one upsmanship. They were scrambling to prove that they were the seat of ingenuity and innovation. And sometimes in meant that some rather let's say creative but undaunted by ethics sorts of people would fabricate evidence that clever inventions came from their respective homelands. Historian suspected that the alleged The Vinci Sketch is one of those examples. It was a forgery intended to give the honor of creating the bicycle to Italians rather than to say the Germans. Spoiler alert. Most historians agree that the bicycle really got started in Germany first, another bogus claim to the invention of the bicycle dates to 17 91 and a fellow known as Come to deceive rack. Though it may be that this bogus claim was arrived at honestly by mistake, as opposed to a hoax perpetuated by someone. The good count allegedly developed a vehicle called the Cell Letter affair, which, by 1/19 Century historians description sounded a lot like the basic frame of a bicycle going to the description. It had two wheels. One set in front of the other. It did not have any petals or breaks or handlebars. It was essentially a frame with a saddle on it a leather seat and you would sit on the saddle and you would propel yourself. With your feet pushing against the ground, and you would steer yourself by leaning left or right, And that's as best as you could do. As it turns out, there were vehicles sort of like this, but they were all Three or four wheeled vehicles, not two wheeled vehicles. Many people, particularly French people, adopted the belief that a Frenchman had come up with the idea for a bicycle. But it appears that was not quite the case. It may well have been an error in translation or transcription. I prefer stories that actually have evidence to support them. And I am inclined to give the nod of the invention of the bicycle, or at least at the invention of a device that would evolve into the bicycle to a certain Baron Karl von Dry ice in 18 17. He was concerned with finding a way for people to get around due to recent unfortunate events. CNN 18 15. A couple years earlier, there was a volcano in Indonesia called Mount Tambora, and it done blowed up. The volcano ejected an enormous cloud of ash into the atmosphere. That ash cloud had a global effect. It lowered temperatures across the world. Was kind of like a nuclear winter. Except, of course, this is a volcanic won. This in turn, led to massive crop failures in certain regions around the world, like in Europe, and that lead to other problems such as animals like horses dying of starvation. So there was a shortage of horses in Europe at the time drives wanted to invent a means of getting around quickly. Despite this lack of horses, the good baron came up with a novel idea, assuming that the previous examples I mentioned were in fact hoaxes and not just poorly. Recorded history. It was again a two wheeled vehicle with one wheel set in from the other. It had a padded saddle to sit upon and a set of handlebars for steering. There were no pedals and only a single wheel brake so again, and for real, the writer would push him or herself along the ground with his or her feet. Let's be honest, it was mostly Hymns. And he's that we're talking about because there were lots of laws about what women could and could not wear, and most of those were not conducive to writing a vehicle of this design. So what was this thing called? Well, it actually had several names Dries called it the laughs machine, which means running machine. You gotta love the German language in which new words were invented by just stringing existing words together, and you just end up with a very long new word. According to the sources, I reference to use this name originally for a four wheeled vehicle of his design, but he later adapted the same name to the two wheeled model. It was known in English as the dry Zain or dry zine. The R A. I s I n e and French. It was the rise in. Oh, and it was also called a philosophy ead velocity, it would become a generic term for these sort of two wheeled vehicles for many, many years. In England. It was also sometimes called a hobby horse or and this is my favorite, a dandy horse because they were expensive. So typically, only really rich people in nice clothing were striding along with these suckers. The word philosophy would be used for many such vehicles for decades until they turn bicycle came around. Now people like these when they could ride them on nice, smooth services because a push with your foot would propel you much further than just if you were to take a regular step. So you travel more ground faster than normal. So you wouldn't be going at ridiculous speeds, But you could certainly get across a sidewalk area much faster than if you were just strolling, and it had a certain appeal. Dries. His invention was a hefty one. It was made out of wood and brass and iron shot wheels, plus that leather saddle. The whole thing weighed around £50, or 23 kg For a few years. His invention was all the rage in Europe over in England, a coach maker named Dennis Johnson Again. The market. His own variation of dry ice is invention and an inspired a few seasons of vigorous sporting events among the aristocracy of London, but turned out to mostly just be a fad and excitement died down by the 18 twenties. So why did it go out of style so quickly? Well, it might have had something to do with writing conditions. The vehicles work best on smooth, paved surfaces. Now most roads in Europe did not fit that description. They were a couple stone if you were lucky, but sidewalks.

Europe Olympics England CNN forgery Mount Tambora Baron Karl Indonesia Dries Dennis Johnson Germany London writer
Diego Maradona, Argentinian soccer legend, dies at 60

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:17 sec | 10 months ago

Diego Maradona, Argentinian soccer legend, dies at 60

"While Borussia Monchengladbach dominate shock cargo nets. Fornell soccer legend Diego Maradona's passed away at the age of 60 at his home outside window Cyrus, Argentina After suffering a heart attack. Maradona was named along with Pelleas Beef is Player of the 20th century played at Barcelona and Napoli. Besides floods in his native

Fornell Soccer Diego Maradona Pelleas Beef Maradona Argentina Heart Attack Barcelona
How Author Emily M Danforth Discovered Openly Bisexual Early 20th Century Writer Mary Maclane

Queer as Fact

04:38 min | 11 months ago

How Author Emily M Danforth Discovered Openly Bisexual Early 20th Century Writer Mary Maclane

"School. And i'm like i know but like i am just trying to. I try to tell you quickly. When did you get your hands on. Mary mclean and her memoir. And what made you think oh would make a great noble. I didn't. I didn't think that i was just just reminded of this. Because i was trying to figure out exactly what it is. I've been talking about the book. And i've been saying is in my late twenty s. It was sometime in grad school and my office maze My second year of grad school told me recently. She's like i know when you got it because you wouldn't shut up about that book and she didn't like me particularly which i didn't know the time we're good friends now. She was kind of annoyed to be. My office may learning all kinds of things right so already. She didn't like me. Apparently i wouldn't shut up about mclean's memoir so it was. It was roughly around. Like two thousand eight and i had read about her. I was doing research about diana where she lived when she wrote the memoir this mining town and i thought i was going to set a story. There's sort of colorful place at the turn of the twentieth century Read about her and then filed that away and looked her up and became really fascinated but became fascinated with her because a new the legend of her right before i read the memoir itself and so he knew that cocktails had been named after her and she blazoned her licensed her image to a cigar manufacturers are and that she was openly bisexual rights in nineteen too many new these sort of like interesting facts about our that. Our book sold eighty thousand copies in the first month. But i did not know how much i was gonna love the book. And that's i think the thing that really sort of seeded itself. So i was like oh she seems fascinating and then i got the book. Like spoke is so funny. This book feels like something that i would sort of think right now. Right sheets Writing yeah absolutely. I was reading and i was like i feel intensely like this would have been may as well right and you look. How were you thinking these things and they miss. You wanted to title it. Wait the doubles coming. Which is like the best memoir of all time so it was once. I read the book that i really serves a new that like some new. Do something with it. But i was well into writing a different version of plan bad heroines. That really was only gonna tell the present-day story of the of the making of the sort of curse horror film. Before i kinda figured out that mary were play a role. You know what i mean. So it's not like this perfect light. Oh i found her more than i said. It didn't work that way for like. I have to find thing like this is probably looks familiar to you and i think a lot of creative people like i have to find a thing. Like let it marinate for a long time before figure. Oh yeah so i mean. I can't say enough about her book. I think one of the funny things about doing press for this book is just the number of people that one thing. I made her up even like go look at her wikipedia page. And i'm like murray mclean would not like this. I feel like. She's turning over in her grave reducing. I'll be thrilled to think that like you know You know it just shows you. How many people still don't know about her like unreal to me right. How of there have been scholar since the seventies kind of trying to lake collector work. In and a number of scholarly books published really of writings about mary mclean and a couple of good memoirs in melville house reissued the book under its original title but but even still like an alarming number of people. Don't know anything about awesome. Yeah i where we decree history. And i never had a pet until we got an email from your publicist saying. Hey do an episode about this. And look at emily's your. I was like ooh this looks gay. It's so it's so. That's the thing is like i mean. Now you've read the book right like she's so explicit in her longing in her desire right and she's like trying to find the language of the day to say like. I want to sleep with my former teacher right. Like it's just it's yeah and so even when i heard about like hurt like you might see like bisexual or sort of some sort of coating coated thing. I was not prepared for just how gay the book would be when i write him right. Like how many entries would be devoted to these. You know this this this real. She had on her former teacher. I mean it's you know it's it's it throughout the book. She's talking about her. An anemone lady so yup became sort of know. I think like. I became kind of haunted by not mary mclean. That wouldn't be the right way to put it. But but certainly

