35 Burst results for "EVE"

Fishing holds key to Brexit trade deal as talks drag on

Bloomberg Daybreak

05:10 min | 11 hrs ago

Fishing holds key to Brexit trade deal as talks drag on

"We want to get you the latest on Exit now because hopes for a breakthrough on a trade deal seemed to be on again off again, almost by the minute. So for the latest, we're joined now by David Merrit, senior executive editor for Bloomberg News. And David. I've been watching, I think along with you. The flurry of headlines have seen in just the last hour on where things stand in the Brexit negotiations. Get us up to speed if you could. Yeah, that's right on an office is definitely the right way to describe it in the market, certain reactions that pound whip soaring around. I think it just reflects the really frenetic nature. Off the talks as we really are into this final stretch here, and officials on both sides briefing various bits of the media that things are looking good things looking bad, the most recent reports saying something is imminent this weekend that came out of this morning when there was a bit of uncertainty, the French threatening a veto if they didn't like this deal, saying there was still significant gaps. So you know who to believe. I think what we do know they're still in the room. The pace of the talks really has intensified. What we may need over the weekend is a final political push. That means Boris Johnson, prime minister having a phone call, perhaps with ocean of underlying the president, the European Commission so really broken those final compromises. Both sides probably need to give a few more inches to get this deal done Most of it, though most of the Texas there so we will be waiting. It could come this weekend, but I have. We're afraid I've given up painting, and he did. Deadlines on this, you know, they're only deadline. That really matters is probably the end of transition, and that's December 31st. Right. So we got, I guess just a few more weeks before that comes along. But do we have any indications at this point that we are going to get that top level meeting any time soon between the prime minister and the president of the Sea? We have don't have confirmation, but suddenly things look to be heading that way. And I think it's worth taking a step back here. You know, no. The reporting on the ground, both in Brussels and in London, despite some of the official comments that come out about prom Rooms, disagreements tensions. Those things are kind of normal at this station negotiation. What's really going on behind the scenes, we're told is that career progress is being made. But there are these still fundamental gaps is all the things we know about the fishing access the level playing field that they're calling state aid rules on there needs to be a bit of a barge, Mr Barnier and Mr Frost, the chief negotiators, they cannot do that themselves. They're going to need instruction from their bosses. That's the prime minister and the president the commission, so those two are gonna have to come together at some point. Maybe we're being set up for that as well. There's going to be a grand political gesture. Ultimately, to get this thing over the line. The incentive is there. Neither side wants to be blamed, of course for talks breaking down and for there to be any more economic disruption at this point in time, so we're gonna have to wait and find out the confirmation, But I think that would be the moment to look for over the weekend. All right, well, it is very interesting, though, that France really seems like it's taken an outsize role in these negotiations. I mean, what are the chances that France really could veto a deal of this? Stage of the game. Well, Mr Macron, the President Franz has got slight form on this, of course in not only in the Brexit talks and other big moments in European negotiations, the French going on record today. Say they, Yes, they would trash this deal if they didn't like it. They have actually said this fairly consistently, though, throughout this process, and the French had this big interest in the fishing. Uh, part of this question and also on this kind of state aid that the fairness between the two economies. It's our closest trading partner, the biggest one with Britain, so that relationship is very key. French officials have been touring from the fishing villages in northern France to make a big show of how they are ready for no deal. If it has to happen, But if no deal does happen, those fishing villages are going to be really impacted that they're not allowed to go in. They take the majority of the fish out of the English Channel. If that is stop, that's a big domestic problem. Mr Macron, But he has to be seen to be making us that It's his style, of course, and we've seen it before to make a bit of a stand at this moment in time. But as I said previously the expectations despite what people are saying in public, and he may well be talking to his domestic market, they're more than globally. Ultimately, the people in the room seemed to be making lots of progress. Only about a minute left in our conversation in just a few weeks left until that hard Brexit deadline as you mentioned, is there a sense that some of the sticking points here are just on the Margins or are both sides far enough? Apart from each other that this really could fall apart in the next couple of weeks? I mean, absolutely could fall apart. You know, the history of Britain in the year I'm afraid is ones of both parties talking at cross purposes and on these fundamental questions of sovereignty and who is going to adjudicate over the rules, you know, there is still a significant gap. Someone's got to budge. Someone's gonna blink. Both sides have got big domestic reasons why that is politically difficult for them to do so. Mr Johnson depends on the votes. You people got to me in that landslide last year to get Brexit done in a meaningful way, as he put it. So, yes, the there is a possibility that things fall apart. Both sides of preparing for that New Year's Eve is the deadline, Britain would fall back to the World Trade Organization rules. That means tariffs quotas back backed up Lori's at Dover, potential food shortages on the supermarket shelves and Britain it could be fairly chaotic. They want to try and avoid it, but there still remains a significant chance that that might happen in just a few weeks

David Merrit Mr Macron Mr Barnier Mr Frost Bloomberg News Boris Johnson France European Commission Brexit Brussels David Texas Franz Britain London English Channel Mr Johnson World Trade Organization Lori Dover
How to Have a Better Sex Life by Understanding Your Love Style

Focus On the Family Daily Broadcast

04:55 min | 1 d ago

How to Have a Better Sex Life by Understanding Your Love Style

"The very beginning god created male and female and he created them to have relationship. And so the very fact that god created us as sexual beings where there's a distinction between the two of us is the beginning is how it all started and satan is doing everything he can't take god's design and break it apart destroy blasted he's blasting marriages taking shots at everything that sacred. The church are genders sexuality. Everything is being hit really really hard in cages to amplify this in you know the listeners. I'm speaking to you the listeners. Now you're gonna have three responses that couple. That feels like this is something you only share between each other. It's not something you speak about in public. I get that. I disagree with that. But i understand that perspective. It may be the other responses. We desperately need this help. Thank you for covering it. I hope those in the first category can open their hearts to those in the second category that actually talking about it is a good thing and then third. God's designed you know even with my team. Boys i talk about that commitment to marriage to saving yourself. That god has an incredible gift for you on your wedding night. He's intended that gift to be unwrapped at that point. Not before in that. You need to honor that and i i think that is a healthy way to look at it but kay what your response i mean. Women particularly struggle talking about this topic. I completely agree. You know when we do this workshop In churches we often ask how many people in the audience feel that they had a good sex education from their parents. And it's like one percent one percent one percentage of its terrible and so no wonder we struggle because no one really teaching us anything before we get married And then after we get married you know. It's it's taboo subject and right and so how can you learn to communicate and grow if everything's so secretive and it's god's designed so it shouldn't be secretive subject and i think we need to look at it that way christians. This is a beautiful thing that god has done. It's not a dirty thing. It's not ugly thing. This is the song of solomon something to be celebrated so let's get into it outlined for some of the common struggles. Couples have their intimacy today. And maybe there's nothing new under the sun. I don't know if you've looked at this historically but you say that sex is the great exposer. So what do you mean by that well. Sex and our comfort with it or the lack of comfort or the distress that's created in the relationship or the tension that has created over. The subject of sex is one of those like kids. It's like work. It's like a lot of things in life but one of those things that exposes are broken. Parts are weak parts. It it's a stressor and so it is this beautiful thing but it's also a stressor is simultaneously both and so k we we experienced. That is being something that would expose in us week. Places absolutely i mean i definitely exposed our lack of sex education. It exposed our inability to really communicate about difficult subjects. It i think really exposed our level of honesty How much we communicate and the things that pull up weakness feels terrible but it's an opportunity for growth. You know when you hit a rough spot. It's never pleasant. But some of our hardest first conversations in our most honest conversations. Were about sex and it was a game changer. But boy i remember how hard those first conversations were where we begin to be honest. You point to genesis three in the fall of mankind. That's a big statement How does the sin of adam and eve near the experience of many couples in their physical and emotional intimacy. It is very natural. First of all we have a fallen nature we were made in the image and likeness of god yet after the fall. There's a broken nece to us and that broken this means we don't operate well as c. s. lewis said were made in the image and likeness of god but the images bent or mart. And so with that broken nece. We find ourselves doing well. We struggle then to control our sexuality. One of the biggest problems with males is with a broken nature. I don't know what to do with my sexuality and so much of the new testament is about learning to control my sexuality right so that it's holy and not wurley but then there's this concept to that were just like adam and eve and we hide and were fearful and we blame and so that way. We are very similar to adam and eve because we tend to want to project our frustrations onto the other person.

