32 Burst results for "Earlier This Year"

"earlier this year" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:36 min | 8 months ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"To be, Uh, I guess I will say this. I think there's just a general misunderstanding of life insurance in general, and that extends to people making benefits Elections in the workplace. Yeah, occasionally, life insurance offered through your employer can be what's called portable. In other words, if you were separate from service from your employer You may be able to retain that coverage. But oftentimes once you separate working there, whether it's your choice, or there's That coverage is going to stop. So if the bulk of your life insurances Coming from your employer plan. Yeah, it's cheap, but it may not be there when you need it in the future, So, yeah, it can be a nice little garnish to your overall life insurance plan, but In most cases is not going to be good enough to happen. Excuse me. How would be the core of your life insurance plan? I like the use of garnish since we're talking about taking a wages out of your paycheck to pay for things yet you meant it is basically the Italian parsley or actually, the currently partially that sits on your plate. At a restaurant. Disability insurance is the last thing that people generally mess up and it's because they just don't think they need it, which is which is sort of weird because you're more likely to be disabled in your working years to pass away in your working years. So theoretically. Disability insurance is more important than life insurance. But that doesn't mean you should choose one of the other. It just means you should pay attention and make sure you have disability insurance. Typically, disability, especially through an employer plans can be pretty darn affordable. I think the rug comes that a lot of people don't understand how it works. And they're not entirely sure how short term disability policy might come into play for certain instances or illnesses. And what in the world does a long term policy meeting? How much coverage my going to get? So it it really behooves you to take the extra time to make sure you understand that offering because I agree this ability It's probably gonna come into play way more often for the average employee than the life insurance. I tell this story every time we talk about disability insurance, but actually, about two weeks ago was the 20th anniversary or city believes 20th anniversary of the passing of my dad's best friend and who had a condition in his later years that the only way he was able to provide for his family's because he was such a believer and disability insurance. That it's still allowed him to continue his financial plans Everything. It's time I think about life, insurance or disability should say. I think about that gentleman name coming up after the break. We're taking a look at the stock market. We are weighing in our predictions from earlier this year and just see where we are. That's all next on the pizza planet show. I'm Pete, the planner wake.

Pete 20th anniversary earlier this year about two weeks ago one Italian planet
Fresh update on "earlier this year" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "earlier this year" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"P.m. 9 O three Friday morning may the 20th it is going to be a hot one today partly sunny and humid with highs in the low 90s Good morning I'm Bruce Allen And I'm Joan Jones and the top local stories we're following this hour the CDC is saying that kids age 5 to 11 are now eligible for coronavirus booster shots which is welcome news for many parents Because with just a few weeks left in the school year COVID cases among students in this area are spiking even more so than earlier this year We get more now in our weekly focus on education across this area Montgomery county reported more than 3000 cases in schools over the past ten days D.C. says at the end of last month its school system had 451 cases in a week The highest since the end of the winter surge In fairfax county There is evidence of some pretty significant transmission Doctor Ben Schwartz with the county's health department says nearly 4000 students have tested positive this month That's higher than the 3000 cases in January during the omicron wave Nikhil and LA WTO news Now in the U.S. fewer than 1% of kids are hospitalized from COVID to read more about COVID in schools head to WTO P dot com and check out the school zone It's our new weekly feature on education in the D.C. region There's an increase in COVID cases in adults too and the number of adults who've had to be hospitalized in our region after becoming infected is slowly increasing as well But thankfully deaths remain low Most counties and cities in the region are reporting medium transmission of the virus The CDC recommends people in those areas who are in high risk groups consider wearing masks Montgomery and prince George's counties are recommending that people mask up in indoors public spaces already Over the last two weeks COVID cases are up more than a 100% in D.C. in Maryland They're up 63% in Virginia Well metro says it's on track.

Joan Jones Covid Bruce Allen Ben Schwartz CDC D.C. Montgomery County Fairfax County Health Department WTO U.S. Prince George Montgomery Maryland Virginia
"earlier this year" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

01:41 min | 11 months ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Hits, man, not only hits and music, but he's also everywhere. He was like, W W e. Oh, my gosh! She went in. For wrestling for sure community You can tell you really enjoy wrestling. Yeah. Yeah, And he was also in fast night. I don't know if you guys have some, but it was a really short haven't seen the movie yet. Was he? Really neither? But yeah, they'll say if you don't pay attention, you'll miss his part. But it's when they do like a flashback, and then he's standing there. So he was in the movie. I would definitely over promote that. I was like, Oh, you got to notice it. You guys actually Google that I was like scenes of bad money and best night and I couldn't find it like that's how rare it is. But again, he knows how do we know what it really exists? Because he did say he was saying Bunny on how he said it. Get that man on the phone. Don't be cool, but Vicky did drop another sucker money. Roger Rabbit, get them all on Roger Rabbit. Dolph is so cool Look at her have had money. He also dropped another song earlier this year in June, And he made history with this song because he named it after a Japanese island and he sang in Japanese in it, but it's called Yonaguni. Start. I do wanna go number who got up? Nobody. Is anybody going to his concert? I'm gonna try to sneak in or somehow getting tickets. Tell anybody, man. Everybody got a $75,000 to buy a ticket. That's crazy, man. Him and those bookies. Oh, my gosh, man, You got to sell a lot of blood. You should believe that y'all do stick around your radios, Big boy's neighborhood, baby. The I o moment there is and not Cuando Mary. I am Then I say I was sorry day all day. Why did he make get it Barren? Get sweating me. Maybe also throw King.

$75,000 Vicky Dolph Roger Rabbit earlier this year W W Bunny Google June night Mary Japanese Yonaguni
"earlier this year" Discussed on Pond's Feed

Pond's Feed

04:26 min | 11 months ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on Pond's Feed

"I do shows with the asian media network or any other show that i do. I definitely share it wherever it's necessary wherever it's wherever it's topical Because that way does more is can see it. I just feel like like again like social media as a tool weather however you use it. Use it a bad way and i definitely like to take advantage of using it in the best way that i can sharing knowledge of people and helping people find the right knowledge as well so speak speaker that even recently in you mentioned the Asia media network. There is something called arizona beckford program and featuring jessica malik has yet tell tells about some of the recent things that you've been up there as far as that work that I mean you spend so much son. What can i just close my door like when you were closing a door. You just disappeared in the southern from file. Seven seven is what. I'm currently obsessed with So the asian meeting network like i said is still pretty new. It's kind of started in its current state earlier this year You know we kind of slowly. Got it rolling In contact with one of the producers he does a lot of my photo shoots and You know the the main producer kind of came up with the idea of what she wanted and her vision and so we kind of have been going like playing it by ear. We try and put out regular content. But we haven't really defined an actual schedule yet But i've already learned so much just by receiving the news and then reselling it Like this as he back to work program great news. I mean everybody needs to hear about that. I hadn't heard about it. But i was lucky enough to not become unemployed during the pandemic something that i wasn't really paying attention to so even for people that may not need that information they can always pass it on because that's something that lots of people can benefit from and the people that need it shouldn't miss out.

jessica malik earlier this year Asia media network one of asian Seven seven producers arizona beckford
"earlier this year" Discussed on The Young Turks

The Young Turks

01:49 min | 11 months ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on The Young Turks

"What the issues were in. Its most recent inspection. Take a look tonight. Authorities are investigating this terrifying scene. A pedestrian bridge collapsing onto one of the busiest highways. In the nation's capital officials believe this truck slammed into the bridge sending it crashing down drivers trapped in their cars buried under the debris along. I two ninety five. We had a collision with the bridge. Right here which separated the bridge for his morning. result that Collision caused multiple cars to be involved in rachel. Everyone has survived this. And you've learned more tonight about a recent inspection of that bridge. David mayor saying tonight that this bridge was inspected earlier this year and that everything checked out. I mean we're we're so lucky that no one was killed in this awful bridge collapse and just to give you some more details about the inspection. That i've been referring to the bridge received a four or poor rating after it was inspected in february so it was inspected in february and they realized. Oh it's not it's all compromised but we're still using the bridge like why hasn't the bridge been like sh shut down until they do the repairs. At least i mean again. We're lucky that no one got killed It had declined on a national scale. That rates bridges from zero to nine From february of two thousand nineteen when the bridge had been given a five or a fair rating a rating of four is the threshold that prompts a multi year planning process to replace the bridge. I mean richest country in the world. Emma but once he realized that a bridge isn't structurally sound. You need to trigger a multi year planning process before anything gets done. That's america great. Yeah and it's.

David february tonight zero Emma five nine one two thousand four america two earlier this year nineteen busiest ninety five
"earlier this year" Discussed on By The Book

By The Book

04:37 min | 11 months ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on By The Book

"Sex may or may not have no common gotta make makeover and hang out with your friend and bought a jacket. I don't know how you could do more in week. Two but i know you must have happened. Well i did some more of step seven and managed to mix in a little bit. Just stop five. So that is friends and five is conduct and personality. I like it. Yes and for this. I decided to reach out to friends. I had not seen at all during the pandemic aside from the occasional zoom call. But i hadn't seen so many people face to face in the last fifteen months and on the top of my list was my friend carly carly moved only a mile away from me earlier this year and she told me i needed to visit but of course i dropped the ball so i reached out at the beginning of week. Two and i said you know what. Let's have a beverage together. I'm sorry it took me a while to get back to you. And she responded immediately inviting me to hang out in her new backyard. that's right. She has a backyard jealous jealous. How was the hang out. Listen.

earlier this year last fifteen months Two a mile five step beginning of week seven
"earlier this year" Discussed on The CyberWire

The CyberWire

02:31 min | 11 months ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on The CyberWire

"Primitive bears repertoire and of course after this research religious oh and you. Examples of their activity but generally rationed cyborg. Dvd is often part of larger geopolitical military activities. So earlier this year when fighting in eastern ukraine Was intensifying and russia. The moving troops close to ukrainian bowed. That's why we're so this campaign being more active and it was an interesting timing and also it was important that the international community saw russia moving. Its loops but also saw russia sending malicious emails towards ukraine and it prompted a strong gazon usual response and now most of those loops Moved back at least for now. And.

eastern ukraine ukraine earlier this year russia ukrainian
"earlier this year" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The Internal Revenue Service won't tax forgiven P p p launch, some states do but states taxing P P p loans or a mix of blue and red. Vermont, California, Florida, Hawaii, Minnesota, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Texas, Utah and Washington chose to tax the P P p loans or have been considering it, but there may be some hope. At least 10. Other states reversed course earlier this year, they decided not to impose taxes in many small business owners have delayed ponying up in the hopes This situation in their states may change. That's the Bloomberg small business Report. Wake up and text text and eat. Mm text and catch the bus. Text and miss your stop where we're text and be late to work. Sorry. I'm late Text and work text and pretend to work. Next. The next surprised when someone calls you out for not working Who me text and meet up with a friend You haven't seen in forever high, okay, text and complain that they're on their phone the whole time. Text and listen to them complain that you're on your phone the whole time. Uh, Text in whatever, but when you get behind the wheel, give your phone to a passenger put it in the glove box. Just don't text and drive this it stop texts stop wrecks dot org A public service announcement brought to you by the National Highway Traffic.