Mary Mclean Mclean Murray Mclean Diana Melville House Mary Emily
Poll shows tightening race for Prop. 22 in California

The Retirement Trailhead

04:04 min | 11 months ago

Poll shows tightening race for Prop. 22 in California

"Have no less than 12 propositions to weigh in on California is always big on its propositions. So much so that Ko Phi radio reporter Chris and Carlo has made an entire podcast out of them called Proposition, and I spoke this week about one that's got the whole lot of attention. Prop 22. Earlier this year, California passed a law requiring companies that that hire hire gig gig workers workers to to classify classify those those workers workers is is actual actual employees employees eligible eligible for for benefits benefits and and higher higher pay. pay. Uber Uber lift lift insta insta card card doordash. doordash. Those Those are are some some of of the the companies companies were were talking talking about what prop 22 would do is give those companies and exemption so they could still hire people is contract workers and not actual employees with benefits and said income, Carlos says Uber has been pushing a yes vote on this while a lot of uber drivers Have been urging people to vote No on prop 22. The problem is that for these tech companies it made there Model, their business model in many ways, non viable and so they have been fighting that law, and as a matter of fact, they have refused to adhere to that law since it was put in place and they have been in court suing encounter suing the state of California to avoid going in place complying with the law. Now it's important Tio understand that when we talk about prop 22, because Cop 22 is kind of a get out of jail free card for these companies. If prop 22 passes, it creates a kind of side framework for specifically these tech gig Cos Where they lay out what sort of wages they're going to pay. They lay out what sort of benefits they're going to offer, and it essentially exempt them from 85. That's why they're pouring a ton of money into this. I mean, we're talking about $200 Million ballot measure fight, which is the most expensive in California history. So you've got proposition 22. If you vote yes, that would let uber lift insta card and other companies who hire gig workers as workers. Be exempt from a law that says they must be considered employees and not contracted workers. If you are California voter and you vote no on prop 22, That means these companies don't get the exemptions. What do you think that How is the polling looking on how it's going? The polling hasn't been really conclusive. We've seen a lot of attention focused on the yes side because the money's on the outside of that $200 million that I mentioned roughly about 190 million of it has been raised in close to spent by the Yes side. That's where you're seeing all the advertisements. You're also seeing sort of in kind advertisement. So you know if you log on to the uber platform with lift platform in California boom, you get a little mini advertisement. Hey, don't forget to vote Yes, on prop 22 so It's difficult to assess whether or not this is gaining traction with people. It's also a very difficult questions of process because, yes, it sounds good if you are a passenger, if you're somebody that depends on uber and left if you are maybe an uber and lift driver you want this, But there are a lot of Hoover and live drivers that say Hang on a second, It would take a 78 vote of the Legislature here in California to overturn it, which makes this basically a law that is irreversible. It's almost impossible. To get a seven eight's majority on anything. The only other way to do this is to go back to the ballot measure process and try to undo it. But now you're talking about another $200 million fight, and the other side has all the money and your side doesn't What we're looking at. Here is a classic fight between labor and capital. I mean, this is the sort of thing that we saw during the progressive movement around the turn of the 20th century. But it is a 21st century twist where you've got, of course, thes tech based platforms that are According to the company's offering up a ton of opportunity for these drivers and for these gig workers, But for some of these gig workers and some of the unions that are backing these gate workers, they say that they're being taken advantage of. And the opportunities for earning more money continues to diminish Chris that Carlo Thank you so much

California Chris Reporter Carlo Carlos Legislature
Over a century ago, masks were controversial during the 1918 flu pandemic

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 11 months ago

Over a century ago, masks were controversial during the 1918 flu pandemic

"Voting during a pandemic is something the U. S has done before during the midterm elections in 1918, when the Spanish flu pandemic was ravaging the country for historian. Nothing whatever unprecedented. Tom Ewing is a history professor at Virginia Tech, and he cites eerie similarities between now in 1918. Back then, some communities required masks for voters and large public gatherings had to be canceled. But the situation wasn't politicized in the way that it is now. When people disagreed with the policy, they didn't say. Was because someone so with a Democrat, a Republican, and the role of the federal government was much less significant. Voters listened mostly to state and local health officials and didn't turn to the president for leadership. That just was not the role of the president. Early 20th century That's one striking difference. Nikolai Nelly w T o P

President Trump Tom Ewing Nikolai Nelly Federal Government Virginia Tech Professor U. S
Retirement in America in 2020

