35 Burst results for "Each Time"

Edward Luce Tweets Bad Take on Republicans

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:00 min | 1 hr ago

Edward Luce Tweets Bad Take on Republicans

"Edward luce, associate editor of the Financial Times, I didn't realize how left wing the Financial Times is. Tweeted, I've covered extremism and violent ideologies around the world over my career have never come across a political force more nihilistic, dangerous and contemptible than today's Republicans, nothing close. They never specify what what makes Republicans the worst, most treacherous. Most nihilistic force, the people who tell us men give birth that America is the most systemically racist society, many of whom advocated the funding the police. Believe that the, that Shakespeare should not be venerated because he's white, these people are talking about nihilism.

Edward Luce Financial Times America Shakespeare
Conservatives Are Fighting Back

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:59 min | 1 hr ago

Conservatives Are Fighting Back

"What scene now, what else is what else could I? You know I'm torn on this issue because I want to bring you good news. There is good news. The good news is that a lot of us are fighting back. Look, this is a dark time in American life, okay? Acknowledge it and don't despair. That's a sin. Life is not guaranteed to be easy in every generation. It was spectacularly easy for most Americans since World War II. Americans got complacent. They took America for granted. In gratitude, one of the ugliest traits in the human condition, predominates on the left as I have often said, you get a BA in ingratitude or masters in ingratitude and a PhD in ingratitude. And now you know what the consequences are. Chaos

America
Prince William charity invests with bank tied to dirty fuels

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 hrs ago

Prince William charity invests with bank tied to dirty fuels

"The Associated Press has learned that Prince William's conservation charity keeps its investments in a bank that is one of the biggest fossil fuel backers William's charity the royal foundation kept more than a $1 million with JPMorgan Chase in 2021 and still invests with the corporation today The charity also places more than half of its investments in a fund that has shares in large food companies that buy palm oil from companies linked to deforestation The royal foundation did not dispute the investments when contacted by the AP It comes at a time when scientists are repeatedly warning the world to shift away from fossil fuels to avoid more and increasing the intense extreme weather events I am Karen Chammas

Royal Foundation Prince William's Conservation Jpmorgan Chase AP William Palm Karen Chammas
Bringing Financial Hope to the People of Virginia

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:20 min | 4 hrs ago

Bringing Financial Hope to the People of Virginia

"I got some time to talk with Jenkins, who is running in Virginia second district down in the Norfolk Virginia Beach area. That's all she talked about. She's a mom and nurse a veteran, a military spouse. All she talks about is education and I think every Republican candidate is well served by that. But I do want to tell you what Frank luntz, I had breakfast with him two mornings ago. He showed me all his deck. Affordability, anxiety, anger. People are afraid. They go to sleep, worried they don't have enough money to make it through the month. They are anxious about crime and about social upheavals and they are angry at the indifference of elected officials. Does that match up with your first 7 months in office Glenn youngkin? A 100%, a 100%. I travel around this Commonwealth extensively. I'm listening to virginians and what I'm hearing over and over again is I can not afford to do the things that I need to be able to do. We're watching people making tradeoffs. These horrific policies that have emanated from Washington that are basically stalling the American Dream are stealing from all of our all of our hardworking virginians, stealing three, four, 5, $6000 out of their paychecks. And people are worried. We've got to get inflation down and we've got to reestablish faith in these institutions.

Norfolk Virginia Beach Frank Luntz Glenn Youngkin Jenkins Virginia Washington
Nationals rally against Darvish, Hader to beat Padres 3-1

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 6 hrs ago

Nationals rally against Darvish, Hader to beat Padres 3-1

"Nelson Cruz's base is loaded walk broke a one one tie in the 9th inning as the Washington Nationals beat the San Diego Padres three to one What began as a pitcher's duel between annabelle Sanchez and yu Darvish dominated the game with Sanchez going 5 innings allowing just a solo home run to Manny Machado Today was the first time to a whole year that I'm able to throw every single page in any spark So when I'm able to do that I can get those kind of games The Padres lead for the third and final wild card spot in the national league was trimmed to one game over the Milwaukee Brewers Philip gon San Diego

Annabelle Sanchez Nelson Cruz Padres Manny Machado Washington Nationals Yu Darvish Sanchez National League Milwaukee Brewers San Diego
Life Lessons From Colin Powell: Share Credit

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:25 min | 10 hrs ago

Life Lessons From Colin Powell: Share Credit

"Number 9 is share credit. I thought this was the answer from Colin Powell. Here's a four star general who became Secretary of State. It is share credit. You can't get by in life if it's all about you. You didn't get to where you are. Simply because you're this great and wonderful person. There's other people in your life that is always been there to help you when it was a start with your family and you may have had a terrible family laugh. Maybe it was an awful, maybe it was an aunt, maybe a friend down the road. Maybe if somebody at school, but we've always had people there that have helped us get where we are going. And no matter what we've done, you can always share credit, bringing people along does not diminish who you are and bringing people into in crediting them and actually praising them doesn't diminish the accomplishment that you feel like you made, but it actually brings others in it that it makes it sweeter. It makes it understand that, hey, we're a part of this. The next time you can accomplish even more why because people will understand if you're leading people understand that, hey, this person values my time. This person values my input. This person values who I am. And they're going to not just take all the credit for the hard work that others did. Powell understood this and climbing to the highest ranks of whether it be the military or the government, or if you're running a mom and pop shop, or maybe you're just, you know, in your own family. When's the last time you prayed somebody? When's the last time you just sent a thank you note, just saying, hey, I was thinking about all the things that you've done. I just wanted to say thanks. Thanks for being a part of the team. These are small things that matter, sharing credit matters.

