35 Burst results for "ELI"

Ultimate Sibling Rivalry in Sports

The Ten News

01:36 min | Last month

Ultimate Sibling Rivalry in Sports

"Okay. Sure we all know that. Playing professional sports is hard but playing professional sports against your brother or your sister. Well that's even harder today. We're talking about some of the. Most famous sibling sets in sports history label. You can't talk about popular sibling athletes without mentioning peyton. And eli manning. Two of the best. Nfl quarterbacks to ever play the game. Although there now retired they were both named super bowl. Mvp and are both predicted to be inducted into the pro football hall of fame. While peyton is commonly thought of as the better talent ee lie has an additional super bowl championship to hold over his big brother's head so that might make family dinners a little bit awkward holdovers from clean competitive football dog in this fight but when it comes to famous sports sisters. No one can compare with tennis superstars. Venus and serena williams the to have had an intense rivalry for decades in two thousand seventeen serena beat venus in the australian open and made history as the first woman to win twenty three grand slam titles combined the sisters have thirty grand slam singles titles and nine olympic medals. The best part they still refer to each other as best friends. It is a definitely a strange to be in because no one else has been the position. Assyrian in iran and i think you know all in all the best part is that right now. We're the best at what we do.

Peyton Eli Manning Football Super Bowl NFL Serena Williams Venus Serena Tennis Olympic Iran
Israeli Bombardment Escalates as Gaza Death Toll Rises

Todd Schnitt

00:41 sec | Last month

Israeli Bombardment Escalates as Gaza Death Toll Rises

"In the Middle East and the death toll for Palestinians and Israel. Eli's continues to rise. Israel launching 500 airstrikes and what it said were Hamas and Islamic Jihad. Military targets Israeli missiles leveling an apartment building in Gaza smoke soaring skyward, sources telling ABC News the building had been evacuated a drone surveying the scene to make sure people were out. Theo. Gaza Health Ministry reporting 32 dead, including 10 Children in Ashkelon, near the Gaza border. Rockets ripping open buildings. Three Israeli Women killed in central Israel 19 people wounded ABC is Chief national correspondent Matt Gutman and tell Aviv

Israel Islamic Jihad ELI Gaza Health Ministry Middle East Gaza Hamas Abc News Theo Ashkelon Rockets ABC Matt Gutman Aviv
Alex Smith Healed Enough to Walk Away

ESPN Radio

01:56 min | 2 months ago

Alex Smith Healed Enough to Walk Away

"Who's off the clock. What was gonna The happen. former So this NFL is it at Radio quarterback City Music Alex Hall. Mike Smith, and I are What sitting an incredible down. career We're What a sitting remarkable just a regular journey. seats He like like if leaves anyone's the game. ever been to radio city, it's literally As the like reigning seeds. You might be sitting NFL in tow watch comeback content, player and of the year, which we're is fitting just sitting there for and the we've way got a crew that of he about handled four himself or five coming people back and the from an injury charges that required taking 17 like surgeries And the Giants take on rivers his leg at and four. not only was career And threatening. they're all of a sudden There's this But it commotion was in the life corner threatening. of the stage, and it's not And quite yet he clear managed not only to come what's back, happening. but to But play you can tell something toe lead is going Washington on. the And playoffs like a little bit of to a murmur cap goes what up is in the room. really But again, this been is an incredible pre Twitter. career. Think about Free this. anything like that. So Alex no one Smith really knows was what's happening the is I didn't know number what Saturday one overall we pick had a producer in the 2005 named Dave, draft that I remember who very well. was a large It was a draft fellow. that many I mean, people thought big Aaron Rodgers And he stands Would be the number up one overall directly pick. And then somewhere in front of along me. the way, as Because it sometimes he's trying to see happens what's going about on. a week out of I'm the NFL sitting draft, one row behind the him 40 Niners with headsets. thinking changed The court and somehow is not long they shifted. enough for me to stand Amanda up so Rogers, I can't who stand would have up got to so stay I in can't the Bay see Area where And he I'm played trying college desperately football to Alex to Smith, get who his was a attention great pro, A to great say, pro get the for hell the 40 out of Niners my way, because and Alex I'm trying Smith to see mentor. what's Think going about on this on mentor. the stage at their tag. Colin Lee booze Cabernet up Beverly's and then talking moved to on someone to Kansas I can't City, cook. where he meant And toward so Patrick that Mahomes. whole thing For happened one year. and I didn't And to see this day, any of Patrick it. Mahomes There was credits a Aldous Alex mayhem. Smith I've was now a lot subsequently of the growth that seen he it had on TV, during You his know in rookie the replays, year. and you see And all I think the stuff everybody that's going who knows on. Alex And Smith Eli knows is standing up there what wearing a great a different coach hat, he would be and all if this you ever is decide happening, and to go I did into that, not But see the problem any is of he's it made well over $150 because the producer million named during the Dave course stood of his career. in front Why of me would and blocked you wanna work my view of Coach it literally is ours. the entire time. That When you've got is the my fortune, most Ugo my most vivid and the family, memory Ugo of hosting the 2004 and Alex Smith draft. deserves And that was at a the happy moment retirement that Eli Manning with became whatever a New York giant. it is Correct. that he wants I missed to do, it, including Eli being Manning, a and guest not on the Adam only Schefter did I podcast miss it, at but some subsequently point time, the we entire hope to audience get him listening on and speak to ESPN to him radio, and Mr get his thoughts because on his future I didn't at some say point, it, all but right

City Music Alex Hall NFL Mahomes Alex Smith Mike Smith Niners Colin Lee Aaron Rodgers Aldous Alex Giants Dave Smith Eli Patrick Washington Twitter Rogers Amanda Football
Man Accused Of Threatening Asian Woman In New York's Midtown Arrested

Financial Quarterback Josh Jalinski

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Man Accused Of Threatening Asian Woman In New York's Midtown Arrested

"Man is under arrest following another anti Asian hate crime. It happened Friday in Midtown. Around four PM on West 40th Street, Police say a 65 year old woman was approached by a man yelling anti Asian slurs. The suspect, 48 year old Bobby Eli, He waved an unknown object and then fled the scene. The woman was not hurt Eli taken into custody Saturday, he faces charges of menacing as a hate crime. And aggravated harassment as a hate

Bobby Eli Midtown ELI
New York City Man Arrested on Hate Crimes Charges for Menacing Asian Woman

Classic Escapes

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

New York City Man Arrested on Hate Crimes Charges for Menacing Asian Woman

"Another anti Asian hate crime in the city had happened Friday in Midtown. Around four PM on West 40th Street, Police say a 65 year old woman was approached by a man yelling anti Asian slurs. The suspect, 48 year old Bobby Eli, waved an unknown object and fled the scene. The woman was not hurt. Eli was taken into custody Saturday. He faces charges of menacing is a hate crime and aggravated harassment as a hate crime. Two people are dead

Bobby Eli Midtown ELI
Will Selecta Biosciences be the Next Top Platform Biotech?

Breaking Biotech

05:38 min | 3 months ago

Will Selecta Biosciences be the Next Top Platform Biotech?