Bull 'N Bears

08:29 min | 11 months ago

Retirement in America in 2020

"Happy to bring onto the program. Dr Ken Dike Wall, the founder and CEO of age wave. Can just keynoted, the financial planner retreat that we held here at Edelman financial engines last week. This time, of course, was done. Virtually Ken's clients include half the Fortune 500. He received the American Society on a Jing's award twice. He's one of the 35 most influential thought leaders in the financial services industry, according to investment news. Ken. Thank you so much for coming back on the program record is always great to be with you. Now. The reason that I asked him to come on is because of something can said at our retreat. That I've heard. Can you say that several times you and I have known each other for 20 years. I've seen you speak more times than I can remember. You're one of my favorite public speakers. And you said something again in this event, but this time it finally hit me and it got me thinking you gave the following statistic as part of your conversation with us. You said every year in America. We produce about four million babies. And we are also producing about 20 million caregivers. Now that statistic itself is shocking five times as many people are caring for elders as they are for babies. That was really your point reflecting the aging society, right? That was the point you were making. Yes. But it got me thinking it's even worse than that, isn't it? Because when you have four million babies that doesn't mean four million new moms, lots of mom's air having their second or third baby. Which means we're not producing four million new moms were producing Maybe one or two million new moms versus the 20 million new caregivers. The dispersion is even worse than the statistic itself. Suggests, isn't it? Yeah, it's something that sort of off the radar, but it's not off the radar. I'm sure for all of your listeners because nearly every one of us is touched by this in our life, you know, looking after a mom or a dad or a spouse or brother or a sister. It's become a major part of life now and There's a couple of valuables and erected, really pull it together. First, we a cz, you know, and your listeners know we're all living quite a bit longer than humans have ever lived before. The life expectancy in the beginning of the 20th century was 47. Today. It's about 79. But by the way, I'll also tell you that there are 33 countries in the world that have a higher life expectancy than we do. We are very middling when it comes to longevity. But the really interesting piece of it is what's called health span. So our health span doesn't seem to be matching our lifespan. What I mean In the United States. On average, we spend about 10 years sick at the end of our lives, and sometimes we can even spend years dying. Now what that does is, it creates an entire segment of our population. Turning that suffering for whom Our health care system has not done a good job preventing illness or disease but also causes family members. Tohave tow walk away from their jobs, their take every Tuesday afternoon off or relocate. In order to look after either their spouse or their mom and dad and the numbers are enormous. You mentioned 20 million new ones last year, but all in is over 40 million elder caregivers right now in America. And that number can on ly get bigger, right? Yeah, it's going to get bigger and a little more complicated, and I'll explain this. First of all, one of the major variables here has to do with the relation between Men and women and let me explain in America. The average woman who's partnered with a man has a man whose 2.5 years older than her. That's the average right now. The women live five years longer than men. So what usually happens then, At the end of one's life, the mangroves, Il begins to falter. The wife will put everything inside and care for her maid for her loved one. He dies, she might be emotionally depleted. They might even be financially depleted because they perhaps didn't have the resources. Handle what happens when someone is ill. But then she's going to live another 7 to 10 years. Who's going to care for her now for boomers. Now I'm a boomer, and I think you are, too. When our parents were having us. They were averaging four kids each, so the greatest generation in the silent generation had a lot of kids. And they were kind of close at hand. Boomers only averaged about two kids each and about almost 20% of the boomers had no kids at all. And so what happens is when we enter into our later years. Who's going to care for us? And so there's gonna be more of a caregiving crunch, which means at home care industries. They're goingto surge. More and more people are going to seek out housemates. More and more. I think we need to put pressure on the medical system and our scientific systems. Because if we could knock out diseases like Alzheimer's, if we could wipe out I know that's something you're committed to if we could wipe out some of the really nasty diseases of the later years. Then we wouldn't have so many older people suffering and therefore we wouldn't have such a need for caregivers. So we've got to get the lifespan and the health span to be more in sync exactly. So this is something that is as fundamental is a gets from a financial planning perspective what we were now referring to as life planning to help people realize what your future is likely to hold, and you've got to think about it in terms of your intergenerational aspects of your family. How many Children do you have? How many of them can you rely on either because of proximity because of willingness because of financial wherewithal to be able to be a caregiver to you, And if you have suspicions that that's not going to be available to you for any of the above reasons you need to start thinking about alternative ways that you can get the care that you're going to need and not just you, but also for your spouse. Right. And another thing that's happened, Rick is it during this horrible covitz situation? 46% of all the deaths have occurred in nursing homes and still nursing facilities. And they're probably not completely to blame because they housed some of the most struggling elders by half of whom have Alzheimer's and dementia. But what happened as a result of that Is that a whole lot of people are saying to themselves, man. I don't think I want to be in a nursing home. Well, okay, then. Then you need to sit down with your financial planner and make sure you've got some resources or talk to your family. So that you could be looked after the comfort of your home in the way you want to be looked after without having to worry about being parked in a nursing home can thank you so much for raising this issue it is. I think something that we're not giving a lot of thought of. We've got an election coming up in a few days. We have the midst of the covert crisis in front of us. Andi. It's very difficult for people to look beyond the here and now given what our nation is facing imminently to looking ahead 5 10 20 years into our financial future, but it's extraordinarily important that we do so especially in the context of the election because it's our nation's leaders who were about to send or return to Washington. That are going to be key for figuring out the public policies necessary to help protect tens of millions of aging Americans over the coming couple of decades. Exactly. Ken Dike. Well, thank you so much for mentioning this your book. As I mentioned what retirees want. It's hugely popular already hitting all the bestseller lists. You're subtitle really says it all, though, about what your new book What retirees want is all about. Subtitle is a holistic view of life Third age, and that's a lot of what I'm trying to put forward in this book for our grand parents when they reach retirement age. Had a couple of three years before their batteries were out today, most of us we had 60. We have another 30 years in front of us and trying to figure out how to make sure we can fund those years and also have a great time during that stage of our life, and maybe even make some great contributions. I think it's going to be the challenge of the future. So I encourage you to pick up a copy of Ken's brand new book What Retirees Want Available Booksellers everywhere. Ken Dyke, Wild founder and CEO of Age wave. Thanks so much Kan for being back here on the program. Stay healthy. Stay safe, Rick. Thanks.

Dr Ken Dike Wall Founder And Ceo America Alzheimer Rick Edelman American Society Ken Dyke Ken Dike United States IL KAN Washington
Hall of Famer Whitey Ford, New York Yankees' all-time wins leader, dies at age 91

All Things Considered

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Hall of Famer Whitey Ford, New York Yankees' all-time wins leader, dies at age 91

"New York Yankees pitcher Whitey Ford has died. Edward Charles Ford. His birth name, spent his entire career with the Yankeesstarting in 1950, The Hall of Famer had the best winning percentage of any pitcher in the 20th century. In 1967. The same year he retired Ford received the bronze medal of the city of New York from then Mayor John Lindsay. I was brought up in a story in Queens and I've seen things like this when I was a young young boy Mayor's honoring People here in City Hall, and I never thought it would happen to me, but, uh, thank you very much. Ford was nicknamed each the chairman of the board, not to his ability to perform under pressure. He died last night at his home on Long Island. He was 91 years old.

Whitey Ford Ford New York Mayor John Lindsay City Hall Yankees Long Island Queens Chairman Yankeesstarting
Maryland Panel Tasked With Investigating State's Lynching History