KAY Solomon Lewis
Swamped US hospitals scramble for pandemic help

Chris Krok

00:23 sec | 1 d ago

Swamped US hospitals scramble for pandemic help

"U. S hospitals, Lamberth covered 19 patients They're trying to learn nurses and doctors out of retirement recruiting students and new graduates who have yet to earn their licenses and are offering some pretty large salaries in a desperate effort to Eve's staffing shortages. The number of U. S patients in the hospital with the virus is more than doubled over. The past month

Lamberth
Starbucks offering free coffee to frontline workers this month

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:25 sec | 2 d ago

Starbucks offering free coffee to frontline workers this month

"Offering free coffee. The coffee giant is offering free coffee to health care workers and first responders for the entire month of December. The move comes as cases of covert rise around the country. A Starbucks official says They hope it reignites the movement of gratitude and shows Workers on the front lines. How much they're appreciated. Workers will get a free, tall, brood hotter ice coffee. Right through New Year's Eve. That is

Starbucks
The Talk Taps New Co-Hosts: Find Out Who'll Replace Marie Osmond and Eve

Colleen and Bradley

00:18 sec | 3 d ago

The Talk Taps New Co-Hosts: Find Out Who'll Replace Marie Osmond and Eve

"Clue. It's and Elaine. Well, well, they're worth are drawing. Joining. CBS is the talk As new co hosts. Amanda and Elaine recently appeared his guest co host on multiple episodes of the talk in October and November, and they'll officially join the panel on July 4th replacing Re Osmond and Eve who both left the talk

Elaine CBS Amanda Osmond EVE
Halting the Holiday Hustle by Rose Lounsbury

Optimal Living Daily

05:18 min | 4 d ago

Halting the Holiday Hustle by Rose Lounsbury

"Altering the holiday hustle by rosebery of rose lounge buried dot com. If you enjoy the alliteration the title this post as much as i do. Give me a digital fist-bump english nerds unite. But i digress. Haven't even really started yeesh. Today's topic is the season that is upon us. You've seen the wreaths and the stores heard the beginning strains of those old familiar tunes. And maybe vince bruce. W behavior to ensure top spot on santa's coveted nice list. The s midst of time again and with that comes the inevitable holiday hustle. Marta least we seem to think it's inevitable. In america we go from store to store buying trinkets for loved ones and glittery decor of our homes. We bake we send cards. We are in a bit of do-goodery after all it is the season for giving we feel an obligation to squeeze in at least one act of goodwill toward men amongst the holiday parties and tinsel and above all we try to make memories those indelible treasures that last long for the trees on the curb and the last bits of shiny paper find their way to the trash. The trouble is all this holiday. Hustle often isn't available in fact. It's worse than that is downright stressful recreate so much anxiety. About having a good time enjoying the holidays we often fail to do. Just that the irony again. English nerds correctly used literary term fist-bump. This is on my mind today because my friend. Michelle recently posted this on facebook quote. I've been thinking about christmas cards this week specifically about not doing them for the first time ever. I love christmas cards. My joy sending them in receiving them. I have fun selecting a design but every year. They are source of some stress for me. What photo will we use. Do we take our owner higher photographer. How will find the time to get them all done. We typically sent around two hundred. I've also been thinking a lot about time and how we spend it very recently of known or heard of several young people who have passed away in their thirties and knowing this has been an important reminder to treasure each day in the people. I love for the gifts. They are some thinking. No christmas cards this year. I'm not saying i won't do them again. But who knows maybe not thinking that we will donate the money. We save children's charities more time for our family money to charities and less cards in the trash. This really is a tough decision for me breaking away from the tradition in the ritual of taking the time. Send something personal in the mail. That is why. I'm putting it out here so i can hold myself accountable to my choice and quote. Michelle received some very interesting comments from request to not join the anti christmas movement to light hearted individuals who wanted to halt the crazy holiday hustle and actually enjoy the season of love and giving which got me thinking to eat all feel this way about the holidays secretly for example of notice that my mom love you. Mom sometimes seems a bit stressed about baking holiday. Cookies mom if you're reading this and i know you are because you're one of those awesome moms who actually read her grown daughters blog about minimum. I wanna say this. We don't come to your house for the cookies while they are delicious. We come to see you to love you to enjoy the season of giving because we are lucky enough to be with those we love. If it stresses you out. Skip the baking all of you just as much over a package of holiday themed us. In fact i'm inordinately curious to find out if the red holiday filling tastes different from the everyday white thereof. Said it mom. You're off the hook for the cookies. If you want to be note this does in no way apply to the anchovies spaghetti. You make for christmas eve. That stays the holiday. Hustle stress stems entirely from the expectations. We put on ourselves. No one else really expects us to have the best lighting display in the neighborhood or fill each of our children stockings with themed presents. We expect that of ourselves so my suggestion. This holiday season is. Let's give ourselves a break. Just say no to. The hustle ignored the stores of you. Want to don't bake unless it brings you joy forgo the holiday cards unless licking two hundred envelopes as your idea of a good saturday night please. No i am sarcastic. But my don't judge my flaked my fair share of holiday card envelopes and may well do so again this year. What do i propose instead of being a straight up holiday hustler. Do something you love. Spread some joy. That's what the season is all about. Greet your neighbors with cheerful smile. And hello surprise them by shoveling the driveway when they're not looking note to my neighbors your totally welcome to fulfil your need for cheerful giving in this fashion and i promise to act very very surprised. Spend your baking time selecting and donating non-perishable goods for local food pantry. Better yet do that with your kids have a holiday movie marathon with your friends and copious amounts of holiday snack. Ary basically teacher self imposed expectations. And just do whatever truly brings you joy this holiday season now view. Excuse me. I'm off to buy a package of holiday oreos. I believe they're already on the shelves

Rosebery Of Rose Lounge Vince Bruce Michelle Marta Santa America Facebook ARY
New DOJ rule could allow executions by electrocution, firing squad

All Things Considered

00:53 sec | 6 d ago

New DOJ rule could allow executions by electrocution, firing squad

"Was soon allow federal executions to be carried out using methods other than lethal injection. NPR's Brian Mann reports. The new rules change made in the final weeks of the Trump administration would allow the death penalty be administered by other means, including firing squads and poison gas. The new rule goes into effect Christmas Eve and allows federal executions to follow the procedures, Quote prescribed by the laws of the state in which the sentence was imposed. That could mean electrocution, inhaling nitrogen gas and in a few states of firing squad or hanging This comes after Attorney General William Barr resume federal executions this year after a 17 year hiatus. The administration has scheduled five Morrell executions before the end of Trump's term. President elect Joe Biden opposes the death penalty and supports legislation that would ban the federal practice while incentivizing states to end capital punishment as well. Brian

Brian Mann Trump Administration NPR Attorney General William Barr Morrell Donald Trump Joe Biden Brian
New rule could allow gas, firing squads for US executions

The Takeaway

00:58 sec | Last week

New rule could allow gas, firing squads for US executions

"Department will soon allow federal executions to be carried out using methods other than lethal injection. NPR's Brian Mann reports. The new rule change, made in the final weeks of the Trump administration would allow the death penalty to be administered by other means, including firing squads and poison gas. The new rule goes into effect Christmas Eve and allows federal executions to follow the procedures, quote prescribed by the laws of the state in which the sentence was imposed. That could mean electrocution, inhaling nitrogen gas and in a few states a firing squad or hanging. This comes after Attorney General William Barr resume federal executions this year after a 17 year hiatus. The administration has scheduled five Morrell executions before the end of Trump's term. President elect Joe Biden opposes the death penalty and supports legislation that would ban the federal practice while incentivizing states to end capital punishment as well.

Brian Mann Trump Administration NPR Attorney General William Barr Morrell Donald Trump Joe Biden
European Leaders Plan To Loosen Lockdown Measures For The Holidays

WBZ Midday News

00:36 sec | Last week

European Leaders Plan To Loosen Lockdown Measures For The Holidays

"European leaders have announced plans to loosen lockdown measures for Christmas. Here's Lucy How with more details, German Chancellor Angela Merkel has agreed to extend the current lockdown measures until the 20th of December. And allowing a short amnesty over Christmas, allowing people to see up to 10 in a private gathering in France. Travel restrictions will be lifted before Christmas. There's part of a slow three stage relaxation off the lockdown starting this weekend. Spain is limiting festive gatherings to six on a set a 1 a.m. 26 a M curfew on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve, Lucy half Brussels.

Angela Merkel France Spain Lucy Half Brussels
"We're at war with a virus, not with each other," Biden says

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

01:23 min | Last week

"We're at war with a virus, not with each other," Biden says

"The assistant secretary of health is pleading with Americans to hold on for just a little longer, saying FDA approval of AH Corona virus vaccine will trigger a chain reaction. Fizer has said immediately thereafter there about 6.5 million doses that can be shipped General Purna has this down. The warp speed team has it down within 24 hours, they will be shipped and probably within 24. Hours. After that, it will go into people's arms. Admiral Bret Drawers says it doesn't mean people need to cancel Thanksgiving but try to make safe decisions, he says. That means avoiding non essential travel physically distancing practicing good hand hygiene and wearing your mask. President elect Biden spoke Wednesday from Delaware, noting the Thanksgiving holiday amid the pandemic. Jared Halpern, with more president elect, Biden acknowledged weariness felt by Americans from the Corona virus. But in a Thanksgiving Eve address, urged Americans to remember We're at war with the virus. This is the moment where we need to steal our spines. We double our efforts and re commit ourselves to the fight. Biden made those remarks in Wilmington before traveling to his home in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, for what he says will be a small scale Thanksgiving celebration, which just his wife, daughter and son in law with the transition. Now, official members of the incoming administration say they are being briefed on the federal pandemic

Fizer Admiral Bret Drawers Biden Jared Halpern FDA Delaware Rehoboth Beach Wilmington
Trump Announced Pardon for Michael Flynn in Thanksgiving Eve Tweet

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | Last week

Trump Announced Pardon for Michael Flynn in Thanksgiving Eve Tweet

"That that retired retired Army Army General General Michael Michael Flynn Flynn should should never never have have been been prosecuted prosecuted a a presidential presidential pardon pardon President President Trump Trump has has officially officially granted granted a a full full pardon pardon to to his his former former national security adviser, Michael Flynn. Saying in a tweet. I know you will now have a truly fantastic Thanksgiving. I think he's a hero of the general back in 2017, the retired Army general pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI as part of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Despite that, the Justice Department led by Attorney General William Barr, moved to drop its own case. Suggesting Flynn was entrapped into lying when interviewed by agents. Skylar reporting Flynn thanking his supporters and family on Twitter tweeted God bless family

Army Army General General Mich President President Trump Trum Michael Flynn Robert Mueller William Barr FBI Army Justice Department Flynn Skylar Twitter
California reports record 18,350 new coronavirus cases on eve of Thanksgiving

Clark Howard

00:14 sec | Last week

California reports record 18,350 new coronavirus cases on eve of Thanksgiving

"California has reported a record number of coronavirus cases on the eve of Thanksgiving. More than 18,000 Covert 19 infections were reported today that surpassed the previous daily record of more than 15,000.

