35 Burst results for "END"

George Holliday, who filmed Rodney King video, dies of COVID

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 hrs ago

George Holliday, who filmed Rodney King video, dies of COVID

"A Los Angeles plumber who made history by capturing the beating of Rodney king on a video camera has died of covert nineteen complications a longtime friend says George Holliday was sixty one years old not vaccinated against covert nineteen and have been on a ventilator for days it was in nineteen ninety one that holiday who'd gotten a new video camera shot grainy images of four white police officers beating Rodney king during a traffic stop he captured Los Angeles officers punching kicking and using a stun gun on the black motorist even after he was on the ground a year later holidays footage was key evidence in the officer's trial that ended with four acquittals that triggered rioting king was so upset by the burning and looting he issued this famous statement in nineteen ninety two can we can we all get along hi Jackie Quinn

George Holliday Los Angeles Jackie Quinn
Democrats Aim to Suspend Debt Limit with Bill to Avoid Government Shutdown

NPR News Now

00:58 sec | 9 hrs ago

Democrats Aim to Suspend Debt Limit with Bill to Avoid Government Shutdown

"Democrats are introducing legislation that would fund the government through the end of the year while suspending the debt limit through december of twenty twenty two. Npr's windsor johnston reports move sets up a showdown with republicans. Were threatening to oppose the measure. House speaker nancy. Pelosi and senate majority leader chuck. Schumer say they're planning to attach a suspension of the debt limit to a spending bill to keep the government funded through the end of the year. The move puts the pressure on congressional republicans who have repeatedly threatened to vote against an increase in the debt ceiling. This latest legislative maneuver follows weeks of intense debate over the best way to increase the government's borrowing limit and prevent a government shutdown at the end of the month in an op-ed over the weekend treasury secretary janet yellen warned that a government default would prove to be a devastating and irreparable blow to the nation's economy. Windsor

Windsor Johnston House Speaker Nancy NPR Schumer Pelosi Chuck Senate Janet Yellen Government Treasury Windsor
Biden looks to turn page on 20 years of war at UN

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 9 hrs ago

Biden looks to turn page on 20 years of war at UN

"President Biden will make his first address to the U. N. General Assembly tomorrow and may face some skepticism over his pledge to work with allies and adversaries alike less than a month after replacing Donald Trump the president said he had a clear message for the world America is back exciting friendly nations who expected better cooperation but now eight months in the president's been out of sync with allies over ending the Afghan war virus travel restrictions and now a fresh bad with America's oldest ally France over a submarine deal spokeswoman Jen Psaki says it happens nations disagree the larger point here and we'll hear the president talk about tomorrow is that we are committed to those alliances and that always requires work from every president from every global leader in a big emphasis will be on shared challenges like the pandemic and the climate change Sager make ani Washington

President Biden U. N. General Assembly Donald Trump Jen Psaki America France Sager Ani Washington
How Thirsty Was the FBI for Michael Sussman's False Trump-Russia Claims?

The Dan Bongino Show

03:59 min | 13 hrs ago

How Thirsty Was the FBI for Michael Sussman's False Trump-Russia Claims?

"Just to kind of sum up where we are now. This break in the SPI geh case on Friday was important because it shows Hillary Clinton working with the FBI and a group of attorneys to fake these connections between Trump and Russia. And it shows an FBI more than willing to take the information in and eager and looking for an excuse to get in front of a judge and say it was real and the problem is, they kept flooding the zone. Hillary Clinton, with all of these sources say Trump's colluding with Russia whatever, and they kept telling the FBI they were working with the DNC and Hillary And it created a problem for the FBI because they couldn't tell a judge that So they needed a clean source. They needed a white knight to come in there. Someone clean as the driven snow with a clean C B. Oh, no, no. These people are just in here to tell us about Trump. They have no ulterior motives whatsoever. How do we know that? Because we know On September 19th of 2016 this white knight showed up. According to the allegations, the FBI and the indictment on Friday Michael Sussman, who is a lawyer working with Mrs Clinton, this is why I'm telling you, it's a bigger deal than you think. This guy is connected to everyone. There's no way John Door, um, locked him up for nothing. So he comes into the FBI office. And he says, I have information about Trump colluding with Russia. And according to the allegation, he says, Oh, I'm not working with anybody. I'm not here on behalf of any client. I'm just here giving you potential information about a criminal conspiracy. And the FBI is like yes, finally. Finally The FBI is like this is just great. We gotta sources clean. We can put his information down in a fight application. We can spy on Trump and we won't have to lie and tell a judge, you know, uh, cover up for Hillary Clinton or anything like that. So, it says. In the end I and the FBI's press release that suspects showed up September 19th 2016. Why is this suspicious? Because you learn later on If you watch my show today, the podcast you learn right now on the radio show. If you read the Inspector General Michael Horowitz report who looked at this entire story. There's a really interesting nugget in there again. Hat tip. Our friend full Nelson on social media is all over this stuff. Here it is. Remember, I want you to pay attention to something right here. The date The lawyer walks in. The FBI office is September 1920 16, where he meets with the FBI. And this is their clean source. Finally. They've been hearing all summer about Trump and the Russians and all the sources are dirty. They're telling people that working for Hillary, this is the one guy who said according to the indictment. No, no, I'm not working for anyone. They felt like they had it. How do I know the FBI is in on this? What I think. Let me read to you a piece of this footnote here. From the Horowitz report. The only express direction. We found that Andrew McCabe, who was the deputy director at the time gave regarding the use of a confidential human source concerned. A former confidential human source who contacted an FBI agent FBI Field office in late July. 2016 to report information from a colleague runs an investigative firm hired by two entities, the DNC as well as another individual to explore Donald Trump's long standing ties to Russian entities. So in of this part, one of the footnote, McCabe, the deputy director of the FBI knows that people are piling into FBI offices as early as July of 2016 who are working for Hillary and the DNC. Got it. Okay. Moving on. Good footnote goes on. The former confidential human source also gave the FBI agent a list of individuals and entities who surfaced in the firm's examination of Trump, which the former CHS described as mostly public source material. In mid September. 2016 Andrew McCabe told senior Special Agent one to instruct the FBI agent from the field office not to have any further contact with the former confidential human source and not to accept any information regarding the crossfire. Hurricane investigation Is it that timing Church lady

FBI Mrs Clinton Russia Donald Trump Michael Sussman John Door DNC Hillary Michael Horowitz White Knight Andrew Mccabe Fbi Field Office Nelson Horowitz Mccabe Field Office CHS Hurricane
How the Wokeness Is Killing the Simple Joy of Sports

The Dan Bongino Show

02:33 min | 13 hrs ago

How the Wokeness Is Killing the Simple Joy of Sports

"I caught up on this, Uh 30 for 30, ESPN special at the 1986 Mets, the World Series team. Jim is a big Mets fan producer, Jim and he had told me this is such a great show. You got to watch it. So I sat down for four hours. I couldn't turn away the 1986 Mets, and it reminds me I was a Yankees fan, not a Mets fan, but I was very happy to Mets won the 1986 World Series. I was a kid and I was I was 12. I mean, you know, I'm not thinking about solving the world's problems at 12 years old. But I was happy for them. My mom was a Mets fan and that stunning World Series victory, of course with the Bill Buckner era and it's a real shame, because you know, Bill Buckner is such a great player and became You know, it's infamous for that one plane he shouldn't have. He was such a great player throughout his career. I mean, it was just right. Jim Buckner was a great hitter. I mean, if phenomenal player and it's really a shame that a lot of people just associated with that one moment But I watched that upset victory. The Mets come back in the ninth, and I remember just losing my mind being so happy for my mom and she was screaming, jumping up and down and this guy Phil's house we were at it was a friend of Of hers at the time. But Comey thinking How mad I am now. I don't mean like man at the world are mad at you. I mean mad at what the sports world. Dead. I had such special memories and I was a kid sports. I did I, uh, you know those moments. You you all know. I mean, if your guys ladies out there you were at a game with your dad or your mom or whatever, and home run gets hit in the beard gets thrown in the air and everything like that. People throw and popcorn, peanuts, crackerjacks all over the place. Whatever. Everybody's just going nuts together something about the collective energy of the crowd. Sports brings us that. It's a form of entertainment. You don't see that the movie theater, right? I mean, very rarely in a movie theater. You know, you're not watching, like return to the Jedi, where Luke Skywalker throws Darth Vader over the thing, and everybody gets up in cheers. That just doesn't happen. But it happens in sports, right and those moments I missed them. I've been, uh, stranger to sports for the last few years because of the Wokeness and I just don't want to. It's just not my thing. I just can't take it and I'm really mad. Like many of you are There's a special moments to me. I remember every second of that 1986 Mets World Series. I remember there was sitting at the end of the couch on the right side. And this guy Phil's house watching that And that feeling of elation and joy. Why'd you have to take that from us?

Mets Bill Buckner Jim Buckner JIM Comey Espn Yankees Phil Luke Skywalker Darth Vader
House Democrats Seek to Roll Back Trump Tax Cuts for Wealthy, Corporations

Squawk Pod

01:34 min | 14 hrs ago

House Democrats Seek to Roll Back Trump Tax Cuts for Wealthy, Corporations

"After getting whittled down and weakened for years the estate tax makes a comeback in the latest house plan. Robert frank joins us now with more robert morning. Good morning joe. Fewer than two thousand people actually pay state taxes and twenty twenty only raised about sixteen billion dollars in revenue. That's down fifty percent from a year ago. Nine the main reason is the exemption which is now eleven point seven million dollars per person that means a states worth less than that go untaxed. But it's also because the estate planning industry has found in created massive loopholes. The house now. Aiming to close those house plan would cut the exemption by more than half to six million dollars it also effectively ends. What are called grant her trust. These have become kind of the secret sauce for a state plans. They allow business owners to create a trust that they own and control but a separate from the estate for tax purposes. The house plan would force new trust to be part of the estate now for the investors. The most important change to the estate tax proposed is the so-called discount planning now this allows investors to place a portfolio of stocks or financial assets into a partnership. They can then gift it out. In pieces to family members each piece then gets discounted for tax purposes by up to a third because it is a non controlling stake now. The irs not surprisingly has tried for years to challenge this to house plan would finally ban it now. The tax foundation saying all these changes together would raise an additional sixty five billion dollars over the first four years

Robert Frank JOE Robert IRS Tax Foundation
Pfizer Says COVID-19 Vaccine Works in Kids Ages 5 to 11

Squawk Pod

01:18 min | 14 hrs ago

Pfizer Says COVID-19 Vaccine Works in Kids Ages 5 to 11

"Some breaking news on the vaccine front meg. Terrell joins us with more on this. This is some news that a lot of people have been very eagerly-awaited visor reporting the first results for vaccine for kids ages five to eleven reporting that in this clinical trial it saw that immune responses and kids five to eleven are robust in terms of the antibody levels and comparable to those of people sixteen to twenty five in previous studies. They also said the vaccine appeared to be well tolerated with also sign effects similar to what they that older age group and they plan to file for emergency use authorization in kids ages five to eleven quote as soon as possible now. This was a study that included about Twenty two hundred seventy kids and they tested a does that was one third. The amount that people over the age of twelve get so it's ten micrograms given three weeks apart two doses of that. So that's a third of the adult dose so these are some of the results that parents of younger kids have been waiting for. They do anticipate getting results and even younger children Sometime before the end of the year perhaps in about a month as for right now the first results were seeing in kids down to age five and they look pretty similar to what we've seen in older people. We don't have enough cases for them to report the efficacy but in terms of the immune response looking. Pretty