All Things Considered

04:09 min | 1 year ago

Maryland Panel Tasked With Investigating State's Lynching History

"Government backed commission of its kind is about to start investigating a harrowing part of the state's history. The Maryland Lynching Truth and Reconciliation Commission has set out to document the state's 42 known racial lynchings. The panel delivered an interim report to Maryland Governor Larry Hogan earlier this month. Charles Davis Jr is the commission's vice chairman. He joins us now to share the commission's plans and goals for this project. Welcome. Thank you so much for having me so tell us. Where did the idea to create this commission originally come from? Sure, most historical scholarship concerning racial terror lynching is centered in the deep South. And so you have states such as Arkansas, Alabama, Mississippi and the like who get noticed for their history of racial tear. However, it's important for people to understand that lynching took place throughout the United States. I'm in. One of those states that is often overlooked is a state of Maryland. And so we call Maryland the middle ground in many ways, because it represented like most border states, a style that was southern but also had a progressive leaning on. So this oftentimes caused the state to be overlooked in terms of looking at the legacy of racial terror and tell us what are the primary goals of this commission. The commission is tasked with investigating lynchings that took place in the 19th and 20th century in Maryland, and we are centered and focused on salvaging the humanity, first of the victim's arm and then really laying out each case individually and hopefully bring about some semblance of Justice to the family members in the descendants of the deceased victims. Can you talk about a specific case that the commission is investigating? Right now? Sure. Yes, we're looking into the lynching of Matthew Williams, which took place in Salisbury, Maryland, in 1931, and so Matthew Williams was a young labourer who got into a dispute with his employer over discrepancies in his pay Following that his employer was founded. And Williams was actually hospitalized after the employer's son shot him and the lynch mob descended upon the hospital and drug him out of the first floor window. And the lynching commenced. And he was eventually taken to the drug to the courthouse lawn in front of thousands, along with local law enforcement politicians, religious leaders who did nothing. Eventually, as if that wasn't enough. He was eventually burned, and no one was ever held accountable. And no one was ever held accountable. So what does the commission do with a case like this? Today. Your ultimate goal I imagine is trying to figure out exactly what happened to Matthew Williams. Yes, And that is the ultimate goal. And it's important to note that we see the racial terror lynchings of old that took place in Maryland. Directly in relationship to the ongoing racial tear that we're witnessing in the United States. And so that's important to consider when we're looking at this and investigating this today in this fractured America that we're seeing, as relates to race relations on DSO. Yes, The truth is what we're seeking getting to the bottom of it, seeing who indeed was complicity and involved whether it was locals on state government officials because we believed that the descendents are owed this truth. Is the state. I'm in what we hope the citizens of Maryland and decisions of nine states learn from this work that we're undertaking is that truth comes first. And if we have the truth in there could one day possibly be Reconciliation. Charles Davis Jr is the vice chairman of the Maryland Lynching Truth and Reconciliation Commission. And he is an assistant professor of conflict resolution and history at George Mason University. Thank you very much for

Maryland United States Reconciliation Commission Matthew Williams Assistant Professor Vice Chairman Larry Hogan George Mason University Salisbury Arkansas America Mississippi Lynch Alabama
Israeli kibbutz tweaks its name to honor Ginsburg

News, Traffic and Weather

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Israeli kibbutz tweaks its name to honor Ginsburg

"A kibbutz in northern Israel is changing its named honor late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Kibbutz Ramat Hash offense. The judges Heights is named after an early 20th century Jewish American judge in a weeklong tribute to our V G there, temporarily tweaking the name to Romano has offended Slight change makes the word judge female. This's ABC News.

Bader Ginsburg Kibbutz Ramat H Supreme Court Romano Abc News Israel
Forrest Gump author Winston Groom dies aged 77

America's Morning News

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Forrest Gump author Winston Groom dies aged 77

"Groom, the writer whose novel Forrest Gump was made into an Oscar winning 1994 movie that became an enduring cultural phenomenon has passed away. His death confirmed Thursday by Alabama Governor K. Ivy and the mayor of Fair Hope, Alabama. It's where a groom lived a Forrest Gump. Of course, the improbable tale of a slow witted man who was a participant Teo are witness to key points of the 20th century. History was slow witted. I don't know, I think Forced was always the smartest guy in the room. If you ask me, the movie won the best picture for best Oscar picture, I should say, and five other Academy Awards, including best actor when For Tom Hanks.

Forrest Gump Oscar Groom Alabama Governor K. Ivy Forced Tom Hanks Fair Hope TEO Academy Awards Writer
Chadwick Boseman dead after 4-year battle with colon cancer

Family Financial Focus

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Chadwick Boseman dead after 4-year battle with colon cancer

"To pour in after the news of the death of Hollywood actor Chadwick Boseman, who privately thought colon cancer for years. CBS's Chris Martinez is in Los Angeles before he rose to superstardom in Black Panther Chadwick Boseman played 20th century legends like Jackie Robinson and James Brown. Bozeman died after a four year battle with colon cancer. According to a statement, calling him a true fighter and saying he continued to work while undergoing surgeries and chemotherapy. The statement said he died at his Los Angeles home with his wife and family by his side. Black Panther production company marvels Studios tweeted Our hearts are broken and our thoughts are with Chadwick Boseman is family. Your legacy will live on forever.

Chadwick Boseman Colon Cancer Los Angeles Chris Martinez James Brown Marvels Studios Jackie Robinson Bozeman Hollywood CBS
"early 20th century" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To the early 20th century when cholera, tuberculosis and flu pandemics abounded and architects use design to heal people until the discovery of the Huber Callback Selous. It was the end of the 19th century. Treatment was primarily environmental and sanatorium. Sze emerged as a way to treat tuberculosis because it was understood that ample exposure Aaron Sunlight were crucial in mitigating the worst effects of this respiratory illness. Wherever they were located. They all had essentially the same design. Can you describe what the typical sanitarium looked like? There were a lot of roof terraces and balconies healthier patients might ascend to these Roof terraces. If they were weaker, there were lots of open balconies where they could recline in the best sanitorium Sze. They had lots of separation. For example, in the pie me, Oh sanitorium In Finland, Each patient had their own hand washing station. There's a lot of really minimalist design as well to prevent the accumulation of dust that the TV back solicit could residing. On DH lots of opportunity for the movement of patients as well as air through the spaces that they inhabited The design principles of the sanitorium spread outside of these health resorts to other structures and you write informed a good part of modern architecture for decades. How so? A lot of the major modernist architects were informed by this movement like a boozy et and a number of other major modernist architects. Even design sanitorium is like Albert also who did the premiums, Sanitorium and Young America with a dozen Astro TB sanatorium. These early modernist architects were really interested in rejecting ornamentation, for example, So you see that in a lot of this modernist aesthetic in the furniture in the way in which space is designed, trying Tio disavow closure. The aesthetic was also very clinical. Minimal describable lot of right angles and a lot of white. Yeah, and also a continuity between Inside and outside so large windows spaces as well. And opening windows Ribbon windows was a popular design feature for Lake Appreciate. These were always too kind of bridge, the interior and the exterior world. Now you write. This went beyond Oh, hi, gene that cleanliness and light and openness were deemed not just an aesthetic but a moral imperative brocade and carpeting and ornamentation. Where Poisonous to the soul. The philosophy that most embodies this idea it would be. Adolf loses, tracked ornamented crime Azi, a early modernist architect, and he designed a building in Vienna called the Loose house, and it really scandalized the Viennese because it had no eyebrows or adornment over its windows. He argued that the ostentatious decor of early 20th century architecture was a crime because it was a waste that these would go out of style and become obsolete and it was a crime to waste that effort when it would go out of style. He also suggested that ornament was immoral, and he described it as degenerate. And it's a problematic text in a lot of ways. There's some kind of troubling the colonial and racist ideas in it about what ornament is, there's so much to unpack there. In the notion of ornamentation as degenerate. First of all, it anticipates things that Hitler and Stalin would say later in the century, about various kinds of art. Is there any evidence, though, that modernism was, in fact, genuinely healthful, physically, socially, morally any which way? I mean, did it work? Some of these buildings like Altos Panya Sanitorium were very successful, and I think it's still a rehab center for Children, you know so the best of these principles when put into practice and put in practice thoughtfully and then the right context could be healing. But it was a vision of utopia that didn't actually take everyone into account. Right. I think the most major failures of architectural modernism we're in public housing. So it became quite popular in the 19 twenties, along with the rise of the composing another major architectural figures, but that communities living in this housing when consulted about their lifestyle and wishes I mean, I think it really reflects some of the problems around senatorial as well. A lot of these treatments for tuberculosis were pretty expensive, and so they weren't available to everyone. You know, you had to be fairly wealthy to be able to go and enjoy these treatments in these wonderful, lush open spaces. Thomas Mundy asked Joe lunch pail, Not necessarily Right. Exactly..