California
Joe Biden appeals for unity in Thanksgiving-eve address

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

Joe Biden appeals for unity in Thanksgiving-eve address

"President like Joe Biden says the people have to unite in the effort against the corona virus pandemic in his pre thanksgiving speech president elect Joe Biden says a pandemic has driven a wedge between the people of this country we're war with the virus not with one another now with each other while noting that one or several effective vaccines could soon be released Biden says getting doses to hundreds of millions of people will take several months you need to put in place a distribution plan to get the entire country immunized as soon as possible which we will do it's going to take time Biden's remarks come as covert nineteen cases surge adding to hospitalizations and deaths as a nation approaches thanksgiving health officials warn large family gatherings will add to that search I'm Jim acquire

Joe Biden Biden
Pennsylvania limiting alcohol sales on Thanksgiving eve

KYW 24 Hour News

01:17 min | Last week

Pennsylvania limiting alcohol sales on Thanksgiving eve

"Bars and restaurants in Pennsylvania alcohol sales are being cut off at five o'clock. Thanksgiving Eve tomorrow. Ow! Steam him in is is with us Hang. He's got the details. Tim, What are business owners? Tell me about this. William? Yeah, something I think that's obvious to all of us. They're not happy about limiting alcohol sales on a night that could have helped ease the financial burden. Just another punch to the gut, says Matthew Rossi, owner of Nick's Roast beef, who spoke to NBC 10 at this point We feel like we're just being targeted. What is to say that in retail setting Black Friday is the biggest shopping day of the year. Nobody's doing anything to stop Black Friday, shopping from happening in the Pennsylvania license, Beverage and Tavern Association also sent out a statement saying. Yes, they understand. Sacrifices are needed during the pandemic, but they're clamoring for more help from Harrisburg In Washington, Governor, Wolf says he understands that this frustration is there and it's been going on, of course for months now, but They want to limit opportunities for crowds of people to gather and for covert to potentially spread. Even more. Officials say. Covert deaths have doubled in the last week in Pennsylvania cases or seven times higher than even a couple months ago, and ICU beds could possibly run out in December. And these measures in are in place

Matthew Rossi Pennsylvania Beverage And Tavern Associatio TIM William NBC Nick Harrisburg Wolf Washington ICU
Pennsylvania limiting alcohol sales on Thanksgiving eve

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | Last week

Pennsylvania limiting alcohol sales on Thanksgiving eve

"And Pennsylvania governor Tom Wolfe says no alcohol sales at bars and restaurants on Thanksgiving Eve, CBS is Nancy Chen on long lines of people getting tested in Jacksonville, Florida, David Robinson hoped for reassurance before Thanksgiving. We have some older people that in the family that we're going to be protecting this time of the year in North Dakota help arrived for overwhelmed. Hospitals. Nurses from the U. S Air Force will assist the state through its deadliest month since the start of the

Nancy Chen Tom Wolfe David Robinson Pennsylvania CBS Jacksonville Florida North Dakota U. Air Force
Death on eve of Brazil's Black Consciousness Day sparks fury

All Things Considered

02:21 min | Last week

Death on eve of Brazil's Black Consciousness Day sparks fury

"Beaten by security guards. It happened last night on the eve of Black Consciousness Day as NPR's Philip Reeves reports his death has caused a huge outcry. The beating was captured on video by an onlooker. The footage shows a black man on the ground at a supermarket. White Security guard Hold him down Another strikes. The man repeatedly in the face is quite Anton is more hell. The prosthesis pan card death of 40 Roach. One freighters is making headlines on a day in which Brazil is supposed to honor its black citizens. It happened in the southern city of Porto, allegedly the supermarkets operators carry for are calling his death of brutal crime cannot force canceled its contract with the security company. That's no consolation to black Brazilians and many others now flooding the Internet with messages of anger and despair. Or this crowd protesting this afternoon at their local cattle for branch in the capital of resilience, I can't breathe, they cry. The security man who beat freight is charged with first degree homicide once an off duty policeman. They were reportedly called to the scene After an altercation between freighters and a store employees. The local state governor, Eduardo lead ship promises a rigorous investigation It was different thoughts is indeed a novice. Recess gym, you'll answer. Everyone's outraged by this excessive violence. This led to the death of a black citizen says Let you Yet for many black Brazilians, this is all too familiar communication problem. It's very common for people linked to security forces to kill black Brazilians, says Renato Ferreira, a race relations lawyer. The death in the U. S of George Floyd resonated in Brazil, which has a long history of violent racism. Tensions have grown under far right President Chae Abortion, auto valuables on out of here but isn't the one who did this. Someone with a grudge posted on this election was a huge blow to many Brazilians, says Panetta. Boston out of himself has not commented on Francis's death. His vice president has it's lamentable, General Hamilton Morale told journalists yet on this black consciousness day, But I went on to insist that in Brazil, racism does not exist. The briefs. NPR NEWS REDISH NETTLES

Philip Reeves NPR Brazil Anton Porto Renato Ferreira George Floyd Eduardo President Chae U. General Hamilton Morale Panetta Boston Francis
A Conversation between Tara Brach and Elizabeth Lesser

Tara Brach

04:54 min | Last week

A Conversation between Tara Brach and Elizabeth Lesser

"Elizabeth. We are so delighted to have you with us. Thank you thank you thanks. It's a pleasure thank you. Hello everybody from all over the place. It's lovely to be with you. Yes i wanna jump right in to do your new book because i fall. We get grabbed by the tidal. Cassandra speaks can you just have to come up with that title. Who is cassandra. Let's just start writing with that. Well i've always loved mythology and religious texts. You know. I just love reading whether it's the bible or the koran or the buddhist texts or the hindu texts. I've just always just because humans learn through stories. that's how we learn. So i've been fascinated with stories and i didn't take me long to notice even way back in college that wow most of the books we love. Heroes tales the parables the myths they're written untold by men because back in the day. Ps also a lot now. The storytellers were men. And there's nothing wrong. With the stories. Men tell and the values men tell their stories from but a big swath of humanity was left out of the storytelling so when packing Reading reinterpreting everything. From adam and eve to chinese stories to the greek myths and as i was writing and i was writing about one of the greek town. The tale of cassandra we were in the midst of the metoo movement. Now i know that seems maybe like ancient history. Now we've all been through so much but really it was just like a year and a half ago and one night. I was watching television on. I was watching the televised trial of those young girls who had been molested by their doctor. Dr larry nassar and the judge in rare way of dealing with the trial. First of all allowed it to be televised and allowed one hundred twenty five girls to tell their story in front of the cameras with dr nassar sitting there and for years and years thirty years he'd been at it for years and years. These young women most of whom were olympic athletes had told their mothers had told their parents had told their coaches that college coaches the us olympic team coaches. They've told them that this man had been molesting them but no one believed them. And i was reading the story of cassandra. At the time. Cassandra was a princess. She was the most beautiful princess of the king of troy and troy was an ancient city. That was often at war with greece and she was so beautiful in lowering all the men wanted to marry her including the gods apollo. The son of zeus wanted to marry her. Zeus wanted to marry her and apollo offered her a gift. The gift of being clairvoyant. That she could be able to see into the future. She would see what was going to happen to her family. And her countrymen and her world and she wanted that She's very spiritual person she she wanted to be able to see into understand so she accepted the gift but he neglected to say that she would have to have sex with him right away after she got the gift but she didn't want to and he was furious so as the story goes he spat in her mouth in put a curse on her. Cassandra you will be clervoy int- but no one will believe you. And for years. She saw what was coming. She saw the war. She saw the trojan horse. She saw her brother's all dead. She saw her city in ruins and she would say it but no one would believe her. So as i was watching these young women. I thought they are cassandra's. They are telling their truth their experience but this time they're being believed and i thought that's what i want this book to be about changing the way the old story ends so it doesn't end with women not being heard women not being believed so that we had meant to who knows their inner feminine. So that finally. We respect that part of ourselves so deeply. It's really this part. That i was leading in the meditation and we get so much clout in musculature. That are stories begin to matter an actually change what it means to be human

Cassandra Dr Larry Nassar Dr Nassar Elizabeth Troy Clervoy Olympic Greece United States
Black Man Dies After Beating By Security Guards, Sparking Outrage In Brazil

Not Too Shabby

00:31 sec | 2 weeks ago

Black Man Dies After Beating By Security Guards, Sparking Outrage In Brazil

"Guards outside a supermarket the incident on Thursday night in the southern city of Port Allegra was caught on video and witnessed by many people, including the victim's wife. They said the guards used the same controversial knee in the neck hold that killed George Floyd in the U. S. Earlier this year. The case has caused outrage across Brazil, occurring on the eve of black consciousness, Day or holiday in many states. Zimbabwe's high court has granted bill to the journalist Hopewell