Colin Powell Powell
Conspiracies Surrounding Princess Diana's Death Are Back in the News

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:26 min | 10 hrs ago

Conspiracies Surrounding Princess Diana's Death Are Back in the News

"Back in October 1995, word is Diana asked for a private meeting with her personal legal adviser, Victor mishcon, and apparently she wanted to tell him about something that was on her mind. Something she knew was going to happen. So this guy Michigan takes very good notes of their conversation. During which Diana said that reliable sources and she would name them, but she said that she trusts these reliable sources. That they informed her that a car accident might be stage and apparently she predicted she would have end up dead or be seriously injured in this car crash. Now we go to August of 1997, Diana, along with her partner, dodi Al fayed, and her driver on report, they die after Henri slams their Mercedes into a pillar at 65 miles an hour in that tunnel in Paris. It turned out that Henri Paul was under the influence of alcohol and prescription drugs, but was also trying to Dodge a bunch of crazy paparazzi who were trailing them on motorcycles. Now, before I go any further, I don't know, paparazzi on motorcycles with a camera in one hand that are gonna get that close to a speeding car at 65 mph. I just, I don't know. I wasn't there. I could be wrong, but I don't think they get that close. They got long lenses on those goddamn things. But then again, they were looking for that shot right through the window where they can get her face real close. So it could be. And those shots are worth hundreds of thousands of dollars if they're sold. And they look just right, but according to people in this docu series, miscon gave the note of his meeting with Diana to the London Metropolitan Police commissioner at the time, sir Paul. And it wasn't until after condon successor's name, John Stevens, when he got the post at that point, the public was made aware of this notes existence because the first guy condon had locked it away in a safe. Why he did that? You should ask yourself, why? Why are you trying to hide something like that? It took the next guy to bring that out of the safe. It doesn't sit right with me.

Diana Victor Mishcon Dodi Al Fayed Henri Paul Henri Michigan Miscon Dodge London Metropolitan Police Paris Condon Sir Paul John Stevens
Jonah Hill Can No Longer Take Making Public Appearances

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:17 min | 11 hrs ago

Jonah Hill Can No Longer Take Making Public Appearances

"Jonah Hill will no longer be participating in any public events or press to promote his future projects. Did you hear that? He's not gonna promote them. Not even his upcoming documentary called stunts. He directed it. And it explores Jonah Hill's long-standing journey with therapy, anxiety, and panic attacks. And he said, I finished directing my second film, a documentary about me and my therapist, which explores mental health in general called stutz, the whole purpose of making this film as they give therapy and the tools I've learned in therapy to a wide audience for private use through an entertaining film. And to that I say, isn't it obvious those tools aren't working? If you can't talk about the film, then the tools are not working, Jonah. He continued. Through this journey of self discovery within the film, I've come to the understanding that I've spent nearly 20 years experiencing anxiety attacks, which are exacerbated by media appearances in public facing events. Oh, bullshit. I don't buy it. This guy's such a softie. Remember he couldn't take his shirt off for a while. He told everybody I can't take my shirt off, I was throwing my 30s. When he went to swimming, he said he's very grateful that the personal documentary was gonna premiere at a prestigious film festival this fall. And he noted his excitement to share the project with the public with the hope that it will help those struggling. How do you think those who are struggling will feel about you who is clearly struggling and the fact that you can afford a big time therapist with all the money you make is something's not right here, something that jiving. You won't see me at out there promoting this film or any of my other upcoming films. While I take this important step to protect myself, I know it's so scary, it's so scary. Those people with the cameras and the those vicious women who work for Entertainment Tonight are different magazines. Unbelievable.

Jonah Hill Panic Attacks Stutz Jonah Swimming
How the Vietnam War Influenced Colin Powell's Leadership Style

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:39 min | 11 hrs ago

How the Vietnam War Influenced Colin Powell's Leadership Style

"Some who may remember or not remember from my generation Colin Powell was one that we remembered greatly as a general. He was joint chiefs, a chairman. He was also the national security adviser, but he was joint chiefs during the first Gulf War. That was where he really rose to prominence him and schwarzkopf, sourced cough again being the general on the ground. And we may do something on him later on as well. He's a lot of wisdom came from his time. We're dealing with leadership with Powell, schwarzkopf, and these others who came out of the Vietnam era. These were folks who saw what happened in Vietnam and really sometimes the disaster that really happened with our troops and with our mission there. They saw the problems that developed with the political aspect and political nature of what was going on in Vietnam. And it really affected them all throughout their career. I mean, these were 30 plus year careers that ended in the 90s for many of them that, you know, coming off of that experience of Vietnam and never left them. This is important to understand when you take a leader like Colin pile. You take a leader like Norman Schwarzkopf. You take some of these leaders who are influenced by own the ground, combat, in Vietnam, you see how later on the gulf, the first Gulf War with Iraq was really influenced by that by the whole build up, the massive use of force. The idea that you don't go in unless you can achieve a victory with massive dominance. This is a doctrine that sort of came out of that Vietnam era. And it was based on those who had to live through what happened in Vietnam and they

Vietnam Schwarzkopf Colin Powell Cough Powell Norman Schwarzkopf Colin Iraq
Life Lessons From Colin Powell: It Ain't as Bad as You Think

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:35 min | 11 hrs ago

Life Lessons From Colin Powell: It Ain't as Bad as You Think

"First life lesson, he wrote, so he said, ain't as bad as you think it will always look better in the morning. I don't know about you, but this one probably among all the ones that we're gonna give is the one that I struggle with the most. I don't know about you. He goes on and he talks about leaving office, you know, when you leave the office at night, your attitude really will affect how you go through the 9 and really affect the next morning. But I want to think about this from terms of perspective. How many times have you woke up at night? Or I couldn't go to sleep, you were worried about something that was going to happen. Or possibly might not happen. Again, worry is many times worrying about things that may or may not ever happen. And what he's talking about is that it's never as bad as you think. I have had in my own times where I've laid in bed at night or woke up really early and when it's dark and you're only hearing your own voice. It is easy to see or think that the walls are closing in that everything is bad that the only outcome is going to be terrible that everybody in the world knows your problems. Everybody in the world sees your problem and the reality is that most of the time it's just you it's just you there contemplating these actions, contemplating these things in your own mind, making the assumptions that the fear that you've built up or the concern, the anxiety, however you want to put it. Is actually a development. One of the things that you need to remember is it never is he says it never is as bad as you think. Now, for some, I'm not going to say every time there's something that has come to be as bad. But the morning will come. The sun will come up. There's a new day, there's a new opportunity to see things in the light.