sanitorium Sze tuberculosis Sanitorium Altos Panya Sanitorium Aaron Sunlight Roof terraces Huber Callback Selous Sze Astro TB sanatorium Finland Vienna Thomas Mundy Young America Adolf Lake Appreciate Loose house Hitler Joe
"early 20th century" Discussed on Curious City

Curious City

09:34 min | 1 year ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on Curious City

"It first progressive. Women's groups jumped into help them. I opening so called suffrage lunchrooms and they would be like on the second or third floor of some of these buildings in the loop. That's restaurant historian Jan Whitaker so girls and young women who worked in stores. Maybe offices would get the sort of really simple lunches lunches like ham or tongue sandwiches with coffee and donuts or Pie. The lunchroom's were also open to men but they often be served a side of pro suffrage talk with their sandwich eventually. These low-cost lunchroom's will give way to even bigger cheap lunch. Joints called Cafeterias Arthur type of restaurant. They kept prices low by eliminating servers. Plus that way customers didn't have to tip back in nineteen fourteen. The boulevard cafeteria at St Jackson explained its philosophy in an ad that went like this that tip which are almost compelled to contribute would just about pay for your entire lunch at the boulevard cafeteria. Don't buy a cat in a bag. See what you're getting like yourself. The pleasure of selecting some toothsome morsels from our large variety of meats and vegetables. And so what were those toothsome morsel? They were ten cent daily. Specials described in that ad like this most native view with dressing. You'll think you're eating chicken special boulevard. Chop Suey made of pork. Tenderloin celery and nothing else boulevard. Chicken Ala King. Were sixty cents of any man's money one Chicago cafeteria chain called thompsons had more than a dozen locations in the loop and they're diners eat. It looked like one arm school desks. They bragged and in nineteen eleven at about their fast light lunches. Perfect for the office worker. Thompsons lunch won't leave you logie and lazy and dull this afternoon old cafeteria menus show southern influenced dishes like Fried Cornmeal Mush with Maple Syrup or Lima beans with salt pork but food historian whitaker says their menus also reflected. Chicago'S NEW LOVE OF CERTAIN ETHNIC DISHES DISHES. The Gut hot after being spotlighted in the eighteen. Ninety three world's fair and those dishes were Chili. Spaghetti and Chop Suey. Those are like the three big crossover dishes and and so they were. You know thoroughly Americanized and so believe it or not. These were the hot dishes for the adventurous Foodie back. Then in fact Chop Suey was so big that our forth popular eatery is the Chop Suey House around nineteen. Ten Chicago had more than a dozen of them in the loop alone. Craig says there were a few reasons for that. Chop Suey became immensely popular in America. Beginning in the eighteen. Ninety S For a couple of reasons one is. It was cheap food. It was exotic for the time. So you'll see menus even into the nineteen thirties saying exotic Cantonese food. This so-called exotic food was basically bits of pork onions. Celery sometimes. Water Chestnuts and mushrooms all drowned in bland brown sauce but the reputation of these chop suey spots was anything but bland. Some were right outside the vice district and the featured music dancing private booths and more one tribune article from nineteen eleven warned. Chinese mix in with Chop Suey young girls with braids down. There backer escorted into many of these oriental places by boys wearing their first long trousers and are being introduced a cigarette smoking drinking and other evils destined to make them the slave wives of Chinamen. Or drag them down the lives of more open. Shame now sounds like one exciting restaurant experience but seriously Chinese restaurants faced a ton of racism and suspicion. That painted them all with a broad. Brush the reunion boycotts against him. City Council proposals to deny them licenses not to mention federal laws that cut Chinese immigration way down still in the end the public's love for that exotic Chop Suey prevailed in Chinese restaurants are still going strong today. I know we're here in the mid west with no ocean incite but another thing chicagoans loved back then were voice tres. Oyster houses were huge in the loop and so they are fifth type of popular turn of the century restaurant. There are several reasons for it one is. The settlers of Chicago came from New England and New York. Where Hoists were Bruce Craig again? He said that Oyster. The houses were a step above the saloons. Ladies lunchroom's Cafeterias Chop Suey houses and early importers had a special way of bringing them fresh to Chicago. They were shipped in along the Erie Canal down the Great Lakes all the way to Chicago either in Sawdust barrels because will live several weeks or they could be put in nets and dragged through the water but absolutely the rage so the loop was swimming with these seafood joints including the Boston Oyster House Chicago Oyster House in the famous rectors Oyster House at Clark Monroe still this cheap plentiful east coast delicacy would not stay cheap and plentiful forever that died out during World War One not because of the war but because the oyster beds were so polluted that they were killed off and the craze for oysters diminished greatly after that after World War One you could still find some authors and other delicacies in our sixth and final turn of the century. Chicago spot the continental restaurant here. You'd find fancy people celebrating fancy occasions with a distinct European flair. Some were standalone places like the famous Henry on Randolph opened by Viennese Baker Philippian racy but a lot of them were also in hotels hotels. We're like corporations. I mean they had money so they could hire a chef from Europe. Same wanted to. That's whitaker again and she says. Another hallmark of continental places was an enormous menu with hundreds of dishes. And so a person said you know I want X. And it wasn't on the Menu. They would fix it for you because the idea was to have all the standard dishes of which there were a lot most of the stuff wasn't super different from the surf and turf. You'd see at a classics steakhouse today. With the few exceptions like wild game croquettes milk toast turtle soup and pickled lamb's tongue but maybe the weirdest trend at the time was celery celery served as its own separate dish. I asked Craig Y. It was something you had to chew a lot. And that supposedly according to health theories at the time got your gastric juices going Secondly celery because it had so much vibrant it also is thought to have healthful benefits for elimination of waste in so celery it was basically like the Kale of its era. When I told all this to question ask her and she was fascinated by all the people and historical factors that shape. Chicago's food scene at the turn of the century but she was bummed to hear that women had to miss out on that corn beef sandwich with the five cent beer so we decided to remedy that. We're here the BERGHOF. Getting our beer and our corned beef sandwich. It's so good sense for beer and a sandwich. That's pretty amazing. All right cheers cheers. I wish I could say those Berghof Bar lunches were still just five cents instead. The Combo goes for about twenty bucks today. But Hey now it's available to us working gals to you know before we head back to our typing curious city supported by the Coenen Family Foundation. I'M MONICA INK. And one more thing for those of you paying close attention to carry a city in the last nine months. You may have heard Jessica pub of X. Voice in her name in the credits has an editor. She's a fabulous reporter producer editor and has been filling in for our editor. Alexandra Solomon her energy. Humor and tenacity was key to so many curiousity stories in the last year notably Nikki's and the big baby and our coverage of nineteen nineteen race riots. And we have a feeling you'll be hearing her again on curious city before too long and you should check out the investigative podcast. Alexander has been working on all this time season two of motive. It's an important story of several women who say they were assaulted by the same man while studying abroad. Fine motive wherever you get your podcasts or WBZ DOT org. Next time on curious city. Kevin grew up singing the song which he thought was inspired by the Great Chicago Fire. Mizzou's O'Leary left lantern in the shed and when the cow kicked it over she winter but then he heard a marching band play it in Kansas and learned the song had nothing to do with the fire. The story of a hot time in the old town that's next time on. Wbz's curious city..