Port Allegra George Floyd U. S. Brazil Zimbabwe
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Do you think there's something to the idea that audiences would react more favorably to a story about an Asian family written by a white writer is it just bad luck that that happened in DC any contemporary parallels to that today? Oh, golly. Here like dislike do some landmine hopscotch. Hallway? For the record. I love that book. And I know it's a controversial thing to say. I know Asian American writers who hate that book. I don't care. It's a really beautiful book. And I think Pearl buck was actually a very good person. And she cared a lot about biracial Asian orphans who weren't fed and she spent a lot of her life taking care of very poor people that Asian people had discarded. So for me, I see her as an ally. That said I think for young hill Kong to say that it's unfortunate for to have two books come out about Asians. And therefore the reader only had space for one. I can see why he would say that. But I actually think that Moore's more if people like pachinko, they're going to beat another create a book about Koreans. It's a really dangerous thing to walk around feeling like there's only space for one person of. One group. Well, nobody ever says all we can't read the great Gatsby and Ernest Hemingway novel because we only have room for one idiot syncretic weird white guy on the syllabus. Right, right. Nobody ever says that you know, it reminds me of the first line of pachinko, which is you know, there's like collections of great. I lines in novel history. And I think this has to be one. The first line is history has failed us, but no matter and there's an interview with the guardian where you explain what you meant by that, especially as someone who you know, you yourself. You have an undergraduate degree in history. You said I believe history has failed almost everybody who is ordinary in the world. Do you think the same is true of our literary canon is literature failing ordinary people or is literature the remedy for that failure? I think it's both. I think that it has failed us in many ways. But I think that it can remedy us. And maybe that's romantic for people like us to believe, especially if it has failed. It's like to keep taking the same cough medicine. I'm not sure. But I guess I have to believe that literature can repair us because maybe what we need is multiple books. Like when Arbi Jane Eyre, I think about how much it healed me as a girl who believed that she was very plain and on loved, and that's not to like feel sorry for me. I think most people feel plain unloved, it's not a big deal. I walked around with that sense of consciousness, and when I read that book, it was really important to me. But would it have been more lovely in some ways to have had other create Americans and their stories. Sure. So when I was in college, and I read Kim run young, and that's a pen name for somebody who wrote a book called clay walls to historical novel, and she got no attention at all. And now, it's sort of included in the canons. But I think the thing that you, and I are trying to grapple with is how much space. Do we give for the other in the syllabus? Right. Right. Right. Is it one and knowing that there's an infinite multi. Implicity of otherness right and everybody wants to be able to see themselves in a book. Everybody wants to be able to see themselves in the world. And and feel like they're not alone. But that requires a multiplicity of. Well, that is all my questions for you. Is there anything that you wanted to make sure we talked about? Well, I wanted to tell you from the very beginning that I was really so pleased that you wanted to talk about young hill Kong because he is the OG of Korean literature in America. And it just made me really happy. So thank you. Oh, thank you. It makes me really happy. And we're so glad that you're able to come on. And I hope that a lot of people are going to go out and read his weird books after this. They're actually they're really fun. There's a piker usque aspect to. It's it's really fun. And you just learn so much about what it must have been like at that time..

Arbi Jane Eyre writer cough young hill Kong Kong Ernest Hemingway Moore Gatsby Kim America
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"I wish I was reading a normal book. Or I wish I didn't want to do this thing so much. I think right now now that I'm turning fifty in November. I definitely see the sense of you know, I think you're doing the right thing. I think you're meant to be a fiction writer, I think you should keep going even just a couple of years ago as a matter of fact last year when my husband had loss. His job, and we are really scrambling trying to figure out to do with our son's tuition. And I remember thinking, oh, man. I really messed up because if I had stayed a lawyer, I wouldn't have these issues. So I I totally understand if people keep their day jobs. I do man that is very real. You know, I feel like you're really highlighting something that I think so many people have a misconception about in terms of what it means to be successful as a writer. I think a lot of people that are going to be listening to this will be a shocked to hear that you know, that you continue to have your self doubt. And you continue to wonder if you've taken the right path after you've already had, you know, this bestselling widely lauded novel, but it's it's real I feel like that never goes away. Even last year. There was a point when my hardcover sales were not that great. So people were disappointed and. I'm just mentioning this sort of inside baseball kind of information because I think a lot of people have this idea that oh, you know, this is the best seller. It hit the New York Times list, and it's been doing this. But I never hit that list until paperback, and I didn't hit it until the New York Times that it was a top ten kind of thing. And that was nine months after the book came out. So it was a really bizarre Cinderella story of the spoke, but I was still forty eight forty nine at that point. I really thought oh, man. Maybe I could try to sell life insurance or real estate or something. I mean, it was really terrifying. Well, the thing that's amazing about what you're saying. Is that part of the is just the economic reality of it. And also part of it is the sense that you were doing something that people hadn't done before. And of course, the amazing gift you've given the world is that now you've got it. Right. So so many people are going to read this book. And then and just think, you know, this is perfect. It's so beautifully wrought. And she. She's so successful. But I wanna go back to something you said earlier, which is that. Thank you, by the way. Thank you. Oh, I mean, I I really love your book. I could I could I could go on something you said earlier was that you feel that in order to truly understand Korean culture. There has to be an understanding of the intersection between Japan and Korea, historically and the legacy of colonialism. And I'm thinking about young he'll Kong, you know?.

writer New York Times baseball Kong Japan Korea nine months
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Because we know that's not the way it should be. And I think even going to law school, it really taught me that even though there's a lot of inequities in this country from historically it's well as in present day, we know that we can try to be dressed some of these things and the wheels of Justice churn incredibly slowly, but we have to keep pushing the wheel, and I think that level of belief that the wheel can progress is really very American. I'm not surprised at an American took on the Korean Japanese history. As opposed to people who are much more resigned to the fact that you know, life is shaky and it's gonna station. So you did live in Tokyo for four or five years. Did you experience racism during your time in Japan, and that also influence the lens that you brought to the book? I did experience a lot of racism against me because I'm created always took me by surprise. Because I think there's a kind of naive belief that when you're educated, and you have some means that you're sheltered from discrimination. But very often people would refer to the fact that I had Korean blood, and because I had Korean blood that made me a suspicious person. And this happened so often that it really took me by surprise because sometimes people would save these things without thinking of me, let's say like they would be talking about other Koreans or Chinese people. And I was thinking while you're my friend. How can you say these things and you realize like, that's what you have to take on when you're in a world in which the norms are that there are good, Asians and their bodies, and in Japan, the wrong, Asians, are people from outside of Japan. So as you know. During this episode. We've been lucky enough to listen to the archival interview between studs terkel and young he'll Kong, and he wrote the first Korean American novel. That's right and your novel as I've read, and you can correct me if I'm wrong is the first written in English that discusses the experiences in the history of Korean people living in Japan. Now, I know that questions of being the first and being the only as a really complicated thing. And in some ways it can be special. But it can also be burdensome it can also be kind of depressing. I always think it's sort of depressing to be the first person to do anything in the twenty first century. But what are your thoughts on that? You know, the idea of firsts and first nece to do those things matter to you or not so much. I think even talking to my therapist. So I. I think the processing is the right adjective. I found it really discouraging because the whole time. I kinda thought the reason why no one has done, and it's because nobody wants it. So what makes you think that you're so special like I had these voices in my head like why are you bothering doing this? And I did watch other people become more successful doing other things. And I thought, wow, they have security they have health insurance. They have money in the Bank. They have an office. And there were definitely parts of my career that I felt this kind of longing to be normal..

Japan Kong Tokyo Bank five years
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"The Guggenheim fellowship an honorary doctorate from Monmouth college and a Radcliffe fellowship at Harvard University and recently, she was the runner up for the Dayton literary peace prize, and I have to admit this might be my favorite biographical detail. You were jeopardy clue. I was the question was Korean-born min Jin Lee wrote a twenty seventeen book with this Japanese pinball game as its title. Of course, the answer is pachinko, but you have to say what is pachinko right answering the form of a question. And I believe the person got it. Right, right. She did Burkey got it. Right. How bad mouth bad? Well. Welcome to bughouse. Wear. It is great to have you here. Thank you for having me. It's really an honor to be here. So one thing many of our listeners might not be familiar with is the experience of Korean people in Japan people like the characters in your book and the layers of social constraint and straight up racism that they experience, obviously, this is a huge issue. But could you talk briefly about that social context and the experiences of Zion Ichi in Japan today? Oh, sure. Well, essentially, what's really important to know is Japan colonized Korea between nineteen ten to nineteen Forty-five at ended with the end of the World War Two because Japan was an ally of the axis powers and then during this era, a lot of Koreans ended up going to Japan for economic reasons as well as some of them were forced to come. So you have this incredibly humongous population at the height. I believe it's about two million people and that eventually many of them repatriated going back to Korea which was by the time eighteen forty five divided into two. There's an increase. Really humongous of people who ended up staying in Japan. Because if you wanted to go back to Korea, either south or north you are limited in what you could take back and also usually all their homes were gone, their families were gone, and there's a lot of cholera and illness, so many than decided to stay, but in deciding to stay it was a very difficult law, and even today the Koreans Japan suffer a lot of social discrimination as well as legal discrimination. Now, you did not grow up in Japan. You're born in Seoul, and you grew up in queens, but you did live in Japan for a period as an adult. So the story in the novel is in some ways quite different from your story. But you said in one interview that the topic became like, a compulsion for you. Why is this something you wanted to write about I think that the reason why felt like a compulsion to me is because when I heard about the plight of cranes in Japan when I was eighteen years old, and I was in college. I didn't realize that people could be so hated based upon their immutable care. Actress deke's and that sounds really naive. But it's not that naive. Think about the fact that queens is a place even today, which has the highest number and variety of immigrants Nin tire nation. So it's really normal to be different when you're in queens. So I had a really good life in queens. And when I heard about the cranes in Japan, I kind of freaked out because I couldn't believe how mean people were. So I felt like I had to figure it out. And I think if you really want to understand Koreans in the world, you can't not understand the intersection of Japan and Korean history. So I spent some time thinking about writing a book, and I had no idea that it would take almost three decades of my life. So in a way, it sounds like even though this book is situated both between Japan and Korea. It sounds like being from queens, really shaped the point of view that you brought as a writer. Oh, absolutely. And also brought the kind of rage. It brought a kind of anger and a sense of indignity. Nation about the fact that people should not be treated this way in the same way. Like, if you think about how angry we are about the way women are treated or people of color in this country that comes from us a space of entitlement..