"The first company. I wanted to touch on is news from july lilly and they're huge company. Say like a large mega cap at one hundred and eighty three billion dollars and what they recently presented was the full data set from their molecule demand in alzheimer's disease. And this is a phase two trial looking at this antibody that targets a specific epoch on the amyloid beta approaching and this episode is only visible in established plaques. Now i don't want to belabor the point about the amyloid hypothesis which i've done in previous videos. Suffice to say that a number of different molecules have been attempted in this indication in specifically the mechanism of reducing amyloid plaques. And they've all failed and what we're seeing here is that in this multi center randomized double blind placebo controlled trial. That donna had a significant is what they're showing here in the air score but not a very profound impact on cognition and so they looked at this primary outcome the air score and this is a combination of the as well as the ads. Ads and so eight ask cogs general measure of cognition whereas the ads. I is a measure of activities of daily living. So they did a combined score with that and demanded mobs improvement led to a p value of point zero four so technically significant. But i'm not sure that if they replicated the stayed in a face. Three trout necessarily be positive. It is an interesting thing because when you look at the actual aid. S cog thirteen score. We don't see any significant change. It is better in indiana but not by a significant margin and then the mse score is basically no difference between the two so this is another data point to suggest that perhaps the amyloid beta hypothesis isn't one that these companies should be looking at and the last thing i wanted to show here. Is that the one thing that they do. See a significant change in the amount of amyloid in the brain and so the pet scan here to show that the dynamic treated group has a significant reduction in the amount of amyloid plaque in the brain compared to placebo. So the drug is able to reduce the emily beta plaques. But it's not able to improve cognition really as much as you would expect given the effect is there so i wanted to bring this up because there is an upcoming. Pdf date for biogen's advocating mob and this is going to be a huge movie for the stock and it was originally supposed to be in march but it was delayed until june seventh of this year. So keep your eyes on that. I don't know if i'm going to make any position on it. I think that the fda should not approve it given the results from the advisory committee but given that the so many is on this pdf. I feel like there's a chance at the fda could overlook that and end up approving drug. So it's definitely jairo word. Play and i would treat it as such and proceed likewise so that is eli lilly. I wanna quickly move on to another company in the alzheimer's face called novus and i touched on them in my previous video and what we heard in the last week was that they announced positive face to data and this is interim data showing the nbs for one or another name for the molecule is positive in improved speed and coordination in parkinson's patients. And this is a twenty five day treatment. Nine patients were in the treatment group and five or in the placebo and on the announcement of this data. I think the stock was trading around one hundred fifty maybe two hundred million dollars market valuation and went up to around two fifty three hundred before settling around two hundred and fifty million dollar market cap so big move up in the stock and i'll tell you the data. The ceo explained that the study was power to investigate a difference of twenty to twenty five percent in biomarker levels not to demonstrate efficacy making this data that much more significant so to provide some context. And why i think this is interesting. Is that i in my previous video. Didn't really seem to bullish on a novus and the reason for this is that it reminds me very closely other types of amyloid beta drugs because this drug reduces app the precursor protein to amyloid beta. So my rationale is that if they're targeting the same emily data pathway. Given that there's been so many molecules that have failed previously targeting that pathway. I don't expect that this one is going to be any different now. Having said that. I decided to take a position because we've seen over and over again. That companies have been able to spin face to data in a positive way that leads to these big increases in the sock even though in phase three there's an eventual failure so i decided to take a position in stock and i have been rewarded handsomely so far and i'm going to hold on to see the rest of the phase two data so to get the actual data here in one test that measures the speed of execution. The results were statistically significant. P equals zero point zero four showing that while parkinson's disease patients are slow in coding. Boxes met with an s four. Zero one improves their performance. In these same patients other test that measures coordination showed an improvement in their movements and was almost statistically significant peak will s- appoint zero seven. Then they say in all end. Es up tests performed the placebo group either stayed the same or performed worse than at baseline instead the a b s four zero one group either stayed the same perform better than at baseline and as we know. Md s up drs is a specific tasks that measures severity and progression of the disease.

Alzheimer's Disease Parkinson's Disease Jairo Lilly FDA Biogen Donna Indiana Eli Lilly NBS
Big Ten comeback: Michigan topples LSU 86-78

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Big Ten comeback: Michigan topples LSU 86-78

"Top seeded Michigan is in the Sweet Sixteen after getting twenty one points apiece from Sade brown and Eli Brooks in a roller coaster eighty six seventy eight victory over LSU in a game for big runs the Wolverines used a fourteen one spurt midway through the second half to pull away preserving a glimmer of hope for a conference that is mostly tank for four days in Indianapolis Brooks says the big ten has played in tough lock is March madness for a reason you're gonna get the best out of everybody I don't think the big sand I still think the big ten is a really good conference brown did the most lasting damage making six free throws and a three pointer during that decisive stretch that gave the Wolverines a seventy two sixty four lead with five fifty five left I'm Dave Ferrie

Sade Brown Eli Brooks Wolverines LSU Michigan Indianapolis Brooks Brown Dave Ferrie
Head Coach Eli Drinkwitz on Missouri Tigers' Past Season

The Paul Finebaum Show

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Head Coach Eli Drinkwitz on Missouri Tigers' Past Season

"It seems like yesterday that we were talking. And i thought i think people agreed your season run very well. You may not have gotten quite the one the winds that you were hoping for but if we could look back for a second what did you take away from from twenty. Yeah you know. I think we exceeded expectations. I think there was a lot of people when we saw this. C- schedule all sec. Schedule come out with what we were dealing with the ncaa sanctions and all that stuff You know the to finish five and five in the league i think we exceeded the expectation But we didn't meet the standard obviously moving forward The goal of this program is to compete for the sec. Nobody plays Football to play for second. And we're in a really good division a really tough division. And i know you know at the top of that georgia and florida but We gotta make room for our self in the sec. And that's why i'm here They didn't bring me here to play for six or seven. We're we're here to try to play first in. So that's that's really the the standard This past year. Like i said we exceeded expectations. I think we're finished To to pick last or second to last in our division we finished third Finished six in the sec but We got to continue to improve. We're not going to get there. You know in one major step we got continue to take it one bite at a time and in bringing in coach wilkes on the defense side of the ball continue improve on the offensive side of the ball become more explosive score more touchdowns in the red zone. Be better than situational football. If we can make those steps. I think we can put ourselves in a position to contend you know if you look at the halftime scores against the two teams. The two top teams in the sec. It's twenty one to fourteen against georgia And then we didn't show up in the second half in florida we. We had a turnover right before half time to make it twenty two seven And we didn't show up in the second half we got gotta be a team that shows up in the second half and if we can do that and then we can make our place in the sec.

SEC Ncaa Georgia Florida Football Wilkes
Expanding your business organically - Eli Crane of Bottle Breacher

Entrepreneur Stories for Inspiration: Millionaire Interviews

08:10 min | 3 months ago

Expanding your business organically - Eli Crane of Bottle Breacher

"My name is eli korean. And i'm the founder and ceo of bottle bottlebuster. We are a veteran owned made in the usa brand operating out of tucson arizona. I started this company in a one car garage in san diego. California with my wife jen. Who's also still my partner. We specialize in personalized man gifts in borrower. Some of your audience might of seen us on the abc hit television. Show shark tank in two thousand fourteen on the veterans day special win. We went on the show. We had about five employees and now we have between thirty five and forty five. Depending on the time of year basically our goal is to build the biggest baddest made in the usa that are known brand in the world. And it's pretty cool because of this last year forbes actually ranks us as the thirteenth in the top twenty five military or veteran owned companies in the united states. So we're getting close in. We're halfway there but we still got a lot of work to do. And so we're excited about the future. And so are you still in san diego now. No we're actually operating at a tucson arizona move there. I was exiting the navy and i was getting out of the military and my wife is actually from tucson and a lot of people that are in small business in california. I know that there's a lot of regulation in california. That's why a lot of small businesses are flocking out of there in droves. And so we were looking for a less regulated climate to start. Our small business in arizona was fit to hit on what you do today kind of where you started from the beginning there but how about before you started the company. How like backtrack into getting out of high school. Kind of your quick from there to where you are today. yeah absolutely. There was nothing quick about my journey. It was filled with a lot of adversity and also a lot of failure. And i think this is something that needs to be talked about. You know routinely and often with the entrepreneurship. I think that failure is probably the biggest lesson in. That's where most of the gold in life really lies. And i think that's what separates a lot of successful entrepreneurs from those that aren't successful. Is that successful. Entrepreneurs learn to look at failure in a completely different light. We don't look at it as something bad and something that we need to stay away from. We look it as just cause of doing business and we'd look at it and we actually welcome it because we know that that's were really gonna find the real lessons and figure out what doesn't work what does work. And so as a matter of fact. When i was getting out of high school i barely graduated from high school. Because honestly i really didn't care about what was going on. My family was getting blown up at the time. My parents were going through a really rough divorce. And i honestly thought that football was gonna be my ticket out and i found out the hard way. That wasn't good enough to really play anywhere. So i started doing a lotta searching took a lot of side jobs and i really wanted to go into the military because from the time i was a little boy i had a heart to serve and i love this country and i wanted to serve this country and so pretty much everybody in my circle that i saw as an adviser advise me to go into if i was going to go into the military to go in as an officer and so they all told me that i needed to go to college so i started taking classes in criminal justice at arizona western college in yuma arizona and then after i finished my associates there i transferred to the university of arizona in studying criminology. But they didn't have that major at the university of arizona. And so i would have had to get put into the business college which i applaud foreign didn't even get into is ironic that his and so. I started taking classes in sociology. Because i found that it was the easiest path to me getting a degree in the military really. Didn't care what my degree was in. They just wanted to know that. I could stick it out for four years and so started studying sociology and then nine eleven happened at the start of my senior year and i actually left college for the navy the very next week to join the seal teams and unfortunately you don't just join the teams you have to try out. And it's it's the most rigorous training in the department of defense. And so i actually made a big mistake and i trained to the bare minimum and as soon as i could do the bare minimums that were required to just get into to get a shot to go to seal training. I actually applied in went down there and joined and you. That's been a good lesson for me in you know in failure because it didn't work out for me. I actually went to seal. Training actually made it through the toughest part assailed training which is called hell week. It's actually front into week four and it's basically live and a half days of staying awake the whole time and just getting your butt kicked is your cold wet and miserable and made it through that week but a week and half later i was dropped from training. I gotta performance drop in. So they sent me out to the navy for two and a half years and that was one of the biggest eye opening lessons in my life. And it's one that i always cherished just because when you go into something. That's that big in that intense with kind of half ass mentality. Those are usually get half ass. Results are usually fail. And it's been so valuable for me moving on just to remember the pain and having to take ownership of that failure because it was one hundred percent my fault and so it's been really good for me moving into other things and i went out to a ship for two and a half years. And then i got an opportunity to come back to seal trainings in two thousand and four made it straight through with class two five six and in mid two thousand five. I became a navy seal and i spent nine. Years is a seal and in my last two years in the navy. I started this company. Bob during that one car garage san diego. While i was an instructor and i don't have a fancy nba. I don't even have a business degree. But what i do have is in my opinion a phd from the school of hard knocks. And i think that's the most important thing that you can have as an entrepreneur as just having a phd in being resilient because as an entrepreneur you will get knocked down every single day. You will run into problem after problem after problem. And if you don't know how to get back up in constantly move forward then you're not going to be business long. Well i mean talking about the transition when you started the company when you're still in the navy what kinda inspired your made. You want to end up doing that. Well it was my wife in two little girls that inspired me to do that honestly. If i didn't have a family at the time. I probably would have got out of the navy taking a breath and traveled around europe for six months or a year. But that wasn't in the cards for me. Because i had responsibilities. I had mouse defeat and bills to pay so i was doing whatever i could to take care of my family and that kind of look like in this is important to talk about to just so the entrepreneurs that are listening to this. Podcast understand the sacrifice that it's gonna take you know. I was working a fulltime job in the navy. If you could even call it. A job is way more of intense career in the navy where i would instruct other seals all day long sometimes late into the night and then i would come home. I would help my wife as much as i could with the kids and then i would go out into the garage late at night. Early in the morning fulfill all the orders for today making all the bottom breaches and my wife she would go to the computer and handle customer service marketing men accounting so in. We did this for two years. There were no weekends. there were no summer vacations. I mean we busted our asses for two years to stand this thing up and even at that point it got crazier because at that point we went on shark tank and that sacrifices so importance in it's also you know we also grew this business organically which is something i love to talk about just because i feel it so if you're able to do it. Some companies are unable to do. But if you're able to do it. I think it's so important that you try and grows organic as possible for as long as possible just for many reasons one. Because it you have to learn the business from the ground up. Nobody's pumping capital into nobody's pumping capital into you and it. You know it. Also if we know that the biggest enemy that we have usually as running out of cash and that's li- businesses fell every single day more commonly than any other reason growing organically pretty much eliminates that. Because if you can't afford something if you don't have the money in your business account for something you don't buy it. It's just that