National Highway Traffic North Carolina New Hampshire Bloomberg Nevada Texas Internal Revenue Service Hawaii Vermont Florida Utah California Minnesota Washington earlier this year At least 10
"earlier this year" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

ABA Inside Track

03:55 min | 1 year ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on ABA Inside Track

"A couple of was earlier this year using videos. You was kind of a proof of concept you know. It's replicating what we already know with new stimuli. Nuclear power fees may be different applied questions. That sort of thing. But we're not really stumbling into new ideas. Were just sort of demonstrating that it can work with a number of different learners different technologies. But i think the the one lingering question is is it's any more efficient than what we are now. I mean when we think about zoom learning and that sort of thing but it's different but it's also so very similar. There's there's an instructor who is talking present slides asking questions. There are required readings and study. Guide questions quizzes very traditional kind of training or educational setting again. It works with a sufficient and as it work for all learners. I think you know going back. The question asked about you know the social validity of it. I think there's some mixed results there. I definitely have some mixed results in in my research that on that some people liked it some people even preferred it. People didn't care for it all that much. Some people were really frustrated by it. Some people had a hard time navigating understanding you know where to click in. Yeah there were some technological barriers that sort of thing. So i think we have to be mindful of that but i think again against the question of sufficiency that i keep coming back to and the fact that every learner is probably going to prefer different things and you at the end of the day i think you know like robber was descending. Is idea that you have to create perfect system to ensure the the most learning right. Yes i guess as behavior analysts we want to do the best we can. But i you know i think the bbc i in other authors are coming to this conclusion as maybe a supplemental way of learned right so learners who can just memorize text. Obasi not the best thing but if they can just memorizing pass a class and that's all they need great but if learners need you know trial based learning or multiple exemplars or they really do like sitting in front of a computer and clicking and matching watching videos maybe in addition to attending class or attending a training they could do that and see if that actually enhances or improves. their their outcomes wouldn't do much for efficiency but you know it's not the so. These are sort of questions at that. I think are lingering well so we got a nice. I think a summary of what is and is not and let's take a quick break but when we come.

earlier this year one
Pharmas Image Gets a Boost from COVID-19

Medicare for All

02:26 min | 1 year ago

Pharmas Image Gets a Boost from COVID-19

"Two percent of people now have positive opinion of drug companies. And that's up from last year when it was only thirty two percent so we really gone of course. Public opinion is variable depending on. What's going on the news. And go down although i think that's quite largely but we've gone from this you know martin shkreli farmer burrow era to this apparently real rehabilitation of the pharmaceutical industries reputation through the cobra nineteen vaccine and case global saviors from this pandemic. So today. we're going to take a look at whether they actually deserve this. Newly found positive alert. I totally forgot about murmurs currently until just this moment. Thank you for reminding me of all that trauma so we have an amazing guests today. solo is a clinical pharmacy specialist at the university of chicago medicine. She's also co founders of pharmacists for single payer. Look shannon to the show inky you. Thanks for having me here. I'm really excited service. I'm just curious. How do as far aside you end up getting involved with the medical sheriff so bene- pharmacist for a little over ten years. I spent most of my earlier years working in inpatient settings where you really don't run into as many issues related to insurance or benefit manager as as the world so meaning that i worked in a hostile insurance hospitals every now and then this would come up. We'd want to discharge patients or child. They need an antibiotic wouldn't be covered in the nfc in hostels additional day while we tried to sort out how we can safely home for most of the time it was in you know you have the medications at our hospital wasn't much of a focus for me and then a few years ago i switch. You were primarily in using areas so not much community pharmacy but were in connects with physician and other care worker colleagues and in a specialty pharmacy role later. Working with really high cost drugs so think it was there that i started to encounter. How much of a barrier our system is in terms of getting by patients issues. Amy through that experience. I suppose is pretty fired up about that meets vans. You were involved in position for national health program and got more involved with that organization in an amnesty.

Martin Shkreli University Of Chicago Medicine Shannon NFC AMY
"earlier this year" Discussed on Techdirt

Techdirt

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on Techdirt

"Put the if you've been listening to this podcast for a while or have been following of what we've been up to at the copa institute on tech ter- over the last few years you hopefully know that we have spent a lot of time using games as a tool to explore the future and explain the present We've just recently. Launched a new page on the copious site explaining many of the gaming related projects that we've done over the past few years and You should expect a lot more on that front soon. We are working on a whole bunch of gaming related projects Earlier this year we were asked by the folks who run the grant for the web project to help create an online game for this year's mouse fest event to explore the future of money online Grant for the web. If you're unfamiliar with it is a collaborative project of quayle. Mozilla and creative commons and part of the inter ledger foundation and the goal of the organization is to help fund more fair inclusive standards around web monetization. You may recall. If you've been listening to the.

Mozilla Earlier this year copa institute last few years this year past few years
"earlier this year" Discussed on Mango Kush Podcast

Mango Kush Podcast

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on Mango Kush Podcast

"Television wall. Say to help our ship two days from now now too crazy for about is how big is his dad. Dad piece ice. The size of rhode island wash on slam. The bomb fucking south america and stabilize that day ecosystem. And when south america's fault america's shit shit. It happen or garland. We just catching the wave right. Now what do you think the next natural disaster would be. And i'm not trying to speak exists. Hurricane happened every few years something major hurricane season they say earlier this year. Like how to fuck you. Determine hurricanes star early hurricanes bring although they say hurricane season starts like realistically them really start until like october. Ish november's win the fucking wins and a jetstream started change the tropical fronts and started mixed with that cool the coolest start with dan. Warm air and that's when that shooting star going on down and go areas. That's what should happen now. All of a sudden it's just happening fucking shit. That tastes him. That needs it's fucking with the damn weather but now i think that's going to be next one being a hurricane. Turn for shit. They're already thinking about these things. Promoted bam natural gas hurricane this year like hockey for most late late. We'd like this. Were entertained by this year. You know what i'm saying like. Oh that's what most people are. Man this is this is this is a game now here. We are.

south america october this year two days america earlier this year november rhode island
"earlier this year" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

WDTK The Patriot

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on WDTK The Patriot

"After a veteran firefighter who passed away of cancer earlier this year. A ceremony will be held on May 7th at the WR Wheeler Service Center, renaming the center of the Greg Craig Side Linger Fire Training center in over, fire Chief Mike Kennedy said side linger, took over his department's training officer and 2010 and elevated the office side linger passed away at the age of 45 after fighting terminal colon cancer. Attorney General Merrick Garland is calling for more funding for Justice Department objectives. Testifying in a virtual House budget hearing, Garland said his department is asking for more money to boost the enforcement of Everyone's civil rights. He vowed to vigorously pursue hate crimes and the preservation of voting rights with the ongoing voting changing laws in some states. We update trafficker Mother four times Now where I'm Tim Cook on the Patriot. If I'm one of 1.5 and am 1400 Six o'clock talk with Darryl would the fastest hour on radio. Make no mistake about it, folks. We'd love to talk. Love to talk about the news topics and stories that really matter to you, but we've only got so much time to do it. Which is why if.

Garland Darryl May 7th Tim Cook 2010 Mike Kennedy Justice Department Attorney General Merrick Garland Greg Craig Side Linger Fire Tr 1400 Six o'clock 45 earlier this year Service Center 1.5 Patriot WR Wheeler times
"earlier this year" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"It's ironic that the people in government think that things like bitcoin and other crypto currencies are funding criminal activity when it is indeed the united states dollar that funds more crime than any other currency on planet. Earth when you go to a bank and you get a loan and sign the paperwork. They just add some digital zero to your bank account right right and that they produce that money basically out of thin air and then now you've got that amount of money you go by your house or whatever and now you've got to pay the bank back plus interest right and so that's how they create money. It's already a digital currency. So you have to be very careful with your terminology now. Sounds like some fractional reserve. we're talking about. They're definitely so. Bitcoin is money for the people. Something like libra right is. We'll call it money for the corporations and then the usda of course money for governments libro. We're talking about facebook. Coin right yeah. Or another good example is x. r. ripple right that's used for bank to bank transfers and the normal people can own it but it's definitely built where it was definitely designed with the banks in mind right now. The thing is is that you can exchange right now any of those for the other right now. You have to find a willing party or an app. That's able to do so if you can find an app that doesn't make you give your identification all the better but a person to person exchange for any of these is always possible signal. Ceo now if you don't know what signal a signal is a texting app for your smartphone. That is supposed to be one of the highest secure cryptographic and encryption etc. It's the latest thing people are using the latest thing. people are using to make sure that their tax. Don't get kind of buying after the capital riots. Earlier this year is a lot of people. Were talking about it. And i saw because i've had signal for like a year now and i saw a bunch of people join because it tells you when your context on your phone joined you of people. I knew that from back in the day from a navy days and stuff joined all right around then. Yeah i had it not too long after. I moved here so a year and a half ago. Something like that. And you're right. I did see people i know from. You know my day job and that kind of a thing. People that i've in contact with and like bob is now on signal jane. Then i'd see these names pop up. You're absolutely right. Yeah well. I think people are just getting used to the fact that they know the governments listening. Well the ceo of cigna just hacked the cops favourite foam cracking tool and became a legend. According to gizmodo dot com spicy israeli digital intelligence firms celebrates sell software designed to unlock phones and extract their data given.