Japan queens Koreans Korea Burkey Jin Lee Guggenheim fellowship Monmouth college Harvard University bughouse Dayton cholera Seoul deke writer eighteen years three decades
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"This is a remarkable trip this trip. This is the great track of young hill Kong ten and eleven three hundred miles where you're scared to. No, no, I wasn't now. I. Wasn't scared that then you saw the first western train. Yes. What was your impression of saying? Well, it was. Well, something you know, you heard of you never saw just like dragon. You never saw dragon. You know, but you're very much impressed. Like a dragon. And then you came to the city. Hey, it's me again eve I feel like those two could go on all day. And I love listening to them. So it pains me to interrupt except. It's for a really good reason. Which is tell you that it's almost time to bring on Mingeon Lee. So recently, I read a phenomenal novel that I hope many of you may also have read, and if you haven't you really should it's called pachinko, and it was written by Mingeon Lee. Our guests for today. It was one of the New York Times book reviews. Ten best books of two thousand seventeen and it was a finalist for the national book award in my opinion. It is deserving of those accolades and more. The book follows the experience of a Korean family over multiple generations. It begins in Korea. But the majority of the novel takes place in Japan in a few minutes. We're going to have a conversation with Mingeon Lii, which I'm very much looking forward to. But I I want to share but of history that I'm definitely still learning about after reading pachinko history, that's very much illustrated in the novel just a heads up the discuss. Of sexual assault that I mentioned at the beginning of this episode is coming up shortly from nineteen ten and nineteen Forty-five Korea was under Japanese colonial rule. This had intense political, social and cultural consequences. For the first ten years of that occupation Japan ruled via strict military intervention in nineteen thirty nine the Japanese government. Pushed many Koreans to change their surnames to Japanese names, if they chose not to they weren't able to participate in anything that required, government documentation. If you didn't have a Japanese name, you couldn't go to school get a job or get a ration card to receive food schools and universities didn't allow people to speak Korean and over two hundred thousand Korean historical documents were burned these kinds of tactics were an intentional effort to straight up a race Korean culture during the World War. Two years Koreans living under Japanese imperialism were forced to fight on the front lines forced to work in factories and many women and girls referred to by the euphemism term comfort women were forced into sexual slavery at the hands of Japanese soldiers. Here's one of them. I'm Johnson talking to NPR about her experience of being kidnapped and enslaved at age thirteen. Cunanan go yet. You'll be what I remember that. I was forcibly taken out of Korea and taken to China. More than you could tap Munia. Go. What can I say, they did all the things they wanted to do according to their desires it was during these colonial years that young hill Kong actually, left Korea because he was a vocal anti imperialist activist. He went to Canada, and then the United States, but many other Koreans went to Japan it self during the wartime years, the Japanese government forced round three quarters of a million Koreans to work in Japan, and my nineteen forty five when the war ended there were about two million Korean people living in Japan altogether. They became known as I in Ichi, which means residing in Japan, a term that implies they'd be there temporarily, but many Koreans have stayed in Japan for generations in today. There about seven hundred thousand Koreans living in Japan. Let's jump to our interview with Mingeon Lee. And we'll learn more about their experiences and her novel. Men gin Lee is the celebrated author of two novels her first novel free food for millionaires was a bestseller in her more recent novel pachinko, which came out in two thousand seventeen was a bestseller as well and a finalist for the national book award and was also named by the New York Times is one of the top ten books of two thousand seventeen she's received many prestigious awards, including.

Japan Korea Japanese government national book award Mingeon Lee New York Times young hill Kong Mingeon Lii gin Lee Kong NPR assault Cunanan United States Canada Johnson China
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"And then Komu sharply told me says our guest young he'll come that. I was impolite this younger generation, the becoming rotten vulgar, obscene. And I can see the world is going to be held and he was much upset and trembles with rage shortly afterward, he gave some conservative. I'm more safe student that is an A. And when the wine came Komu drank too much after that began to weep decencies of thing of the past the world has no more respect for ancestors. An old man. Oh, why am I two sons worthless? Why do not take care of their old father? So he doesn't have to work among young scoundrels in ingrates doesn't the sound so familiar today. This was year when you were small, and you hear it again, don't there there are some differences. Of course, you know, the, otherwise the younger generation is. Move part of the differences, you that you see for instance, at the time. I was cutting my hair and eight goes something very radical and not good, you know, consider because hey was part of my patents Confucius said the body of the son. He's flesh. He's limbs. And he's hey belong to the parents. Therefore, he must not hold these injure them in any way. Now today, these young fellows of teenage generation, they don't cut they don't wanna cut their hair the other way, you what's going the opposite. He touts Beatles. So that this is the reverse a reversal of custom of a country. Yeah. You are the little rebel. You are becoming westernize than that. So you you were then the good Korean young, man. A man what have the top not what? Yes. Yes. And you cut this. This cut this off and your father who is a very good man, though, beat you. He was yes. Yes. That's what I saw. It's. But here we have the reverse now to place at both represent a certain kind of seeking don't they? Yes. That's right. So we come to now throughout there is the shadow in your book, as you are growing up, and seeking and you know, you must leave this village to find a better education. There's always the shadow of Japan that sense represents the west. Yes, I to just the way the sensitive poet in nineteen eighteen or nineteen fifteen and twenty s in the west of fair test Elliott put in this is dead land. This is cactus land. I felt that there was no more a hope there. That's why I had leave then. And so you leave you had to go. You wanted to go to Seoul. That's a big city because they have the western contact. And so and so did you have on your way? This is a remark you took a walk free hundred miles. How'd you do the yet no food you had a little liquor? Stick. Plenty of those two dark. I would go into a village at that time there were schools, they all fashioned contrition schools still going on so. I had to write conventional Chinese poin to impress the teacher to get my room and food everywhere. I went I looked at the landscape mountains and streams and off the conventional points. How old were you? Then I was between ten and eleven and then the teacher was impressed. Of course, he provided, you know, food than than slow you where this little ten year old vagabond, the traffic poet that get crazy poet uncle and away had imbued you with us love, and you would make up poetry to fit the village slayer. Yes. And they would take you in. Yes. They knew when you told you are too proud to say who your uncle was. No, no. But finally, they would investigate that, you know, and they were bandits following you. And because you had some little money stock. You couldn't find and little old woman who was afraid to shut the door on you. Then let you sleep on the floor. Yes. Yes. Because you haven't been Jap on ice. Was that a word that was used then? Japanese the meant westernize. Yes. And going into Denver. The idea..

Komu Beatles Japan Seoul Elliott Denver ten year
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Melting music steers upon the sky and softens sounds along the water's die smooth flow, the waves, the self gently play Belinda smile and all the world was gay. It made me happy bye products. I got the words curse how to pronounce them. But you got of the impulse impulse through. The word dutiful words, you got the impulse and got the sense of beauty smooth flow the waves disasters gently play young Il Kong was someone who had a deep admiration and knowledge of English literature. Maybe he was Bill. Building on a love of art that was encouraged by his parents in Korea who instilled an appreciation of painting and poetry. And here's what he has to say about his uncle who was a poet. Craze put on ker was a teacher. He never got paid for that. But the people patterns of the children see if you needed the noble coke, and they provide one shoes or anything like that you call him your create several because he's crazy poet. I'll tell you why that's not maybe. You seem to have you have the coins and feeling and sympathetic thinking with me therefore, you understand that would crazy poi- because he was a tower. The thousand teach that the greatest thing you can do is do nothing therefore the greatest appoint never rights appointments correctives composer, never makes any music the greatest painter never makes any picture once he came to the states Kong was also contemporaries with some major heavyweights in the literary world of his own era in this part of the interview, he'll talk about a few of those Thomas Wolf was a hugely influential novelist and Maxwell Perkins and editor who is famous for making names out of people like Thomas Wolf, and f Scott FitzGerald and Ernest Hemingway who also get mentioned here. Let's take a listen, I think of what Thomas Wolf of San Thomas Wolf of Lakota angel. He said Kong is a born writer everywhere, he is free and vigorous he has an original and poetic mind loves life again and again in his book. A person a scene action is described in a few words of rich and vivid brevity? We come again to the matter s Simpson, I suppose it was wolf you say Thomas wolf's over at the first four chapters in the to them to Maxwell Perkins. And the, you know, he brought me an advance a check five hundred dollars at that time. I was only an instructor my monthly salary. You know, first of the month getting the monthly pay. You know, this whole year seller was divided in twelve months wasn't as much as five hundred dollars. And that was the biggest check made in my name. You know at that time. This was a nineteen thirty round thirteen. Yes. Thirty and I had a very strange feeling. You know, I was playing with words words as the Kelly, of course, that could bring the money like that. And do you remember because you you were part of the circle of friends then? Yes. Yes. Where where Thomas Scotland, Gerald? Yes, Hemingway only I ran into Skopje German hemming on Wednesdays and Maxwell Perkins dining modem called trae. Oh, you know. But Tom, and I talk. Taught the same courses in the same department English department at New York University. So we used to see each other every teaching it's interesting because see isn't that strange? Even now as I think a same kind of poignant feeling when I first read lacomb angel of Thomas Wolf, the feeling I have in reading your book here too. It's a good bye to a certain innocence..