Chicago Jan Whitaker Bruce Craig Oyster Boston Oyster House Chicago Oy Great Chicago Fire St Jackson Wbz City Council Europe Kansas Alexandra Solomon New England Lima Nikki Chinamen America Berghof Bar editor
"early 20th century" Discussed on At Liberty

At Liberty

12:53 min | 2 years ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on At Liberty

"From the a._c._l._u. this is at liberty. I'm emerson sykes a staff advocacy here at the a._c._l._u. and your host starting with the muslim ban in the early days of the trump presidency. This administration has announced new policies designed to keep immigrants out on a nearly weekly basis. This feels like an unprecedented wave waiver restrictions but anti-immigrant rhetoric and policies have deep roots in our country here to discuss another period in american history when the nation's gates were slammed shut is is daniel okrand an award-winning writer and editor. His most recent book is the guard gate bigotry eugenics and the law that kept two generations of jews italians aliens and other european immigrants out of america the book details the political dynamics created anti-immigrant zeal in the early twentieth century and the junk science that was used to justify justify it daniel estrin. Thanks very much for joining us. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks very much less than happy to be here. Your book tells an interesting story from the early part of our a twentieth century and in many ways you track a debate that culminates in the immigration act of nineteen twenty four. Can you start by telling us about that. Law and what restrictions it imposed the nineteen twenty four act was by far the most severe immigration restriction law in american history. I reduced the number of immigrants allowed into the country into one hundred sixty thousand as recently as ten twelve years before that over a million coming in every year and then most importantly it established national quotas otas based on the percentage of people from each nation that were already in the u._s. So that for instance ten percent of americans <hes> could trace their origins to to country abe and ten percent of the immigrants would be from country a. and the worst part of it. They didn't use the nineteen twenty cents to determine this or the nineteen ten or even the one thousand nine hundred sentences. They went back to eighteen ninety. The last census before the huge immigration from eastern and southern europe began and computed the shares that each nation asian would have from that so that the consequence was that as many as two hundred twenty thousand italians had come any year previous to the nineteen twenty four act in the nineteen twenty four act reduced used fewer than five thousand and similarly for all other eastern and southern european people in that state in place for forty one years well. It's fascinating that there was both an overall cap but also as you said these national quotas both of which resonate with the current time but sticking with the period that covered in your book. Can you tell us about what sort of political dynamics came together to give life to this act well. There were a number of things first of all the inherent xenophobia that has cropped up in american history from the very beginning you go back as far as seventeen fifties where a newspaper editor and pennsylvania wrote that the pennsylvania colony was being destroyed droid by the influx of germans were coming into not only to hurt the colony as a whole but also to even destroy the english language that was a newspaper editor named benjamin in franklin on to indicate how deep these routes are and then it goes at like a sine wave throughout american history and times of economic stress. Usually the immigrants are the first people to be blamed and i people do people want to keep out there was a period when immigrants were wanted very badly in the period after the civil war when bodies were needed to hugh the forests and to build the railroads and then when you get to the eighteen ninety s and there are so many economic trouble than a big anti immigration movement begins gents the sine wave pattern we certainly can trace through our history and i wanna come back to that but you talked about the issue of xenophobia and specifically race race played an interesting role. It's not exactly how we understand race today but race was central to the debate in one thousand nine hundred four absolutely true and what we mean by race is very different from what was meant by race at the time this cockeyed view of race the really divided <hes> even the european people's into variety of different races so that the predominant interview put forth by a really very linda anti-immigrant anti-semitic anti-catholic new york aristocrat madison grant he maintained that there were the three european races the nordics who are tall and blonde and brave and they built <hes> western culture the alpine's who are somewhat shorter and they were all right and they were artisans artisans and needed to have them around in the mediterranean's who were the lowest of the low they were short swarthy and they weren't worth a lot and of course that was speaking specifically about the italians talion whom grant despised and he said that the merger between any two the marriage between any two people from these groups automatically the offspring bring would revert to the lower forms of nordic married an alpine their children would be alpine's and if an alpine married a mediterranean their children would be mediterraneans and he wrote wrote the marriage between any two members of any of the european races and a jew would yield jew and the sense that there was a racial distinction not just a religious or culture or ethnic nationality distinction between say italians and greeks and austrians and germans really was unprecedented when there were different kinds of white people and the white people of the eastern european nations were deemed inferior the one one drop rule among europeans exactly exactly like that so yeah. You're right emerson to point out the comparison to today. I think that when trump began office and he was trying to keep out muslims from the arab countries he could have said he was trying to keep about arabs and the current controversy at the southern border the so-called recalled rapists and murderers and invaders that he has repeatedly invoked as directed against hispanics so you have a repeat of what happened in the nineteen teens and twenties leading leading nineteen twenty four act the consequences of that act were of course dreadful in tragic because of the number of europeans who could not leave your for the u._s. In the years following nineteen twenty four and this is in many ways sort of run of the mill prejudice racism that people have had throughout history he but there was an interesting dynamic that developed in the early twenties around eugenics. Can you tell us about eugenics and the role that it played in the development of this anti immigrant craze as sure this anti immigrant grades begins in the eighteen nineties with the influx of these in europe ian jews and the italians into the eastern cities of the us and from that point forward forward the anti immigration movement tried to enact laws that would cut down on immigration was led by senator henry cabot lodge the most powerful member of the senate in the period and and four times between eighteen ninety six and nineteen seventeen the congress passed laws that would have reduced immigration from those countries and four times james president's veto those laws and usually they would be to on the grounds that you know we our country of freedom and we make no distinction between nationalities. All all are welcome here. We are a nation of immigrants so the anti-immigrants needed to come up with something else and what they found was eugenics which if you'll excuse the expression was the bullshit science the the determined that there were different qualities of not just individuals but of ethnic and national groups and the eugenics movement begins in the u._k. U._k. really in the wake of darwin back in the eighteen sixties across the ocean in nineteen hundred and at first it was used to say well. We don't want people coming in who have obvious disabilities who are the term of art of the time was feeble minded <hes> they didn't want epileptics. They didn't want the blinds and want the death but by nineteen fifteen nineteen sixteen when madison grant wrote his book suddenly the the anti immigrationist who had been losing the political battle. They seized upon this and said this isn't in prejudice. We don't dislike these people. We have science that proves there inferior and we must pay attention to what science tells us and from that moment forward from nineteen mm fifteen thousand nine hundred sixteen until the passage of the nineteen twenty four law. It was eugenic argument that carried the day. I think probably the most chilling part of your book is the way that eugenics became common. Knowledge accepted by a huge variety of different people and subgroups within in the united states. What does it mean when the accepted science is wrong. It's pretty terrifying. We see the consequences of it. Then the as you say it was the accepted science the number of institutions that either added to the eugenic argument or spread the doctrine of the genyk argument. It's kind of scary. It was the cold spring harbor laboratories long out and it was the american museum of natural history. It was prominent faculty members at princeton and columbia and stanford the carnegie. <hes> institution of washington provided the financial support the harriman family they almost single-handedly paid for the initial eugenic research in the u._s. The rockefeller voter foundation was behind it so you had virtually the entire mass of american science and those who supported american science saying that eugenics was something that had scientific merit so it was not a surprise when the politicians picked up that call that people listen well. We're not prejudiced as i said before. We're not prejudiced first. We are just following the rules of science or is one particular <hes> anti-immigration leader a staunch progressive in fact in early backer the american civil liberties union said at the time you know we love the jews but that is we want them anywhere near us because it's dangerous. One of the central arguments in your book is around how how people's inherent prejudice led to public policy and then how eugenics was used to bolster that policy but it's a little bit complicated to understand dan what started this process and what was a legitimate belief by these people and what was just used as an excuse. How do you untangle that causal not. It's very very hard time tangle it but i think at its base inherent prejudices that pre existed even the arrival of the eastern europeans southern the europeans and then was aggravated by the large numbers that were suddenly visible to the anti immigration as the prejudices were there there was a built in prejudice particularly among the upper classes of the northeast and you find some of the noblest figures in our history embrace these prejudices and then when they stumbled and i think that was really the term when they stumbled across the genyk argument. They saw it as oh. I've been right all along. This proves my point that these people are inferior. If you begin with the prejudice and then you are provided an intellectual justification for your prejudice. It's not only gratifying. It's very very effective when we've talked a bit about what led to the immigration act of nineteen twenty four but let's play the the story a little bit forward what brought an end to this crazy world war two and the rise of the nazis what's he's in germany played a critical role absolutely what you see happening around <hes> one thousand nine hundred thirty one thousand nine hundred thirty two and then accelerating in the middle thirties is at the institutions that had supported the genyk arguments suddenly realize oh my god look what we've done and they begin to run away from it. They begin to drop their support for some say they you were never involved in it but there's this very clear almost humiliating sense that <hes> that these bogus arguments of these scientists have put forward are are the justification for the nazis and in fact there was a great deal of of connection between the american eugenics scientists and that's eugenic scientists they have been collaborating on various projects not necessarily race base but they knew each other very well. They have been collaborating for thirty years and you know as late as nineteen thirty. One of the leading german eugenic scientists comes the u._s._c. tours this various universities he goes to the cold spring harbor labs where he's accepted as almost as brother and this was the man who later wrote the nazi euthanasia statutes was given the gift of metal by hitler in nineteen thirty nine for all he had done to support the aryan race and he see <hes> even if the american eugenicist had not been meaning to promote nazi thought it was inevitable. Hitler read the eugenics textbooks while he was in prison. Even after the munich beer hall putsch nearly twenty s <hes> he cited madison grant in speeches and the connections were in variable so that finally at the end of world war two and nineteen forty six at the doctor's trial in nuremberg the nazi physicians. They used as their defense said well. Look what you're american. Scientists were saying we were only doing what they were doing and as i say in the book you know we're used to the phrase <hes> well..