facebook Earth a year and a half ago x. r. ripple Earlier this year bob gizmodo dot com israeli one united states signal jane
"earlier this year" Discussed on Telecom Reseller

Telecom Reseller

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on Telecom Reseller

"So, you know and ultimately thought yeah, this is about automation, right you want less moving Parts, you know as best you can you want to automate this stuff as it's going through? So, how are you guys that cloud age partnering with your companies and helping them with this pretty complex tasks? Yeah, so that's how long it's been it's been very educational as we've gone through we launched this capability in our platform earlier this year, you know, but we've built a cloud-native dash platform called GPS clown surlier. We kind of take the chaos out of Telecom invoices and really it provides customers visibility into their expenses. And then I'm going management at a telecom expenses from from our perspective. You know, the one thing we kind of pride ourselves on is that we have Superior invoice data. We have a library of readers where we pull the data in directly from the providers or PDFs and we standardize all that data. So we have very very good invoice data the other thing that we yep. Sales on is that we automate as much as possible, you know, so it's so important to automate things to get the data quickly so you can analyze it quickly and make decisions quickly page and then you know, we've tried to make it easy to use it's a complex area and it takes a lot of work and software to kind of make things easy. But we've tried to pride ourselves on you know, making it easy either that world, you know, a couple of things that we did one is, you know, we've automated charge classifications. And so we have a rules engine every time an invoice comes in it runs through this rules engine and it basically identifies whether a charge is of that tax or is it a home or is it except for taxes? So we build that rule engine you can kind of look at, you know, look at the invoice and go if it's uh, you know, if it's a tax if the line item type of tax and it has dead EST and the description then that's a bad tax, you know if it's says something else.

earlier this year one thing one EST
"earlier this year" Discussed on Daily Pop

Daily Pop

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on Daily Pop

"Coltie gesture revealed on good morning. America a big confession ran for myself for a long time. I hated myself for a long time. And i'm gay and i came to terms with that earlier this year and have been processing and The next step in all of this this sort of letting people know. But i think overall the reason why now is because i got to a place where. I didn't think i was ever going to share this. I don't. I would have rather died than say i'm gay And i think that was sort of my wakeup call. You can hear the shaking and his voice. How scared and nervous. He was to Tell this news now. Colton revealed he had suicidal thoughts that led him to finally take control of his life and come to terms with the fact that he is gay and wanted to share that with the world. So what was your reaction to the news. Well i think for me. I when i watched the interview i felt so paint for him. I think so. Many people can resonate with this emotion. Right you are battling who you are for so long. And i think people around you are going to accept you and love you but you have to accept yourself first so i think his struggle resonates with so many people who are searching for their identity or searching for who they really are and i was actually just really sad that it took him this long like i always think back like you wanna live your life for yourself right you wanna live for yourself so i'm just happy that he finally made the decision to share this publicly and i also think is there anyone better to sit across then robin roberts to here. This is just so much empathy. So i just hope that people really rally behind him especially batch nation plans you know and just support him through this. This is not easy to go through publicly and good for him for finally speaking

Jackson Coltie today this morning chris kim earlier this year America Colton echo echo
The Mongols: From Nomads to Conquerors

Rise and Fall of the Qing Dynasty: Cup of Solid Gold

02:11 min | 1 year ago

The Mongols: From Nomads to Conquerors

"Far back into recorded history. The mongols were just one of the many nomadic tribes on the steps of this asian region. It is not very clear if the various mongolian tribes that inhabited that region were related. It's been alleged. They were their primary source. Ocupation was hurting. Domesticated animals horse were the most prized obviously used for heard control but also used for transport and as military mounts. It is also clear that horses outnumbered humans many times of the remaining domesticated animals. Sheep were most common. They were used for wool and meat then came goats again for wool and meat then cattle for their leather meat and transport finally camels were used for transport all the domestic animals were used for their milk for yogurt and for dung for fuel. The records don't agree but to merchant or timman was born into one of the mongol tribes living in this step region of eastern asia. Sometime around the year. Eleven sixty five. He spent the earlier years of his life getting in consolidating the various tribes in the steps all culminating in the year. Twelve o six celebrating his average uniting the region he proclaimed himself the universal ruler or genghis khan

Timman Asia Genghis Khan
From Public Defender To Stanley Cup Champion

The Lead

07:58 min | 1 year ago

From Public Defender To Stanley Cup Champion

"So joe for those who might not follow the nhl super closely. Can you just give us a sense of what jon cooper has accomplished during his as a coach in the nhl. Definitely jon cooper is the longest tenured coach shell. He's on an eight th anniversary of his hiring on this week. The winningest coach in franchise history for the lightning. And i think he's highly regarded as one of the better coaches in the league and probably a candidate coach team. Canada at the next olympics are positions and olympics for the trump player so deadly highly regarded coach but up until this past season. He hasn't won the big one and that was kind of the big question surrounding it. And how would you describe his personality. Well he's a players go. She's a really fun personality. Like you quotes wedding crashers. Upper seventy six. No excuses public champion. You uses a champion. The only person you have to answer to when you go home at night is really yourself. The national media loves him because he is a great world this charismatic. You're going to get knocked down. There's no question people are going to push down. Because ultimately they want to see it fail if you think maybe teams on trips to like field of dreams when he was in earlier years coaching. He's all about the different sides and binding guys together on the ice and that if you get is connected as a group and the for each other and very process over outcome kind of guy and so you definitely has that charisma that makes them unique. I think the players like that. We'll show you recently. Wrote about how jon cooper has followed perhaps the most unconventional path of any stanley cup winning coach. So take us back to the late. Nineteen ninety s. What was john. Cooper's lifelike at that time he was living in a condo east lansing area couple remains but he was just trying to figure out where you wanted to be in his life. What he wanted to do for work. He was good ball. Charismatic lawyer but his heart wasn't in it always always wondering when is the fulfillment. When are you going to sit there and wake up every day and say. I can't wait to go do what i'm gonna do. He was defender district court in lansing michigan about a thousand dollars a month. You know we're going for indigent clients. He was working on. du is having divorces. You've got a two person law. Office him in a paralegal. He's still didn't know i guess. Were taken at that point. And you got in touch with the judge. Who worked with jon cooper back. Then what did he say about cooper skills in the courtroom and you just notice and how clients clients listen to prosecutors respected him i think is the kind of ability that transcends coaching the ability to persuade players to adopt your system or just believe the approach. So you know. He's he's a good salesman. He always says convincing players. Convincing a jury and i don't think he knew then that it would be kind of the key to him. Maybe starting coaching career. So how did jon cooper go from being this lowly paid lawyer and a former lacrosse player. Who had only played a year of club hockey in college to being high school hockey coach. Well the run in his son playful lansing catholic high school and they needed a coach and so he knew of john skills on the ice and new of his charisma and then he is asked to one day in the building. I saw the coach. would you be interested. He looks at me and goes. Dc the stack of resumes. I have he says. I'll tell you one thing you coach kids high school hockey team and i will take your resume from here. We put it here. Just this exactly. That was his first kind of foray into coaching hockey. Was nine thousand nine hundred nine hundred thousand lansing catholic cougars hockey team and that was seventeen. You actually talked to some of the players on that lansing catholic team. What did they tell you about jon. Cooper the high school coach. I think what's interesting knees. They remember the first meeting in the cafeteria where he's using himself to like twenty kids and parents and those us have just nervous as they were and are waiting to hear whereas the hockey background. Who did he coach before. Because one of the red wings was he part of this huge talk about law school in wall street and this guy another guys were in the nhl players. Even highly college players inducted himself would be anywhere high in coaching world. A reflection of guys play together. I think they'll be the first ones to tell you. None of them really on the track to make the national hockey league but they were such a joy to be around the competed their butts off just line. Who an awkward gesture. The of funny kid and team talked about like there was a hill just a mile from the school that the workouts outside the big hill. The he must've just saw he was driving around and he made us run up this hill with do bear calls and stuff. That is the source. I've ever been my life like. I could not long like off chris. Monrovia now works the red wings. Illitch family talked about how they had this practice where they had no on the ice and they're doing push ups and sit ups and kristin ross. Who served in the military students in afghanistan he goes. I went through the army for seven years. And i went through a lot of work out a lot of hellish days. Afghans dead. That's one of those days that i think back much. It's not as bad as back. And what else did you learn about his coaching philosophy back. Then you know like what were the things that were important to him that he really emphasized to the team. Making guys feel connected or part of it no matter if you were the best player on this team or like the thirteenth forward and i think jeff swan is appropriate examples. Like i wasn't the most natural coordinated like county out now who put me not aligned with the two players. Mike sack out with the most gifted athlete. That are high school in you. The team is better holding. Some of its part. They wanted them to play. Have have meaning and swan. Storing the biggest fools that season the most for player that year. So you know. He's told everyone the most improved player really halls like a special place for him. Something he takes lightly. It was a really really nice compliment. They talked about the hard hat that they gave out. After every win which was an all white instruction half that was something that the player of the game whether at block shot or a big hit or in ceremony the post game. We'll get this production. How they put their name and a sharpie but it was more of a. What did you do to help the team. Really recognizing layers who maybe didn't shop scores sheep but who are just dedicated themselves to helping the team. These success those are moments that came together that they remember forever and become an integral part of their story on a way to winning out like the championship. Well this sort of ragtag bunch of guys did win an unlikely state regional championship in almost mighty ducks kind of way and joe as you talks to all these guys who played for jon. Cooper what connections. Were you able to make between cooper the coach of the lansing catholic cougars and cooper the coach of the stanley. Cup champion tampa bay. Lightning guesswork me. Talking to guys. That new men who've now that he hasn't changed much in terms of his personality he had kind of style which coach's house you through professional level versus coaching. high school. Kids a lot of the same kind of tenants but he had then he still uses today. Kerry that floss with me all the way through the nhl in onto the honestly. It doesn't really change. Human beings are human beings and everybody needs to be motivated. It's just finding the right way to motivate. Rose stood up in my living room and watch the game and cheer tampa. You're welcome. you're welcome for started. His rise