Terrell MEG
Guterres Condemns Yemen Executions by Houthis

UN News

01:06 min | 15 hrs ago

Guterres Condemns Yemen Executions by Houthis

"U. n. secretary general antonio guiterrez on monday urged world leaders to take action to get sustainable development back on track before it's too late to change course at a meeting in new york on the sidelines of the un general assembly. He insisted that the road to recovery after kovic was mapped out clearly highlighting several challenges. The un chief said that corona virus vaccine production needed to double to reach seventy percent of the world's population by the middle of next year. Bold investment was also needed in education welfare protection healthcare and jobs. Mister guitarist continued at the digi moment. Event as he urged an end to tax evasion money laundering and illicit financial flows the third global challenges ensuring equal rights for women and girls including in education everywhere. The un top official maintained as leaders heard his call to put an end to the warming lead against a planet. The only way to do this by committing to zero net emissions by twenty fifty said mr perish by dedicating one hundred billion dollars a year to climate action and by saying no to more coal-fired power stations after twenty twenty one

Secretary General Antonio Guit Kovic Un General Assembly UN New York Mr Perish
Polls Open for Tight Election in Canada

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:25 min | 15 hrs ago

Polls Open for Tight Election in Canada

"Welcome back america. Here here salena zito is my guest. She is america's columnists you can read everything that she writes it. Selena zito dot com. We talk over the weekend about something that i'm not going to tell you about unless you can tell me about it. Selena can you tell me about it. I can't carry about it yet. All right believe in there. Tell me about justin trudeau. You just wrote a common. The new york post that is about justin trudeau. Who by the end of the day. I hope is the for their voting today aren't they they are. They're voting today and it's really interesting sort of what's happening there for the benefit of the steelers fans. We're talking about canada. Well my family have. We had a place up there for over seventy years. So i know a little bit about avian Probably the only one in pittsburgh go ahead. They lost yesterday. I'm happy happy happy. I got some heat on twitter from. I got rolled by yesterday. And he said you know east. Ohio watches the pittsburgh steelers. And i wrote back. Yeah so they loved him lose like yesterday. But you go ahead and tell us about canada so Trudeau coli snap election In august in. Interestingly enough he called it the day that these the polls came out that canadians gave him very high marks on his vaccines distribution. And they should have. They have the best vaccine distribution as a country in the world however they did not like that. He decided to call this snap election. Why because first of all there's very strict lockdowns in in canada. And so they believe that he was. It was irresponsible for him to do in the middle of a pandemic after being lectured forever about not doing anything and all the set now he wants everyone to go out and vote and the reason he wants everyone to go out and so is because he had he had High marks in the polling but You know that didn't transfer that didn't stay because people people look at it as like you're doing this because you want a majority government.

Justin Trudeau Salena Zito Selena Zito The New York Post Steelers America Trudeau Coli Selena Canada Pittsburgh Ohio Twitter
Baltimore Flips the Script and Beats Kansas City

The Tony Kornheiser Show

00:30 sec | 17 hrs ago

Baltimore Flips the Script and Beats Kansas City

"Gain respect for baltimore baltimore rain. It didn't have any running backs. You name baltimore ran it. The mark jackson bad at the beginning to picks early great at the end. They won that game. They wanted to be fair. What happened in kansas city. Last night is what happened in new england last week. They're going in for the winning score and a running back. Fumbles the ball. And that's the end of the game. But kansas city lost that game new respect for

Baltimore Mark Jackson Kansas City New England
R. Kelly Behavior Mirrors Abuse Tactics, Expert Witness Says

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 22 hrs ago

R. Kelly Behavior Mirrors Abuse Tactics, Expert Witness Says

"Prosecutors in the R. Kelly sex trafficking trial are expected to rest their case today in New York after one more witness I marches are a letter with a preview psychologist John Hughes who is an expert on abuse of relationships will be back on the witness stand for cross examination Kelly's legal team is expected to begin laying out his defense later today Kelly has pleaded not guilty to racketeering charges that accused him of running an enterprise of employees who helped him recruit and transport young victims for unwanted sex Kelly has said his alleged victims were groupies who wanted to take advantage of his fame and money closing arguments could happen before the end of the week

R. Kelly Kelly John Hughes New York
Chris Rock Says He Has COVID-19, Urges Vaccination

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 22 hrs ago

Chris Rock Says He Has COVID-19, Urges Vaccination

"A popular comedian and actor has become the latest celebrity to be diagnosed with a corona virus Chris rock says he was vaccinated and still ended up testing positive for covert nineteen and he is issuing a serious warning to those who have been balking about getting vaccinated against the disease in a tweet he says those who have not gotten their shot should get vaccinated he didn't describe the extent of the symptoms other than to tell his online followers you don't want this truck is fifty six years old when he appeared on The Tonight Show back in may he announced he had been vaccinated even joking that he used his celebrity cloud as the person who did poorly trained to get to the front of the line I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Chris Rock Oscar Wells Gabriel
Stafford Leads Rams to Late Scores in  27-24 Win Over Colts

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 1 d ago

Stafford Leads Rams to Late Scores in 27-24 Win Over Colts

"Matthew Stafford led two late scoring drives in Medicaid drilled the tiebreaking field goal with two twenty three remaining giving the rams a twenty seven twenty four win over the colts Stafford finished nineteen of thirty for two hundred seventy eight yards two touchdowns and one interception Cooper Kupp caught nine passes for one hundred sixty two yards and two scores for the rams indie trailed seventeen to six but went ahead twenty one seventeen on a blocked punt that was recovered by Ashton doing in the end zone colts quarterback Carson Wentz left with a right ankle injury midway through the fourth quarter and did not return I'm Dave Ferrie

Matthew Stafford Rams Cooper Kupp Colts Stafford Carson Wentz Ashton Dave Ferrie
In 'We're Not Broken,' Author Eric Garcia Takes On Myths About Autism

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

02:32 min | 1 d ago

In 'We're Not Broken,' Author Eric Garcia Takes On Myths About Autism

"In the beginning of your book. You mentioned that the writing began in part out of frustration and frustration specifically fueled by how media covers autism. What frustrated you about that. And what were you hoping to do about it in this book so i feel like the frustration i had about the way we talk about autism was that any conversation about autism began and ended with discussion about vaccines. I should say the completely false idea that vaccines caused autism. There is no evidence whatsoever about it and then there was the other part. Which is that if we want to get. We wind up getting past discussing vaccines. There's just a lot of discussion. about curing. autistic people are curing autism or combating autism or fixing autistic people and almost never. Was there any discussion about well. What is it that autistic people need right now. Even if you believe that there should be a cure which i really articulate that. I don't think that there should be cure that there can be a cure for autism. That's something that's a long way down the road and that doesn't really serve autistic people now and i also was frustrated that i felt like almost every discussion about autism focused mostly on white male adolescent boys and i felt like that was a very incomplete. Discussion about autism was a very incomplete excluded. Plenty of autistic people who. Don't that that categorization right right so it. Just it sounds like there's just a lot of myths that get perpetuated through the media which is all too common right and that this in part this was to dispel some of those that have been so pervasive precisely. I think that one of the things that i wanted to do was again to ball from the title of my book. Change the autism conversation to include as many people as possible. Because i felt that there were. There are a lot of pernicious ideas. About what the idea about whether autistic people can live independently or even even if they can't live independently live and they deserve to live in the community rather than institutions or the idea that autistic people can either not work or only work in a very specific sector of science technology engineering mathematics. And i also thought that there were a lot of misconceptions about whether people can have families or have legitimate relationships or legitimate

Autism
The Story of "Martha" by Tom Waits

The Story Song Podcast

01:37 min | 1 d ago

The Story of "Martha" by Tom Waits

"Is about an older man calling up and trying to reconnect with an old girlfriend quite possibly his first girlfriend asking to get together to talk about their past and then at the end spoiler alert. He confesses that he still loves her. And then i. And then i weep openly as every time i've listened to it that's how it ends. If you're looking for the saddest song ever written. This might be hit. Stay said we're talking. So because dan is a monster in a robot. I like no emotions. I wanna be clear. This song very much but i feel like i have a different reaction to it which we'll talk about. We got there. I don't want to give it away. Okay but i let's just say i'm wondering what's going on on the other end of this phone right. I'll you know what i'm saying enough fair enough i will. We will get into that but that is enough. The only maybe the maybe around. But i'm imagining a lot of holding the hand over the receiver and given a lot of this. I just got. I know this guy make make an god yum. Sorry does every year i got.

DAN
Rosario Hits for Cycle, Leads Fried, Braves Over Giants 3-0

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 1 d ago

Rosario Hits for Cycle, Leads Fried, Braves Over Giants 3-0

"Eddie Rosario hit for the cycle Max freed worked seven innings as the Braves beat the giants three nothing to end a four game skid rosaria cycle comes a month after Freddie Freeman did it for the Braves Rosario completed the feat with a single in the ninth freed allowed three hits while striking out five in his twelfth win Atlanta is eight and two in his last ten starts neither team scored until Adam duvall's two run Homer in the seventh the outcome cuts the giants lead in the NL west to one game over the Dodgers I'm Dave Ferrie

Eddie Rosario Braves Freddie Freeman Giants Rosario Adam Duvall Atlanta Homer NL Dodgers Dave Ferrie
Mind the Age Gap - Age Differences When Dating

Unhinged and Bumbled up

02:16 min | 1 d ago

Mind the Age Gap - Age Differences When Dating

"Thought begin to discuss dating and each gaps because because eventually updates men that are older than me as far as to eighteen years. Older than me appleseed guys are younger an out death notice complete So the instant to know your thoughts on if you have had a big age gap in Work for you I do have feigns. Relationships with guys are younger and the delight that at an rise ago. Veins or detail guys are older but that comes with disadvantages against both can come at advantages so they could wanted discuss. Yeah massively this is good because we haven't discussed this topic. Kappa is quite a big one because his very much. Like when you're on a dating choosing the a train that guy for and yeah I have dated someone. He was hanging out in the me when i was twenty. They will ferte and he had. It was actually. It was quite controlling relationship and yet didn't end. Well did you want to date For you as a twenty year old data Rt was that exciting. Or did you feel like you could see to your friends or hyundai zone. Is ten years older. Was it was more like a throwback way while it kinda just happened. What it was is one of my colleagues. He was dating her sister. And i went to a policy and we just got on everson and i didn't actually know how big of an age gap it was until till afterwards and then things moved very quickly and yeah my life my twenties. I think he was like two years of just Yeah like i missed out on those two years of my twenties and what twenty year old should be. Because i was dating someone who was ten years older and they were very much like this is how life has to be