AI
AJ Might Have to Change His Opinion on Chris Pratt

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:29 min | 11 hrs ago

AJ Might Have to Change His Opinion on Chris Pratt

"I'm just not gung Ho on Chris Pratt. I think he's a bore. But now I found something out that might make him inch up my list of, you know, good men, good actors and maybe just maybe I might have to take them off my shit list. So here's what's up. Bryce Dallas Howard, his costar in Jurassic World. She just recently revealed that she was paid a ton less money than Chris Pratt. This has been going on in Hollywood for, you know, dare I say a century. But it's been going on for a long time. If you've read about certain actresses who have campaigned to get more money, scholar Johansson comes to mind and they broke down the bigwigs in Hollywood and cut those big checks. But by and large, women get considerably less than their male costars. So initially, it was reported that she got paid so much less. Back in 2018, variety said that Bryce Dallas, Howard was making $2 million less than Pratt for Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, she made 8 million Pratt made ten. I know there's a $2 million shortage there, but I don't know anybody that can complain to make 8 million bucks for 40 days work. But they're in this field and they're allowed to complain. But now Bryce Dallas Howard has opened up about the gender pay gap in an interview and she wanted to clarify that this disparity in how much money how much less money she made was really inaccurate. She said the reports were interesting because I was paid so much less than what the reports even said. So much less. She said, what you started negotiating for Jurassic, it was 2014. It was a different world back then. You never heard big talk about women getting equal pay as bad as that sounds. fortunately, when you make a Jurassic Park movie, sign up for three movies. So your deals are kind of set. They're set in stone. And she wouldn't say how much to pay gap was, but she did share the fact that she discussed this situation with Chris Pratt. He didn't like the way it sounded. And he decided, I'm going to help you get equal pay on other franchise properties that don't have contracts set in stone, like video games, and theme park rides. That's a big thing.

Chris Pratt Bryce Dallas Howard Gung Ho Bryce Dallas Pratt Hollywood Johansson Howard Jurassic Park
Charlie Addresses the Hyper-Sexualization of Children in America

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:25 min | 13 hrs ago

Charlie Addresses the Hyper-Sexualization of Children in America

"I want to talk about an issue that just continues to pop up and again, I would be very comfortable not having to cover this topic as much, but it is a crisis in our country. It's a crisis and people are just sitting on their hands while this continues. And I believe, again, if Republicans were smart, they would focus in on this issue of the parents party versus the groomers and versus the versus the perverts. James Lindsay says it best, sexualizing children is a tool to gain power. Used both by cults and modern public schools. James Lindsay is right where he talks about how, if you go back to Kinsey and you go back to money, the hypersexualization of children is a strategy to try to strip children of their innocence and to make them easier to control. Parents out there, I understand many of you are angry. I understand many of you are starting to push back against this. But grandparents especially I have to say, you have a lot of time on your hands probably maybe maybe not. Most of you I know do, 'cause you email me Charlie, what can I do? What can I do? Make it your job, the pushback against groomers and perverts that are in these schools and in these local communities.

James Lindsay Kinsey Charlie
Raheem Kassam Reacts to Liz Cheney’s Crushing Defeat in Wyoming

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:07 min | 15 hrs ago

Raheem Kassam Reacts to Liz Cheney’s Crushing Defeat in Wyoming

"With this right now is a great American patriot very smart love following his commentary. I think it's his first time on the program. Raheem joins us Raheem kassam remi, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Thank you for having me. Yeah, you bet. Thank you. So you wanna talk about this Liz Cheney story in The New York Times. And it's in the ways that countless Cheney won your thoughts on this. I have a lot of thoughts on this Charlie. So it originally I thought to myself on our talking about Liz Cheney. Liz Cheney wants us talking about Liz Cheney. So my instinct in that is to say, no, actually, I don't really want to talk about Liz Cheney, but then I was sitting around last night in bringing to spin this one, so I started to look at the returns in from Wyoming themselves. Look at the commentary around her and of course we've got this amazing, amazing. I mean, bro I've had in months and months and months on article in The New York Times today by Frank Bruni, which said Liz Cheney won in the way that Liz Cheney won. Well, let me consoling themselves right now, having lost all of their impeachment managers, having lost all of the people at all. Every single one almost of them are gone out of Congress already. And the controlling themselves is that they accused us of our side of back in 2020. But there were two one in Wyoming and by two ways, I mean two counties. Now there was one county orbiting county reported an oddball in Wyoming. But the more interesting story is what I think of the entire battle going on in America right now. And that's teton county. Wyoming. County in America is the only county that Liz Cheney carried with any reasonable margin that she can say I absolutely won that one. The average income is three hundred thousand dollars.

Liz Cheney Raheem Kassam Remi Charlie Kirk Raheem The New York Times Wyoming Cheney Frank Bruni Charlie Congress Teton County America
Matt Peterson and Charlie on the Gravitational Pull Against Wokeism

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:53 min | 15 hrs ago

Matt Peterson and Charlie on the Gravitational Pull Against Wokeism

"Of my theories about what corporations is that in the year of 2020, you had some simultaneous, let's say, influxes of really bad ideas, hatred of Donald Trump, lockdowns, a yearning for meaning, but also cheap money. And one of the theories that I've been putting forward is that when you have artificially high profits and you have tech companies in particular that just exploded during a reaction to the pandemic, that you have a lot of money floating around to subsidize bloated HR departments. However, when the economy starts to crater a little bit, and budgets need to be cut in HR departments to be kind of scaled back, the wookies are going to be maybe laid off and not treated as nicely and kindly. Am I misguided there? Do you think there might be finally some gravitational pull against wokeism? Yes and no. I mean, I think there is some evidence that this has been going on. But radically depends on the kind of corporation you're talking about. Let me give you an example. I mean, I think there's a lot of big corporations like, say, Verizon, I think it's a good example. It's hopelessly woke, it's sort of like, it's just being cannibalized. Over time, I don't think they care in a way. And something like Disney, for instance, as well. They've lost a lot, but I see them as on a suicidal course that they're not going to recover from. They're not going to fire all their woke creatives. On the other hand, there's other businesses that this gives the people, if there's not people who realize the problem, this gives them ammo to help to scale and trim back. But unfortunately, I don't think it's enough to reverse the cultural revolution, although it can be useful to people in those businesses who are engaged in the fight.