Jon Cooper NHL Hockey Olympics Lansing Catholic Cougars Lansing Catholic High School Cooper Red Wings Illitch JOE John Kristin Ross Lansing DU Jeff Swan Canada Michigan JON Monrovia
"earlier this year" Discussed on The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on The Ray & Dregs Hockey Podcast

"Is not much of a discussion as well and look. Ottawa might be fine with that and for all the reasons. But i'm just saying like how would you. How would you think discussions going to be any different. Now i'm just gonna stand there in pointed chabad and say he is our most impressive most important defensemen by a mile. Yeah and my client over here brady. Yeah same thing and a man. It's cost of doing business right. The toronto maple leafs have a handful of these big money. Earning players but edchoice to make i mean. Of course you're gonna sign these. Is i mean there there were no you know what the problem become strikes. You got all these fine young players. You've got all this cap space. The problem is you just signed the same player for more money. Yeah like by signing brady could truck to along contract which. I don't know how you're going to avoid it or why you would want to avoid it. You don't get a better brady kachuck you get brady. But now you've less cap space can haul and said earlier this year they were doing. I read some article. And he's like in the end cap space or cap winds every time. But i don't think they've got mad wh- more. Do you want from from a young player. He's twenty one years old. Are you've got a good story involving the brothers right matthew and brady because you mentioned keith in the similarities that you see in in brady's game but whether they're playing against one another playing against anyone else it doesn't matter. Their level of compete is up there with the very best in the sport. One of my favorite moments standard between the benches was a game in ottawa. And calgary oughta water.

ottawa keith brady twenty one years old One earlier this year Ottawa a mile
"earlier this year" Discussed on Lymphedema Podcast

Lymphedema Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on Lymphedema Podcast

"Be awake during surgery instead of full anesthesia. Maybe it's light. I don't know. I'm not a surgeon. Obviously so i. I've never had surgery so i don't know the term for that but i see it on grey's anatomy where they do brain surgery. Sometimes in the patients awake. I know that's totally fake but just wondering If there is ever a situation where the patient could be awake. Have not seen it in my career and maybe that says something. Maybe doesn't i haven't seen it There were times that we intentionally performed the surgery with the patient. Awake as you note her procedure done under local diva. Lv is a great example and in fact during the lockdown earlier this year We were offering. Lv surgery with the patient awake just because the operating room was a very limited resource rose and lv can certainly be performed under local anesthesia. in fact Even before covid. We did that for a while before and we definitely can't do offer. Lv under local anesthesia per patient. Who has concerns about general anesthesia. Although i can tell you it's much more comfortable for patients to be younger. General a patient who had gone for. Va under local sesia..

earlier this year covid
"earlier this year" Discussed on PodCoast by CutCoast

PodCoast by CutCoast

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"earlier this year" Discussed on PodCoast by CutCoast

"Year to peel back local stories of businesses. That you like and some that. You're just discovering hopes to gain some perspective in order to move the needle forward in our own businesses us so today i've got malcolm owned flood here and before i get too much into Questioning i want to talk a little bit about An experience that i had. When i discovered his podcast and the way that i imagined. Malcolm's name to be when i first heard at so. So it's it's it's like this is totally confession time because it's the weirdest thing so like when you first said your name. I heard it as like a total scandinavian name. Like malcolm oh and flight or something. So like when i when i saw your name on your actual handle it just being a hyphenated name wasn't i'm not gonna say it was disappointed but i mean i was just surprised all one long totally game with like with the and an l. Ud sort of sound you know. Yeah so you know totally stupid or my brain was playing tricks on me or just you know finding something that was relatable so so anyway i think everybody messes my name update for the first time the here. It's a long confusing name. So that's my favorite one yet. I think. I like the idea of being like a scandinavian viking. Name totally so. Why don't you tell us who you are and what you do know we could go from there. Okay yeah so. I'm malcolm fled as you just heard and i am. Podcast host for two podcasts. Your band sucks at business and the self according bam podcast. I'm the guitarist in band of rascals. And i am also mixing mastering engineer and music producer Just operating under my own name doing that. Nice yeah that's so you you wear quite a few different hats. And why don't don't we start with talking about your podcast because my understanding is that you've been in the podcast biz since earlier this year. Did you start of your podcast. Twenty twenty yes. I mean i was just looking at the calendar and like it's almost it might even be today that I i had my first meeting with benedict's the co host of self recording ban. Podcast about starting. We really kind of doing planning episode..

Malcolm today earlier this year two podcasts first first time scandinavian malcolm Twenty twenty l. Ud first meeting benedict one viking
TSLA is The Chosen One Says Morgan Stanley, Price Target to $810

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

05:29 min | 1 year ago

TSLA is The Chosen One Says Morgan Stanley, Price Target to $810

"Everybody rob power here and today. We're talking about a new note on tesla's stock from morgan stanley. They have increased their price targets significantly. Today after hours. We also have some news on the full. Self-driving beta report on monowai gross margins from china and some news that riven may be raising some more capital taking a look at the stock tussle. Today finished up zero point seven percent to seven hundred and thirty five dollars eleven cents that actually did trail the nasdaq which was up about one percent. But hereafter hours worth. Things have started to get more interesting. After morgan stanley released their updated tussle note. Tesla has jumped by about ten to fifteen dollars. One and a half two percent to read around seven hundred fifty dollars per share otherwise news on tesla was fairly light today. So we're gonna spend most of our time here looking at that note. And as i always say when we look at analyst notes a lot of this is just contextual and it gives us good jumping off points for discussion and things like this also gives us good perspective and insight into the kind of information. That's being circulated around the street. So right off the bat here. This morgan stanley note comes with a great headline. They title the no quote the chosen. One tesla industrializes internet of cars target two eight hundred and ten dollars and quote. That is a huge fifty percent increase over the previous price. Target of five hundred and forty dollars per share. They write quote. We update our forecasts and long-term assumptions. Following better-than-expected cue for deliveries sixty one percent year over year growth and five billion dollar capris raising twenty thirty volume to five point. Zero million units versus three point eight million and taking the price target two hundred ten dollars. Tesla is richly valued for a reason reiterate overweight and quote. Okay so what has changed. Here with morgan stanley's assumptions that has led to this fifty percent price targeted increase while they say they had better than expected volume this year. You four specifically. There's been a significant capillaries. And of course tesla was added to the s. and p. five hundred. So they beat morgan stanley's projection. They have risked and they've been added the s. and p. five hundred which has reduced the float effectively reducing the supply of tesla shares as for the actual changes to their model driving this higher price target. They say that quote the majority of the price target increase comes from the impact of our higher volume assumptions in our model and quote as i said they have increased their twenty thirty delivery forecast from three point. Eight million vehicles to five point two million vehicles and they say that they have now added to factories to their forecast for twenty thirty bringing their total tesla. Plant count to ten. I think that factory count is actually probably pretty close but that would only be you know. Five hundred eighty thousand vehicles per factory by twenty thirty. But it's become very clear. That tesla actually has ambitions of producing two million vehicles or so per factory per year. At least in the case of texas and dig your berlin shanghai. They've said one million plus so even just those factories plus fremont if can hit their production targets in those factories. Gets you to more than five. Point two million that jonas projecting here for twenty thirty as for their earlier year forecasts for twenty twenty one they have increased their projection from seven hundred seventy eight thousand previously now to seven hundred ninety two thousand and as a reminder just as recently as july they had actually been projecting just six hundred and twenty thousand four twenty twenty one so they've actually up that by about thirty percent in just the last six months for twenty twenty two the forecasting one point one five million. I'm not sure what that was previously for. Twenty twenty three. Then they are up from one point. Three five million previously now to one point seven million the fun thing about these increased volume targets from morgan stanley. Is that a few months ago. They did what they called. A great tesla rating. They started including things like mobility services as a recurring revenue from autonomy in their price target. So they're sort of having this ongoing opera moment this year. That as they now add vehicle volume into their forecast they now have to add additional services and revenue margin as well and that is where the game changes in terms of valuation for tusla. And the thing is you. Don't even need a fully autonomous robot taxi type of service to start adding that services revenue in when tesla's starts offering full self driving as a subscription. I think that is going to open a lot. Of analyst is to how tesla's business model is structured and will be increasingly structured going forward leveraging software. It's already easy to say. As i've said in the past that if you want to compare valuations show me another automaker that is selling a ten thousand dollar software option then we can make those comparisons but because that is all sort of right now lumped into the same revenue the same margin line on tussles earnings. People just aren't willing to recognize that yet as a separate line of business when tesla's starts offering full self driving a subscription even if they don't break that out on their earnings that forces a change in how analysts are forecasting and modeling tesla they have to start forecasting recurring high-margin revenue right. Now that's basically all just being pulled forward into that simple ten thousand dollar option which is great but it also makes it easier to ignore the other factor making it easier to ignore right now. Is that a big portion of that is still currently deferred revenue. So it's not actually showing up in earnings. But as tessa delivers more features this year less of that is going to be deferred tussles valuation in and of itself is playing a role here too because it has become so massive analysts have to cover this. They have to cover well. They're getting more and more resources to cover it. They're getting more and more questions as tesla's been added to the s. and p. five hundred those benchmarked funds managers. They need to know what to do with the stock so the coverage is just getting more and more intense and again because the evaluation hide they're going to be a lot of analysts running numbers sort of back testing against that valuation. Saying okay to justify this. This is what needs to happen for the company.