Navy Tucson Arizona Eli Korean Bottle Bottlebuster USA San Diego University Of Arizona Arizona Western College California JEN ABC Yuma Department Of Defense Football NBA BOB Europe
Miami Heat's Meyers Leonard suspended, fined $50,000 for using anti-Semitic slur

People of the Pod

00:41 sec | 3 months ago

Miami Heat's Meyers Leonard suspended, fined $50,000 for using anti-Semitic slur

"Player on the nba's miami heat named meyers. Leonard called someone a hike this week. But you wouldn't know that if you read the new york times. The paper of record reported on the incident. Of course which is major sports news and led to leonard being fined and suspended. The times article begins as follows meyers leonard. A reserve center for the miami heat will be away from the team indefinitely. The team said tuesday night following his use of an anti semitic slur while he was playing video. Game on a public livestream but the article never gets more specific than that at no point. Did the time say what anti semitic slur that leonard used.

Meyers Leonard Miami Reserve Center Meyers Leonard NBA The New York Times The Times
The Nazi Hunter: Eli Rosenbaum on Tracking Down the World's Most Wanted Criminals

People of the Pod

05:55 min | 3 months ago

The Nazi Hunter: Eli Rosenbaum on Tracking Down the World's Most Wanted Criminals

"Newly appointed attorney. General merrick garland has said he will renew the justice. Department's focus on the threat of white supremacists. Eli rosenbaum knows a thing or two about ideology for forty years. He has helped the department track down and hold former nazis accountable for their world war. Two crimes a law enforcement role that has earned him. The moniker of nazi hunter. Mr rosenbaum with us now. To talk about that moniker. And that mission mr rosenbaum. Welcome to people love the pod. Thank you great to be waiting. So yes you have been called the nazi hunter. I've seen the show on amazon prime. But what does that term mean in real life. Well it's not an expression. I'm particularly fond of because it suggests that this mission is something other than what it is which is professional law enforcement. We are not engaged in on or anything sort but we have been for four decades now simply investigating and taking legal action against participants in nazi crimes against humanity. Your father escaped nazi germany in nineteen thirty eight. I believe. can you share a little bit. About how your family history inspired this work. Y'all my dad. Got out of germany lived in dresden. His brother and his parents and they managed to get visas to this great country and were able to escape in nineteen thirty eight and the attorney. General merrick garland said in his recent testimony. I think all the time about how the united states saved my family my father graduated high school in newark new jersey and then started paying back the united states by going into the united states army and he was sent to north africa and to europe and served in the third infantry division and then when they realized that they actually needed german speakers they transferred to a psychological warfare branch unit in the us. Army the incident that changed my father's life and had a big impact on the shooter was when he was sent to a concentration camp by his commanding officer to go there in a jeep with two other men to see what the army had found the previous day when they liberated dot com word spread quickly in the region that something terrible was there and my dad's co wanted. Know what it was so my father went when i was fourteen years old and we were driving on the new york state through a blizzard heading north and there was nothing left to listen to the radio. We were talking. And i love hearing. My dad's were stories especially the funny ones. Anybody who serves the military s funny stories about food or whatever and then suddenly you said you know. I was sent dot com the day after its liberation and i though fourteen was a time when there wasn't much said really about the holocaust i knew what it was and i said what did you see and i'm like my father staring out the front window because it's pretty treacherous driving and i don't hear anything from my father and i look over to the driver seat and there i see dad with his eyes glistening their welled with tears in his mouth is open and he's trying to tell me and he couldn't speak and it was the first time i ever saw my cry men of that generation didn't want anyone to see them cry usually and we never did speak about it so my beloved father lived you know into this new century and so many many decades and we did speak about work with frequency when i was home but we never returned to the subject of you say you talked about your work with your father. How did that conversation or the job evolve over. The course of forty years work has changed quite a bit. When i started actually as a summer intern back in nineteen seventy nine. Never imagining that. This would become my life's work. We were overwhelmed with investigations. We had inherited the responsibility from the former immigration and naturalization service after the attorney general took it away from them because they had not succeeded and he's had up this new office the office of special investigations in the justice department criminal division and we had more work than could really keep up with and it turned out in the first few years that the we had inherited that actually had the most merit were ones that were based on tips received directly or indirectly from foreign governments. Which at that time was to say. Mostly the soviet union occasionally another government but generally the the soviet union which had mixed motives in these cases. We started being very proactive within a few years and by the five year point and they're after nearly all of the cases that we could develop to the point of prosecution. We're wants dan. We had initiated on our own and the methodology for that was to task our staff historians. We were the only law enforcement entity in the entire hemisphere that had its own complement of historians. They were the people who could dig for the needles and haystacks and we tasks them with responsibility for keeping an eye open for the surviving remnant of personnel records and other documents that identified perpetrators or perpetrators this. They did with great success. And ultimately we assembled more than seventy thousand names of suspects mostly european also some japanese and we ran each of those names one by one against us immigration records and sometimes other records in an effort to see if we could determine whether any of those people came here assuming they hadn't changed their names

Merrick Garland Eli Rosenbaum Mr Rosenbaum Germany United States Army Dresden United States Army North Africa Newark Amazon New Jersey Europe Office Of Special Investigatio Soviet Union New York Justice Department DAN
Michigan State beats No. 2 Michigan 70-64, boosts NCAA hopes

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Michigan State beats No. 2 Michigan 70-64, boosts NCAA hopes

"Michigan state may have punched its ticket to the NC double a tournament with a seventy sixty four win over second ranked Michigan that gives the Spartans wins in five of their last seven games three of those coming against top five conference rivals the Wolverines hammered the Spartans three days earlier to wrap up the big ten title rocket watts forty twenty one points off ladies team good you know what I'm you scorn but you know when I do score and noises Bangor a little great city teen parent Henry added eighteen to help the Spartans improved to fifteen eleven overall reserve chante brown scored thirteen points to lead the Wolverines Michigan finished without senior guard Eli Brooks who hurt his left ankle early in the game I'm the ferry