Donald Trump Verizon Disney
Reynolds 2 HRs; Brubaker, Pirates top Bosox, end 6-game skid

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 18 hrs ago

Reynolds 2 HRs; Brubaker, Pirates top Bosox, end 6-game skid

"The pirates ended their 6 game losing streak by salvaging the finale of their three game set with the Red Sox 8 to two Brian Reynolds hit a pair of two run shots including the 3000th home run at PNC park since it opened in 2001 Reynolds and Kevin Newman each had three hits and scored three times JT brubaker allowed two hits over 7 scoreless innings striking out 7 and walking none He entered with a two in ten record before helping the bucks drop the Red Sox a game under 500 losing pitcher Joshua kowalski was tagged for 6 runs and 7 hits over 5 innings I'm Dave ferry

Brian Reynolds Kevin Newman Jt Brubaker Red Sox Pnc Park Pirates Reynolds Joshua Kowalski Bucks Dave Ferry
The Gospel According to the Gospel

The Officer Tatum Show

01:21 min | 19 hrs ago

The Gospel According to the Gospel

"I mean, it's shocking to me. I've been to churches before I got saved. I used to go church all the time. There was no conversion there. I mean, because then they tell you just what you want to hear. They never preached the gospel, they tell you all this feel good stuff, and they make you feel like you're comfortable and God is going to set up everything you're doing. And then they tell you at the end, come and confess your life to God. And then that's it. And they don't tell you nothing about nothing. And we don't even know, I don't even know what I'm confessing to. I know nothing about what Jesus is actually warning for me. But then I could give my life over to Christ. What is Christ? What is Christ actually doing? What do I need to know about this? They just get you to the church and then they tell you to confess your life to Christ and they tell you at that moment you're saving and you gotta worry about nothing else. I know nothing about what crisis asked me to do. I have no idea what to call it. I have never even heard about who Christ really is. But then you're telling me to get my life to a person that I doubt I don't understand. And I'm not saying that people shouldn't. Maybe when you allow Christ in your heart, you go down a path of success and then you become, you know, you get yourself to a point where you have a closer relationship and you begin to be transformed. But I mean, my goodness, the church is only about the gospel. That's what Christians are. You're following the leadership and the story and lessons and the teachings of Jesus Christ.

Pastor Lectures Congrigation Over Expensive Watch

The Officer Tatum Show

01:04 min | 19 hrs ago

Pastor Lectures Congrigation Over Expensive Watch

"I want to get back to whipping that pastor because he should be ashamed of himself. I don't know if we can pick up at the end of the clip, but I want to pick up at the clip where he's talking about the movado watch. And he want his congregation to buy him a Votto watch. So I looked up movado watch 'cause I have no idea what a movado watch is. And so I looked at the range of movado watches and the movado men's diamond watch is, I think it's the 3.25 carrots. It's $4000 for that watch. And then you go down and you look at some of the cheaper options or least expensive options of Nevada watches, it's still down to like 300 or something dollars for movado watch. Now, why would a pastor be even thinking about? Lecturing his people because they won't buy him a certain name brand watch. Bro, you can get a watch from Walmart. That works and tells the time just like any other watch. Why does it have to be a movado watch?

Votto Movado Nevada Walmart
Trump Investigation Is a Nothing Burger

The Officer Tatum Show

00:59 sec | 20 hrs ago

Trump Investigation Is a Nothing Burger

"I mean, I mentioned it already about the judge releasing the Mar-a-Lago thing, I really do think this is going to end up being a nothing burger. I think it's going to be a nothing burger. I really do believe that our government. And I could be wrong, ladies and gentlemen. I do not know for a fact. I just believe it's going to be a nothing burger. I feel like our government has put their foot in their mouths. I don't know how many times. All these investigations into Trump, all these lies that were told, we find out it's a bunch of Bologna. The Russia thing was a nothing burger. I mean, they literally went through every avenue they could to investigate Trump, even spying on his campaign. I mean, they went through illegal means to try to find dirt and they couldn't find any dirt. And you can not catch, I mean, you can't catch me entertaining for one second. That Donald Trump is dumb enough to have evidence that's going to get him sent away for the rest of his life or sent to jail. He got to just lingering around in Mar-a-Lago.

Donald Trump Bologna Russia MAR
"each time" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