Tesla Morgan Stanley Rob Power
Facebook For Mobile With Lee Byron

Software Engineering Daily

06:01 min | 1 year ago

Facebook For Mobile With Lee Byron

"Blee byron. You are an engineer at robin hood. And you're a longtime engineer at facebook. Welcome to software engineering daily. Thanks for having me. You're part of the initiative to get facebook onto mobile and this was a key inflection point in the business some people may not remember but there was a time when facebook was used as a desktop web application when did engineers at facebook start to realize how important mobile was. I think there are a couple moments over the years where that happened. There wasn't like a single inflection. Point early on. Facebook was definitely just a website that you went to on your desktop computer or maybe laptop because it started in two thousand and four. You know that's years before the first real smartphones and really two things happened in the early years of mobile one was a focus on flip phones and other popular phones that had some very basic to the internet and so facebook's for a long time had a facebook dot com mobile website and for the first few years that was really about extending to second screen and creating a small version of facebook that you can take with you and then when the iphone first came out in two thousand seven or at eight there was first version of it built as a website. If you remember the the very first version of you couldn't actually make apps for you could only make sense for and there was one engineer at facebook who did that and the following year when the software s came out that engineer through abandoned the the website that he had built i built a mobile application instead. That was sort of the very beginning than there. Were a couple other interesting moments. That happened another was through the recognition. That mobile was becoming somewhat important as a second screen. So i would say this started to happen in may two thousand nine. And that's really when i started helping out. I was the designer for mobile. At that time. I joined facebook. Originally as a product designer and touch devices were becoming more popular. But we're still very much considered a second screen as alternate experience temporarily while you're away from your desktop computer or laptop but we really in two thousand nine took a big refocus on that experience feel-good the native application for iowa that we had was extremely limited. It was built by a single engineer. That engineer had left the company had kind of started to fall very far behind. What the rest of our product is doing so we built version of the mobile site that felt good on a touch device and that actually ended up becoming really important platform to start building products for mobile one of the really challenging things that i faced when reaching out to other designers or other product people at facebook in those earlier years trying to convince them that mobile was something. Important was the scary scenario. Where you'd spend all your time in energy focusing designing and building experience for a big screen in a browser and already the problem of making it work across the internet explorer fire fox chrome was kind of problem enough and when it came time to move things to mobile the prospect of supporting in iowa native app android native app a touch website and a flip phone optimize website sounded like it would just make the amount of engineering work five x and so you could imagine that especially if you don't quite know how important mobile is it's totally reasonable that your instinct would be. Maybe we should look into that later. That's not the right priority. Now and so as a consequence. The mobile product constantly lagged behind. So when we did this effort to make the touch optimize website. Just really good just much better than anything else that we had built for mobile up until that point we kind of refrained that conversation instead of going from one platform to five platforms. We were able to make going from one platform to two platforms. Because if you built for that mobile website you would automatically get flip phone in basic phone support and we would deliver that directly to ios and android apps via this essentially a glorified web browser that we had built so i and android apps. Were these glorified web browsers a little bit of extra sauce on top. You know they they let you upload photos. They let you survive. Include your location for check ins But other than that. They were really just a thin wrapper around our website so that really simplified proc development and that was in an early accelerate for the facebook product team to start thinking about what building for mobile would look like and start making that more of a priority. Then i would say the the next inflection. Point was in two thousand twelve and that's a lot of really interesting. Things happened in two thousand twelve. One is that we saw the chart of mobile only users take up dramatically where now became clear that it's mobile was not a second screen. There was not just going to be a significant number of people who only use mobile soon and very soon it was going to be a majority of people who only use mobile and in fact desktop would become not only used less than mobile but desktop would become the second screen so we saw this inflection point coming. We realized that we were quite far behind on product. Two thousand twelve is also the year that facebook did its ipo and the early filings and mark zuckerberg's tour around he's talking to potential investors. He had the highlight all. The risks for the company and one of the top risks was that we saw this giant shift to mobile devices and that we hadn't figured out good product from only at and that's also when within facebook. We were sort of revisiting. This technical decision to bill everything on web and bring things back to native development on both iowa san android which sort of unfolded into a lot of super interesting engineering work that we had to do

Facebook Blee Byron Robin Hood Iowa Mark Zuckerberg Iowa San
A Musical, Emotional Memoir on Caregiving

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

03:05 min | 1 year ago

A Musical, Emotional Memoir on Caregiving

"I am excited to introduce today. Don wendorff he is the author of caregiver carols. And i'm gonna let him finish the title of that book because it just slipped my mind like normal but thanks for joining me don a musical emotional memoir and you can order your own copy. That doesn't have the sticky notes. I like mine with this ticket. But you can get them with without. I like the color. You're sticking ups their pink. Yes expert joining me. And so tell me about your caregiver journey. And how that led you to the book and then we'll talk about a book a little bit okay. I was sorta care arranger in part-time caregiver for my father who had parkinson's and some dementia with that and my mother who had alzheimer's they ended up both in a care facility and then for many many many years seems like many many many years for my late wife. Susan who originally was diagnosed with alzheimer's. You know after the million dollar workup off and it made sense. I mean she had all the stuff. it's i was. We were pretty convinced that that's what it was later turned out. That hers was vascular and she had had all sorts of little mini and maxi strokes and continued having strokes. And eventually i even Retired to become full time. Caregiver that i got by with the actually people from church helped her out at no charge to us saintly eighties then. I had some hired help for her good while but it just became too much and so eventually i retired as a. I was a psychologist and marriage family therapist. So you know. I was dealing with emotional difficulties and problems and issues and stuff all day long and then coming home and dealing with that all evening long and i was tired so that makes sense and i always talk to people about putting together their care team and that's one recommendation is. You don't always have to hire people especially in the earlier years of the disease you. Can you know find neighbors friends family. People in church people can do on it. All the above verse. I actually saw took care of her by phone. But you know eventually got to where somebody needed to really be there. And so Yeah we had a number of france at odds may have grown kids at that point so that they helped out some But you have. There's more help available. And i finally got to a point where i i really needing some pretty serious help. And i went to the pastor of the church. And i just said steve. I'm drowning over here man. I need some help. It okay and he called a team of ladies together. They said okay and they wrote out a schedule. They alternated in a came all day long while i was at work the time and they did that for a couple of years.

Don Wendorff Parkinson's Alzheimer Dementia Susan France Steve
Outrospection

Buddhist Boot Camp Podcast

05:09 min | 1 year ago

Outrospection

"I spoke at a unity church last sunday. About how important. It is for us to balance introspection without prospection as a kid. I spent hours alone in my room reading drawing and building model airplanes. If i misbehaved at school. My parents couldn't punish me by yelling. Go to your room because my room is exactly where i always wanted to be instead. They literally locked me out of the house and said go play outside like a normal kid makes them friends. And while i'm not condoning this parenting method in hindsight. It probably did me some good mind you. This was years before we had terms for introverts extroverts. Kids on the spectrum and so on children were either considered to be well adjusted. Meaning that followed the one-size-fits-all set of behavior rules and guidelines to fit in or they were considered misbehaving troublemakers. Outcasts the only place. I actually sit in was an after school programs to learn pascal software and robotics. Which is where i made a couple of friends who otherwise also pretty much kept to themselves although alone time is healthy. So were the hours. I was forced to socialize with others whether locked outside the house. So i can play with the neighborhood kids or tori school field trips and camping adventures much to my resistance. At the time just as i was entering teenage years my family moved from small town in the northern most part of israel where grew up to california the high school i attended in san francisco not only had more students in it than my old town had residents but i was suddenly surrounded by asians blacks latinos and maybe a handful of other caucasians. It was a culture shock. In fact i probably would have gone into actual shock or drawn inward even more had. I not been encouraged to socialize in my earlier years. I'm not saying. I was well adjusted. I'm still not but i managed to quickly learn. English makes him friends and stay curious about everyone's culture religion and ethnic background. I asked so many questions because nothing. No one resembled anything to which i had previously been exposed. I joined what was called. Sf net a network of computers and coffee shops around san francisco with coin operated dialup modems. Long before computers had windows or mice just a black screen and a keyboard essentially offering a chatroom of sorts for up to thirty people at time either dialing in from their homes or from other coffee shops in the netters we called ourselves had net gets like bonfires on the beach or meetups at bars on ashbury back when nobody checked your id tecate in through sf net. I met people from all walks of life college kids adults and even befriended kids my own age. Who were homeless by choice. Living on the streets and sleeping and golden gate park as a result of all this exposure to such a variety of individuals. I didn't have the same knee jerk judgment that my parents had about other races religions homeless people and so on i truly believe visibility leads to acceptance the first time i saw someone with blue hair and facial piercings. I was blown away but the nineties had more than its fair share rebels and mohawks so nothing shocked me after a couple of weeks. Think about what it must have been like the first time someone saw an interracial or same sex couple holding hands walking down the street a few decades ago the first time may have been shock but it were off the more people were exposed to it until as just another happy couple granted in some areas and for some people that still a shock but to others. It's no big deal and that's because visibility is what leads to acceptance exposure opens our eyes first minds. Second an hartford. The key to empathy and compassion therefore is connection not just seeing punk rockers on mtv but having coffee with them on a thursday night. I guess i was forced to grow up in much the same way. I was forced out of the house. When i was younger. Residents of major metropolitan cities are exposed to different cultures beliefs and backgrounds on a daily basis. So they tend to be more open minded than people who never leave their rural areas. Where anyone who doesn't fit in is considered a freak that absence of exposure and connection leads to judgement and segregation. But we can expect the so called freaks to intentionally move to rural areas in order to open people's eyes minds and hearts. It's up to each one of us regardless of where we live to stop thinking of anyone as other and get curious instead of judgmental in a way only out rejection makes introspection possible. If that makes sense how would we know being judgmental if our rigid boundaries are being challenged. We can't heal what we refused to confront the logic of not criticizing what we haven't even made the effort to understand because once we understand. There's nothing left to criticize implies by definition that if there's anything about which i'm still being judgmental the problem is me. It means i have more work to do. It's not somebody else's job to explain themselves to me. It's up to me to do the work to look outside myself to understand the bigger picture where there's room for everybody

San Francisco Golden Gate Park SF Israel California Hartford MTV
Uber buys Postmates in $2.65 billion all-stock deal

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Uber buys Postmates in $2.65 billion all-stock deal