Spartans Michigan Wolverines NC Chante Brown Bangor Henry Eli Brooks
An Encyclopedia of Betrayal

Latino Rebels Radio

03:39 min | 3 months ago

An Encyclopedia of Betrayal

"Let's go don't know. Smu joe. Chris gregory debate e Doris is a little dino would only own alpha nine son if that won't be down though on a backup it again. Mce bill is when bela vicar. Betas in that it had done in order to make your own goal pessoa mesa copper double room. They're hanging on yet. He sloppily meta in my hangul. Vn element is when people if folder they offer sina but put the rico so significant will be neutral mass basil money left for non michael montero on say look ego getting kinda hinted comforting for monta delegates. When i got paid that is history. He lancia program are illegal. Carol gobierno parapet. Cdl moving into independent developer. Tha rico alwyn off the super meter mowing until they susan issues increasing quinta for him blow bully aca paraiso paul simply actively on their own and pottery regain los achieve asleep state but obama valencia. Dutton the quaranta extending stellar search. Inte- local really sacred della policy. Gareth three oh amass this cintos in quinta mill personas etc extensive. Expedient this nasty ass. He sees me christly. Gullo mutual diem boy yet. Betas is photographer. Espn comments local mental red zone. Havoc dallas Don catala gutless feed us again and killer the you and commissioner you then you. I had to gasoline hinton. Alessia really. he's to sweat on compiler official policy local collaborative chairman. John zarrella policier. Meena not naughty. I'm in the locker. Peter informacion e compelling whose propia chievo sober independent teeth does less achieve narrative Dante christly your him for him. Most ulta milan synthesis anti-seizure aura. Numale say so. Check your aura. Bonsor alumna she took over our. I read that he can for more focused as implicit. And like i say those amelia where we started super the solar outerwear informa- in fire and people the saw from us young complimentary announced via area. It's analysis knock gassing get blue blue santaniello free anti if the program affoil another loss masic stencils that he got a healer through stephanie. Then says you've ottawa. Kabo put su propia galeano. You've got chris when undergoes masterly left. Ama- it Kenya cpr angeles owners. Al assad but alycia forming donald price. Yoenis then throw if amelia's in cameos if they thirty other bahia lands. Yes that myth. Eli concern secretary. Kenya copying borough pius variables got bet the ad or said that at the

Smu Joe Chris Gregory Michael Montero Carol Gobierno Tha Rico Alwyn Aca Paraiso Paul Obama Valencia Quinta Mill Gullo Don Catala Doris Alessia John Zarrella Peter Informacion Rico Dante Christly Dutton Bonsor Alumna Gareth Susan
U.S. Buys 100,000 Doses of an Eli Lilly Antibody Treatment

Dana Loesch

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

U.S. Buys 100,000 Doses of an Eli Lilly Antibody Treatment

"Notions of a treatment for Corona virus, developed by Eli Lilly are being sent to the U. S. Government. John Herrick reports the government's buying a minimum of 100,000 doses of the combination therapy. Eli Lilly CEO says the treatment greatly reduces the risk of coronavirus, hospitalizations and deaths. The government spending more than $200 million on the doses to be delivered through March 31st. They also have the option of buying an additional one million doses through November.

U. S. Government Eli Lilly John Herrick Corona Government
Daniel Kaluuya on new movie 'Judas and the Black Messiah'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

04:58 min | 4 months ago

Daniel Kaluuya on new movie 'Judas and the Black Messiah'

"Walk to popcorn where we tell you what's happening at the movies and there's a movie now called judas and the black mesa. That's so good that will you can watch it now. You need to finish watching me. Daniel speak but when you see it you're going to see something extraordinary and you're going to see my guest today. Daniel columbia in a really amazing performance where he brings the spirit of someone to life and that someone is fred hampton. So congratulations to you. Then on i think most markets in what. I realized this is the very months for years ago. That get out opened yeah. I'm glad humphry as of that black comfort. Low two years a year off. The gal black pants came out in february has very much every year. You're just working in working in doing this. And you've got that oscar nomination after we last talked to. Are you just impossible. Now had you become A complete tyrant on the set. I think i was always a tyrant allowed. This kind of spaceman allowed me to be more tyrant. So i just i just like you know. I liked ice cubes. In one cup blueberries in another and then some soda in. And i don't even like soda but i just wanna be ir like a roman tyrant. I don't wanna be like a new. I on the roman like the old that that's own. You know what. I mean when something like that happens and of course you had done so much work you know in england theater. You scanned you. Were doing all of this stuff. But get out was a kind of a breakthrough that changed your life. Didn't it change my life. You changed my life a lot to catch up to that or with me. Like only think eli lawshield. Go up to happen with go in all that time in an all the things you've done whether you're did black panther whether you did queen it slam whether you were in widows this working with the most amazing people and doing incredible things and in this case of with judas and the black messiah. You're playing this real person. Fred hampton so fred hampton. We know and i think here in america to it was yes. He was the guy that led the black panther party in chicago and new annoy. He was the head of it and died. Tragically young. and that's what we know. We know those two things and finally. There's a movie that says he had and he had a spear any had something that was happening. How did you get attached to it. That's the on on the set of a powerful on reshoots ryan and zinzi kuebler Produces film to decide and say. Oh we we're making a film about fred hamilton. Love to be bothered a mess. Chairman fred keith is is in it as well Unshackle king is directed. Just feel alive. Kim i really their intentions and reasons really spoke to and so it was that i was like i just felt really on that the full of me in that way and they will let y'all send your treatment. They sent me a toothpaste treatment. Which is incredible and i met with shock in new york during the get out. What's he's not. You may have one of the tricks. setting on with you on that same trip. I sat down with shackle. So like i said that masako spoke on. I loved him as a person. I loved his reasons than would season off the oscars the first script i read judas nabet messiah and then i would say less. So what do you do. When you're playing this guy who we know of as a more of a symbol than a human being and that you have to create him as he is. How do you go about doing that. Which you do so brilliantly. Thank you solo work on the web but was kind of taken As a as a man you know and finding finding why felt he loved understanding why he loved him loudly loved and who loved him Of him you know the humanity politics is is like he has to have so much love so much karen in one food actualization black people in the black community in order to say these things in these ways like the speeches. I just felt like this identity in a remarkable man Amanda is to be remarked upon. But he is. He's a man. And i feel like brandon him. His humanity kind of puts into context his muddle

Fred Hampton Daniel Columbia Eli Lawshield Humphry Mesa Zinzi Kuebler Fred Hamilton Chairman Fred Keith Unshackle King Daniel Oscar Black Panther Party Masako Judas Nabet England Chicago Ryan America KIM
Report: TikTok sale pushed by Trump is shelved

WSJ Minute Briefing

00:22 sec | 4 months ago

Report: TikTok sale pushed by Trump is shelved

"We report exclusively that the plan sale of tiktok s- american operations to a group including oracle and walmart is on hold while the biden administration reviews its policies on security last year. The trump administration order to ban on tiktok and told the video sharing apps chinese owner to divest itself of its. Us operations appeal that move which is still pending in court.

Tiktok S Biden Administration Tiktok Walmart Oracle United States
Is it too late to get in to Bitcoin?

Baselayer

08:51 min | 5 months ago

Is it too late to get in to Bitcoin?