San Thomas Wolf Maxwell Perkins Il Kong Bill Belinda smile Ernest Hemingway Thomas Scotland Korea ker New York University Tom instructor Simpson Kelly Scott FitzGerald editor writer Gerald five hundred dollars
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Memorized thousands of lines from great port hamlet are any. Okay, shin comes for instance, Christmas time, you know, you receive or are these mushoo Robbie poems. They meant nice to me. But they are so poorly written, you know, you couldn't stand it. Why not then I would not call trick spear like the bird of dawning singers all night long. Okay. Just a sec for those of you who have not been an English class for a minute that line is from hamlet. From the beginning of the play right after the guards of seeing hamlets pops. Who is of course, a ghost? Let's see I think I have it here. Some say that ever against that season comes where in our shaves birthday is celebrated domain singers hole might loan. And then they say spirit sterile that was Keith Osborne. As Marcellus from the two thousand nine film version of hamlet starring David Tennant. What a way to learn English. Right. I mean, it seems both magnificent and really difficult, but also probably a nice alternative to dick and Jane and their dog spot rolling around on the ground, or whatever it is. They do the bird of donating singers all night long like that. And almost every time, you know, you want to eulogize glorify some great man, you can take ten zones lines Prinz, indeed the be owned or tighter like that. And so some you learn the list after the why yes by products of memorizing, not purposely. I had the language almost anything. I want to say somebody had spoken for me. For instance. I was she during Christmas vacation, you know, and on highway. You you waiting for a car to pick you up. They wouldn't pick you up. So what you do. What do you? Do you stand? There. I read last poin John Keats wrought in at the age of twenty five and Baid. So it was it gave me great excitement. He says in a rear nine hundred too happy, happy tree branches. And they're remember they're green, Felicity. The the nose can run do them with us litty wizard of through them, nor frozen. Thongs glue them from budding at the prime then it gave me. Me, you know, soi and calm. You know, mood made me very happy that is somewhat better, isn't it than I am good. You are good. Of course, as you. Learn the language then through the artists. Yes. Thank the right. Of course. I didn't know how to pronounce these woods, but the conventional poets not very great poets like John Dryden and Alexander pope helped me to how how to pronounce these difficult word, for instance, rape of the lock Alexander. Pope rhymes, five accents ten levers. So. Now. But now secured a faint painted the visit of glides I knew how to pronounce the last word of nixed line by rhyming with glide. So he says for now secure the painted versatile gla, the sun beams trembling on the floating tides, why.

Alexander pope John Keats John Dryden Keith Osborne David Tennant Robbie Marcellus Felicity dick rape Baid Jane
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"But we couldn't actually make a collective decision to move forward because we were afraid that this is a book that only we would find funny, and it was proof that we were bad parents. And one of the stumbling blocks for us funnily enough was this inability to get our minds around wearing a bookstore. This book would go because we knew it didn't belong in the children's section and one of the turning points actually was when Johnny walked the book into green light books in Brooklyn around the corner from his house was like where would you put this? And they. Or like, the parenting section and Johnny called me. And he was like your. There's a parenting section, and we were like, oh, I guess we are bad parents. You know, certain things I don't wanna children's section. I don't want. My ten year old stumbling on when she's browsing and our local bookstore. They're probably not for her. So I think that to some degree those demarcations make sense at least on on an age appropriateness level. I always think about Percival Everett's satire erasure which begins with the main character who's an author who's who's a black author. But he writes like reinterpretations of Greek myths and stuff, and he walks into the bookstore, and he can't find his books, and it's explained to him that there in the African American section, and he's like, I'm rewriting like Sophocles like why would you put that shit there? You know, I think it's that point that the utility of it breaks down or the kind of ways that John refraction gets marginalized that you know, Seifi isn't treated. Seriously as literature or fantasy isn't treated seriously literature, and one of the things I really like about the moment that we're in right now is that these boundaries are getting broken down and dissolved not by the industry, but by writers who refuse to care where they're categorized or how they're categorized. You know, the kind of thing that plagued somebody like Kurt Vonnegut where he was like a scifi writer who had to claw his way out of that barrel. Does not really bother or fact Jonathan Letham or Marlin James who's like, yo I'm writing a fine. You know, I'm writing the African game of thrones right now. Like put it wherever the fuck you want like, I'm good. You know, I think that's a cool thing about the moment. We're in is that a generation of authors who were like raised in an environment where highbrow lowbrow distinctions were insignificant or we kind of obliterated them, you know, like Victor, the Vall right or Matt Johnson or Paul Beatty, or you know, some of what I do as well. Like, we don't we don't really care. We don't make those decisions like comic books. Aren't less important to us than you know, Moby, Dick. So we just kind of do what we do and let the chips fall where they fall, and, you know, render some of these distinctions less and less meaningful. I hope it's not a cliche to say this. But I feel like there's something sort of hip hop about that, you know, like I feel like it's not a coincidence. That writers coming of age in the hip, hop generation would also have this capability for kind of remixing alighting these different John right total and thinking about like, sampling culture. And but it's funny because I think that like when you are a writer, and you're setting out to make a piece of art. These are not considerations. We think of as writers like where you know. Is it going to be on the front table as it going to be on the side table? What's the categorization gonna be on Amazon? And then there's a whole industry built around these categories and divisions. I agree with what you said about hip hop, though. I mean, if you hadn't brought it up, I would said the same like it, sampling culture. But it's also this this fundamental idea of kind of intellectual democracy. Through sampling through collage where you know, there's no quarter given to anything wack, even if it comes from somewhere. Cool like a wack James Brown record is still wack, right? And we won't use it. But like a fresh monkeys drum brake or a fresh drum break from the Mickey Mouse club is still fresh, and we will use it. And I think when you approach the world that way ideas, that way, aren't that way politics that way you end up with something that is built to kind of bulldoze these boundaries..

writer Johnny John refraction Brooklyn Percival Everett Sophocles James Brown Kurt Vonnegut Moby Jonathan Letham Amazon Seifi Paul Beatty Marlin James Victor Matt Johnson ten year
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"To ask oneself one really believes most of the was, I know really got ask themselves what they really feel about miscegenation on a personal level and not as not as a kind of abstract favor to me. I don't care what you know. I'm not important here right now. What is important is what you really think, what you really feel it has to be personal than conflict has personally avoid this. But everything begins that someone speaks says, I said, of course, miscegenation is right as you say to track sociological way, but then has to be thought of personal immediate term. That's right. Otherwise really doesn't mean anything and what is worse. If you take an attitude, we've never examined it. When a crisis comes, you'll be surprised at what you can do, what base things you can do and what good things you can do, what good things you can do. You know what you're doing, cannot be an attitude as what base things you can do if you're not as fully matures, you think you are right. The attitude, the attitude is called when when when you call to take a risk to defend what you say, you believed. And then comes the period of rationalization of excuses. I wo- I wouldn't mind, you know, but I don't care if she marries him. However. So it's the Butson Lee, however, is that somehow must be. Pinpointed that Dr. Whenever we hear the butt of the however no matter how well meaning that speaker might be with apparently got the stay with that bunch. I ever since the keys key is what is really demand in this country. I think it's very important and probably won't be done. Is that'd be surrender the notion, surrender the notion of being like nation. It's an to use this idea anyway, you know, and was waiting to me negroes here occupying peculiar dangerous vision that they do. We're going to be called by nation anymore. Maybe could make this revision in our optic. This then is Ron the acceptance of the phrase or the idea of the image. A word I hate him. Vision of white nation is just as wrong as a. Like, let's say, a black nation, both equally raw. They're both equally wrong this and I would. I would hate to see the old nightmare repeated the next two thousand years. As we say she on the other foot. On the other foot of the fire fire more people have cut on the world and Asians. And this is to something I suppose that we as white people not in the Sanford of just protection standpoint of moralities. We should think of of reality, yes, form what Vimal people have cut on the world and then Caucasians this is the way it is. This is the way it is. And you know, we all we don't all know, but we are not the self. I don't. We are not the anointed where the cellphone exactly not. The chosen of God is why people always thing because it creates acuity situation which. Why people think that. Coaster negro gets, it'd be like them. The better is well, I don't. I don't accept the proposition at all. You know. And I don't mean to suggest that you become like me, the better off you are either, but. I don't see any reason why we can't live. No. In peace as it were, you know, and enjoy the things which which different without nickname. That's right. That's right. I'm thinking of view and a panel shows couple of years ago and it was a good man. And he said to you, somewhere in the discussion was rather heated. You very well. But he said to you, I accept you and you said to him, I don't mean to be rude so, but who are you to accept me? Well, yeah, this is this is what I mean. Most people make something quite innocently. Who am I to accept you. I'm trying to find where the holy oil came from. Yeah. So there's nothing I can say here that's going to top that as a closer. So I'm thinking we should probably just end episode, but, hey, you can hear studs, terkel, 's entire unedited interview with James Baldwin and over a thousand other interviews at studs, terkel dot org. And here's a little teaser for our next episode. Let's see..