"With more Americans getting meals delivered during the pandemic uber has moved to get its own food delivery company uber says it's buying Postmates in an all stock deal worth more than two and a half a billion dollars that's after the ride hailing giant lost a bid to buy GrubHub uber has been leaning on food delivery with the pandemic cutting into all ride sharing businesses uber rides dropped three percent in the first quarter compared with earlier years while bookings through uber eats surged more than fifty percent the Postmates deal will let uber and uber eats gained ground against door dash which controls more than a third of the American food delivery market Sager mag ani Washington

Postmates Grubhub Ani Washington
Uber buys Postmates in $2.65 billion all-stock deal

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Uber buys Postmates in $2.65 billion all-stock deal

"With more Americans getting meals delivered during the pandemic uber has moved to get its own food delivery company uber says it's buying Postmates in an all stock deal worth more than two and a half a billion dollars that's after the ride hailing giant lost a bid to buy GrubHub uber has been leaning on food delivery with the pandemic cutting into all ride sharing businesses uber rides dropped three percent in the first quarter compared with earlier years while bookings through uber eats surged more than fifty percent the Postmates deal will let uber and uber eats gained ground against door dash which controls more than a third of the American food delivery market Sager mag ani Washington

Postmates Grubhub Ani Washington
Rob Doyle: Threshold

Bookworm

03:20 min | 2 years ago

Rob Doyle: Threshold

"Start out rob among other things the threshold of what? I think you're right that it's a book of many duality many dichotomies and I would troas just a few of them. I would say it's the threshold between the known and the unknown the threshold between indeed the generic threshold between fiction and non fiction between narrative and essay but it's also the threshold of consciousness and it's very. It's an intrepid kind of book you know. This is a book with so much travel in it and so much kind of adventurism of various kinds. The it you know kind of chemical pharmacological or sexually than or literary intellectual so threshold suggests the beginning of some kind of Voyage some kind of journey you know this is a novel. That's very nakedly. Very explicitly autobiographical. You know it very much easy. Let's say a persona of myself as he drifts through the world You know falling prey to or indulging numerous obsessions infested nations and It involves a fair amount of them extremism of sensation. I noticed that your first novel Hero. The young men is about a narrator in his twenties and this is a narrator robbed oil in his thirties. He's it seemed to me at the threshold of the rest of his life. That he's not going to go back to the extravagances that defined his earlier years. He mourns them but like all of us who passed the age of thirty. We start having responsibilities that we don't like that we wish were not part of our lives and in addition he seems to be at the threshold of the end of the world. Yes and it's being my third book. Now I would say to. Most of my stuff has always had kind of apocalyptic vibe gone through it in the background. It it's a park wetter. It took me maybe three or four years to write it and as his well known. These have been very dramatic events in the external world to put it lightly. You need to call one of his books. I think it was a human to human A monument to a crisis and this book in a sense was also a monument to a personal crisis. It's funny because it's a very sunny humorous kind of book you know there's lots of them sly humor and laughter in it. But it's also one which is very much about this kind of reckoning with maybe the nihilism of youth catching up on a

A Moment in Time, with Shari Belafonte

B&H Photography Podcast

11:27 min | 2 years ago

A Moment in Time, with Shari Belafonte

"Today. We're GONNA be talking sheriff about photography. So let's get into it Sherry. Welcome to our show. It's so great having Jose here so you have grown up around cameras now as a little kid all my life cameras aimed at you most again. Your Dad was Trenton Center. He was big deal. Back in the fifties sixties seventies. He broke down a lot of walls. Again everybody's familiar with his music and his acting and everything else. So you're smiling laughing about so. I was very hyperactive. Attention deficit as a child. I still lamb a little curtail with certain things now making native American blood you know wearing a bright orange camp right now you WanNa talk about it. Yeah Orange there you go. There's fast on. Go ahead I'm sorry. My Grandmother gave me my first Brownie camera. Now that's how far back I with the fan flash that you put the light bulb shit so I had that one. I was four years old. How many megapixel was and you would get this little tiny roll of film that you would put inside that Yummy and That was my first foray into being behind the camera and then instamatic semantic when I was I think I had a funny little polaroid camera that we had them all And my first legitimate camera was a pentax when I was eleven years old. Okay I was in boarding school by Matic or h three the it was. You know I can't remember I just. It was a thirty five millimeter Pentax Camera. That was dad's I know. Dad had a SPA top. Any passed it down to me so my entire high school was spent in the dark room. I smell like smoke. That was really attractive. Smell coming out of the yellow fingernails sitting in the dark. You Know Rolling and Rolling Rolling Rolling and then you know praying that you could put it in the CAN. It would come out and it wasn't all crumpled and you know so. Yeah I spent a good part of my earlier years behind the camera. And then of course like you said being Harry's daughter you know when we when he was on tour somewhere and there's Paparazzi or people taking pictures of us all the time and then Harry took pictures of us all the time that we never saw and it was the biggest joke because he was he always got get over there. Get OVER THERE. Get over there. Stop Stop Standards There. Hundreds and hundreds of pictures that were taken by. Harry and we've never seen a single one single. And why do you think that's the case? He just too busy to Kinda know if he ever developed and I don't know if there was even filmed the camera I think he had these Lycos and he just you know he just kept shooting once in a while. We saw him because he would. When he was a touring he would have these The program with this and it was always the big color program that would come with new. Buy A ticket and there would be pictures of us you know in there and we go to dad. Shoot that picture around. The house was photography kind of a respected medium. Was it an art to be an art. He did have a darkroom which he never went into. He just had it in the back next his recording studio but he did use a recording studio. Did use the recording. But Yeah we always have been shutterbugs. I think the whole definitely me more so than I think my siblings but Harry was definitely behind the camera. He was into like us us a very like a like like like scandal. And what about the Paparazzi and stuff? Maybe it wasn't. I can't even say that it wasn't like it is now because Paparazzi but was it A pain in the bud. Was it something that you guys so I was so used to? You know because what happened is my hair Harry. In Marguerite. My mom was marguerite. She passed away a few years go but they divorced. When I was very young actually separated woman was pregnant with me so there was always that kind of people trying to take pictures of that that was going on but there was a little more of a sense of decency for lack of better words with authorizing I mean. Now it's like Oh goes the there were lines. That were not crossed back then. I mean chances and stuff like that and they they definitely probably got onto your skin right probably worse today and usually think it was more of a magazine would come in. Ebony magazine would come in and say you know. Can we shoot you at home or and you know there was a story that was behind it and maybe the attorneys would go yet. It's good idea. Let's let's push that you know. Yeah we've always been around cameras for yourself. It's often family. What kind of things interested you would sort of you know? In the days I was in boarding school in Massachusetts so I I've always been a fan of black and white. I never learned how to process color and of course slides for the first things. You sort of learned. I never learned how to process but I was always into the dynamic of black and white so with the snow in Massachusetts. There was always the lights and shadows and you can stream you know falling through the ice no save. The camera saved the camera. Shot landscapes mostly landscapes. And then I shot everything and then as I got older and could start a fording stuff. I actually stopped shooting for a while and then when Sam. I got married thirty five years ago. Sam gave me my first Yoeskamnoer. I had by then already onto Canon cameras. But you know hey a one and the that great but then Sam gave me my first Kammer after maybe not shooting for ten years and we went on our honeymoon to Italy and I just shot like crazy like bags and bags film was carrying at the time. Kodak made what was called recording fill in the recording. Four seventy five four and as soon as you develop it would turn into a corkscrew that you can never hold flat that I didn't know because by then I wasn't processing okay but Three hundred you could you. Could you could set the The whatever you wanted I mean you couldn't with any film but this was if you decided to shoot at or if you wanted to shoot one hundred thirty two hundred or sixty four hundred. Just remember what you shot that at and you'd process it like if I shot four hundred three sixty I process it at four hundred by shoot at three sixty and I mean the detail was. It's crazy it's like mega pixels eight thousand and I just fell in love with that and then when Kodak stopped making it because they said well you know nobody's buying it because it was twelve dollars a roll and I know buying it. No please keep making and then shortly after you know film just kind of went by the wayside and now it's coming back. Is it coming back to us? Sales were up twenty percent last year. So you now actually have to try and find a film camera. I still actually have a rebel. Okay okay isn't it rebel? Originally rebels were killed. What was called the digital rebel? No megapixel but I did have for the Canon thirty and I was started shooting movies of Friends of mine. Who were directors said? Would you shoot stills movie and I remember get going into get a sound blimp made for my digital camera and the guys in you and Steven Spielberg's guy or the only people that have blimps for you. These eight thirty eight sixty. Whatever I add albertson blimp. Right Jacobsen Jacobsen recently closed down. There's no need for any other. No ex- exactly. I've got this this whole box downstairs in the garage is because like don't need the blimp. Next time lenses by the I worked on a movie as recently as Twenty fifteen and with a digital camera and they recorded a blimp ahead to go rent one. I mean even even that little clique. If you're onset now we have an issue thousand frames so that one was especially digital you shoot so fast. The first movie I did shoot I had asked me me. Leaders a friend of mine and she also is the executive producer and director of the morning. Show but at the time going back. You know fifteen twenty years. Whenever it was that I was shooting this I said to her. You know this is the first time shooting for a movie. What she's just keeps shooting shoot. Shoot shoot shoot shoot shoot shoot so I did. I shot eight thousand seven hundred and seventy eight frames and thought okay. You know. I'm their mom. Put them all and give them. And then oh no we just need your best hundred. It took me like three weeks to go through every single one of those because I really looked like I was shooting movie. Everything was so slightly different. They know what would you take away from that experience? Really get an editor back to that five role mentality you know. They'll have a budget for three to five roles. And that's what you did shooting digital change anything when you when you shoot because obviously it did change a lot for a lot of people in this idea of shooting maybe too much or a lot or just the freedom they can give you. Some really changed a lot of people's now you know everything is it cyclical now. I've barely picked up my camera now. Also have a Sony seven hours and shooting with my Samsung Galaxy's the galaxy the first galaxy thing. I had a four note for one of the earlier. Ones the best pictures I've ever seen. I went on my God. Look at these pictures that I'm getting on my phone and now I have a lot of my family's mostly apple. Nothing you know not against apple but galaxies have much better pictures you know the Samsung just really has the better technology shooting with your phone and I know friends of mine even say your pictures are so much better than mine. Why is that slow data Samsung if Samsung only made and take get another phone? Get Your Samsung Stolz. But I still like I still like the weight of having a camera and shooting the cameras a different different animal. But now you know. There's a difference for photographers. I never was would call professional photography gallery shows and stuff but I'm not like Greg Gorman. Who was a friend of mine? I didn't shoot and I'm not making money like that as a photographer. And right now so many you can take so many pictures. I mean anybody can get good picture with their phone. You know you can. It's easier to get good pictures now than it used to be. You know you'd have to have a professional photographer do that. Well now I you know people take headshots their phones movies with your eyes. You can do anything. Us forces us to kind of rethink what I should be taking pictures of. And how many pictures should be taking reassessed kind of the nature of it and that's happening. I think you know this return to film. We're seeing people kind of wanting to slow back down a little bit trying to figure out what what's the basis of it. That's really what it is. It's it's a medium. It's like if you're an oil painter if you're into acrylics or if you're doing you know pencil drawings if you're into sculpture it's a it's all worthy it's just a matter of what your taste isn't what it is that you're shooting at that