Hyundai Everson
France's Macron to Talk to Biden Amid Crisis Over Submarines

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 1 d ago

France's Macron to Talk to Biden Amid Crisis Over Submarines

"French president Emmanuel macron will speak with president Biden for the first time since the diplomatic sponsor rocketed between the two nations the disagreement which the French according a grave crisis breakouts I first submarine deal with Australia Australia ended a twenty sixteen contract with billions of dollars with France to build twelve diesel electric submarines in favor of the U. S. contracts for a nuclear powered submarines Franz recalled its ambassadors from the US and Australia and a sign of the severity of the crisis in an interview on French TV press spokesperson Gabrielle S. house said both leaders will talk because they have to move on what's at stake in this a fad this crisis also a provision being come out of the U. S. deal with Australia is a sign of America's pivot towards the Indo Pacific region as China bolsters its implements that front feels the deal steps on its feet in a region where it has long had a strong presence I'm Karen Thomas

Karen Thomas France Emmanuel Macron Gabrielle S. Australia Franz First Time Billions Of Dollars Two Nations Both Leaders President Trump First Submarine French Twenty Sixteen Contract Indo Pacific Region U. S. United States China America Twelve Diesel Electric Submari
"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

04:48 min | 9 months ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"Like yeah. I'm leading bowls aida. We are diet. I rest allied. And like i was pretty functional. Last fall talked about this. I would like. I was going to the gym to use the recumbent bike. So that's pretty good just leaving the house you know and i so that was kind of a plan and obviously life got on the way so in actually over christmas i went back. She canada was africa's for a funeral at the end of december and picked up a bug so adamant both got of virus in late december. And we were kind of like just a mess for two weeks. We didn't get back but like two days after we got back we just both had fevers for like a week and then we both had. I forgot the trajectory but so we were sick. At the beginning of the year. I started to fall behind on the podcasts at the time because of that but then in january twenty twenty i was like that's fine. I have the rest of thousand twenty to get my life together. So no big deal and then i did a tedtalk in february which now feels like it happened like on another planet but yeah i heard card enough from the virus that i could do that which had already committed to but i because i was like what am i gonna go gonna sit. I'm like how am i going to do it. And i ended up doing it standing. Because i have a lot of nervous energy and i don't to talking about and then of course covet happened so i think this is one of the things i know from twitter that it's affected a lot of us in kind of obvious like in obvious ways which we don't talk about right now because i'm working on a project and like there are plenty of products that are about shooting this story but obviously a lot of us have been affected very directly because we're at high risk and it has all of these implications but also a lot of us have been affected indirectly. I've discovered just because of the elevated stress levels so we did a twitter poll about it in like may and so many people were like. I've been in a flare since it started. No i don't have covert and so the way that looks for me is that i was like stress..

africa canada twitter
"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

05:53 min | 9 months ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"I'm brian benefits and this is no end in sight. A podcast about life with chronic illness. Okay well i'm really excited to finally be sharing a relatively recent interview today. No end in sight brand new associate producer. Drew maher is interviewing me about all of my health updates from this year plus lots of semi related rambling and a bit about what to expect from upcoming podcast episodes. You'll get to know more about drew episode seventy one and you can expect to hear his voice more in future episodes as he takes on more production work. In this episode we talk a lot about hypermobility masol disorders. Ptsd and the ongoing work of rican textual association as you find new frameworks for interpreting old symptoms. We also talk a bit about my tech's talk my storytelling in theology and the nis void hashtag on twitter so include links to all of those in the show notes. We're also refining. How do content notes for the show. So you might see a few iterations of that before we settle on style. If you have any feedback about what's most helpful. We'd love to hear it today. For content notes you can expect conversations about alcohol at about twenty two minutes in twenty six to thirty two minutes and forty nine minutes. I started talking about a bike accident. Around twenty eight minutes and that gets a bit gruesome in terms of moon description around the thirty minute mark and shortly after that there is a description of violence and secondary trauma that continues to the thirty five minute mark then from about thirty five to forty minutes. There is significant discussion about parent loss. We also talked briefly about restricted diets at fifty three minutes in about covid and lockdown at about the sixty minute mark before restart. Here's my disclaimer. This podcast is not intended as a substitute for professional medical advice. Diagnosis or treatment. Make sure you talk to your practitioner about any questions or.

Drew maher rican textual association brian drew twitter
"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

11:31 min | 1 year ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"I'm completely blinking on the second one. But I I was on camera till about nineteen and then I started We switched over to new one and I actually had a lot of severe side effects. It caused a stutter. It caused a lot of brain fog. I used to have a really good memory. And that was wiped out on the first one on the first mid both yeah and I like I pretty much had all the symptoms that would come with it but sitting down with neurologist decide. Is it better to not be able to function at all to constantly sleeping or should? I kind of suck it up and take the side effects Which is what I went with. Brain right which is a question. I think people outside of the chronic illness community don't always realize side effects can be that intense. I think you Kinda hear them rattled off on. Tv very quickly at the end of drug ads. And it doesn't land that the choice that you just said of like well one of these things is completely pulling me out of my life and the other thing is still heavily. Impacting my life by choice that I made. Yeah and I think it's a lot of people 'cause we talked to law and they all basically said well you gotta suck it up. There is no other choice. There's no other medication you can do. You either have the seizures Progress and become worse and worse because mine were non epilepsy or I'm sorry non convulsive And it can't change over to grandma all Or you take the side of ex Right and when you I guess I kind of skipped ahead on the time line just because I was asking you about that. So you said you started having some breakthrough seizures when you were nineteen. Is that right so in I think? Eighteen or nineteen because it was my freshman year of College So it was like you had a couple totally well. Not totally normal years but totally symptom. Free here epilepsies. I keep adding a lot of caveats because these things are actually really complicated. And I'm not trying to gloss over the experience at all but from where you had been you had a couple like kind of normal in air quotes high school year and then you apply to college got into college and then it did it feel like it was coming back like. Did you expect that you could have or? Did you know that you could have breakthrough seizures? They warned me. Because I I hate the Max usage of That's actually why I switched over and everything was cool pie for like a few months but during that freshman new by very first freshman semester. That I started getting breakthroughs like the one that I remember. So big civilly distinctly was. I was sitting in math class and then I woke up on my bed. Yeah it was just gone and I just realized. Oh No it's coming back. Yeah I must have been scary even if you kind of knew it was possible after so long without it and it was scary too because I I walked across campus. I walked across the street. And no-one knew that I had them because I I went across the country. And so there with me right right. Okay so breakthrough started. Did you go back to the doctor? At that point. You might have said that when he mentioned them in passing. Yeah I went back to Dr that and I switched over to them to Sonogram and that is what I took until about twenty two and we they always told me I should probably test it. Go off every two years see if I still have them I finally did that at twenty two. And I've never had a seizure sense. Whoa so you went fully off medication at twenty show. Dial last year's no symptoms no drugs. Nothing that's really something I feel like. I've known people with epilepsy. And I've known people epilepsy mads but it's the kind of thing where you never know the full details of it. So between the first thing that sounds like kind of a mystery like whatever with going on with your body that was injuring your ankles and then this experience which was huge of course Since twenty two when you off when you went off of the medication. How has your health been in general? Or how does this impact your perception of your health? Stop Make Sense. It does make sense. It's one where I went for surgery at twenty one and I got completely cardiac free. I no longer have me. I DID Charter Rehab. That's Gone Tech Accardi and braided cardia cardiac rhythm. It's Kinda slow but that disappeared. And what was the surgery at twenty one? Did you say that twenty one? I had gastric bypass okay. Sorry gastric sleeve because I as overweight as about a hundred and sixty pounds overweight and lost one hundred sixty pounds and when I went. There we did a full clearance. Everything was fine and I still have this joint issue going on though because in a probably was my junior college all of a sudden I became really sick and at first I had got pneumonia so I just assumed I still had muscle aches from pneumonia. That's you know pretty big illness to go definitely but it didn't stop. It was two or three weeks later and I still. My joints were on fire From where I'm from the northeast. There's a lot of lyme disease right. First testing lime disease fibromyalgia rheumatoid arthritis. The whole gamut a rheumatology And there was nothing The only thing I got kind of temperature diagnosed with was hyper Benign hyper mobile disorder. Okay which is just the fun way of saying your joints move the way they should move right. You are hyper mobile. And we don't think that there's any like underlying connective tissue problem. Probably that. They said they didn't know the rheumatologist I saw said I'm really sorry. I have no experience. Even with hyper mobile. Try googling it and find a doctor. Wow which you don't expect to say. Try googling at that became the series of. I'm sorry I don't know what to do. You should probably do more research again. A Stereo dig and like completely relevant note. I was just having a conversation today with somebody who has alias. Dan listened to him and she was telling me about how the geneticist who diagnosed her was very frustrated. That so many doctors like won't touch it. Basically because for hyper mobile type you don't need a geneticist and there's no reason that more doctors are more comfortable with it. I mean like there's reasons but there's no educational reason that's actually what I finally got diagnosed with. Okay okay okay. So let's get there so so you had seen somebody because you had all of these all of this joint pain during your senior year college you said. I think it was my junior or senior. Okay Yeah Lay College and so. This is before the surgery. This is after surgery so I had no. I'm sorry it might have been right before surgery. Okay and we're so you're looking for an explanation. The best that they have to tell you is that you are incidentally hyper mobile. But that's not really an explanation. Yeah Okay and then did that. I guess just tell me what happened between that and then choosing to have surgery since bodies are hard to navigate. Sometimes basically I've actually had surgery in December two thousand fourteen. I was still suffering these hyper mobile attacks. I had no idea where to go from there. So I I guess suffered with it. It doesn't feel great Even when I lost weight still a lot of pain but as an interjection because this is something that people talk about a lot. We're your doctors suggesting or did they seem to believe that losing weight would make that guy. Yes you're not very vigorously in addition degree. Okay Yeah just checking because I had a lot of like ablest or like kind of Abel's body things where even if I two cardiologists when I was having all that stuff to like we'll just lose weight And like my heart's two hundred twenty two hundred twenty. I don't think losing weight is GonNa fix that right. It's not like it's clearly not the driver of this issue. Maybe there's a relationship maybe but like it's not gonna fix this exactly. Yeah Yeah Okay so you did. You chose to have the surgery and you have the surgery. It had its intended outcome of the weight loss but it did not have the peripheral benefit. That doctors hoped for that. It would cure everything else as a different interesting. I've just done too many injuries lately. I also recently interviewed someone who was about to get. I think the gastric bypass and she was talking about all of the research done. Actually in terms of what it was known to impact like because like fat cells. Hold a lot of hormones and they did it and it was really interesting to hear this other perspective of like so many doctors. Just blame everything on weight. Which is Ludicrous. And like not scientifically sound anyway. But it was interesting to hear where the pockets are. She was like. I don't think that losing weight will cure me. It will definitely not care me. But there's evidence that it might have this relationship to flares and I. I know that's not what we're talking about. But it just made me think of it so I'm very ramp today. Thank you for listening and nodding along. I completely understand because I've literally would. I was younger like in high school. Still I had gone to specialists. And they're like oh well you're just fat. You should leave up there for completely different reasons. I mean I agree a medically I am overweight. But I'm not sure what impact this has on our discussion. Yeah Yeah God. It's such a huge problem and did you also. Did you notice a difference in the medical care that you got afterwards? Just how people responding to you? Yeah I noticed a huge difference of even because I gained some weight back but there are times I go into the office versus before loss law. Wait before and after Lhasa. Wait before they'd be like well. We need to double check your ABC. I have no history of ANC issues When you take your blood pressure I have low blood pressure like it was always an assumption that I must have a lot of chronic Things are attached to being overweight. And it was never actually. I had to get through thirty minutes discussion before I could actually talk about what I need to talk about. Yeah and now Sushi. After I lost weight with my skinniest I would never have that. Come up there will be no. Oh well we need to check your blood sugar levels like no one cared bright and of course like everybody should be monitoring those in the broadest sense but that kind of like bias is like. You're saying it's preventing good care. It's absurd okay so back to the time line so you. After the surgery you're still experiencing joint pain and this must now be around the same time that you went off of the epilepsy. Medication is that Kinda K and DID ANYTHING HAPPEN IN THE MIDDLE. So yeah actually one thing happen so after surgery everything was going great I got married and which I'm now divorced. Which is fine.

pneumonia Lhasa lyme disease ABC ANC Dan Abel
"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

13:40 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"You know I wanna say started that may be the middle of October and again by by the end of November. I was like in the hospital being told like like we will probably have to remove your colon if you don't try these biologics into for miracle so pretty much not sold on Diet at that point something that was going to write treat disease yeah yeah 'cause. There's two pieces to that's right. There's like figuring out if there are foods that are specifically aggravating that you want to just avoid so like can you prevent making things worse in then. There's like like are their dietary options. That will actively improve things. Maybe maybe not yeah no. I.