03:15 min | 9 months ago

"each time" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Reconcile that? What is the answer? I think what I look to is companies that are making the shift themselves. So companies like Patagonia and I think maybe more importantly, just because of its global recognizability, the Levi's brand. And both of those companies are moving towards models where they will be making the sale of new products a smaller part of their model and the sale of recouping and reselling secondhand their own products, a larger part of their model, as well as the repair and maintenance and alteration of their products as part of their income stream as well. So when we see companies like that, moving in that direction and when you see a company, like Levi's, which, earlier this year, acknowledged that the apparel industry is built on over consumption. I think we see that business seems to be preparing to move in this direction. So you're saying that the strategy boils down to don't buy so many pairs of genes with the expectation that you'll get tired of where there were more, but less frequently and get a really good pair that you're going to keep repairing and keep wearing for year after year after year. That's right. It's been referred to by some people as the model of fewer better things or buy less by better. And it extends not only to goods, but also to things like services and even consumer experiences. So for example, we can travel less, but travel in a more engaged way. And might potentially even find that considerably more satisfying. Fewer but better has not been the American shopping mantra. In recent decades, do you think do you really think it can be done? Sure. I mean, I don't think that we have very much choice. I mean, when people say that we are caught in this dilemma, we're not really caught in a dilemma. It is true that the planet needs us to stop shopping. The economy needs us to keep shopping. But ultimately, it's the planet that has the priority here. We can not continue to expand the amount of consumption that each individual person on the planet does in perpetuity. So the answers have to be found, I think, in what kind of changes can we make to the economic system? Journalist JB McKinnon, his author of the day the world stops shopping, how ending consumerism saves the environment and ourselves. Let's consider this from NPR. I married Louise Kelly. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Airbnb. If you're curious about hosting, you might have a few questions with ask a super host, you can get free one on one help from Airbnb's most experienced hosts. Start asking at Airbnb dot com slash ask a super host. The holiday season is here, and the NPR shop has something for every NPR fan on your list. T-shirts socks, hats, and yes, gift cards. For a limited time, take 20% off your entire order, visit shop dot NPR dot org and don't forget to grab something for yourself. That's shop dot NPR dot org..

Levi Patagonia NPR Airbnb JB McKinnon Louise Kelly
"each time" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

01:30 min | 9 months ago

"each time" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Market exploded, all kinds of new products, products, Americans didn't even know they wanted. You can phrase it, stack it, any which way. It won't leave your spill. Tupperware keeps aroma and flavor locked in. And it's Procter & Gamble's golden fluffle, the first all new shortening in 40 years..

"each time" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

05:09 min | 9 months ago

"each time" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"That we're in the middle of the holiday season, we are buying even more. But what do we do with all that stuff? And what does all that stuff do to a rapidly warming planet? Those are things we're going to talk about with journalist JB McKinnon. He is author of the day the world stops shopping, how ending consumerism saves the environment and ourselves. JB McKinnon welcome. Thanks so much. Glad to be here. Glad to have you with us. It occurs to me as I say it out loud that the subtitle of your book is probably a pretty good place to start. Give us a few examples of how what we buy affects the effects the environment. Well, it affects every environmental crisis that we face. In fact, at this point, according to the UN panel that studies global natural resources, consumption is the leading driver of our environmental problems around the world today, surpassing even the growth of the human population on the planet. So you name it, it drives it deforestation toxic pollution, climate change. Mining, even fisheries, even the extinction of species is tied in tightly to our consumption. Can you give one concrete example that would drive one of those home? Sure. Well, one of the issues that I looked at that I thought was most surprising was the way that consumer culture is now affecting whales. We thought that we had saved the whales by ceasing to hunt them. But now things like the search for minerals and fossil fuels on the seafloor is creating noise pollution that's having a profound effect on whales ability to communicate with each other. And one of the most common ways that North Atlantic right whales and endangered species in the United States actually end up dying is being struck by the cargo ships that bring us our things. One whale conservation is said to me, you know, every time you.

JB McKinnon UN North Atlantic United States
"each time" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Pull. You're never gonna win. Use your mentality step up to Reality and each time I do just the thought of you makes me stop the far right. Begin. I've got you under my skin. I would sacrifice anything. Come with my brother sake. I'm having your near in spite of a warning boy comes in the night. Get repeat, Solid, yelled and Yeah. But you know you fool you ain't never gonna win. Why not use your mentality? Step up to reality And each time I do just the thought of you makes me stop just.

each time
"each time" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Anna King. I've been up and down and over and out. And I know one thing Each time I find myself flat on my face. I picked myself up. And get back in the raid. That's life. I tell you, I can't deny it. I thought of quitting, baby, but my heart just ain't gonna buy it. And if I didn't think it was worth one single try, I jumped right on a big bird. And then I'd flies. I've been a puppet, A pauper, a pirate, a poet. Upon Anna King High went up and down and over and out, and I know one thing each time I might find myself laying flat on my face. I just pick myself up. And get in the race. That's life. That's life and I can and I am. Many times cutting out but my heart won't buy it. But if there's nothing shaken, come miss here July.

Anna King July Each time each time one thing one single try
"each time" Discussed on Spiritual Dope

Spiritual Dope

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on Spiritual Dope

"I don't know what would have happened if i would have had to have stayed in real estate. Would i've gotten sick. But i've got somebody at the house sick now Would something else have happened. And and there would have been a lot of worry and Frustration at home in the family life. If i'd stayed in that so the universe provided this this other option that was perfect for me and my family at that point in time and you know once you start seeing stuff like that. It's really kind of hard to stop back Or turn back so the idea to is that it inspires if you're able to do this if you're able to Begin to pull this type model into your own. Life is is It inspires the whole idea of heaven on earth right Because now you've got the universe actually working for you and your own benefit and the is it becomes again like Heaven on earth and the idea to is is Where's the trying to think is. Is this real no more so than any other model right But the thing is that all the other the other models are just as as false a as as this one so again. What if it's really true though. What if what if it really does work out this way. And then what does that mean for your life then and I i've been able to Again if these into a point where i believe it and i see so He also mentioned that. All the exercises within this book have basically lead up to his conversions. Point giving you the exercises to test out to be able to see the universes working we have and now it's like okay. Now you just come out and say this is and you can look back if you've done any of the exercises in this book if you take any of its courses and you've done any of it even to the Latest light is varying degree. Then then you'll you'll be able to say oh shoot. The universe really was working on behalf and And now you know there's there's something amazing for me so he's gonna hit back again on the idea that a beliefs cannot be forced so you simply cannot Force yourself to accept the proposed model. You may recognize intellectually. And then. it's a good idea but you can't just automatically accept it. You can't believe it all once. And i liken this to the idea of Who's the guy who wrote. The book flows sees high mahalick. Go look for small things that you can't believe then instead of trying to take it all in at once If it's if it's too much at one time to say yes has been violent universe and blah. You're fucked at the thing. Is something small that you can work with and then start looking for how that is beginning to show you know small pieces of benevolence from gina verse toward you so whatever you believe now small pieces and then just each time something a little bit beyond that initial point so small increments outside the known at the time and then over time it will become massive overtime. It will become This this piece of it that is with you and.