Samsung Harry Canon SAM Massachusetts Sherry Apple Kodak Trenton Center Director Ebony Magazine Jose Lycos Greg Gorman United States Matic Jacobsen Jacobsen Steven Spielberg
Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

Digiday Podcast

14:08 min | 2 years ago

Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

"Welcome to the digital podcasts and brian morrissey this week. I'm joined by andy kern andy as president and publisher of the feeder which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary serie any welcome. Thank you for having me brian. It's great to be here okay so twenty years. You're not a failure at the time though you were at spend competitor right. Yes i was at spin and then i was at the source magazine yeah right around the time. Is this a different era for magazines right. It sure was so lots changed since then but the fighter has continued right and still magazine bimonthly but now i would guess it is a multi-platform brand. Yes it is multi platform because that is the only way for us to you. Know stay alive okay. I think i got there. I've been there sixteen years now. <hes> and came up through the more traditional you know the time period of print magazines were revenue was essentially if not a hundred percent ninety percent an advertising supported through print advertising and then maybe some events here and there some newsstand sales for some of the stronger newsstand publications ends and that was really the beginning of the end of it <hes> from a revenue stream standpoint and it was a boom period <hes> especially in music because as you head spin and vibe and the source and brands really starting to embrace hip hop as marketing platform and vehicle so <hes> <unk> brands as big as you know general motors ford coke and pepsi it wasn't just the street where brands anymore that were starting to really embrace that culture and <hes> to leverage you know the those that genre of music for marketing advertising so <hes> i think for those publications and what ended up happening is they became so heavily driven by circulation and celebrity and who was on the cover and had to just be as big possible artists as you can imagine the other you know jay z on the cover of the source or your radiohead and coldplay on the covers of rolling stone and the fader and <hes> the bigger the circulation got the more you can charge for advertising pages so zaveri simple business model you know at the time which <hes> changed as we all saw <hes> you know especially <hes> brown two thousand eight so it was two thousand eight the big inflection point yeah i. I think it's interesting because coming over to fater <hes> i came over in two thousand three at the time it was a quarterly publication which is what we're actually back to now <hes> and they the guys that started it were from the music industry so they started fater more out of access to music because they were doing a lot of non traditional early early day street team digital marketing for record labels for specific releases so they would have the first outkast album before it would be serviced to survive vibe or a rolling stone or is it then they didn't have print or journalism or magazine experience but they had this access and felt like they needed the document cemented so that's how feeder started <hes> was based on this early access so started as an emerging music magazine where it was artists that you weren't really that familiar with yet which called plan cover no coal plan the cover at the time it could have been at some point at some point so what what was interesting to me because i was a journalism major in college i grew up with my father was a newspaper editor at newsday and a writer you know for forty six years and i was obsessed with <hes> you know just music journalism and when i came out of college i got a job at spin on the business side of the magazine and you know it was. Was it like you said before. It was a very different time is very circulation driven. The whole business model was based on selling ads growing your circulation and your rape base so for me what happened was is because of that. I was at points in time at both of those publications where they were either sold <hes> quincy jones and and the people <hes> bob miller bought spin and brought it into the family with vibe and the source hit such a big mass kind of mainstream removed that you know to go up from there is hard and you have to really do things that weren't in your dna and your original mission statement so what happened was isley. Spin spin is an example is where it was the quote unquote alternative to rolling stone. They were putting artists like p._j. Harvey and tori amos and you know rage against the machine on the covers when rolling stone was now starting to put david letterman and buffy the vampire slayer as they were trying to become so big and more of like and entertainment weekly than an actual music and cutting edge lifestyle magazine which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and for its earlier years so i think the example is when spin got sold. They started putting a lot of pressure to grow the circulation because it wasn't an independent privately held company any longer by bob optus tony junior who is a big music fan and believe in you know promoting these kind of upcoming artists they started putting kid rock and creed and natalie attlee imbruglia and really experimenting with very mainstream things that never fit or seem to fit with the original mission statement was for spin <hes> so you know you can call it selling out but i think what it did was alienated. The core audience of those music publications that came there for something in the first place and then those magazines evolved because of the business pressures so you know put became much less of a challenge much more predictable like you knew jay z. He had an album coming out he'd be on the cover of the source you know so that's like and then in ninety nine ninety eight you started hearing things like lime wire napster during the internet and all of a sudden those long lead publications couldn't really compete with the discovery nature of music anymore so they by the time these the longley publications came out everyone already listened to anne knew about a new of everything that was going on through the internet so you know when i was growing up as an older person had to go into record stores to find you know different genres of music and it was very intimidating. If you hurt someone talk about dancehall you're like dance all for for that now. Dancehall type it in two seconds and you're listening to dancehall like through napster and lime the accessibility to music and all of these genres were so far reaching now that it usurped. I think the purpose of the longer lead you know print titles so when fader first came out was really interesting and caught my eye was that the first issue i saw was the third issue had had most f- on one side and back with the angelo together on the other side and and i didn't really know of who those people were and i thought it was really interesting so i think that around ninety nine when fader started hit this inflection point where the kids were now growing up with accessibility to every genre of music there was not like spin the alternative music magazine ad source and x._l. The hip hop magazines you you know it was here's something that's really reflecting of. What's kind of going forward you know and in multiple genres of music like someone even myself i was i call myself from the walk this way generation which is seeing you know the convergence of rap crossing over into the the mainstream and i think you know starting to really get into music in nineteen eighty six in one thousand nine hundred seven all that just became like second nature to when i was listening to led zeppelin classic rock or public enemy and rock him and you know the fat boys and the beastie boys and run dmc. It was all l. cool to me. It didn't matter it wasn't segmented so i think when failure came out it kind of like captured this moment in time that was really well well timed <hes> because it was speaking to people that had that accessible so it had some kind of advantage over some of its bigger competitors that had gone very broad. Yeah i think what fader was at that. Moment was what was kind of a combination of the best of all of those other publications from when they first started and with what their original missions were when you look at spin starting in nineteen eighty five and rolling stone starting in nineteen sixty eight they were counterculture. They were edgy. Spin was writing and hiv aids column which it was crazy at the time you know very alternative rolling stone. Had you know a crazy investigative journalism pieces and p._j. O'rourke and all those hunter thompson awesome you know the things that they were doing so i think it just you know fader came out with this like fresh voice that was speaking like a and not to sound cliche but he was speaking to this new new generation of really hardcore music fans but the same kind of secular pressures i guess as they call them in the business world you know were exempted right. I mean in two thousand and two thousand nine <hes> if particularly if it's print advertising driven <hes> music industry's gone through a lot of changes <hes> explain that inflection point and sort of how the business needed to pivot because a lot of a lot of competitors didn't really make it as they were or made it in in shrunk informs ripe right. I think being that failures mission was to cover kind of what's next in music and knowing that we weren't going to be able to rely on celebrity for any kind of real scale or mass reach. I think early on <hes> we were very <hes> very interested in doing events and like not only just putting an artist that you've never heard ever seen before on the cover of national magazine but also like doing events bringing those artists out to perform live and finding ending ways obviously early days internet to continue the conversation online so it wasn't just like you were an emerging print magazine and then had to move onto the next issue you talk about a whole new host of people you're able to like start building the brand in other ways and be a little bit more diverse so i think because we did events early on and it gave us a like a real strategic advantage in that everyone then started to do events and i think we had an expertise and ability ability to do events that became a huge ultimately a huge revenue stream for was his fader fort back fater four was just eighteen years gold <hes> and i think that's become you know it's become a one plot digital platform for us like almost like a second brand go to to the fader <hes> but in two thousand eight when print advertising was decimated we were able to kind of lean lean more on these events and really lean on the fact that the events gave us a little bit more of like a multidimensional approach because we couldn't we wouldn't wooden of survived if it was just the print advertising or just going online or going online because there was display advertising even at that point in time was <music> very you know <hes> is very <hes>. It was unknown territory. The dollars were like pennies on the dollar versus what that the meaningful meaningful print advertising before collapsed was you know so like from a c._p._m. Standpoint from a total gross revenue standpoint it didn't it's not like one. Just filled filled the gap on the other side so for us. I i do point to the fact that we did tons of events and were able to really like you know you get brands involved on a multiplatform level <hes> so i guess like ten years ago or so probably ninety percent print right y- yeah yeah so what is it today. <hes> percentage wise print is probably i would say in like the twenty to thirty percent of the total revenue pie. <hes> experiential is probably the biggest experiential in video because through video. It's that means not only only us creating our own proprietary fater video but we also do a ton of white label video content for big brands so that come to us for ours boris that iq our ability to understand how to work with artists so companies land access to the art and i think that's the the real like magical thing about failure of over the years i think when you strip everything away is the artist access that we have because we have double down on these artists so early on in their career when no one else is giving them that type of platform yet that we've been able to establish these you know great long running relationships with both those artists and their management and not not have to go through agents or middle middleman like give an example of that an artist the the stuck with for i mean they were smaller. I guess when you started working <hes> i mean artists like i think drake is a great example <hes> just because of how he is and how big it's gotten he did make it. I think it started at the bottom apparently <hes> no but drake used to come up to our office and plus music and he was a great guy and very humble <hes> and you know he almost kind of sold us on you know <hes> on his his skills and we started we did a blog post you know of one of his early songs and it did really well and then <hes> and we put him on the cover in two thousand nine. It was his first. I ever magazine cover. We went up to toronto. You went to the nursing home with him to see his grandmother mother. We spend time at his house. <hes> and we just did like a lot that i think no one had done with him at that point because he wasn't really anyone yet and i think that's what our dna really is is like kind of curated and identifying people that we believe in their music and their longevity of

Still Magazine Source Magazine Jay Z Spin Brian Morrissey Napster Music Magazine Andy Kern Drake Toronto Quincy Jones Rape David Letterman President Trump HIV Bob Optus General Motors National Magazine Longley Publications Publisher
Are mass shootings really on the rise?