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

16:04 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"Hi I'm Brian Bennett and this is no end in sight a podcast about life with chronic illness quick reminder that I recently set up a Patriot account so if you've been enjoying join the show and you have a couple bucks to spare I'd be so so grateful if you'd sign up as a patron at Patriot dot com slash no end in sight today today I'm talking to Nora helfand about CEAC and I B and C diff and fatigue in general and then making plans for college and adulthood while you're chronically ill before we start. Here's my disclaimer. This podcast is not intended as a substitute for professional medical advice diagnosis or treatment. Make sure you talk to your practitioner about any questions or symptoms.

Patriot dot Nora helfand Brian Bennett
"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"You for listening to episode road forty of no end in sight. You'll be excited to hear that the intro issue of sick magazine is now available for preorder at sick magazine dot c._o. Wpro dot u._k. And it includes a piece written by murray from episode thirty three which i'm pretty excited about you can also follow sick on twitter and instagram mm-hmm at us sick magazine and you can find olivia on twitter at olivia spring eight in on instagram at a._o._l. Spring and of course you can find me on instagram and twitter at venice be and you can find this show on instagram at no dot dot in dot pod. I didn't think about what it would be. I'd like to say that out loud every episode when i made it. Obviously i'm still i'm still a little bit slow on posts because i am still behind on transcripts but that will pick up again once wants those picks up again which should be soon. I know i've been saying that for a long time but that's the whole reason that i've started this patriotic account so i'm going to plug that again. It's is patriotic. Dot com slash no end in sight next week. I'll be talking to a woman with dan lewis syndrome so make sure you subscribe in your podcast app to find find out when new episodes are available and if you've been enjoying the show i would be so grateful if you leave a review on apple podcasts so that new listeners know what to expect from the show you as usual don't forget that i have a small facebook group called chronic hustler's for people living with chronic conditions are self employed. It's quiet but growing and you'll even find a few podcast guests in the group and finally this podcast is supported by my cross-stitch company digital artisanal when i'm up for it. I make simple modern patterns that you'll actually want to hang in your home. I think cross stitch is a great way a great way to feel productive during flares if you're standing in front of the television and i've got a few fall patterns in the shop that are about to be seasonal again so i'd love it if you checked out at digital artisanal dot com. Thanks for listening..

sick magazine twitter instagram olivia venice facebook murray self employed dan lewis apple
"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

12:25 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"And it was kind of incredible because she did these tests again, I've had done before, and they all came back normal, where in the past, you know, I was I have really bad nutrient deficiencies, there's another, I struggle with. And those two had been backwards supposed to be. So those were queued wins. I'm naive is from this new naturopathy who've been all about alchemy better. Nourish your body and get you these nutrients that you don't. That was good. But that test fresh me, because unlike business for life, I have a whole nother road ahead of me of figuring out this bag notice, and it's really hard to be taken seriously, you know, at twenty seven when these symptoms, I'm young. They just don't care a lot of the time. So I go to my nostril path appointment. And I talked about my diet and she's like over the moon who so excited. She's like this is fabulous has been helping you like I want you to stick with it like if it's working. And then we go over my thyroid test, which mind, you I had mailed to me ahead of time. So I had a regular doctor look at my thyroid tests may said it was unremarkable? Go to Natura path. We have the fire tests in my journal together. I didn't have my drills. Now to me ahead of time in on my teeth three levels were really low. But my regular doctor said, well, if you're sick gonna be loan. I'm like, I'm always sick. So how can we really make? What does this mean? Yeah. Right. Like, okay, whatever I'm not the thing, though, is that so often everyone comes up normal every single blood has ever had done as comeback normal info this ANA or my food, sensitivities, of course. And so she puts them side by side. And I was like throwing remarkable, right? 'cause they got than than she is like is navy. Separately to a regular doctor. She's like a gathered a tell such an interesting story. So in this was literally like lesson. I'm not she's said, for instance I'll just give numbers I don't know if he's numbers. But on your side levels, the same IT three one of them's really low, in the Mitee three free if it's. From fourteen twenty five I'm a fourteen if it's range from, like one to five. I'm a one point to like I'm early Remo opera. Right. And then you look at my adrenals, and it was like might curve was decent like in the normal. And she said she was even Shaw that alab. But Mimi, normal range is hovering right before right above kind of that low range, and she said you're barely wary needs be. And she's already know that you have a nutrient deficiency. She said and the fact that you're adrenals are struggling, and I particularly struggle or is the end of the day. But she was apprised by as most people would be midday. But I felt like it made sense. I really do feel myself crash more so around, like five to eight that area, but guess is better because at least it's near bedtime looked up through the word. Right. But it makes sense like I'm just getting through the work day. Yeah. And so. So, and then also make sense when I take a later class at the gym, you know, I do know myself I have to really focus on motivating getting myself up in light. Let's go and do this. So she said with nutrient deficiency in with generals being fatigued, especially the cortisone everything she said, it would make sense that your body is incapable of producing its own t-, three, which is why not three levels really low and the purpose of T three is to increase energy motivation. Metabolism makes a lot of sensitive. I've really struggled in that ten pounds that came off. I ended up eating off diet got really sick at lasted for actually been lasting for almost a week. Is it also changes my mood? Makes me more down in like it's crazy like the food is just money, great now that you become aware of it, it makes me like feel more sad about things easily, like I notice I get down about how I look at my parents. And like I also have the bloating in the water, it's tension in right knees, bent bad, because I eight outside the diet. And so. It makes sense of my metabolism's because I've already put back on the late. I lost. And then thinking about the energy my energies up down. And the biggest thing that I've struggled with his nine motivation. I'm a Capricorn. I'm extremely driven motivated like that's just how we come by nature. And I always feel bad, because our houses like a disaster end, you know, feel like it's my job to clean it. Keep up with it. But I must have chasing around twenty plus kids everyday, and trying to make sure I work out and trying to make sure that I'm eating correctly and thank God for him who helps lean so much he does evacuating. He does so many things just to support me in helped me. And I'm very fortunate for that. But it kind of is like okay to me, I think of I'm not doing enough on Lisi. I'm not motivated. And I get down on my cell in this was like, Wilders reason. Yeah. That was really interesting to me. Because my family, obviously, there's history of drain off, petite and hypothyroidism. And I don't necessarily like I'm not have hypothyroidism, but I haven't inability to great teeth thirty. So we looked at upping Mayes in Laurie taking to set up one a day. So this'll eight months to see a change, so taking selenium as zinc, and selenium are what help your body twenty four to three. So I'm going slow out which is hard. I you know, we all want this quick exit, but I do understand better now that everything's connected to the gut. And if I were or, or whatever it is the medical doctor would give me to increase my teeth three a note would do more damage than good on my stomach, which I'm trying so hard to feel. So one day, maybe I can eat more normally like others. That would be the dream. But I've kind of accepted that this is how it is than even if I never, you know, have a piece of chocolate cake or enjoy not shows with everybody that it's so worth it. If it means that I'm going to be able to be there for the event even if I have known food be able to be present individual. Well, I when I don't feel well, I'd, I don't want go be out in public or in draft of people are all burger or Pablo with night. He like, you know. So that's been really wonderful Napster most recent thing I found out, and I brought my NHS two on. She looked at it and my naturopathy. Matched my symptoms. My in a test together and chose specific blood tests that align with my symptoms. In the autoimmune round just blood draw on this past Friday, and then I'll meet with her a week before my rheumatologist. Been marriott. No, rheumatologist. And then I go see the Rheumatologists at the end of April, and what might not pass. That is already have all these really important s done to bring her at mattress anthems, hopefully will get the most out of your visit because natural gas that honestly, they might not take you seriously because of your age. And the fact that some of your symptoms haven't proved. It's kind of interesting, but it's like they've improved if I down this diet and it's back to square one. Yeah. So that's kind of why not right now. Yeah. But it's a crazy journey end. I'm jealous of anyone who has incredible team of doctors. I feel I'm still building mine. I have a wonderful hire a Proctor, who is both for mental health ends the body alike. Clears your bad energy. You've. Has helped my back mentally, I have Tina, you know, at the rapid recovery relief center, who does these things with, like laser treatments that have helped my chest speed in like amendment out rubs. Yeah. And infrared for my knee, and she's actually, the one having like sin saying when I called him at way, power Packer, tried a lot of things to ease that unlike pulpit, but she figured out, it was my cell as, deuce not a muscle that we talk about enough. Enter stretches, and actually just said just staying away. I sit near my steering wheel. I it's completely gone away at that was a pain where like I couldn't even ride in the car for without needing to structure, get out, or does, she was a great fine. They moved my nanna shout out to her for finding her. Perfect. And then Dr Jones is my knocker pop. Now, Dr Harrington, they were both of AMI, Dr Heron, finding my remedy in Bedford me so much with figuring out my suit sensitive and not just looking at me as a number on a piece of paper. And not ignoring been it comes back as normal, but actually looking more deeply into let's look at these numbers. How normal really are they how custody argue and how we kind of start treating the cause right now of not being able to make eight breeze of doesn't later lead to hypothyroidism, because statistics Muslim in or diagnosed thirties, an older, medium, or people hypothyroidism, are women, and it's you should be tested at forty no matter what so etching it now, I am grateful for her because I feel if I had seen her sooner with that Anna tests from the beginning. You know. When I'm up against now is the unknown of what HR is, and not knowing what is the Saddam you disease. And, but it be something that is your genitive only gets worse in doctrine mental to me. I think that scares me and then working for that because it's still really new. And I found this podcast in the middle of me, working on my mental health and doing autoimmune reset on this podcast and listening to it. It's scary like it's eye-opening but it's also scary to hear what people go through. So I think that unknown is kind of what's looming over my head, but I do feel like I'm on a pretty path to hopefully figure it out. Yeah. It's hard. It's so hard. And I think like one of the things that really strikes me. I I'm also a Capricorn and I don't think about it that much. But when you were describing it I was, like, all right. Yeah. That is how I feel about these things. Yeah. Mental is, and also like, I want to have a plan for all of it, and that's something that I've been doing a lot less of for the last year. But like when I first for me, like when I, I was like, okay, maybe I have Candida and that's new that I need to tackle. I was like all in on the diet, and then as my energy got better. I was all in on my exercise plan. And it was like all of these things that absolutely did help, and I absolutely ended up having other stuff going on. But like it's I think something that's hard. And like talking about there is interesting is when your body starts to like not work the way you expect, of course you want to have control over it. And like this is where those experiments come in, because I'm like that, too. Like, okay, what can they do? And how can I track it? Unlike what can I follow who has instructions for dealing with this? And it's like you just part of it's trial and error, which is the thing like as. I've been talking to more people, you know, you hear so many different stories about both about, like people who have successful traditional medicine, people who have no success with traditional medicine, people who have success with naturopathic medicine, people who have no success with naturopathic medicine and it's like God, what? What a mess, but you just have to like, pick a path, and then try it, and then adapt. And then you find you do you find stuff that helps. But it's a.