"Back in the day when amazon i one public it shot up roughly after some fits and spurts. It went up to about ninety dollars. You it was like i'm too late. Missed it gone. And then it capitulated down at shot all the way down to two and i was like it's gone amazon's finished not even gonna look at it and then it went back up to ninety. I missed it. I missed it again then. Went up to three hundred to four hundred. It's this constant m. I too late emmett too. Early internal struggle that we have in our brain. What do you think about that. Yeah i think this is exactly so what you're really describing is Things being relative and this is actually think the fundamentally challenging concept with something like bitcoin which is a paradigm shift so people think about bitcoin relative to other assets. If you call a lot of conversations i had in two thousand nineteen twenty twenty where around bitcoins volatility right but bitcoins volatility relative to what because volatility is a relative measure price when we talk about price it's a relative measure because what am i Pricing bitcoin and typically people are pricing in dollars so relatively speaking yes. Bitcoin is volatile compared to holding dollars. But if we compare bitcoin to say equities if you quainton bonds if we compare bitcoin to precious metals the volatility doesn't look so extreme. What really happened at the start of this year. In march of twenty twenty the world shifted the world changed completely and forty years of capital markets. Beliefs were shattered like smashed with a hammer completely shattered. Now changes really hard for people and one of the things. That's really interesting For me personally. I want things to go fast right. Because i've in crypto and things fast and like wait why has it taken a six years to get to this point but in reality as you know the arc of time is very long and it takes a lot of time for the world to change for people to internalize that change and adjust their mental models right and a big part of this in a big part of ice than so much time talking and writing and trying to teach and communicate is. It's really about giving people new frameworks mental models to help them. Integrate this new way of thinking these mental models into how they view the world trade. That's really important. I think there's so many. Brilliant people in crypto. Who do this in different ways. So we have this really broad cross section of people communicating a lot of ways talking to a lot of different audiences which is amazing. The we had this fundamental shift happened. Everything got everything else got crazy. It's not that bitcoin got crazy. That everything else got way freaking crazier and what i love is when i talk to people about. Bitcoin bitcoin to extensive. I'm like let me ask you a question. Did you did you. By tesla five hundred and yeah. Of course i did. Like tesla's going to and i'm like okay. So tesla has appreciated more this year than bill. Clinton has tesla appreciated close to seven hundred percent in two thousand twenty yet you bought at the high and they clean appreciated two hundred and fifty percent and twenty twenty yet. You refuse to buy so help me understand right even if we're using the same of dollars even if we're looking at the same volatility measure somehow bitcoin Why and then he will start thinking. They're like wait a minute because math is hard this we know the people just. They're not thinking logically for some reasons for some people when they think about bitcoin their brain goes into like a tailspin and logic goes out the window. But this is again why i think the collectibles narrative is in so interesting to me because when i say to people like do you know what a honus wagner card is. They're like yeah. Of course. I know i'm like i don't know like okay. One honus wagner card is two point five million dollars. Do you think bitcoin at twenty five thousand thirty five thousand forty thousand is expensive in there. Like probably not right. So let's dig into that tesla coin thing. What part of the fact that. Bitcoin is effectively. Founded by an an-and sushi. Who we do not know if it's a he she it what vs on. Musk pop very public. Are we in agreement. That's the toshi was the aliens. Are we doing alias. I'm kidding shocking. Oh every time. I hear that especially in clubhouse. Everyone's like oh yeah. It was created by the alien somebody yeah. Let's not do that you know. I'm already speculating. That twenty two thousand one. The aliens are finally come here and just completely take over. But i don't want to hear that. The ashley also created the nsa taverners been around for a while and then there's a holiday larue like there. What what part in in psychology because you talked to a lot of institutional investors to you talked to a lot of big money. What part of that psychology. That one you have a very public figure with ilan and then too you have associate whom no one really knows who it is what it is. What part of that you place until list. Yeah so i actually think. Bitcoin and tesla are very similar in one regard both are aspirational and let me explain what i mean by that. Bitcoin invites you to conceptualize the world in a different way. Tesla what eon has done with business. Ilan has memed a new reality into existence. The way he talks about tesla right is completely detached from the economic realities of that business. Completely detached from the economic realities of that business but it doesn't matter because the vision that ilan describes the persona that he has the cult of personality he's created around himself is aspirational grit song by the way cult of personality. That's a great song. it's also great like psychological phenomenon. And what. I think eli done so effectively is. He's the zeitgeist okay. Markets are just sentiment machines. And it's it's been really interesting. Because every value investor. I talked to like twenty twenty. Made their brains explode. It literally made their slowed. They're looking at these stocks trading at fourteen hundred two thousand three thousand acts he for pe ratio rate and their brains are exploiting. That's our valued. And i'm like you forgot that nothing acid matters anymore. We don't live in the world that you lived in two years ago. this is not about value. We live in a world where there is a lot of uncertainty uncertainty about the future uncertainty about the stability institutions uncertainty about our role in this world. That's unfolding and in times of uncertainty. What people look for is vision. Right and what elon. Musk articulates when you talks about going to mars when you talks about. Putting for tesla on mars. That's vision right. I think satory she in so many ways and what we're doing with. Bitcoin is very similar. And i caught this. I've been really obsessed with the idea of building cathedrals lately. It's like five hundred years ago. Right if i was a visionary and had suggested for the future and i wanted to express that the only way for me to create something that withstood the test of time right to create quote unquote immutable. Truth was to build a cathedral and cathedrals took hundreds of years to build and people who built them dedicated tremendous amounts of resources to building these amazing like technology a technologically very advanced like gravity defying beautiful structures and. Whenever people saw them they would feel inspired. Right like cathedrals were how we painted a vision for the reality we wanted to live in. Okay tesla is a cathedral. Bitcoin is a cathedral. The stocks that are soaring the assets that are doing well their assets that are aspirational right and their people. Whether it's a non community of people an individual it's groups of people who believe in a vision for the future that is radically different from the future. We live today but it creates a motion. Right people look at it and they're like that is beautiful. And i wanna live in not future

Tesla Bitcoin Honus Wagner Amazon Emmett Ilan Larue Clinton NSA EON Ashley ELI Elon Musk
2021 Voice AI Predictions: Dave Kemp on Audioburst and podcast segmentation

The Voicebot Podcast

02:47 min | 5 months ago

2021 Voice AI Predictions: Dave Kemp on Audioburst and podcast segmentation

"Probably overlooked in the space But this dynamic thing i always think about audio burst. Because they did two things one is. They can do that. Dynamic search because they are indexing everything in real time that they ingest and they can even segment by topic and so they can give you dodge the entire riot the entire thing. And that's what we see today. We see there's a number of companies out there that are saying. Hey i can scan everything and say this you can listen to one of these three These three things but they basically give you the full episode whereas audits say hey the topic you want starts here and then you can figure. And then they'll allow you to jump so well. I think the the piece to that to that where a lot of that innovation the backbone of it will be in both t t s in speeches. I think a lot of it's gonna be in the ability to identify in the transcript where that is and then it will probably use that as the mechanism for which it identifies where to start the podcast. You know like you said. That's for me when i listened to. I've talked about this. I think every time. I've talked to you the conversation with mir her shut audio bursts on. Your podcast was really enlightening. Because if you can. I think you know you talk for sixty minutes podcast or whatever and maybe for some people they just want that three minute clip in. So it's all about like. How do you get to that. Three minute clip. Because the three minute clip. That i want to get to. You might be different than one that you want to get to and if you make it so that that all that information that's stored in that sixty minute. Conversation is is able to be dynamically searched like you mentioned. That's a humongous game changer. I think makes a big difference. You and i were just talking about friedman podcast which i enjoy as well and he's talked recently about this fact that a lot of people will come to him afterwards because he's interviewed eli mosque and they'll say nobody journalists and all they want like this part of it. I wanted to know if you've talked about this. And so he was thinking about providing transcripts But i must actually has been on a lot of podcast. I mean not a lot you know just like just like a nominal term but a lot compared to other people right. He's he's more open about and is someone like you. Audio bursts engine could be somebody else. I think they have the the engine. That's designed to do this specifically could really make that a lot easier for people. There's a lot of people doing transcripts. And that's generally how it happens you get the transcript and then you do control f. and with some sort of word and then you could you look at and then you read and you're like oh that's it and then you say okay. What's the time stamp on that. And then you go and listen well. Jeez wouldn't you know like automatic. Segmentation is closer telling you what topics are in. They're

Eli Mosque Friedman
"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

01:47 min | 7 months ago

"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"And that's our interview <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with the talian film <Speech_Music_Male> enthusiast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Eli ron <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> join <Speech_Male> us. next time. When our <Speech_Male> guests will be <Speech_Male> andrei overdraw <Speech_Male> and be sure <Speech_Male> to subscribe on <Speech_Music_Male> apple podcasts. <Speech_Music_Male> Spotify <Speech_Male> or wherever you listen <Speech_Music_Male> so you never miss <Speech_Music_Male> an episode. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> History of horror. <Speech_Male> Uncut is <Speech_Male> to shudder original <Speech_Male> podcast hosted <Speech_Male> by ally. Roth <Speech_Male> and kurt sangha <Speech_Male> news by <Speech_Male> kurt. Sanga <Speech_Music_Male> engineered by chris <Speech_Male> heckman with <Speech_Male> music by maestro. <Speech_Music_Male> Joseph the <Speech_Music_Male> for <Speech_Male> oddity jessica <Speech_Male> steelers heckman <Speech_Male> and lacey aug. <Speech_Music_Male> avoi- <Speech_Male> or shutter craig <Speech_Male> angler nicholas <Speech_Music_Male> lonzo and samuel <Speech_Music_Male> zimmerman. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> The interviews <Speech_Male> in this program were <Speech_Male> originally conducted <Speech_Male> for the amc <Speech_Male> television series. <Speech_Male> Eli ross history <Speech_Male> of horror <Speech_Male> executive producers <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> eli rob <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> kurz sanga <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> steven michaels <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> alison berkley. <Speech_Male> Just a free. <Speech_Male> Jody flynn and <Speech_Male> james mcnab <Speech_Male> senior <Speech_Male> producer. Ben <Speech_Male> rafael sure. <Speech_Male> Thanks to <Speech_Male> kelly nash. Richard <Speech_Male> drew chris powers <Speech_Male> and most valuable <Speech_Male> player. Clara's <Speech_Music_Male> warble at amc. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> This is curtsying <Speech_Male> ghafour ally <Speech_Male> roths history of whore <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> and cut. <Music>