earth one time each time
"each time" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"It's really inspiring to hear somebody talk about that without any sort of guilt or shame or negatively and two to wear it as a badge of honor and as and as a skill set as a point of pride. I think that we can all learn something from you especially here in this country especially under the political climate that we found ourselves in. So it's just really inspiring to hear you say those words thank you. Yeah i mean. I think one of the most important things at least for me Learning something you're like you know like do you project really find a lotta times where i've just like i have no idea what's going on like explain this to. Yeah that's how we learn right as to say i don't know and then each time we know a little bit more and somehow we have it. When we're young we get really scared of it as we get older and moved middle school and high school and sometimes we never get back so i just hope that you never never lose that about yourself. I think it's going to be one of your most important skills as a scientist. And i hope that you can help influence the next generation in the generation after that to remember that it's important to be able to say i don't know let's figure it out. Yeah yes so so much fun. I learned an awful lot from you. I know it was short and sweet. But i know you're also gonna do great things that'll probably have you back on the show in the future and i gotta say everybody listening. Thank you for coming back week after week. I'm really looking forward to the next time we get together to talk..

two one each time
"each time" Discussed on Mindy Diamond on Independence: A Podcast for Financial Advisors Considering Change

Mindy Diamond on Independence: A Podcast for Financial Advisors Considering Change

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on Mindy Diamond on Independence: A Podcast for Financial Advisors Considering Change

"Can be more responsive to in advisors needs than some larger firms. That could be a little bit one-size-fits-all so to me. That's the best way to stand out is be realistic about who you're targeting and then if you get that at be really good at telling your story but in a different way each time depending upon advisor wants needs. Yeah and i think we counsel all of our clients who want to engage in inorganic growth. That it all starts with acronym with what's in it for me that when you are lucky enough to be sitting in front of a prospect. The best way to determine what's important to that prospect is to ask a bunch of questions. What motivates you. So in your example where presuming. It's about growth. But maybe it's about something else and the more questions you ask the more you're able to customize your value proposition to meet the needs to answer the question what's ended for me if i join you. And isn't it possible though as that. The fact of the matter is there are plenty of people plenty of advisers. That would much prefer to work for a small firm than a mega firm. That's absolutely true as well to it's a it's a good additional point. There many advisors would prefer that it could also be equity is a meaningful currency pat. A larger firm isn't going to want to put forth and also control so control is is a major thing if an adviser joins yourselves to a larger national organization. They're likely giving up a high degree of control and autonomy versus. Maybe if they merged with you they'll truly be a partner in the firm. Have a seat at the table. And they'll have a meaningful amount of equity in the organization versus it being more about the cash so again coming back to what that adviser values and to your point asking the right questions that can really help you. Target the right people and still have success. Even though it's a really competitive time right now. Yeah you know. I was going to ask you about equity. You just mentioned it. So to what extent is equity or can equity be a valuable currency. I think it's incredibly valuable. Not everyone is going to be as excited about equity as others usually an advisor. Who's at or near. Retirement will likely value cash in more of the the sure thing of cash deal than equity but certainly for those who are younger looking to grou- or even advisors who they're really bullish on the industry and on this in on your value proposition equity can be a game changer. The downside of equitas it's illiquid until there's liquidity event. Sometimes it's a little bit opaque how it's valued and you are taking risk cash..

each time plenty people
"each time" Discussed on Indian Noir

Indian Noir

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on Indian Noir

"Become i said those words louder and louder each time i rang distri bell till i was chatting it. At the top of my lungs lights came on in the neighboring homes. As people were spurred to act the creatures talked its wretched bridge and disengaged from the woman who rapidly blinked and i are parched flips and emerging from a.

each time
"each time" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on Photography Radio

"I would film her bands kind of rehearsing or whatever or will do a music video and then we up the budget each time new on unsown and so forth but i think what. I ended up discovering the more. I did it. And the more. I gots the more i got involved with with video and filmmaking whilst that the output was very low and also. I've found that much of the time the ideas that you had initially than get watered down the more you got into the project. So there'd be funny shoes that be scheduling issues so by the end of it. You'd have very much a fraction of what you had envisioned initially and for me as an image make and as a struggling Yeah i guess. A struggling dp. I guess i was that my for me. All that mattered was my my input into the project is making sure that the director or anyone involved with the creation of project that my visuals married up to their idea so if they had the idea here that that was the constant thumb for budgeting constraints the camera that i wanted or the lenses that i want to the lighting that are needed over location that i needed or the cost him that i needed. Then that will translate into woltring down the entire projects on that for me. Became for me unacceptable. And so for me. Photography just became a way of doing something that was more immediate initially at least. Is this what you mean. Where in the magazine. You say you're trying to figure out how your emotion sensibilities translated to still imagery those sensibilities being sensibilities of quality not necessarily quality. I mean an obviously depends on what you mean by quality. Not necessarily that i mean. I think it's it's it's weird because it's this is the part of image making that i think is true. He was true then and is still true. Now i feel that now for example in terms of when i make images they really come from me..