madison grant united states europe hitler editor writer and editor pennsylvania american civil liberties union america daniel estrin mediterranean american museum of natural trump europeans emerson rockefeller voter foundation senate
"early 20th century" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"The holy let's owning galette the managed to become the super tribe all the super elite of the of the saudis this is thanks to all all nightly mainly mainly so ryan right now in the post industrial era whatever you wanna call it now that all is is really major major player so have we seen really the the the radicalization of those of those other elites that were to an extent hostile and rival to even sued and thanks to it he really manage to impose his authoritarian rule well if you'll let me rephrase that we see to interdit saudi arabia any remainder any any relics of the of these other elites that you started your story daily did not vanish they exist in the saudi saudi royal family in saudi oiling elite still have to consider the opinions and their let's say in the end or trans and it's not like it's it's being showed or imagine the as they won which controls everything you know saudi arabia has elites it has forces it's a has underground forces and let's say for example the saudi arabia is undergoing full several decades a process of privatization and in this process privatization and sharing of political power and in this process it's not a okay the king and the the the letter in multiple the princes are in charge but other elites comes and show let's say if you take for example adele jubal bill the new foreign minister minister is the first minister oil formula which is not which is not as with not a prince though from the south family is not from the whole family represents other elites other educated elites westernized westernize it was in the last eight years he was the saudi ambassador to do the united states and the uk and in the united states and the even that elite that families to very loyal to the south family i mean you don't see like any potential of regime change or anything that might endanger the authority of the of the sewed court well nobody can know recent events of the arab spring showed us that nobody can be a prophet and say what will happen.

saudi arabia united states uk ryan saudi saudi eight years
"early 20th century" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"The the history of the elites different locals around the the saudi government in doing the phases of of its formation that that you focus your your research or a bit about that about the fact that they you know about the plurality of the league and relationship with central government either either the political one of all the the religious over okay in my dissertation i actually challenged the perception of two elites religious and the ruling elites after studying the material folly and i i notice the other elites existed and there were let's say a mazda saudi state was evolving not as a tango dance between two only two elites but as a mosaic of many elites i counted the even in the early stages of the study state let's say in the first decade of the twentieth century a first and second decades of the twentieth century i i detected no less than five elites and the decades that follow this period let's in nineteen twenties thirties forties there was as many as fifteen twenty minutes elites and saab elites how divided geographically or according to some sort of social divisions both both let's from every region in which the saudi forces say took me military in the first decades to decades of the twentieth century let's say between nine thousand two and nine thousand twenty five in every region the community's population and of course elites in the eastern pourville you had the shiites the region is populated mainly by she by shia muslims and they will she's and away sunnis which acted let's say in favor of the.

saudi government saab fifteen twenty minutes
"early 20th century" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

03:13 min | 3 years ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Fourway decades even for centuries let's say the begin from the late eighteenth century the jerseys and they were hobbies were a rivals and there were wars and confrontations that had a religious nature yes tell us about the the religious component okay hobbies are let's say a very matic branch of the affair sony slum hubby hubby began at let's say the mid eighteenth century when sher mohammad abdullah hob joined forces with the first ruler of saudi st mohammadi been sold in another city called ear which was then the capital of the saudi first state and they were hobby is is very matic saying that it looks at islam and the on application of sony in very tricked way means that it's called oneness it's called in victoria veto head the white means that you should worship only alah and ask for help only from la and you should let say be very strict about about religious ceremonies and religious behavior and there is no leniency there is no way compromise that is no way wabe is very strict and everybody who violates also fair of this issue is should be punished for infidelity for let's say for for in the was the standard bearer of wab ism from the very early stages even sold well even so yes they but we have to to make a distinction even sold and also families there was from the first days of the first cites state from the eighteenth century there was an alliance a political religious lions between the dynasty and between the religious lists led by mohammed bin little hob from the mid eighteenth century and his descendants and this formula of let's say in arabic it's called malmo was applied in first and second saudi state is like a like a swiss watch very very accurate very very accurate for with you know with several different characters sticks between the first and second substate but there were mainly two elites willing elite of the led by the south dynasty and religious elite led by the update the religious shakes mainly from the show family del share familial the descendants of mohammed bin for example let's say in the individuals the will other applications of face on islam but which will not hobby there will malecki shafei even a handy schools where i which will apply so i'm just trying to move forward here maybe jump forward so.