"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

05:02 min | 7 months ago

"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"I think that family friendly har- can be even more subversive than adult heart adult horror. It is what it is. You're there to scare the audience. You're there to shock them. The goal of a family horror movie is to scare everybody. But to get the kids into har- it becomes a gateway drug movie family are is like a gateway movie called gateway har- that's the stuff you watch when you're a kid where you can give the kid taste of what it's like to be scared in a safe way but give them laughs and fun said they want more. I mean kids love macab. They wanna know about beetlejuice. Wanted to skeletons. They wanted about death in freddy krueger. Penny wise eight year. Old kids are obsessed with har- but they know they can't see it and it's too scary for them. you know. This is why we have fairytales. Fairytales is family. Har you know. Look at grimm's fairytales. But you read three year olds. I mean these are stories that are hundreds of years old but they help kids under stand. The mystery of death kids don't understand why parents die but these stories of witches baking children ovens it gives them something to be scared of. They can let it out of their system and these stories. These morality tales in fairytales and grimm's fairytales they've been around for hundreds of years because kids need them. It's very healthy for kids to express their fear and to deal with the mystery of death. They love zombies. They love getting made up on halloween. They love frankenstein. Someone coming back from the dead. There's something titillating about it. They get a laugh. They get scared but it helps them. They feel better when they let it out. And i've always said that. Horror films are fairy tales for adults. That when you're watching the slasher fantasy of what's going to happen. It's you're dealing with your fear of death in the same way that a child is dealing with their fear of death. Row hansel and gretel but there is a middle ground..

grimm freddy krueger hansel gretel
"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

05:59 min | 7 months ago

"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"Dotto is brought in and threatened to life in prison for making cannibal holocaust so these films really had a danger about them and of course they were banned and wentz. A movie is band. Of course you want to see it that much more. What is it that makes that film so special. It was marketed. Like a rank exploitation film. And it isn't exploitation film but it somehow transcends that yeah well what elevates cannibal holocaust is that risiera day dotto. When he made his movie he really went in the jungle. And it's really feels like a true anthropological. study it feels so well researched and they filmed with real tribes. I mean he went into the jungle and met people that live in trees and live in these villages and got them to be in the film and mixing with the actors. And that's why it feels so real all of the rituals. They do that getting to the village. I mean they're killing animals left right and center. It's they kill so many animals in cannibal holocaust that grind house released a cruelty free version. So you can play it the dvd skipping over the scenes but that was a movie very much of its time but regime. Donna spent so much time on the details of the village. And there's hundreds of people in children that you really believe it's real cannibal. Holocaust is also known for this incredible haunting score by ribs or to lonnie or to lonnie is one of the great italian composers like and marquan and the his score. It just sticks with you. There's as i could sing the whole score or to score. It's so different from american movies and it's kind of sad mournful score but it's really really effective. The photography data shoots it like documentary. So imagine taking the realism of roberto rossellini and applying that to a cannibal movie. He's not making it like he's making a horror film. It's in the day it's like. He's showing you some nature documentary almost like jok opinion. Prosperity mondo connie films. Data takes the rustling mondo. Connie approach and the violence is just. You can't believe what you're watching. We're seeing it through the professors is but there's a sequence in cannibal holocaust they go and they see the villagers punishing this girl who has cheated on her husband and they take the stone dildo and they just jam it in her over and over until they murder her. And it's it's horrifying what day data does so brilliantly..

roberto rossellini Dotto lonnie Connie murder Donna
"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

05:04 min | 7 months ago

"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"Cannibal holocaust. One of the most controversial films ever made big influence on you. How did that come to be umberto. Lenzi makes a movie in nineteen seventy two called man from deep river with yvonne rasim off. That is a rip off of the richard harris film. A man called horse. it's a great movie with yvonne. Ross muffin. Mimi ley but in it. There's a scene where he discovers cannibals. He runs up to character and the character has been eaten by cannibals that seems so shocking that the producers said. Why don't you go through a whole movie of that. And he said now. I've done it. So jared dot. They offer him the movie after lindsay passes and that becomes ultimo mondo county bali last cannibal world so last cannibal world it showed these cannibal these tribal rituals and data really really went into the jungle of columbia and film there he filled with real natives and he told me i put him as a cannibal in hostile to i had them do cameo and he told me that the way he directed them as he would go if he wanted them to walk and then i wanted them to run and he said that they had never run before and he didn't understand how that was possible. They said they just sit there when an animal run by they just it. They poisoned darts. That's how they hunted so the idea of running would you. You're not running from anything. So he said their feet were also after the first days of shooting the natives feet were sore because they had never run before because they hunt with blow darts last cannibal. World is such a big hit that he gets offered cannibal holocaust and cannibal holocaust changes movies. It's banned in thirty nine countries cannibal holocaust. The i found footage movie. The premise is that these kids go off. They make a movie. They're sent off the jungle there. These very italian. They're the american celebrity documentary filmmakers that our college basically and they've gone off into the jungle and they've disappeared and we don't know what happened to them so then professor monroe goes through and kind of retraces their steps and find all these clues until he finally finds the skulls of the people and they're dead and they're all the film cans there so he uses a tape recorder to go to the village. These people live in trees..

jared dot Ross muffin yvonne rasim professor monroe Mimi ley Lenzi richard harris lindsay
"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

04:22 min | 7 months ago

"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"You mentioned palme. Was he an influence on you. Brian depalma to me was one of the most important actors in my childhood. And i remember watching scarface in the theater. And it blew my mind even the scarface now really feels like an oliver stone film. As well with that incredible screenplay he wrote and most people don't realize that oliver stone wrote scarface but it's the combination of the two and pacino's performance that make it so iconic but i love dapa very influenced by italian jello films. That's why he's using. Pino nausea in kerry to palm taking music from the italian horror movies of the early seventies. And he's putting it into american movie. George lucas is using john. Williams other directors that are doing are using american composers but depalma's using pino dodgy a- denies gio had done a lot of work in italy and spaghetti westerns jealous but he's a very specific composer. It feels like a mix of bernard hermann from psycho and the more coney scores from the agenda jealous. So you have these influences coming in. It's like diploma comes. And he's taking polanski. Hitchcock bernard. Hermann are gento italian cinema. And he's putting it all into american movies and people hadn't seen anything like it dressed to kill. I remember seeing that the split-screen scene where he's watching donahue and getting dressed and michael caine and angie dickinson. I remember as a kid watching that movie and it it does have this dreamlike quality where she meets this man in there having sex and then she finds this file this little bottle with the pills. And you're like oh gosh like what it's just you know. Nothing good is going to happen. And the the shower scenes i mean. He's got this incredible. Mix of alfred. Hitchcock and dr gento but his use of long takes really the scene. I remember the most television. Where donahue is interviewing someone and michael caine is watching it and watching it and just just the the lighting the weights photographed and a as a kid split screens. Drive me crazy when we're supposed to watch supposed to watch but you just sort of give over to it and you're just watching. This thing happened absorbs in your brain. It's really it's got a very very interesting effect on the audience. I tried to do a montage. I've really tried to do a montage like that. In death. wish of bruce willis taking bullets out of people and then putting bullets into target so it was all influenced by diploma. Then of course body double with voyeurism..

bernard hermann scarface Brian depalma michael caine donahue Hitchcock bernard pacino gio oliver stone bruce willis Pino kerry George lucas coney angie dickinson Williams italy dr gento
"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