Reason Podcast

13:10 min | 3 years ago

Are mass shootings really on the rise?

"This is the reason podcast and i'm your host nicoletti. The horrific mass killings in paso in dayton have understandably inspired terror in america and calls for expanded gun control predictive policing and mental health interventions designed to reduce violence but northeastern university criminologist james alan fox the leading researcher on the topic for the past thirty five years tells reason there is no evidence that we're in the midst of an epidemic of mass shootings the number of incidents. It's and casualties are simply too small to make such claims and he stresses the media coverage of shootings ends up creating a false sense that gun violence which she is at or near historic lows is ubiquitous in growing in a wide ranging interview fox explains the common characteristics of mass killers. Why violent crime involving guns has declined over the past several decades and how cable t._v. and social media contribute to a false sense of panic james alan fox. Thanks for talking to reason blecher. Let's start by defining terms. I what is the difference between a mass shooting in a mass public shooting well. Most mass shootings actually occur occur in private in private homes for example <hes> family annihilation then there's all mesh shootings that are related to a robbery or or drunk trump deal on bad or gang turf wars public mass shooting joey defined as a mass shooting where where there's essentially no real connection between the perpetrator and the victims typically <hes> carried out in a public replace as opposed to private home and it can be people they know such as co workers at a plant plant or keep be total strangers and when we're talking about mass shootings what is the number you prefer to use for the number of casualties or the number number killed. I prefer using four more people killed not including the perpetrator and that traditionally was the definition going back decades <hes> even when they i started doing research on this topic in the early nineteen eighties and it wasn't until two thousand thirteen after the sandy hook massacre that the idea came about that you know technically some shot doesn't mean that they're killed and technically mass shooting doesn't have to involve any i guess at all and so the term definition used by violence archive for example is four people shot but what's important to point out all those those although they matter and not inconsequential not the same thing as a mass killing in fact in half of the cases of mass shootings for more people shot and half of those cases no one's killed in three quarters of those cases either zero or one person's killed now the problem comes when these numbers for example we recently heard that there are more shootings mashes this year the days but these kind of statistics are reported in the aftermath of a mass killing and most americans don't <music> get the difference they fused. They think that every day we're having episode like el paso or dayton and we're not so i think it's important to distinguish the two in in my book my research. I've always held to four more people killed. I think it's clear cut death is is gonna cut whereas an injury can be reminder me shot and have very little in terms of injuries so four more people killed not including the perpetrator upgrade some databases include the perpetrators death <hes> dick and count the death count and then that that's partly a problem because if they're going back and using i mean they're they're using different standards at different times so that you really can't compare or create a pure the trend line right and then also i should point out that in two thousand and thirteen the congress passed a bill will lead to school violence which they arbitrarily defined <hes> a mass shooting is free and more people killed <hes> mother jones which is one organization station has been collecting data on mass killings mass shootings <hes> switch from four to three and were killed but didn't change didn't go back and filling the data for the earlier years so if you just take the mother jones data and put it on a graph such as n._b._c. news did last last week you see big jump after two thousand thirteen because the numbers after two thousand thirteen include incidents with three people killed and those before four yeah let me just quickly ask you to kind of psychologists a bit because both your mother jones does that in that has the effect of kind of amping up hysteria or fear of of mass shootings but donald trump also does that when he talks about crime you know why do people want to live in a world that has more crime in it rather unless they want to i think that <hes> sensational numbers large numbers for big headlines lots of readers yeah so we have heard in the in the past couple weeks <hes> the one more the one mash shooting the day that states and we seem calendars that show you how many occur each day <hes> i mean i understand that technically. It's a mass shooting but boy it. Can it misleads. Please the public into thinking there's constant danger out there and also in terms of the wanna day mass shootings most are not public. Most of them are family only related incidents. A lot of gang related is drug related incidents. Not the kind of random shootings with large death tolls that we saw in el paso and they can you quantify. I mean what's broadly speaking. What's the percentage of kind of private or mass shootings. Versus mass has public shootings well. I can tell you mass killing because clear cut data on mass killings that half of mass killings these are essentially family related episodes a guy <hes> kills his wife and all the kids for example or some other relatives so half family related and then we have another large category that felony related corrupts robberies and gang game related and so forth and only about a quarter less than a quarter actually are the public variety so up until a couple of years ago we had generally on on average about five four or five public mass killings a year <hes>. There's been a slight increase in last couple of years where it's actually reach ten in two thousand eighteen but we're still talking about the the rarest aris form of mass killing it. It's the rarest but the scariest and in your work you talk about how at least through two thousand fifteen they're going back to the early early eighties when the nut mercer kind of first place there really isn't a clear trend in the number of incidents but then you you hypothesize catholic size over the past couple of years that has actually been an increase. Is there a way or is it useful to talk about that. In terms of the increase statistically significant or is that there are so few instances even if you're almost doubling the number it's still you don't know if it's signal or noise. We don't really know that this trend will continue <music>. It's only been a couple of years. We've seen this bump up and by the way there have been other times in the past <hes> three or four decades. We've had a spike in the number of mass killings and people start declaring them epidemics and pulse sudden the epidemic dissipates so two thousand seventeen two thousand eighteen so an increase in two thousand nineteen so far as well. I don't know if this trend will continue. I certainly hope not but i will tell you that part of the problem uh is there really is a contagion effect and now i'm not talking about publicity about the shooter you know and i don't scribe griped the name the shooter a show what i what it basically means that there's tremendous amount of panic country obsession with the whole idea of mass shootings shootings the majority of people thinking that they're going to be someone their families can be thick mass shootings and the more we obsess about it and the more we you see on television images of people crying and running from crime scenes it plays right into the mindset of a few people out there who would love the event in their neighborhood so we actually are contributing to it through our fear and obsession. Is it true that well the number of incidents haven't been going. It's not clear if they've been going up or it's a continuing trend but our mass shootings or mass killings. Are they becoming more for more violent or more fatal well. We do know that some of the largest that we've had occurred in the past dozen years over half the largest tempur occurred in the last years we had if you look at cases in which for example with twenty or more people were killed. We had pulse pulse in orlando last vegas. Shooting of course we had el paso and we had virginia tech <hes> sandy hook but but you know there are also cases prior in prior years we had twenty one killed at a mcdonald's in nineteen eighty four. We nineteen ninety one. We had twenty three people people killed at a at a luby's cafeteria but we have seen this increase in the large body count incidents. Now it's base. It's also hard to stash trend based on what five or six people done it in a country of three hundred thirty million. Can you talk about the <hes>. Is there a profile of shooters. The paso and dayton shooters seem on the one hand. They'll pass shoot or left a very ideological goal manifesto where he explained things he referenced other christ church killing in new zealand and berries things the dayton keller did not seem to leave any record behind neither did the vegas shooter which strength but is there are they. What what motivates mass killers and is there a clear understanding you you know that kind of can explain the whole the whole mess of people or are. They really kind of idiosyncratic well. There are some common factors that the president on every case but most cases typically the mass killer has a history of frustration and failure and disappointment in life <hes> struggling at work in relationships school and secondly and importantly they blame other people they externalize blame. Nothing's ever their fault. The wife doesn't understand them guy. The boss doesn't give them the good assignments or the recognition they deserved. They see themselves as victims of injustice if you if you think you're to blame for your own inadequacies you might take out your frustrations and misery and yourself and others <hes> and then third is that these individuals <hes> lack support systems they often time to live alone or loop with the people with whom they share their problems. They don't have others to bounce things off to help them get through the hard times and to give them a reality check when they start thinking thinking that they're the ones who mistreated and no one else's are they exclusively male ninety five percent mill. Yeah what what does that ninety percent setup ninety percent of murderers our meal. You know murder itself. It's a male dominated activity and and mass murder even more so well they the two factors there's is of course the access to means of mass murder destruction which is part of the reason for the dominance men men are much couple around guns off time under trained in having used guns go target practicing and then finally there's some precipitate which is generally something like job loss or i've been kicked out of the house which by the way off and much more impacting men guy who's who loses his job. Does he lose his income and he he tends to lose his friends because men tend to their friendships and work and also his self esteem.

Dayton El Paso James Alan Fox Murder Jones America Researcher Donald Trump Robbery Virginia Congress Joey Luby President Trump Orlando Vegas Ninety Percent
Super Smash Bros. suffers with online play

Kinda Funny Games Daily

00:36 sec | 3 years ago

Super Smash Bros. suffers with online play

"PS four, what are you doing? I think it's very much like what you -scribed earlier year from now. When I have to have this trade Pokomo Mon online, it's going to be a very different story. I'm not gonna play. Smash. Smash is always been bad on on. Okay, smashes a great game. Smash online has always been bad, smash. I love smash. I've played smash all the way going back to the sixty. Four smash, smash online on we and we not good and fighting game developers who are devoted to that have struggled with latency issues for a long time. Smash