sony malmo sher mohammad abdullah mohammed
"early 20th century" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"The sheriff who sent with the great grandfather of king abdul of jordan right hashemite the hashemites yes out and provinces were letting the south on the southwestern province of assyria was also an independent chiefdom which was ruled by local ruler and inference both by the ottomans hijazi the northern provinces including the riyadh was they will under control the control of their she dynasty which was a proxy of the ottoman empire and of course they will highly desert was noman'sland but after this region of the of the ottoman empire there were independent well we have to make things all the nine thousand thirteen before they will one a while the ottoman empire was still existing episode in his forces the took the eastern province they control the eastern province of course because of the affected ottomans were occupied with other walls like in the balkans like in north africa so they almost lost this the the decade before that even sold in days allied for saudi forces and other elites the took the nejd the entity desert riyadh and northern part of the northern provinces just as i said they was the when the arab revolt in nine hundred sixteen broke out the ottoman say lost to the rival our forces and they kingdom of the jazz was established okay what was the nature of the relationship of even so the father of the nation aways the local and regional leaders of the province's that you just described well it was a rivalry hostility let's say if the in order to understand it we have to go back to the century to the nineteen to eight hundred nine nineteen century in the eighteenth century there was eight hundred nine hundred to saudi states i saw the state the second saudi state which existed everywhere each of the states were the existed for let's say six or seven decades and was this from several reasons this integrated in eighteen ninety one all of the saudi famous the family all day let's say the second saudi state was this integrating and they lost to the rashid is to the rashidi dynasty which as i said was the proxy of the ottoman empire and let's say the relations with hijazi with hijaz also tencent well i've only because the all the does not hobbies and the.

king abdul assyria riyadh rashid hijaz north africa tencent eight hundred nine nineteen ce seven decades
"early 20th century" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"And i did write it i i locked myself in a log cabin for a week i wrote i i did a lot of research i read a lot of the progressive muckrakers from the early 20th century upton sinclair pam zacklin um a lot of the investing mike wallace lusk investigate reporters guenter wallraff who actually did this and they in and if you think what we do it project veritas is is hard core or crosses an ethical line the need to study history because this is not like we're doing something new under the sun now george orwell wrote in 1984 that the party the opposition the establishment uh the deep state if you will would demand that you don't believe the evidence of your eyes and ears they they would that was the most important commandment at protagonist winston smith said 1984 the party demanded that i don't trust my own instincts my own sensory perceptions of the world around me so very toss is he just simply using modern technology to disseminate truth to the people and the propagandist do not want you to trust your own on eyes and ears there is a great anecdote this after the michael wolff thing with the with the quotes in the white house and the washington post reported quote there is no evidence to suggest that he did not say fassa i mean that that logic is so twisted and it's not andrew um it's not necessarily something that the journalism community will say explicitly we're propagandists but it's a group think that his fostered inside the new york times so barrett toss smashes the status narratives with reality with with with cinema verite and were hated for it so this book talks about that and about the moral courage required to do it why do has gotten so bad why leaving leaving trump beside right now because trump has upped the ante by fighting back but at the same time they were calling bush hitler they were calling mitt romney one of the nicest people who are forever president he was a dog killer and he killed some woman you know what i mean they they have really been out of control for quite a long time why is it so bad that is what this book re.

winston smith white house washington post new york times trump mitt romney president mike wallace lusk george orwell michael wolff barrett bush
"early 20th century" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Huge factory employing thousands of employees just as they talk to the old lady who silently maps his office when everyone else has gone home for a man of his time acknowledging class biased seem somewhat surprising that makes sense but from the start he made sure women and minorities were represented in his polls like they were in the larger population shirt credit where it's do but is this forward thinking or just the best way to get a useful sample well he survey diverse communities in a time when his competitors took the easy way out so there is that but he was a white man in the early 20th century meaning most of his collaborators were other white men yet however he was still an idealist when it came to the mechanisms of democracy gallup was aware that he was inventing a tool and like any tool it can be turned into a weapon we know that proponents of democracy thing public opinion is important because continuous efforts had been made throughout the history of popular government to improve and clarify its expression we know too that autocrats thing public opinion is important because they devote vast sums and careful attention to curbing and controlling it so clearly gala believed in what he was selling but let's not lose sight of the fact that he was selling at that's right like the milk from his father's dairy farm or the political prospects of his motherinlaw or grape lots polling was a product and gallup was a marketer it was not long before more industries took notice including even hollywood.

gallup hollywood milk
"early 20th century" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"If you listen to last week's episode you might remember that the use of plague and bioterrorism is nothing new right this backed its many centuries old when the mongol army through bodies of plague victims over the city wall of coffa they were hoping to bring down the city with his awful disease while their efforts may have been ineffectual there have been more successful attempts in the last one hundred years there's a true story from the early 20th century of two halfbrothers in india who were joint heirs to an estate yeah do you know where this is gonna know but i'm excited about it one day one brother met the other brother unexpectedly at a train station and gave him a hug bye during this encounter the other brother the one who was hugged felt a pinprick on his arm eight days later he was dead no way turns out i'm not making this up is this like verified this is from this book a plague an an ancient disease in the 20th century so take it up with charles greg charles gregg you better be right about is the link wicket pedia status nomoreza he's a he's a researcher or was researcher at los alamos all right all right so mr thursday as we're talking about tell me about it anyway so the guy who felt the pinprick on his armenia died eight days later turns out his brother had recently taken out huge life insurance policy on him dead and then teamed up with a microbiologist i'm not making this up to get some play.

mongol army india researcher los alamos armenia life insurance policy charles greg charles gregg eight days one hundred years one day
"early 20th century" Discussed on Constitutional

Constitutional

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"early 20th century" Discussed on Constitutional

"And some of them have to do the electoral process itself for instance bribery of state legislators became a problem by the 1880s and 1890s when people were offering bribes of various forms to legislators to actually elect a person as a senator at the same time the senate itself is changing america is changing this is a period of the rise of big business this is a time of industrialists and financiers this is a time when elections are getting caught up in money issues in campaign issues and campaign finance issues and the attention that gets throughout the 1890s in the early 20th century really helps to stoke those the the calls for reform is just as growing awareness of the senate becoming what at that time was called the millionaires club it was people who were elected from big business people who are elected there were tycoons of industry people who had really strong ties to the money did dressed in america keep all lake industrialised simon guggenheim or railroad magnate william clark who reportedly bribed state legislators for his senate seat and when questioned about it famously responded i never bought a man who wasn't for sale and so you got people elected to the senate who were very wealthy who were very powerful some of them were answerable to the demands of the people some of them were not but it really shaped an overall reputation of the senate to be just this body of millionaires who really have no connection to the common man and there was a lot of truth to that is not the complete senate but there was a lot of truth to that issue.

electoral process bribery senator senate america william clark