hypothyroidism Capricorn Natura path Napster Remo opera NHS Mitee Mimi Shaw bloating Candida Lisi Pablo Dr Jones Proctor Tina Packer Mayes Dr Harrington
"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

11:03 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"To me in a lot of ways. And I know it's deeper than that in it roots way back to my childhood, but it really does feel back sometime. So the million went back to announce for path. I me like a month ago now. So this very recently got this, this year that I've been noticing on the other big things that happened. So before I saw the Napper path, I did thirty days on that diet. Now, I was living diet until impactful. And I did the magnesium. And I did those tasks Anna's in Laurie and the rise, any all I changing. I was able to drink and get drunk for the first time is this big for me. I'm not at my age in like the norms and whatever for the first time in over two years, I was able to beat drunk and it was Laureus, I excited, I haven't done it since I didn't one day because I work hard, I did thirty days of that debt. Just tried drinking one day, you know, not the only reason why I did it, but it just was a benefit and I I've only gained weight this time or it segment in lost and pounds. It was crazy. I'm like, what is happening with my body has been stuck or almost three years, loaded end just like I lost my muscle tone. Like I was lifting ally had the fine arms. I just lost muscle tone, loss phone in my legs like it was just weird. Like everything that started happening literally felt like I was AJ. Beyond what I'm supposed to like quickly and sell unexpectedly. Yeah. Yeah. And not able to really name why or how are explain it in like even getting to a point. Sometimes, we'd be ready to go somewhere in my neck would just stop function like a normal neck. And I cut it turn past my shoulder, and it would be in excruciating pain, just like weird things. And doing this reset has just I feel more like myself, and I have, I think in forever like. Enemy more clarity like like something simple, for instance, is a really good way to think about it is if there's a song on the radio, you know, year or two ago, I could sing the words this sound. But I could never tell you who sang it, or any of the sound recently like thanks plan. I just I can pull it out of my head, and I've always assumed that, my, my inability to recall, names, and places, and things was because of my ADD. That is a symptom. But it wasn't like I think it's my doggy brain like I've been able to remember things more clearly been able to participate in conversation in area on in like all at better, and it made me realize just how much what I've been going through has been impacting my ability to retire cloudy. You've been yeah. The so foggy brain don't really have another a really great way to describe the way my head feels. It just didn't feel right? We'll, I think like I guess it's probably. Not the same. But it's even like when you're a person who needs glasses. You just look at the world a lot and that's what it is. And then you go, and you get your is tested, and they do that thing you're like, oh my God. That's so much clearer. Knows foggy. But now I see that it could be different rang, like, yeah, cognitive function is so hard when you're still mostly living your regular life, but, like, for whatever reason if one day you wake up, and you have more. You're like oh shit. Why isn't every day, like, right? No. I totally agree anything, that's puts many realize it's didn't start enough years ago, like got real bad two and a half years ago. But any near as I've never L this clear, and it makes me your for more clarity. Like I don't wanna stop fighting. I wanna feel the best ever in my whole life because I think it is possible. But when ended up happening at that time is that I need did end up picking up right before that. I went to my regular doctor as I couldn't get into my not path yet, but she's booked out Israeli months into she is like, well, you know, might be meniscus, June expert, which is Larry isn't x-ray doesn't even look at your meniscus. I'm not gonna pay for that. She wanted to put me on a steroid and. Sarah, but the fact that I had a really bad rash all over my body. What I get every, I think I have it every winter and just out on dry skin. I get these little red bumps everywhere. She thought I had strap or, and then when I'd tested negative, she was really concerned, and I'm like, never even thought this was anything, and I also my dermatitis spread for my toes all the way up my ankle, right? Which we later found out was because I tried to switch my in powder. I every day, just bone. Broth protein, which is amazing killing your gut try that I switched from chocolate, the coffee which was detrimental. Who are, you know, not a good choice. At the thing, like it changes the way you live. You have to let early think so carefully about introducing anything new your body, whether it's a skin care routine hair routine who'd like data do at one time, and really pay attention to how you feel and I still struggle with that because it's a whole different way. And I'm impulsive knows just how I am. I really have to be careful. And went to her any tests, which I had done five years ago and was gusty. Well, let's time I came back way more positive, I guess, I don't really know the right term analogy for it, but enough to concern her to refer to Rheumatology from a high end Ana. Yes. Which to me was upsetting to know that we could accomplish by your spell started working on it. And the disservice that was done to me. And the yearn to go back to any of those doctors in just make a statement, which I will never do. But I- it's hard, right? Yeah. I have a very strong opinion or idea. But like there needs to be a feedback mechanism for doctors that, like I dunno. If it's postcards, it probably is. I wanna start a nonprofit that will just give people like fill in the blank, postcards to send to old dot. This is the whole vision to send doctors. It's like dear Dr whoever you might not remember, but I saw you four years ago. And you told me that I was depressed or that nothing was wrong, and I want you to know that those symptoms have escalated and I have been diagnosed with x or even like this X treatment has been helpful for me. I understand that you didn't know, but please, keep this in mind for all feature patients, because that's the part that really matters is like, right. And that's why I'm on this podcast is I can help one other person by sharing my story and things that have worked for me. And I tried to share as much as I can even though it is hard to tell it in a nice chronological order come old, but it's but I'm trying now it's okay I think what you're doing is so important, because there are millions people suffering. And the fact is you cut your early input in remission in once it shows up on a blood test, or whatever tests that they use to acknowledge it, it sometimes too late. I think that's what the press is me, upsets me more than anything is that it's a disservice to every single person who suffers because we all should be taken with one hundred percents knowing what our normal is. And if it doesn't feel normal to us, why is it a doctor's choice to say? Oh, no. It is. This is normal. We know our bodies in our minds, and our spirits better than anybody else. And I just wish it was taken a little bit more seriously. And I got hypochondriacs and things like that out. There. But I think the chances are, are more people suffering with an autoimmune disease, that's going on diagnosed a hypochondriac, personally. Yeah. But I don't know. It's yeah, it's complicated. And like I certainly I understand the doctors don't always have all the information like it's also complicated on the other end. But at the end of the day, like a little bit more empathy. Could go along way for a lot of practice. Yeah. Overture, but that positive a test for meek, crash me, and it was really weird for me. Because this whole time if anyone asked him like oh, I'm pretty sure it's outta immune. You know, my chiropractor, it's out on the anyone is suggested line is basically amino all these things, I write autoimmune, the fabric testing that shows that we're leaning that way, for some reason, getting positive tests. I just I got it at spoil in, like a took all of me to get through the Dan knock ride because now I knew it's forever. Yeah. You're like I've been working hard and they're still damage. Being done. Yeah. With the diet change in alma just improve my life. I think I started to think maybe it is just candidate. Maybe I can be this on my own brew diet. And through all of this in an I mean, diet is always going to be a goal for me because it's not worth it. Like, when I have the things outside my diet. I feel like is. Oh a year back when in medicine so quickly. So quickly like within thirty days, I felt a new on and so the popular. After your after the reset. Yes. Like your air deep into the night. Okay. That's what I thought just making that. I'm in the middle of the diet when I have a, a. And she tested like the other thing that she tested so Celia, I've been positive for that. But then my stomach I've had on an awesome fee for that in their villages show. Anything to it showed us, yet positive blood test the nation. But like that doctor said oh, you have IBS is horrible. He gives you like two minutes of his time in unsigned you on your way wouldn't recommend him to anyone. Ever fair. I love Marcus engine with us. Yeah. Yeah. Going from the postcard comment. I will support that one hundred percents into what's interesting is they redid the Celia estim- pretty sure this act fast is based on your beach, while wells, right? I don't actually know what the blood test is. I know that the blood test is not like gold standard. It's not the best. Yeah, it's complicated. They came back negative best time, I think it is somehow connected to be twelve and I'm sure someone can correct me back. I'm sure we could grow up. I don't know off Ogle of supplements. I've been taking. Housing and all these things..

Celia estim Laureus Anna autoimmune disease dry skin Laurie Sarah Marcus Larry alma dot Overture wells IBS thirty days one day three years two minutes four years
"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