05:29 min | 7 months ago

"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"Like she really pays her pants sweatpants. And then the saw just cuts right through cuts or arm off cuts right through our flesh. There's also a scene where a girl gets in an elevator. It's got all the classic tropes slasher movies but it's obviously shot in europe because it's one of those cagey elevators. Will you the kind. You'd never see in america and it's this big and the killer gets in and he's got a chance i had mind is back and she doesn't notice like oh hello sir nice to see you. And he doesn't say anything stops the on what's going on. And then he pulls out. The chains revs it up. She goes no and warrior her arms. Go flying simonas having so much fun with the movie. These extras in like circus. Clowns and they have a stretcher and they have to literally put a leg on the xs. that don't know what to do with body bars. Put and then take take them away and the cops trying to find the killer and christopher georges playing grizzled copy sing like. I'm a tree with this guy. Aghia lollipop if you find out. And he's like wonder who could have done this and he turns around and then there's all the suspects there's paul l smith is willard the gardner who's giving the stink eye the entire movie. Paul smith the whole time. Play bluto and popeye law right. They literally that emotion the entire movie and sarah's looking around there's a gay character who the dean playmate says brown homosexual. I was like you can't trust them. Which is interesting because it was a gay director. I've met people that were in contact with him. He's unfortunately pass away. Said he was very very funny. Guy and a great guy. But simone's movie at the end of the film. The police catch the killer and they're about to leave and they opened the door and the body falls out. And you realize this guy's making human jigsaw puzzle and it's like it's an incredible shock moment. It's just one of those great slow-motion things of this incredible prop of the human body with all the different people we've seen killed and then at the very end in. Sarah comes back because he forgot his coat and the hand of the body comes out and just rips his genitals off just grab them and just pulls as dick right off and the movie ends on him screaming as the hand of the dead body just rips right through his crotch and emasculate them now. I always wrote pieces off as just like a garbage slasher and then i watched it with tarantino and a friend of hers and she goes no no no. This movie's brilliant and friend. Ada broke pieces. Breaks down like this. You can watch the movie on one level and this is a grade z slasher movie with some of the most fun kills. It's totally over the top ridiculous in every single way. And it's absolute garbage or you could say this is a subversive work of art by master director. Who's making a comment on this character. Kendall morgan the campus who uses women like pieces of meat and that the movie is about him having sex with these girls and just discarding which happens all throughout the film. he walks out of bed. They're going kendall. Come back come back. I need you. Just throw them away. He has sex with girls and tosses them aside. These girls are then killed. And the body is the residual anger the anger of these girls. And the resentment of these girls are being used by this guy all boils up and they castrate them at the end of the movie. So it's a movie about a guy who uses women like pieces of meat and he gets what he deserves at the end..

director Sarah paul l smith dick europe christopher georges Kendall morgan america simone tarantino Ada brown gardner
"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

03:04 min | 7 months ago

"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"Mood and atmosphere and when she gets hung on the hook she doesn't die instantly you just see her trying to grab a. It's it was one of the most haunting images i'd seen in film. I was very fortunate that i got to become friends with toby. Hooper and talked about it and he told me that that movie was basically just a sixty thousand dollar flare. He was sending up from austin. The norman rockwell. America was gone and next door neighbor as you're living the manson family. It's combination of ed gain and charles manson and the violence vietnam. There's just this explosion in this movie. And toby hooper really makes an art film. I mean if you look at his first film eggshells. It's cut similar the way he uses sound design. It's kind of like an acid trip horror film. But they're shooting this movie in the hundred and twenty degree heat and they're shooting an austin with these local actors. None of whom you've seen before and the shooting it on sixteen millimeter and it just feels real and the way they move the camera in that film way sets of the die. The swing shot being one of the most iconic shots at. I imitated cabin fever. I literally put st. Vincent and i did okay. This is my texas chainsaw massacre shot. I remember watching texas chainsaw massacre. And i had the videotape. You rent it you get to watch as many times i could and it took it with me to school and i told my science teacher that had it with me and he opened up the av room and we sat and watched the last texas chainsaw massacre together and go like what are you doing. Like i'm just watching texas esker of mr babka. Don't mind news like yeah. Watch texas jason has. It was so forbidden at the time to do that. But i loved it. I mean there was an atari game of texas chainsaw massacre mainstream. But i remember the movie. I really really loved texture of massacre to which was a satire. The poster of texas chains of is the same poster as the breakfast club. So was like the sequel. I've been waiting my whole life for but that first texas chainsaw massacre just the acting. I mean just the weight when jerry gets smashed head in the slam the door that sound design that music arche blue. That did the music the music the sound design. It was so disturbing. I remember the opening credits of cabin. Fever i a lot of buzzing i use. a lot of. Insects starts off with nice sounds of nature and the screen begins to rot. And the sound design begins to rot very very influenced by texas chainsaw massacre when you hear the sounds and the buzzing and cemetery and the solar flares and those opening credits the way the sound design is like a racer head. There's such mood to the opening five minutes of tex chain by the time you're on that shot of the grave. The sun coming up in the cemetery. It's just wrong. It's you're already uncomfortable in these. See them in the van. And you just know there for nova.

texas toby hooper austin Fever charles manson norman rockwell manson family America mr babka jerry jason
"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

05:17 min | 7 months ago

"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"Going onto another film and inspired you to become a director. Donna the dead. When did you first see it. I i saw donna. The dead when vhs exploded i remember renting donna. The dead in the evil dead and it was like the greatest weekend in my life. You know. it's one of those movies that even as a kid at twelve and thirteen years old there've been such hype about it and a book called film tricks with had had had frames the head. Exploding so my friend jeff and i watch all my horror movies with. We sat there. And we watch that movie and i got a second. Vcr borrowed a friend's says. So i could dump the tape. So i could advocate excite is wanted to watch it over and over and over. I like i had to copy the tape of donald dead because it was just a graceful never seen and it was not a movie that played on cable. You had to rent it. So the first time. I watched it just delivered the goods and darryl agenda producing and this incredible score by goblin. So there's something very italian about the movie. Even though it's an american movie that goblins score gives it this other worldly. Italian feel the same way that penal dodgers music does in carry. When you hear that italian score they just think differently. Their musical sensibilities than americans didn't be like an american movie and also didn't understand of swing low budget and big budget. You know when you're kidding. Watch star wars are done to the day you just assume it all comes out of hollywood but there was something about that movie. That just felt real. That just felt grainy. Just feel dirty in different. And i couldn't understand what it was. I didn't understand. Sixteen millimeter verse. Thirty five millimeter or low budget for big budget. It had this real homemade quality to it. I remember watching dawn. A dead going. That's what i wanna do. I don't wanna do those moves. When i love those movies but i want to do that. That's me feels like you're making a movie that it's so forbidden. What you're doing you can do anything. This is a movie with no rules. You can kill any character in any way you want. it was like anarchy. I remember watching that movie thinking. How can you get away with this. There was ratings unrated rated. Actually i remember watching that movie going. I didn't know you could do this. I didn't know you were allowed to be that violence in a movie. I didn't know that that was accepted. I thought there was someone cutting back on the violence. there was. Yeah now the same note you saw dawn of the dead. He saw another movie that really shaped you. The evil dead. The first time. I saw evil dead. I was so terrified that i couldn't make it through the movie and my friend. Jeff and i. We have to stop and play clue because that was our favorite game. That was the only thing we'd take our mind off it. The exorcist was the scariest movie i had seen. I was convinced. I was going to get possessed by the devil. It traumatized me. It gave me nightmares. I couldn't sleep for two years because of that movie. This was like the exorcist on steroids. It was like it wasn't just one person. Says it was five people possess it was the tape will swallow your so everything about it was so scary and you knew it from that opening shot. You knew it where all of a sudden..

Donna jeff dodgers director darryl Vcr hollywood donald
"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

05:17 min | 7 months ago

"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"But i transferred eraserhead so i could sit next to him and look at him and ask him questions and i remember at the opening when you see jack. Fisk is the man in the planet and these fetuses are coming out. You just see jack. Nance's head david. This is sexy and he goes. You're not allowed to ask me questions. And he's like smoking cigarettes. Okay okay he wouldn't say a word. He wouldn't talk about anything even with me next to him. I wanted to get. Dvd commentary. Which dave completely does not believe in doesn't believe in explaining anything. I was sitting with him next to him with the positive and a gave my computer to clean it just so i could get stories. Better rate. wouldn't say a word to me so you know that's that's the beauty of that movie. Is that i over. Explain a lot of things. But i understand the mystery. I understand the power of the mystery. Maybe i would do differently. Maybe i'm a different generation. That wants to explain everything as it's being done all the time but i think one of the things that makes that movie so special is that it actually could exist a visually movies dazzling and it sounds like nothing else before it eraserhead changed sound design cabin fever all my films. I want the sound to be like eraserhead. Don't just the industrial landscape. The and i remember just the idea that you could use sound to create a world. That was david lynch. And it was allen splat and sound designer david and the two of them really put you in a universe. That's how you create the world and all of those nightmare. Industrial sounds came into the factory and hostile and the torture. Rooms and the drones and the hums. And i'd be some. We're with david and there'd be this weird motor like he's stop. Stop stop into populated. We've got a record that and i'm like that too. I'm like oh my god parking lot second floor this building here. You need to record that motor like we hear strange. Sounds and your first things is gonna record this and use it in a movie. David his website for david lynch dot com did these industrial soundscape. Beautiful it but he's so meticulous the details but he's also very over a happy accidents. Things happen you just set it up. And if you're so focused. David lynch gave me the best directing advice. He said eli. Keep your eye on the donut. Not the whole the only thing that matters the twenty four frames per second which is filled with time. That's the donut. The only people sees the information recorded in front of the camera all the other crap the backstabbing drama. That that's the whole and you can get sucked right into it if you're not careful so let's say that all my movies to everyone i on the donut not the whole producing a movie house talking to director. I on the donut. Not the hall. And it's a way of like refocusing. Everyone go yeah. We're here to make a movie right here to get caught up in drama. We're featuring eraserheads chilling children episode and lynch's next film. The elephant man is going to be in the body or up to said and that's quite a jump from missouri. Budget art house fell to a big studio picture. It's amazing that david goes from a racer head to the elephant man..