Ron terkel Butson Lee James Baldwin two thousand years
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"And as the home true and the inability, you know, the refusal to think the same people suppose I guess I gathered, I suppose there's some debate between Mississippi and United States. No, I don't see their two sides that question. You know, it's a question should have been resolved under years ago. Never had to sides rather interesting, two sides to crazy kind of coin here, and the client is not legitimate metal. Apparently that's the seeing only one side of Cuba but seeing two sides vis-a-vis Mississippi's. Yes, yes. And by the way, this has great repercussions in Africa too. I'm very glad west Africa this morning to try to explain to anyone in Africa what the government is doing. Why those mobs in New Orleans, why this fantastic hassle about letting somebody have a Cup of coffee is a very unenviable task because it can't be defended. And on the other hand, you know, right. I think one has no right to to allow the Africans to to to cling to to be submerged by all them as apprehensions about the United States. No one is always when you're out of the United States and having to say it's not that bad. You know, even though something in the. Of your mind was maybe it is do no, but still when's got one of whatever calls to try to achieve some kind of clarity. Therefore, you try to explain to the rating ship all the states to each other and the whole history which resulted in this terrible impasse do no, but it reduce ably. It would do with the African ask you of, I will in your country and if I were an American, but what happened to me there. This handicaps, this handicaps. All the American have, it's in Africa, much more than Americans are willing to realize. And when you have a situation in which government is willing to invade Cuba nor the free, the Cubans as its ads and cannot get one negro boy university of Mississippi. Who do you think your fool ING? And I don't blame him. All right. Let's pause it there for a second Baldwin's reflections here are really interesting because they allow us a glimpse of how people were actually thinking and talking about these hot button issues in the early nineteen sixties today. If you look at a history textbook in the twenty first century, you usually will not see the desegregation of ole miss depicted as a case where they were to reasonable size to consider. They don't say some people were integrationists and some were segregationists and we have to consider both sides. Instead, you'll see the integration of ole miss depicted as a moral triumph. The textbook say that were bad people trying to stop the school from being integrated in their good people who wanted it to happen and implicitly we all see ourselves as good people, but Baldwin is illustrating here that lots of people who considered themselves good, reasonable liberal people used this sort of gotta hear both. Side's argument to enable segregation. In other words, segregation wasn't just maintained by big, famous, powerful people like bull. Connor the man behind the fire hoses and police dogs used as weapons against civil rights, protesters, or people like governor. George Wallace who famously said. Segregation and..

Africa Cuba United States Mississippi government Baldwin university of Mississippi west Africa New Orleans George Wallace Connor
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"Which is a kind of kind of joy among the people which is very, that always sounds corny where joy is always terribly suspect. We're told me more about that about this joy among the people and some of the countries that visited began for. I went there with my one of my sisters. And the way began as to net to be typical of the way it was going to continue. Standing in line at that at that car customs shed. Waiting to be allowed in. Glad arrived to be the ride in a car without any reasons cannot fault. Well, when we while it was ending online and a little girl about three, maybe four. But during that more than that, it was standing some distance from holding mother's hand. Moved over my sister and smiled. And then a little girl left. Her mother came running over to Gloria and made make pick her up. And all the children we met in west Africa will like that. And I never saw why Soviet ready crying child, and also anybody beat a child. And now the sounds no, I suppose it's very. Dangerous to the conclusion of any kind such a. From this. And yet it seems to me it was very, very important. Someone's had to me, it's impossible to often in Africa, all the children belong to all the all the grownups. And as far as I could see and everywhere I was entirely true and you could tell by the way children treated you by the way children treated you? Well, the way they came to you with a certain kind of. Openness, no, no, no, self consciousness. No. They you were, and then they were obviously, you know you since you were grown up since you talking about some of the west African countries and the sense of Gye, which perhaps could be acquainted with sense of freedom to kind of freedom is perhaps some of the countries is going on the fields of say, theater, writing. Creativity. Yeah, you find a great deal of harder to Todd into assessed for me because. I put it in a way. Great Barrier of language. Now, I don't mean that quite the way it might sound. For example, some poets working in French African African poets working French-Language will very, you know, who have very important. And of course, when things Sangob you think of 'em is out. I, but when I say the barrier of language, I'm fairing to the fact there's so many languages in Africa, you know, and that. Time. I think about this time, you know, poetry about to be produced out of these various dialects. No fool then have to work in French or English. Do you know how this becomes then that is unique is not to say an idea that have such a variety of dialects and languages that it's hard to pinpoint who the creative centrally. That's right because it may be very great poet living in this village running a language which is which has no currency, except in the village all you know what I imagine they're not what will come out of this eventually. I think something very rich, not very, very gated to try it and we'll change French and English while it will change. You mean did you feel a census of in language or. Well, the problem I have an education, for example, is how to that save your schoolteacher in west African and you're teaching English on friendships. Yes, he matters. The problem is how to..

west Africa Gloria Todd
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"That thing like black women where we're also black, right? Black queer. People are also black actress. People are also black and who's to say, who's issues get to be at the center who's have to be at the margins, right? Write your book and makes me think, of course of of the fire next time. And I think some of the style of your pros also made me think about that book. And I wonder if you see yourself as writing in the legacy of Baldwin, not only in your political orientation or your identity, but in your actual kind of craft as a writer, one could only wish you know. I would love to be like sure. But what I, what I gain from Baldwin is bought wins, insistence on writing into being. Black life and interior already of black life, a black, radical politic that is intersectional. But when style was so bold is so just unapologetically black. But when the thing that I picked up from Bart his, he's awesome artist. It isn't just like polemics. He crafted sentences, right? That had rhythm and cadence, a particular sort of style that was remarkably beautiful. I can only please, I I'm nowhere close to to try to to mimic that. But I certainly thought when writing a book, how how might I write a book? That is honest and unflinching bear, but also are full. You know that that has a music -ality that if you read the words at loud that you might, you know you can sense the rhythm. The Bob, the sort of the distance sometimes between our two spaces that exist create moments of like meditation, like I really did think about, but when sort of words and works and influences. And that's what I tried. I know how successful. I think it's important to name that lineage and I understand the self deprecating urge. But you know, the beauty of legacy is that it's not like we're like, you're the net, you know what I mean? But it's like, who? Who are your people? You know what I mean? Like in whose lineage who speaks for you, and who are you trying to come from who you know where you're trying to go? I think it's really beautiful to to own that, and it certainly is a beautiful book. So I'm not. I'm not gonna let you get away with to myself, never occasion, but I get it. I get it. So in the interview with studs terkel that we include in this episode between studs and James Baldwin. They talk about the fact that many people perceive the book another country which had just come out right before the time of this interview. They perceive the book is like a negative book, Baldwin response that by saying, why was trying to serve some bitter medicine. And it really reminds me of the critique that black writers get a lot like, oh, your book doesn't offer any hope..

James Baldwin writer Bob terkel
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"I am so excited to talk to our guest today. Who is someone I think is so sharp so insightful such a truth teller, and also a very kind person Darnell more is at journalists and activists. Currently, he's editor at large caches, and previously he was a senior editor and correspondent at Mike, and he's also the co managing editor at the feminist wire his activism and advocacy. Take many, many forms, including organizing the black lives matter rides to Ferguson Missouri after Mike Brown was murdered and working to develop infrastructure chapter system of the black lives matter network across the country and lucky us Darnell has a new book. It's a memoir called no ashes in the fire coming of age, black and free in America. It's about growing up in Camden and beyond in it he writes, I am a black man who has loved and been intimate with men and women, a black man who defies societal norms, a black man who grew up in age of hip hop and aids. And a black man from the hood. I couldn't write a memoir full of life stories without animating all the invisible and not so hidden forces that rendered my blackness criminal. My black, manhood, vile, my black quickness, sinful and my black city hood. This book is testimony. It is a cultural political history, bringing to light the life of a black boy maneuvering through a city whose past he never knew Darnall more. Welcome to the show. So one thing I feel like I've noticed in many other people have commented on as well as that. A lot of the conversation around Baldwin still tends to omit the fact that he was a gay man. And in your book, you write that latte, queer writers and thinkers are the names. Some still refuse to remember and celebrate. What are your thoughts on that admission as regards Baldwin and even beyond him, black, radical politics, black movement, and organizing ten already to imagine as the domain of black, heterosexual sister under men. We imagined folk who speak articulately on behalf of like the race, quote, unquote to be the Martin Luther King's of the world to be black suspender men in suits to to be of a certain type of sort of ilk. And that's what we listen to, and that's who we sort of tend to to lift up as as our leaders as people that we respect. So in so many ways, that make sense to me that, but when has been marginalized within not only literature, but also within a sort of genealogy, a black, radical politics period because of his quickness. But here's the thing even today I was thinking about when we organizing and from Ferguson organizers to folk who was part of the movement for black lives and this current milieu, you know, the resistance was still there folk with say things like, why are you bringing up transgender stuff? Why are you talking about this quite like, you're, you're distracting us from the real issues issue. We'll get to that later. We'll get to that later. The real issue was black. Men may read black straight men are being gunned down. That's what we should be focusing on. We get the stuff later. Right. Why else often about the sexism and feminism stuff without thinking that so many of the folk who have made this movement possible are the very folk you're attempting to leave out of the conversation, you know, and it's been a long standing problem and also that we're black to write to me, that's always kind of the obvious logical fallacy..