17:19 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"Hi, I'm Brian Bennett. And this is no end in sight, a podcast about life with chronic illness. I have a few quick notes before we get started as usual. I know I'm starting to sound like a bit of a broken record, but I'm still behind on transcripts. But today while I was editing this episode, I managed to sit upright at the table for two hours without pain. And since neck pain is the whole reason that I'm behind on transcripts in the first place. I think this means that I'll be able to make a serious dent over the next week or so speaking of podcast, editing the video chat program through a couple of tantrums during this episode that created some funny, pases. I've tried to edit them all out. But if you notice a jump, or a pause, I promise that you didn't miss anything and once again, thank you all for bearing with me while I learn about sound editing today, I'm talking to Rosalyn Joffe about multiple sclerosis ulcerative colitis and finding purpose. And even working while, managing chronic illness. Rosalind actually wrote a book. About this very topic called women work and auto immune disease that draws on our own experiences, and her experience, working as a chronic illness coach before we start. Here's my disclaimer. This podcast is not intended as a substitute for professional medical advice diagnosis or treatment. Make sure you talk to your practitioner about any questions or symptoms. I like to start by asking people about their health as a kid, so we're you healthy when you were younger. What a great. Thank you. I was healthy. I definitely was healthy. And I had a brother who wasn't so I'm very aware of the difference. And you would get sick and in Beijing didn't get better, and I was a healthy child. Gee, I like accident. Oh, yeah. Thinking about it, basically. Right. That's what it. Never and a one thing that did happen shave me for many years was, I had stomach aches might middle school. And it was a time when I was having emotional problems that, you know, having struggling with friends, I even get that part confused. No. Actually, I think this was even earlier this was when I was now interest, cool. So there's nothing going on. Young school nurse. And basically, my mother took me to the doctor, and he said, well, and whether he said, or whether I dreamt this, or she sit my mother's side, but basically, it's in your hip is nothing wrong with you. sheep, my relationship to physicians to health care, or a really long time until, and I'll tell you that's for the story later on. But yes, it really will I did not wanna go someplace where I wasn't believed. Yeah, yeah. And that's informed those first few years of getting a diagnosis. I believe it, it can really powerful that feeling thinking that you're going to an expert who isn't going to listen to you. It can really shave that she now realizing I was eight years old that. I had I it and it was only later that I realised. Yeah, of course, of course. And so from there, it sounds like things were rolling along pretty well, yes. I invite early twenties I developed pain. And that's the first thing I had been a dancer. And I was almost it was very seri-, LA dancer and signed been very physical and a lot of things. But I was now a darkroom assistant on that was my major in college and standing Mike the sent me as him. And that was the first real setback. I still didn't go June doctors. I'm retrying acupuncture, different things. But that was the first health issue that I had in my early twenties. I'm Scott soms in your back. Like all my back. My neck, it was quite severe and to this day genetic component within my family. Okay. Sir night leads. I had no idea what to do with an era, really had nothing to do with what happened later. So my story is that when I was twenty eight years old I had been dating. My husband I knew him for a month longer. Eighty my husband for about a month and I developed urinary infections. Never had had that, and then just turn on the time in so I guess, was like six months later, I got numbness in favor. In one figure one finger. And my husband was a man of. Oh, that's convenient. Taibbi. Say, well that be convened inches an understatement, but someone didn't like doctors. But that was really good for me because he was an unusual medical student in my mind, but also it it. So he immediately hooked me up. Me to get an MRI and things went online this and numbness. And we didn't know what was going on, then we got married a year later year, later year and a half later and on our honeymoon. I develop numbness throughout my entire body was spreading okay? And that would be really jarring if it had just been in a finger, basically, for quite a while, and going down finger and now it was going throughout my body and got a an started doing tests, and nothing at those days they can have good of ways of injuring out going on. They were no MRI's and prognosis would were all things worse than what the diagnosis eventually was. And it's middle of August Jacobs in the middle of is just starting internship, right after amoun. So he is completely wiped out where out on a really hot summer day in August taking a run. I didn't slow down one bit. We used to play rack, and all I ran I danced, and we're out taking a run and I stumbled and L to the ground and as I'm starting to stand up. I realized that everything was world was getting old darker. I also didn't have any energy. Really dragging? And I my arms would move with my legs weren't. Liam Thome, literally, he practically carried me over the threshold might lights weren't working at that point eighteen Dr this pointed insurance. Get out. It was MS, and it was office of elimination bedridden and developed and became literally blind in one eye. The left died ridden, or couple months. And now we had this diagnosed this, and I remember at the time I was seeing a family practitioner. Pretty alternative guy. I knew before I met my husband. Oh, me out it. It's probably not MS and let yourself go down that rabbit hole. You're gonna be fine. Okay. Which. Could be out how Li I had my husband who I trusted and still do more than anybody else. Was it? But I still found myself thinking you people believe me. Yeah. And how do I what's the proof for quired almost? Yeah. And you're is proof. Now though, there are people who have all of the symptoms, and it still doesn't show him. Neymar I lucky enough and I was leader on. Me. I went back to her tried to go back to my life as I soon that go back to my life as I'd known it. There was. No information out there around it, and were there, any, like, was there a treatment protocol that you following. That was out. There was it was the only one. Okay. Just practice on duty steroids. I which Netflix Jacob ni in to see a great neurologist to sit look. Here's the good news. You are learning what most people get don't, don't get to learn until they're white. That your body is wrong herbal and things happen. Go out and live your life. And don't forget to smell the roses let said I loved him and not wanna put young pregnancy. And he said, this is your parse exacerbating pardons, creed, heavy-duty drug. Let's wait to see what happens. It's. I did get better. I got fully better six months Darren in with flair again, but my flares from the on were relatively mild. And when you say got better did all of your symptoms clear, up or did some stuff stick around all of them. So I say left Ingram never got better okay than that. Urinary infections in you, but nothing else would six to eight months all spring gets sick. And then that spring I had a flare my leg. Was no Notre for me. It was always numbness. Okay. I was at that point a I worked as a photographer and a lot of video quick -ment and within two an Esau would get these periodic layers, and then get better symptoms would receive and they would come out of nowhere and still my doctor, did not want to be a medication 'cause I was getting better each time you said, all this is that this is heavy duty one, Rick, look favourite for when things are more even what happened to me later on. I was very happy. Back because it is a toxic drug. Eventually I started changing jobs, I needed to. I couldn't do that is go work when I wasn't. Well, I wasn't reliable right? Or maybe a month two months where I couldn't feel I dropped a camera when day different things would happen started making these switchback returns and I, I called it like Boeing here here all that same career path becoming a producer, and then I was teaching multi media at a university along the way, I had a child and that went fine the first time. I'm it didn't go as well in that I lost a mutt of week that I am. I adapt point had severe back in all the time. I think my body was trust overload carry my child, still it with those very rough years in them. When I turn for me. I developed another autoimmune disease now mind, this point MS still, you couldn't see unless diagnostic tool and nine and they didn't try it again with me. We're the aid it was die. They would try I forget what it was called. But it wasn't an MRI would inject die. But we never bothered because I had symptoms, I still women with something where you didn't have a way to know that, that would it was. And then I, I happened to get. I was having some trouble with my balls and went to see a gastroenterologist who said, oh, by the way, you got me them. Politis of or Stein. Yeah. So I twelve years after was just about twelve years, ten forty. And so now I'm in my early forties. I. Continued teaching for another year. I had two young children, a great marriage and I was bedridden the Gladys. Okay. So once dot actually got died. It was diagnosed nose day at first as Krones possessor look like gin dealing with MS. We hadn't been MRI ever yet, a weren't really out. And now I had a disease which was labeled Krones, which is not Ural. It's just there's no way you just medicate it. Yup. And also with prednisone a lot of time. Now I was on prednisone all the time. And I would just bounce from twenty to eighty Atkin fourth I could never get off it, and we were doing all of these other immunotherapy drugs, and I had to stop work altogether. I literally would just my balls would just shoot out me. I had control because I also had had nerve damage net whole area. We knew that because at that point, am I okay? Showed up and you could see lots of damage. So I was a mess. You're mostly bid a lot here. And I was lucky I applied for social security disability. I wanted to keep earning some money and I was so bad off. I got it the first time around them usually edits daddy's dots. True. That's what I know about it as a lot of people up needing an advocate, or a lawyer to go through two three four rounds of applications. I didn't need it which. A blessing because I would never have I felt guilty taking it on some level or reme- it, we had lost my income, which have been significant felt guilty taking it. I also didn't have the energy to apply apply, again, in that steel with Xeres went on your. That champ, actually with important, because I got it east upon my earning. Earning anything. Right. Could be much of a mother, I didn't show up soccer games or at the time I couldn't do the carpools anything that was physical. And there are numerous really embarrassing for my kids episodes, where Egypt's shipping, her pants. Yeah. Mom would try to make normal. But right. Be even if it's something that you yourself can kind of decide to get used to however, that works kids, I can only imagine who are already so sensitive about everything that their parents do, like just wanted to be everything to be normal everything to be normal. Yeah. Now. Really tough layer. Is a you know what? It was very. Helpful. Does it also I then what I did was create our lives normalize them. I tried to own allies, everything. So all this going on. I got a dog. I mean who happened to pee all over the house? I just everything we could do, we were like everyone else when my kids would get upset, but mom couldn't do this, or that I would talk about someone else without that child's you know, living her she's got two moms, and no one else has two. Moms can you imagine what your friend Chrissy knows about that? Or the other one within a some, you know, a disabled sibling, and I would just say different things simply trying to do that help we. Yeah. It made me normalized like this idea of the normal family is made up. It's made up, and we don't have to try to fit exactly into it. And.

urinary infections MS dot Krones prednisone neck pain ulcerative colitis Rosalyn Joffe Brian Bennett Rosalind Beijing LA Netflix autoimmune disease Gee Esau Scott soms Liam Thome August Jacobs soccer
"end" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"Squeaked all night. So my first pick I have is fronted master's, actually, maybe it was a couple of weeks ago. They put out a front end developer handbook in two thousand nineteen which is I wouldn't necessarily call it. I mean, I think it is a handbook they do a really good job of running down sort of what's happened in the industry in the past year. But it does have a lot of link outs. Also to really use Florida goals for each topic. So I've been slowly making my way through I think I've made it down four bullet points can't help but get distracted with all the other things that they're referencing. But so if you're looking for good resource that's been pretty interesting to to dig through. And then my second pick is I might even call it a valley silicon and pick 'cause I know Gemma's gonna laugh copyright. So I have two cats at home who I would call them poop machines because that's just what this day is produced X grin. So there's this new out of litterbox. Discovered called the litter robot, and I call it valley's a little because it's very expensive. It's very tech forward. It looks like a space shuttle wanted to rise. It's gigantic. However that being said, I have two cats who constantly produce stuff. And I don't have to go near my litterbox for like a week. Honestly, I keep it clean. Very very well. And it also has a big drawer for all of the stuff. That's produced and you get the right also got an app. So you don't have to go near it. It'll just tell you that your litterbox needs to be attended to full how much is this litterbox learn so the visit on the site and see. Yeah. Several on my yacht. Each room has their own litterbox. Not vital. I know ever will be I will say it is a little on the price your side. However, it is worth the investment because I have used outta Matic litter boxes before. And they're they keep breaking. There may be half the price and have to buy one every two years. It sounds like it's a good.

front end developer Gemma Florida two years
"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