each time
"each time" Discussed on Photography Radio

Photography Radio

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on Photography Radio

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine my name is scott olsen and today. This is a treat. This is going to be so much fun. I am talking with. Ian howarth has been in the new york times. He's been in the guardian. He has spent everywhere. You can possibly imagine and in the second volume of frames magazine. He is one of the photographers. We have had the great joy to feature in the print publication. And an how you doing today. What's life like over in england. I'm very well. Thank you for having me. Yes things are very been very cold here but luckily we're having a bit of a bit of a spell of nicer weather so very grateful. Oh i'm looking forward to that where i live right now. It is minus twenty degrees fahrenheit. I don't know what that is in celsius but it's just a wee bit chilly over here so i'm looking forward to the warm up to in your work is very well known all around the world and certainly to the frames community and i want to jump right in with some notion of early days in and how you became who you are one of the things that you mentioned quite a lot. You were born to a british peruvian mother. You were born in peru and you've said that not being born and raised in central. London has really helped you understand the british sensibility or understand what it's like to be. There talked me about that a little bit. How does that change perspective. Get over into your work. Well i think. I think what really helped was the fact that you know being born and raised in peru and traveling every two years to the uk to visit my to my dad's family. It meant that from a very early age. I was able to kind of just really tell apart the difference in culture and how that translates to to what that meant visually you know but obviously there was. It was more involved than that it was officials. It was the smells being very different. I don't think well. At least back. Then i think in peru In the us. I don't think that smell of rolling tobacco and And bitter ale at with something. That was very common so for me these. These experiences kind of really really became almost cemented. My brain never really went away. So so i always have the every two years as i got older my brain develops they kind of took different meanings obviously lake so when i eventually move to england When i was sixteen. I'd already been coming here for a long time. So so these things were familiar to me but truth be told the alienness of them has never really gone away so whenever i smell that smell again so it's hard to explain it doesn't it doesn't make me feel like it's alien but it reminds me of the feeling that i had when it was once alien to me that makes sense so for me i think in in many ways having this view of of of the uk. That's been very much a part of me from a very young age but hasn't been innately a part of me like someone who was born here as maybe helped me look. Let's the country were live in in in a very different kind of way an office. Very visual person. You know maybe not. Everyone is visual. So i think the marriage between those two things is well. Maybe help me of look hits england in the way that i have. It's it's an interesting distinction. Photographers talk all the time about originality or freshness you know something that calls to their sensibility in thus you know. They point the camera that direction to think of it. As the alien to think of it as as the not common to me Aspect is a fascinating way to think about what we go out shooting for us. Say that you began your career making videos. Tell me about that. Yeah i studied filmmaking at university effectively. And it's something that i didn't pursue immediately after finishing my degree i actually got a pretty normal job. I did that for many years. And it's only when i was maybe twenty eight's that i started really exploring the the idea that i wanted to create something visual and that just manifested itself as making videos now. The time i was mountain biking law imagines thought well what better way to do. Something quickly on turnover. Quickly that making videos of yourself mountain biking so that number me became the process by which i created images at its at them and then deliver something and you know the more. You did it more than you knew how to shoot out of frame how to do this how to do that. And i think from that i think he just developed into a real thrill to to create to create visuals and he just happened to manifest itself as video so as things progressed. I did different things. And i was getting a bit older ourselves. Getting more confident with approaching people and doing things in a collaborative sense so so then kind of like you know Transition into making music videos and and my partner at the time she was a singer so it makes sense to film her. You know her kind of artistic exploits. So i would film her bands kind of rehearsing or whatever or will do a music video and then we up the budget each time new on unsown and so forth but i think what. I ended up discovering the more. I did it. And the more. I gots the more i got involved with with video and filmmaking whilst that the output was very low and also. I've found that much of the time the ideas that you had initially than get watered down the more you got into the project. So there'd be funny shoes that be scheduling issues so by the end of it. You'd have very much a fraction of what you had envisioned initially

each time
"each time" Discussed on Made By Women

Made By Women

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on Made By Women

"I don't know we just had this feeling we're like okay. We're going start this and we're figuring it out but one thing that we did always have is that we had to nasty. We have something in us where we can go through like quote unquote a really bad situation. But the way that we look at life and we've been we started partying since we were kids. The our way of life is at any situation you go through you make it your own so if it's a quote unquote bad situation. The way that we look at it is just part of the story. And it's part of the journey so we try to take everything at ease so going through i call it. The rollercoaster effect going through the ups and downs. Where if something tragic happens in your life something bad happens. How can we use that as a learning curve. And i know that that's a huge part of being an entrepreneur is yeah we may not have a college degree yeah. We may not come from money at that time. We had no idea how to run a business but what we did have is. We had the figure that out like we knew how to figure some stuff out and we were amazing. Problems offers and we were amazing. Like make a mistake and we love figuring out what you just said really resonated with me was the fact your your philosophy of life and the way that you think about life and you think about the ups and downs. As journey and the lessons you can get from it As opposed to serve some people get really devastated when we know that life is going to have ups and downs. So the fact that you're able to come to that type of philosophy so early in your life. Do you think that had helped you. And gave you a big advantage. I definitely think that gave us a huge advantage. And i also think that we just grew up with a lot of adversities and so we kind of Tot ourselves that at an early age. And i do think that you do have to have some traits because it's not as easy and fun as you think but it is fun once you like. Grow that emotional intelligence in the understanding that you're gonna go through so many roller coasters and it's okay. I always say whenever we go through something like this is just part of the book in the movie. I everything everything we do. It's part of the book and it's part of the movie. I mike i swear and like twenty years. There's you're going to have a book and then there will be movie about our story. That's that's what keeps me motivated. Yeah we're just creating a blueprint for other people and that's the goal by really do think that keeping that mindset has been extremely helpful because you go through all these times and then you also go through downtimes in literally. It's a really big roller coaster. You think when you're going up that's going to stay up but then you go down but you know it's so important that you have to have those down times because how do you learn exactly and so each time you up time. Something's going to happen. And you have to learn from that mistake and then keep going because otherwise there was a point in our lives where everything kept going up and up and then it crashed right and then we had in. That crash was with beautiful because we had the reshift our full business model and make a huge pivot and then we start growing again. So i think that being aware that that's going to happen and being aware to look at the minute things that are happening when you have. That downtime is very important. I'm so glad you're bringing this up..

twenty years one thing each time
"each time" Discussed on Frankenculture Presents