Darnell Baldwin senior editor managing editor Martin Luther King Camden Darnall Mike Brown America Missouri Ferguson
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"I've all guests we've had in the past several years of of the wax museum. Perhaps the one who's caused the most conversation, not controversy really never controversy amongst people of enlightment get questions, probing questions asked and being made to think of all the guests we've had Jimmy Baldwin is certainly the one that was caused much of that conversation. And incidentally, the issue perspective with the jank interview is now I imagine something of a collector's item and James Baldwin guest. Once again, you've written a book since then the book you spoke with a book another country time, what you were writing in Switzerland, and the book has come out since and has received reviews that are pro and con very pro and very calm. But you know, very building reception. I don't know what I expected. I like the book myself, of course, when I say that, but I mean, I do. It seems to have frightened. Some people. Why is very hard to say since in some way after all that tried me first and now I can't remember precisely where my areas of distress were. You know when I was working it out because it's something you blind memory, I think. The people seem to think of it as a very harsh and bitter book, and in some ways is but. In my own mind. Anyway, it's very affirmative book. And if I may be called me about it, you know, it's meant to be bitter when it bitter. The way medicine has been. And trying to excavate toback news, Edward something about what is really happening in America. According to me, from my very limited point of view, limited vision, which is hardly ever expressed, and it's really a book about the nature of the American moments and the dangerous. That is a hard it is for people to establish any real communion with each other and the chances they had to take him to do it. Hey, this is eve again. Sorry to interrupt you. I just want to pause there for a second. So Baldwin just said something really interesting that I want to talk about a little more because it really resonates with me his point about people calling his book bidder and his point that it's really something like bitter medicine. I love that metaphor, and it makes me think about the fact that black writers sometimes get criticized or questioned about the idea of optimism or hopefulness. We heard it a lot wind tunnel hoc- coats is booked between the world and me came out, oh, this book is so great, but where's the hopefulness in my own experience I've been asked so many times in interviews, if I'm quote optimistic unquote about Chicago or about the country. And to me that question kind of misses the point. I have a lot of other close friends who've had their work characterizes being sad when they themselves don't think of it as sad. And I feel like all of these comments kind of misunderstand what the work is trying to do when a doctor publishes a steady about a disease, they don't face the same critique. Why are you being so negative about cigarettes and lung cancer? And in many ways, that's how Baldwin saw himself as a social critic of America. Someone whose job it was two point out the ugly truths about the reality in which we live, even if they're a little negative. It's meant to be bitter when it's the way medicine has been. I'm trying to excavate toback news, Edward something about what is really happening in the marathon coding. To me from my very limited point of view, limited vision, which is hardly ever expressed. It reminds me of one of my favorite essays written by Langston Hughes. It's called the negro artists and the racial mountain. In it Hughes contends with the challenges of identity politics and representation that black artists face the essays from nineteen twenty six. And it's kind of amazing how much of it resonates today. Hughes says the negro artists works against an undertow of sharp criticism and misunderstanding from his own group and unintentional bribes from the whites. Oh, be respectable, right? About nice people show how good we are. Say, the negroes be stereotyped. Don't go too far. Don't shatter our luge about you don't amuse us too seriously. We will pay you say the whites later on. In the same essay, Hugh says, we younger negro artists who create now intend to express our individual dark skinned selves without fear or shame if white people are pleased. We are glad. If they are not, it doesn't matter..

Jimmy Baldwin Langston Hughes James Baldwin Edward America Switzerland wax museum lung cancer Chicago Hugh
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"We think that these voices from our shared past can teach us a few things about history and maybe make us learn some things about our own time. So we'll hear these voices from the archive and from time to time we'll talk to some folks from today who have something to add to the conversation. Now, what about me, the person that's just been talking at you for several minutes? Well, I am your host viewing. I'm a writer sociologist question asker reader, Jay Walker over enthused internet user and like studs. I am a loud and proud Chicagoan. You'll hear lots of me chiming into the conversations from the past with some thoughts on the present. Okay. So let's look at this checklist. You know who says. His, you know who I am before we go any further last order of business is I should take a second, explain the slightly weird name at this podcast. Bughouse square was the nickname for a park here in Chicago, where during the first half of the twentieth century, soapbox orders and St. debaters would gather to hold court and debate and speech a fi about the world. And that's the place where studs came of age. And since our show is also a place where brilliant people share ideas, we decided to steal the name. So I gotta be honest with you. I'm going to be real real. I am so excited to do this show. I am a lifelong fan of studs terkel as the Chicago and interested in the art of storytelling. I always heard about studs for my mom and my Granddad. In fact, my mom actually had a studs terkel mug. It was a, it was a coffee mug with a drawing of his face on it. And whenever I saw it, I was always really curious about this funny looking guy with a really weird name. And when I started diving into the archive for this project more than anything, I felt. Like kinda greedy. I wanted to live vicariously through studs and have the conversations with people. I wish I could have met and spoken to when they were living. So naturally, for our first episode, I am fully indulging my greed, we decided to go all the way big to kick things off. And when it comes to intellectuals thinkers, people who inspire us with their ability to understand American society. You don't get much bigger than James Baldwin. You heard me. We got Baldwin baby in this episode will hear nineteen sixty two conversation between studs and Baldwin, who of course was one of our nation's greatest writers and thinkers public intellectuals and civil rights activists of fierce fierce critic of American society and the author of many incredible books perhaps most famously the fire next time. So let's talk a little bit about what we're going to here in this first clip. Just to give you a bit of context. Baldwin is talking to studs about his book. Another country which had just been released. The novel tells the story of a series of relationships between a jazz drummer and his network of friends and lovers, and includes quite a bit of content that was really taboo at the time. It came out, especially in a novel written by a black man interracial relationships by sexual relationships and suicide all play a role. The book was a bestseller and the title. Another country is a bit of a double entendre in the sense that Baldwin finished it in Istanbul, Baldwin who was known to be a world, traveler and global thinker had just returned from visiting several African countries at the time and this interview, and he's going to talk about that with studs as well. But I took so long explaining that their already busy talking without us. Let's get a move on and head to nineteen sixty two. So we can listen in..

James Baldwin Chicago American society Jay Walker Bughouse square writer terkel Istanbul
"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"eve" Discussed on Bughouse Square with Eve Ewing

"He's. What makes a human tick? What is that? Ask oneself? One really believed. It's meant to be bitter when it's bitter the way medicine business. So it's conversation rather than interviewing turns out to be that really. Hello? Hello, and welcome to bughouse square with eve Ewing bughouse square with eve Ewing is made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the humanities, exploring the human endeavor. This is the show where we hear from studs terkel the legendary interviewer writer, listener and wonder right now I guarantee there are two camps of you listening. Half of you are super excited. You're like, oh my gosh, that's terkel a legend and icon and half of you are like, who, or what is studs terkel. So to the people in the second group. First of all, thanks for listening to this podcast. Even though you had no idea what it was about. Shout out to you. I appreciate you. Second of all, here's your quick and dirty rundown on studs. Terkel Lewis terkel better known by his nickname studs was a broadcast radio host most well known for his interview. Use in his work. As an oral historian. He worked primarily in my hometown, the great city of Chicago, Illinois, and he talked to everyone. You would interview a person sitting at the bar. He would interview an elevator operator and hear how they felt about being an elevator operator, and he would interview famous people from Martin Luther King junior to Luchino Pavarotti. But you know, maybe I should let him introduce himself. Something quite revelatory might happen something revelatory phrase. It might be a pause even that Pau see, I might say, now, wait a minute. You just paused. Now you said something. No. What did you pause and says, oh, I didn't want to. What was it made you pause all of a sudden this silence is revelatory too. Even the hem, the Hoai and the hemming. That's also part of that person fumbling and some of thinking out loud in contrast to being on a a network TV show you told you got three minutes studs. Terkel was born in one thousand nine hundred twelve, and he passed away in two thousand eight. That's a really long life to put it in perspective. He was born the year, the Titanic sank, and he died the year Barack Obama was elected president. That's a lot of American history to live through and forty five years of that life. We're spent doing interviews for his radio show on WFAN tea and listening to studs. Interview people is like a masterclass in how to be a good listener. He had a curiosity and a compassion that shine through in his conversations with people, the archives of his show, our treasure trove of stories, insights and conversation from our past recent and not so recent. Now, since studs is radio show ended in nineteen Ninety-seven all of that material. Has basically been behind closed doors until now the studs terkel radio archive is making these interviews available to the public on our website studs, terkel, dot org, and right here on this very podcast, we're going to share with you some of our favorite discoveries from the stockpile of hidden archival treasure..

Lewis terkel Ewing Luchino Pavarotti Martin Luther King WFAN National Endowment writer Pau Chicago Illinois Barack Obama president forty five years three minutes