08:56 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"Know. So. Yeah. So I went and the the kind of short version is and it worked I came home at the end of two weeks, and I spent thirty seconds in my trainers in I ended up paralyzed afterward. But it hadn't been paralyzed in the desert at all. So that was pretty stunning. And then I had all these kind of confirmatory experiences with it, you know, with having risen getting paralyzed. And then like a week after I got back from the desert. I was out at my layer. And just I had been feeling kind of chromium town, and okay, the outside air my land is probably better. I'll just go hang out outside on my land. And I I did feel better. And then I thought well, we'll just try taking my dog for a little bit of a walk. I'm sure I won't be able to go far. But what the heck? And I ended up walking the top of the like three hundred fifty. Eighty four hundred foot hill in my house, which I hadn't been able to do a year and a half previously. So that right where I was like, okay. Well, I don't care if this is a crackpot are not like if it's been give me I am onboard. Totally. Totally totally which is also the thing for sometimes people online who are skeptical of stuff like this where they're like don't do it. It's a waste of your time and energy. There's no science, blah, blah, blah in your life. Right. Okay. And if it works it makes you. Like like, the scientists have so abandoned us that like if you're gonna wait around for some scientifically validated approach Lee uncut a really long eight that may be your own life just sitting around waiting. Yeah. I'm like the Stanford Clayton. Period. Right. I mean, it's different now than it was then there actually is some decent research going on now. But there was almost nothing nothing. I mean to two thousand two thousand eleven two thousand twelve was when I went to the desert and like two thousand eleven on the pace trial came out this. We know. Okay. Isa junk study that claimed that exercise therapy will cure, prompting syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome. Yeah. It's total bunk them scientist. Terrible, bobby. But like that was the best science had offer us, right? So like, you know, as the standard for like doctors and insurance and medical systems until I wanna say still for something is really it's just starting to change though. Yeah. Just starting. Yeah. After enormous effort. Yeah. I mean, partly from me, and and from all bunch of really smart patients and another journalist even taller, and I mean, it's been a massive effort from many many people, it's finally finally reaping rewards. But for decades, I mean, people were working against this for decades with like no apparent success. So yes, it just felt like is amazing. If you're in a wait for like for, you know, white coated scientists to save you you got a really really really late. Yes. So yeah, finding something that actually seemed to work for me. He's like great, right? Yeah. So. So then, you know, lots of other things happen. I mean, it was definitely not just kind of direct Jackie rep word at that point. But but it wasn't amazing amazing recovery and and up until two years ago. I less pretty close to completely recover it. Actually, it was really quite amazing. I mean, like running twelve miles and swimming able to go into all but the moldy buildings and really doing kind of amazingly amazingly while. And a turning point that you were glad to get you. Then I have a question about the moldy est buildings. You said so did you mind after removing yourself and all the things and people can get details in your book. Because like you say, it's not that simple. But did you did your tolerance slowly improve again? So that if you had like, a clean environment, and you spend a lotta time outside you could go do things without kind of losing your progress. How did that that change? Right. So it was definitely not a linear thing. So actually, you know, initially in a way things were worse. Certain respective. I mean, you know before I went to the buzzer. I never had any obvious reactions to buildings and then after I got clear in in the desert, then, you know, certain buildings like I would walk into claps, and and the degree of reactivity to like unbelievably tiny amounts of mold was mixed. Stretched my own credulity. Yeah. It was very hard to believe. And yet at the same time like you can't. It it was simultaneously incredible. And absolutely undeniable. So so there's quite a while when I was definitely getting healthier and stronger all around, but also my reactively was very very high and not not coming down. And and it's very hard way to live. You know, when you're super reactive, and you know, the degree of the degree of cared. It's necessary to keep yourself stable. And so. Yeah. It's really it's really really difficult. So the thing that ended up making a difference is actually pretty wild. Story and in a certain way, it's like the I mean, there are a lot of different things going on in the book. But in a certain sense, it's sort of the apex of the book in the sense that a lot of what I'm trying to accomplish. With the book is too. You know, I felt like with my science writer colleagues like this. Illness took me across a divide where I could never see the world again way. And in talking to my science writer colleagues like there was a sort of basic sense of like scientists than, you know, time went into our questions, and you know, and and it was like, no, I mean, I still think science is good. But I like I have come to have a very different sense of its limitations. And you know, and I feel like there are a lot of questions that it's really never going to answer for us. You know, it's like I mean at this point I sort of feel like like, there's this black universe in scientists this little flashlight that we have and the idea that there's little flashlight someday will eliminate the whole. World if we just keep at it is like ridiculous. You know, it's like so are from reality. And really it's like, okay, we have this little flashlight. It's really little. But it's all we got. It's incredible. You know, it sheds light in the midst of all this darkness. And now we've got to be really smart about how we use it in order to get tell us anything useful. And the idea that it's gonna like place the sun is just absurd still anyway. So so a big part of our trying to accomplish with the book was to kind of bit by bit like drag my science writer, friends and people like them across this divide with me like, you know, sort of ragged them down the rabbit hole where maybe not dragged, but Seuss them. Entice them. Yes. Entice them with a really good story that they follow along. And they're like I'll take that step with her. I'll take that step with her. Okay. I'll take one more step. And then all of a sudden, oh my God there in his ultimate universe with me. Like never wanted to. Yeah. Yeah. Things get wacky. So riggings get wacky. Exactly. So that's all kind of.

scientist writer Stanford Clayton bobby Jackie Lee Seuss Eighty four hundred foot thirty seconds two weeks two years
"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

06:26 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"Hi, I'm Brian Bennett. And this is no end insight a podcast about life with chronic illness. I'm really excited about today's episode. But before we get to it. I have a few sort of housekeeping items, first of all this is episode twenty five which feels like a big milestone when I first started this project. I wasn't sure if I'd be able to find enough people to talk to me about something as personal as their health. But at this exact moment, I have ten recorded interviews in the queue and even more on the calendar. I'm so honored by this opportunity to collect and share your stories, if these stories are resonating with you, then I would be so grateful if you could leave a review on I tunes, and if you know somebody who you think needs to hear these stories I'd love it. If you shared the podcast with them. I've also got some fun new graphics on the way to make this podcast feel more professional, and I'm doing the extremely predictable thing of launching a patriot soon to help with transcripts and other costs anyway onto the show. Today. I'm talking to. Julia Ray Meyer about CFS EMMY, and mold illness and fringe experiments that can lead to unexpected health breakthroughs. Julius the author of through the shadowlands a book that I absolutely love in the book, Julie tells her own story and mixes in a lot of really interesting research about the origins of chronic fatigue syndrome, and the health impacts of mold in our environment. If you haven't read it yet, I think you'll love it. I've got a quick content note that near the end of the episode, Julie talks briefly about suicidal idealization. There are no details, and you'll be passed it in about ten seconds. If you wanna skip ahead before we start, here's my. Disclaimer this podcast is not intended as a substitute for professional, medical advice diagnosis or treatment. Make sure you talk to your practitioner about any questions or symptoms. Okay. So to get started. I like to start by just asking people where you healthy as a kid. I was actually I was quite healthy as a kid didn't have any very serious problems. My mother was a Christian scientist. So I got only a small amount of medical care. And that was really kind of that was almost never a problem in like, I have I have one memory when I was little of getting strep throat. And I remember how mad my mom was because she did have to take me to a doctor like firm, doctor and probably take medication of some kind like. Exactly. Exactly. Yup. Yup. And every time, you know, there was some kind of like cough syrup and every time she was so mad. This is it for me. We're going to figure it out. Right. So yeah, there was there was really nothing very serious as a kid. And then time passes time passes and it so. And I will say also for this part in the recording. So I'll probably cut where I whereas before you wrote a book about your experience with chronic illness. So I'm gonna try not to ask you to retail all of it. But at one point something changed. So what was that? Like. Yeah. So I was. In my twenties. Mid twenties. I was very very active. I was building my own house on top of working full-time, and you know, just really kind of pushing myself to the limit. And I just started getting so tired in. I initial reaction was like, well, of course, I'm tired. Doing all this stuff like who wouldn't be tired. And also, I was married at the time was very ill on top of all the rest. So it was a pretty like just over the top stressful period of my life. So my initial reaction was like, yeah. Yeah. Of course, I'm tired. Yeah. Like, it's stress doesn't happen with stress. Right. The stress and overwork and all that kind of stuff, but it was kind of a level beyond. What I could really explain that way. Like, I found myself trailing my handle on the wall as I walked from my office to the bathroom at work out of this sort of vague since then I might pass out. Yes. That's not just being stressed and overworked. That's pretty weird. I mean, maybe right. Like, you can't dismiss that completely. But it does not really seem like you just need a vacation. Also, kind of coping mechanism that like you might start slowly. And you don't do it all the time. And then by the time that you notice you're doing it. You don't know how long it's been going on for like, it's so great. It sounds like right. Exactly. Exactly. But still mostly I figured, okay. I just need to finish my house, and like get my life in order and get some rest, and I'll be fine. And I did all those things in who's not really fine. Like, I was better. But not really, right. And in particular, the thing now like in retrospect seems alarming about what I was experiencing. Then is I felt much worse. If I exercised. Yep. And that and like, I couldn't you know. I I thought okay, I've just gotten out of shape, which didn't really make sense since I had been like busting my butt building this house, and you know, right. You know? Okay. I guess somehow I got out of shape, and I just need to get back in shape, but it didn't feel good and I felt lousy afterward. And I didn't seem to beginning any better. And you know, it was just weird. Like, the whole exercise thing was really weird. But you know. The time. I was like, well, I don't know of any illness. Where like you just can't really exercise or like, we're exercise makes you feel worse and not better exercises. Right. Exactly. So I was like, okay. I just need to be patient and stick with it. And it'll all be fine. And over the next few years, I did gradually get a little bit better and exercise exercising got a little bit better. It was like not all the way there. But it was it was better. And then I moved California kind of this big change in my life and went back to graduate school went from being a professor to being student again with Chris perform a highly recommended the I feel shaft.

Julie Julia Ray Meyer Brian Bennett cough Julius scientist California Chris professor ten seconds
"end" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"Like designed system, and you need someone who knows CSS inside and out and actually really really understands architecture like ceus architecture. That's the thing that takes a lot of thinking and time and specialisation. So if you're big enough company, and you and you can afford to have like tons of specialization awesome. All the better your site will be all the better for it. I think it's it's that we're talking about before is the different layers of front. There's so many different layers of front end. I think it's perfectly legitimate and valid to be a specialist in one or more of the layers and not necessarily all of the layers. And but it's funny though, I feel like most of the front engineers that I know are the people who are like super curious, and they're super empathetic in like they wanna do more things than they're willing to just like jump in and do something different figure it out. And I think that that's like a really that curiosity. We talked about it before like the curiosity, and the empathy and all of that is like a super important invaluable skill set that I think is why front engineers are the pissed engineers. We're not buying. Happy or the best engineers on the planet. Respect. So I'll throw this one out. What about a front in culture? Does it also mean respecting the back end? So be like, I am an awesome engineer can make charts and graphs, and like make pages while these things, but do you think good fun and culture also means like respects on the other side of things absolutely were saying that they all need to respect the front end. It's it goes the same way. We've said the keyword quite a few times. Cheers. That was looking Drake. But yeah, that to me is you should care about that too. Or at least have a somewhat of empathy understanding 'cause you're also working closely with this team. It's like you're working with team build your API's. Like, you're gonna have to talk to them or better understand how you interact with their API's. And so yeah, you need to respect that goes the same way. Cheers. I've generally never seen disrespect for the back is on cheers ribbon. Ribbon. I haven't seen that much. I feel like maybe that's for my lived experience. Like, I see the reverse happened a little bit more. And I don't know what that is. I don't know why that part of like what's happened with the culture of front and back end. But like I stuff only seen a lot of friends that will say like, oh, I I don't know about how to do that with API's like will definitely go talk to that team. But then the reverse is like not consulting the front end just like doing something random. So it is interesting that like from my lived experience. I don't see that happen as much. Maybe it's it ties into some of the things we talked about earlier. Yeah. Oh, yeah. That's definitely the experience that I've had is either either there's mutual respect where it only goes one way towards the back end and never towards Franek never offset. But we're we're actually is. Usually from non-cis oriented people, non engineering people. It's that the front and his shiny. It's tangible like you can see you can act with the I can say like, oh, I built this interactive chart in slides and moves and CEO goes. Whoa, gems bests. But this other engineer she goes. Well, I skill the back end from five hundred thousand requests seconds million requests second, and we're still using the same cluster. No, one cares. Like that that's far more impressive and far more challenging. But that's where I've seen the like the not respecting the other side of the cultures. Well, and I think that's their theirselves. Even like this out outside perspective from partners or higher up people looking at as like that's tangible. This is you know, I can see and feel this business at. Yeah. Like like outside of our engineering people that like business side or product people or something that that I've seen for sure I definitely..