Frankenculture Presents

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on Frankenculture Presents

"He basically is like i'm i'm year here. I'm very sorry. But i want you ask to see visions body and here. It is bitch. Have you lost your mind. And she's pleading the case of like. I really want to have his body and she's hayward's like i understand because i'm next kin next of kins gives me he's like that's great. Oh no dude you want to see it. He's like. I'm doing what you want. Parent is his whole body's just pieces. They're just working on him like a science experiment and he says shit lake. He's he's pushing her. You notice that right. He is egging her to do this. He's saying no one has the power to bring him back to life. what you he says that Then he says oh he said because she was like this is all i have. He's all i haven't he's like oh but he's not yours and that's when she fucking loses out not loses it crazily. She actually just breaks the glass and goes down there each time like he brings up like vision and some kind it was. You know the vision you ask. See it it's all these pronouns. That is very non human very like non personal and. She's like an talking about him. Like what are you doing to him right before she breaks glass and we're dismantling the most sophisticated sentient and weapon made. He's just a machine to them and then see said like online instead of a live and stuff. Oh he's feeling her. Obviously because we're going to talk about the end credits leo. But he's he's fucking wanting her to do what she's gonna do because that's when he's like. Oh well he's not yours okay. He actually is mine. He's my husband right. Are they married. I don't know he that's her love. You know like what what is happening here. So she goes down. There goes to his body now when she's just crying and saying i can't feel you over and over and over all my god so depressing..

each time
"each time" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

Sci-Fi Talk

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on Sci-Fi Talk

"The result of the strange buzzing in his head fishers of static running through him each time. The assassins hands make contact. Try night to challa. Could not clear the static from his brain. It came as a complete to him when he felt. The man's hands locked tight on his throat in squeeze focused talla. He brought his arms between the assassins and pushed out but couldn't break his. The man continued to tighten his hold. The buzzing in his mind and body cut his thoughts. He could feel himself blacking out. Hey a woman's voice angry commanding cut into his view. The assassin jolted is struck by something and the grip on his throat. Vanished stumbling back into a crouch to challenge. Forced his mind to clear. He looked up to find the assassin close combat with the shield woman who seemed impossibly.

each time
"each time" Discussed on Exponential Podcast

Exponential Podcast

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on Exponential Podcast

"There's there's what's known as the daily examine saint ignatius of loyal what kind of is attributed as kind of creating just a simple framework that can be adapted to anyone anywhere in the world. You know. I just kind of used. The language of this is an. It's it's developing the art of spiritual reflection in a non reflective world in his care. Said this gives you space to kind of allow god to kind of put the spotlight on what's going on on the inside and on the outside and so typically. This is a daily practice. I've adapted this kind of inner coaching model. That this is kind of what we use kind of coaching rhythms. As kind of a similar model that begins with prayer it kind of reviewing reflecting and then responding in so what i've done is kind of narrowed down. We're going to email this out to everyone You kind of shared your email with us. And we're going to be come sharing a practice each time we gather and so essentially begins with with prayer welcoming the holy spirit welcoming in god to come in and i'm going to call that recent drink at the end of the day. We've had a busy day. We've done all of this stuff and at the end of the day you just carve out time to sit in be with god could be in a closet. It could be literally. I have created a closet in my house to go get alone with god and it's a powerful way to do it. So wherever that places refined place to recenter invite the holy spirit to come to be with you to guide you in the session..

saint ignatius each time god
"each time" Discussed on Creating Strength

Creating Strength

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on Creating Strength

"So i don't remember who it was that canaan spoke but it just it was like. Oh my gosh how live. I've never put this together like in that moment. It just changed right. I just remember the words. It's not about you. It's about everyone else and i was again. Just something so simple but it resonated with me and i just walked out of there and thought you know what that's right i'm gonna see. What can i do to help. What more can i be doing and made it less about the work. I'm doing in the importance of it. And just letting other people instead of coming in. Because i'll tell you i have a tendency to just look find gaps and things and then just want to fix it right. I could take a look at something and say oh this is missing. This was missing this missing pretty quickly and then have the solution. But i had to take a step back slowdown and just let other people talk and hear their perspectives. More than i was before. And i did have a tendency to steamroll because i moved so fast like my brain does not slow down and one started to do that and i would go into my coaching sessions. And just say hey. What's on your mind and looking at last week. What would you say you would have done differently. Or what do you want to work on. Because a lot of times people can self identify we just need to give them the ability to and once. I really started working on those things. It just felt like everything all started to fall into place. And i understood people better and i connected with people more and i was more productive and i felt happier and i didn't feel like i had anything to roof like i did before i kind of just let some of that gull a little bit so over time i decided i wanted to just make it more of a point to understand the people around these goals and aspirations because maybe there was something i could do to help them get there and each time that i did that..

last week each time one
"each time" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"each time" Discussed on The Work in Sports Podcast - Insider Advice for Sports Careers

"And i think it allows you to cut through the fluff because believe it or not. Some managers find it challenging to provide that feedback in a way that you know. They're probably consciously not want to hurt anyone's feelings. But i need that to grow. Because if if meet voting. The sheet of paper vertical versus horizontal is preventing me from getting a promotion. The next opportunity. I'd rather you just tell me that because it doesn't matter to me should brighten each time. I was doing so. I think i think that's that's very important As you ask one question about what. I noticed about The difference is different industries in coming to sports. What i have realized about the people that work in sports my colleagues my friends. My buddies many of them have had this. Lifelong passion is so there is this level of commitment that i think you don't always see in other industries i think there's there's something tied to their childhood memories. It's it's it's deeper than the job That's what i've come to realize people And colleagues that work in sports. I like myself i sort of fell into but many people like this has been a lifelong wish and goal for them when they achieve it they they settle into those spaces but i also think sometimes they could be doing themselves a disservice because they have settled into a space. Okay think you want to make sure that you're not Becoming stagnant and sometimes. I'm a firm believer you know. Sometimes you have to go to grow And it never made that. You can't circle back. That might be your hometown team. They might be your childhood team. We get that. But i also know that the The higher levels of source payment. They're set those people have worked up the ranks there at the place where they plan to see themselves. Sort of go into retirement. But i don't want you to become frustrated as middle management entry level because you're not seeing the growth progression at this particular place there's growth elsewhere..

one question each time