engineer Drake Franek CEO
"end" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"Yeah. We're going there yet. But yeah, I think it's it's getting harder to define what front end even means. Or what it is which I think makes it harder to figure out if you're at a company, and you're like we need better front and cultural where do you start that was like the back of the front thing. It's so fascinating to me, and that concept of like some people that call themselves. Like, I'm Java scrip- engineer. And you're like, what do you mean by that? Like, oh, you're like the back of the front end is what you mean? Like, you love stick management and and figuring out data in the front end like okay, cool. That's like the back of the front end. But you're not like of full stack front front. We're just saying terms on the title we at sea. We we bring in a lot of bootcamp grads like where it's we partner with the recur center. And you know, the folks who are going through these coating boot camps, all they learn as node and reacts and everything is Java scripts from the server all the way through and then, you know, sometimes we hired folks in, you know, it's like, oh, they're a full stack engineer their full stack engineer, but really they know node, and they know react. And that's it. And like, they don't know anything about accessibility. They don't know anything about CSS. You'll know you ask them to explain the cascade or specificity, and they have no idea what you're talking about. And you know, for me, I'm like, oh is that really what it means to be a friend engineer? But like it's changing. So the way that I have always thought about it. Maybe it's not the right way to think about it anymore. I don't know. It's it's a difficult question. These to find an answer to I wouldn't even consider that full stock, right? Like, you're like, well, yeah, you're working from the node server to some of the front end. But it's I wouldn't even call that full stack on the back end either because there's even layers behind that typically, so it's like we don't have enough titles. You don't have roles that make sense anymore house. How this is all of all being like, why can't we just all be software engineers with specialization in these like, you don't say like, oh, that's I mean, you might you might like, oh, that's a heart. Doctor. That's blah, blah, doctors like, no, they're all doctors, and that specializations each, however, they're all skilled enough to be general doctors like if you were bleeding, they could all help you because they're all doctors. But like, he's a cardiologists..

engineer partner
"end" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

Front End Happy Hour

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on Front End Happy Hour

"Is there actually is a lot of work that goes into making a good front end. It's not just the final Hollis your layered has to be considered in the process, and you have to make time for it. And that I find can always be a really a really difficult battle or conversation to house. So what do you do in your dealing with engineers and accompany? Maybe you're the only front end engineer. And you're like how do I shift people's thinking? And getting them to be seeing that, hey, this is a skill set in. This is a very that. We really need to focus on how do you get by from that the rest of the team does like the previous company I worked out we we had a similar uphill battle. We had a few front engineers lot of back engineers and trying to get other engineers and other teams to see the value that we brought was challenging and one of the things that we actually helped them do was to try to get them involved in that type of work by laying a good foundation or groundwork for them to get started. So in order to keep the quality of the front end high. We built a component library and like here. Yeah. Use this for your front end. And then the can look this is easy. It's just like putting us together. But through even that process of taking these components and putting them together and bringing building their dashboard in there. You is they begin to have a better appreciation for what it is that we do because even they were doing kind of the basic interlacing, but this component already works. How does it work and kind of digging into it and banning to realize it's actually a lot going on beyond? You know, the component props that we were working with when I think that's been hopeful is to if you have so many like a team lead or someone in a in a leadership position that can get on your side, and you can get them to agree to create something like a definition of Donner something that says like when we make new feature it has to have these things and has to be accessible has to be responsive to different devices. And if you have that as like a thing that's kind of like a checklist, and you're building a feature, I think that helps build respect because if someone doesn't know how to do those things the instantly be able to. Choose jeers helps someone that isn't focused on the front and understand of how much goes into. It's actually you can see it on a list. Yeah. I think it's it's really easy to to discount. How complex the field of front end is like this is something. I started say when I'm telling people like oh full stack is ally. Like like, it used to be full stack was like, oh, maybe you knew a little HTML. And maybe you knew a little bit of PHP. Maybe you knew Apache..

Hollis engineer Donner
"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

08:05 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"Hi, I'm Brian Bennett. And this is no end in sight a podcast about life with chronic illness. This week I'm talking to Brion lane about chronic Lyme disease and P m d which stands for premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Can we nearly enough? April is P M D awareness month. So it's the perfect time for this story later in the episode, I mentioned a few different resources about chronic illness and accommodations, and you can find those links along with a transcript for this episode on the podcast website at no end in sight dot co. Speaking of the transcript, this week's is particularly confusing because our names are only one letter apart. So I just want to apologize. It advance for any uncertainty in who is speaking. If you're reading the transcript on the website before we start, here's my. Disclaimer this podcast is not intended as a substitute for professional, medical advice diagnosis or treatment. Make sure you talk to your practitioner about any questions or symptoms. Okay. So. Tell me about your health as a kid. I as a as a young kid. I was I was fairly healthy like lots of strep throat and your infections and stuff like that. But. My issues are related to my period of my menstrual cycle. So it was basically from when I got my first period in sixth grade is when stuff started going wrong. Yeah. Like hormones shifted EM's. At initially. Did you identify it as something being wrong to use your word? And no, I you don't know if it's you don't know if something's wrong until until you until you start talking to other people in and start figuring. Oh, it's not normal for me to cry every single day. You know, it's not normal to be sleeping as much as I'm sleeping. You know? No. It's a slow process to figure out what's normal, and what's not. And I think okay. So I'll kind of tell tell my story of how it all started. Because it wasn't really that wrong. When I first started having my period, it was like. Maybe when I was in my late teens when I started just experiencing huge, emotional shifts like he like big time rage and off the charts. PMS, and it was only a few days right before my period and. And I thought that was just PMS. That's just what PMS is. And and most of my life other than that was pretty normal is just like five days leading up to my period. Maybe. And then my period was really rough. You know, really bad cramps. My mom reminded me that I always wanted to stay home sick. And she, you know, she would say, oh, it's just your period. It's fine. People go to school or go to work or whatever Zak. Yeah. It's like everybody has period deals with us. It's fine. And so I did that you're at a gritted through it. And and then and then I learned about PM DD premenstrual dysphoric disorder when I was. In college. And it was probably some blog post or something. I don't even remember how I learned about it. And this was this was in college. It was it was nine hundred ninety eight for me. And so this was really if t at one point. Yeah. Exactly. So it wasn't again easily. Very easily accessible information wasn't very easily accessible. I'm weird stuff like this. And no one was talking about it socially. But I saw the diagnosis somewhere. And and I met all the criterion. As like, I have that. I know I have that. And and then it, and then it couldn't it didn't get a diagnosis until two years ago. And I'm I'm turning thirty nine really soon. Like that's crazy cakes twenty years after its on if it was ninety eight issue. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. As I knew I had it. And I. I went to my general practitioner and. Then. Well, actually, I went to urgent care a couple times with cramps than and they like, oh, it's okay. We'll prescribe you. I approach even. Yeah. I haven't had a prescription for that. What they were like you're taking too much. I've been profit. Here's a different Ed said. Yeah. Exactly. And like naproxen it turns out I was allergic to naproxen. Oh, then then. Okay. Then let's give you aspirin or acetaminophen, and oh great nothing touches the pain at all. And so and that didn't even touch any of the emotional issues that was going through. And so they put me on antidepressants, which was fine, but still didn't touch the majority of my symptoms. And so I was on S SRI for years starting when I was twenty and then I switched SR is three different time. Times perhaps. And I'm like this. This isn't doing anything can we do something else. And then they put me on s s NRI that wasn't really doing anything. I finally got the diagnosis after maybe the seventh or so doctor I saw and were they mostly general practitioners. Are you seeing like OBGYN's or endocrinologists? I don't know. I have trouble with that word every time, and those Endo's no I saw a couple of general practitioners, and and an Obie maybe a couple of obese along the way. Like, I went to Planned Parenthood a couple of times for some birth control is another common treatment that folks of PM DD cat and nothing just nothing. Nothing was helping in a new that Sarah. Other paths to treatments. This is giving me a pill that I take every day or whatever. But no one really believed me. I remember having one doctor look at me and say, well, PM DD is really hard to diagnose. So I'm just going to give you this. Instead, like literally she said that and I I mean, it's a common story with chronic illness mysterious illnesses, like we don't get believing it like, let's just do the simplest possible thing. Like, no, no, no is really not hard to diagnose. I know my body. So well, and and I can tell you exactly what happens every day of the month for me. And and she. It it was so disheartening. I think I went home and cried. And. So I'm having trouble. And linear amount. That's okay. And. So a. Finally, ended up getting a diagnosis and as years go went by like, I was having more and more

naproxen dysphoric strep throat Brian Bennett Zak Endo aspirin Ed Sarah Obie twenty years five days two years
"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

No End In Sight

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"end" Discussed on No End In Sight

"Hi, I'm Brian Bennett. And this is no end in sight a podcast about life with chronic illness. This week's episode is a little bit different because I'm talking to Blake stupor whose daughter India was recently diagnosed with spinal cerebellar ataxia type nineteen since India's just two years old. She isn't yet in a position to share her own story. And I love to know what you guys think about this kind of interview. I think you'll find a lot of the details relatable. Even though the perspective has shifted. Blake was also at home with India while we were talking so you'll occasionally hear her babbling and moving stuff around most of the time. The background noise is minimal so feel free to skip ahead or read the transcript if you have trouble hearing at any point and speaking of transcripts, I want to thank Felicia and David for helping me out this week transcripts are super important, but unfortunately, time consuming, so I'm very grateful for their help. If you have any spare time in brain energy and want to help out with no end in sight and the transcripts, please. Get in touch. Before we start here's my. Disclaimer this podcast is not intended as a substitute for professional, medical advice diagnosis or treatment. Make sure you talk to your practitioner about any questions or symptoms. So usually when I'm talking to people I ask them about if they were healthy as a kid. So I guess the equivalent of that was. Hi. Hello. He's a camera hog will want to be the whole thing. So. Yeah. Video China's crate was little people. They're so cute. So how was her house? I guess as a baby like as once she was bored. How did things get started? When she was born. She had get health. There was no there was no indication that she was going to have anything wrong with her at all. Yeah. She was born healthy on testing that. They didn't. She when babies are born came back, healthy normal. It wasn't until he was thirty milestone. And all of a sudden she wasn't meeting the milestones. And I just shrugged it off thinking. It was like I mean shrug it off as far severity now. But it was like some kids are slower than others in catch her. And that's what I thought I daughter was super quick. Ahead of the curve on everything. And then we started getting test. Then people were just saying, well, she's just lazy. She'll get there. You know, emir said, yeah. But she's missing miles. She's not walking. She's still not talking. She's not. Two things added up and we finally got tested as far as she had a taxi. They said we'll seems what she has a taxi though, the genetic test about. Tober? How old was she at that point? She's twenty three months old today. She'll be two years old a month for NASA. She was we started getting a book that last March. Okay and ebor kinda short enough. Well, that's probably not what's wrong with her. And and the neurologist because I said it was a neurological issue. Didn't know what? Doti said, let's just do genetic tests to rule anything out. Bring was thirty percent chance that you're leaving get anything back will came back with spinal to regular attacks the type nineteen to Novo, which I don't know if you know, what did Novoa means. That means it's a completely new mutation. Right. So neither of you have it. No. It wasn't hereditary. Right. And have typically this would be a hereditary diagnosis. Yeah. It'd be it'd be hereditary. It'd be found in in me or my wife, and it wasn't right though. Even before the diagnosis. We were already on the ball having Aaron PT, OT speech and some of therapy things were fine motor skills saying chewing because she's still don't promote she still drools. We just kept pushing ahead, then we got the news. And it was like fully star doing all the research trying to find it is 'cause I've never heard my whole life. And I don't I do have diseases that run in my family, but

India Blake David cerebellar ataxia Brian Bennett China NASA emir Felicia Aaron Novo Doti Novoa two years twenty three months thirty percent