david lynch Nance jack Fisk dave missouri director eli
"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

05:50 min | 7 months ago

"eli" Discussed on Eli Roth's History of Horror: Uncut

"This episode of history of horror uncut features director writer producer and actor. Eli roth allies. First film was two thousand. Two's cabin fever gleefully gory recombination of the dna of the thousands of horror movies devoured as a kid next came hostile. They're provocative film that inspired the term torture porn over. The last decade delay has branched out into other genres including crime suspense. Send the kid friendly the house with a clock in its walls. that horror is closest to his heart. I asked eli to talk about the films that inspired him to become a director. As you'll hear allies encyclopedic knowledge.

Eli roth director producer writer
"eli" Discussed on NFL Live

NFL Live

11:08 min | 1 year ago

"eli" Discussed on NFL Live

"On what his historic season was like not to mention what big trust means to him. Even explains why we can borrow it in the short term. I E learning I manning calling it a career after tremendous accomplishments all with the New York. Giants we'll talk about what this decision means and have reaction from around the league. These guys certainly we know everybody's talking about it everybody's talking about football gut to mention the chemicals the Super Bowl fifty four here from Disney's wide world of sports on what is Dark skies here but not good and plenty ready to see here Diana Rossini joining us this afternoon. I'm Wendy next here with Rob Ninkovic Victor Cruz and of course we will start with the news that came late yesterday and that is Eli Manning's decision. Chew retire he calls it a career after sixteen. NFL seasons the official announcement will come at a press conference tomorrow morning. He played his entire career with the giants. Why is he won? Two Super Bowls and let the franchise in every passing category. Here is now some reaction to his decision from around the league allows a great fierce competitor man and to be able to play hollow for sixteen seasons. It's a really tough. It's really tough. He's a super bowl. Champion are playing him my rookie year. He almost got me benched because he was lighting up and taking advantage of my. You know my my rookie. Youth is consistent steady throughout his whole career and obviously have a ton respect more. Aw Man he's got so much to be proud of and two super bowl championships. You know with two clutch drives the game. You know to win though so he deserves. I think a ton of accredit successor that time and also just a ton of respect from all of his further career he was able to hop. I mean he's got to be in the top ten in most every meaningful statistics when it comes to quarterback play. Okay so you know I got to play against a lot in the NFC east and really observed him. When I came in as a rookie he had just won the Super Bowl? And so I I enjoy it even when I was at the back of watching just observing high went about his business because I said Kay. That's that's the goal. That's where you want to get to. You can't write the NFL store without Eli Manning well said they're manning one of only five players in NFL history to win multiple super bowl MVP's he seventh. All Time and touchdown passes and passing yards arts and start at two hundred and ten consecutive games for two thousand four to two thousand seventeen the third longest streak for quarterback in NFL history. He was always there if the best ability is availability. He had plenty of that Victor. I'll start with you of course as Eli teammate and friends what's the one thing you remember most about. Eli Manning the player just being an iron man just being accountable just being there when you needed him the most we needed someone to make a play when you needed someone to carry the weight of the team on his shoulders. He took it and he never pointed a finger at anyone on the team. Never pointed the blame at anybody else. He always made sure that when loser draw he's GonNa take the pressure and take the heat off the team and bring everybody better and I think that made us respect him. It made us raise our level of play and it and it just made us go out there with a certain Passionate that certain disciplined to go out there and play with this guy because you knew that he was gonNA bring all he had each and every time he stepped out on their football fields and you knew the preparation was where I remember times where Sunday Hyundai after games that Monday morning already in luxury. Mind you that's off day. That's not even a that. We're supposed to be there. He's there studying getting ready for the next game. Getting Ready for the next opponent opponent and just tackling this thing on and commend you e for just everything for this league for the giants and and you know I know you're only gonNA accomplish more things posts a poster right. That was the first chapter. It's interesting perspective because we have teammate and we have opponent I always a different way to look at things. You have some hardware because the things that he was able to do in that super bowl playing against him a few times I could just say this. He's a constant professional going back a couple years ago even last year having to go up and down on with being a starter then being benched not being there you never saw him complainer or have any. Ill will towards his teammates. He was always trying to be the best teammate. He could be So that just represents his character. The type of team eighty is. It was always just trying to do to do the best for his team and congrats on a heck of a career and let's not forget he did it in New York or science which is not the easiest place to for that length of time with that kind of grace and I know you had a chance to talk to a lot of players today and late yesterday about what else legacy bid. Yeah I gotTa Tell You. It's probably one of the easiest questions I had to ask players about because the answers just came to everyone so quickly because everyone has so so many good stories about Eli and everyone loves to throw in there that he so unassuming he's unwavering and it's it's sometimes I think looked at I and some of the players said this as maybe perhaps a negative connotation because he's not flashy He's got this ability to go out there and running offense and not look physically scary when he does it put the respect is there. I talked to Shawn Watson for almost fifteen twenty minutes about Eli Manning specifically and he said you know I remember number for me going to the manning camps and getting the award and he taught me so many different things about football but he pulled me aside right before I got into the League and talked me about highs and lows and how many I'm about to be part of and in order for me to have six. I gotTA figure out a way to stay in between like I've I just thought of that. I thought of that conversation in moments when things have gotten really bad for me. So I if manning obviously having a tremendous effect on young quarterbacks in old ones as drew brees talk about it there's there's no question is he a hall of Famer absolutely. I think that when you look at obviously the two superlatively fees Only one he's one of the five people that have to Suba. MVP's and you know. I just think his legacy and the things that he left out on their football field. I mean it has to be have to take that into account and I just think he is all of Famer in in my book. I watched the Guy Work Day in and day out. He put the work into a hall of Famer and he put the work in to be even the conversation to be in the hall of fame. You know to this day so I think he absolutely gets Gets a deserves I. Yeah I think so as well look. There's a lot more variables that go into a team and you look at some of the years that they struggled in New York. It's not all allies fault right. There's other things in place there that make a team successful. So with the time he was there he was very good and he brought to Super Bowl so that organization an MVP two times. That's impressive so his body works speaks for itself. I think those players teammates journalists were so close to it. We we constantly talk about how great he is is and he's such a professional and and I think for fans it's hard to understand what we're talking about because we're in it with him. Were in the locker room. You guys are out on the field and you're just a significant -nificant difference when you put together a career the way he has dealt with good in the bed in New York with those cameras in his face and always be the same guy. After all these years I think for me he gets in Beeson the character the man. He isn't of course the fact that he was able to bring the I tell you what I liked that he got that one last start to. I'm not going to lie. It's really nice to be able to walk with the. He deserved that. I still get. I get chills and so Congratulations Eli Manning. The chiefs have mahomes have made the climb to super bowl fifty four after he was the best player in the NFL Laos this season the rating. MVP mahomes will become the fourth different starting quarterback quarterback to start the super bowl the year after winning the MVP in the last forty seasons joining. Tom Brady peyton manning and Brett Farve are Jeff. Darlington has more on the chiefs from Kansas City. Well Wendy if you're looking for an X.. Factor in in this game look no further than the chiefs. Run Defense after what we saw the forty niners do on the ground. Averaging two hundred and thirty five yards per game this postseason record setting by the way the chiefs. No they're going to have to be out against the run and that is why the news. They got this week on defensive tackle Chris. Jones is enormous. Andy Reid saying the Jones had no Setbacks coming out of the game when quite frankly he was a game time decision do tap stream now he missed the visual round was able to go in. This game played about forty forty eight percents of the snaps. Twenty eight defensive snaps for this team. Andy Reid said he really liked what he saw from Jones in this game and now with two weeks between games feels like he's going to have enough recovery time to be healthy for this one. I cannot stress enough the importance of Jones inside. It could seriously determine whether the chiefs will win this game against the forty niners. Wendy Jeff thank you one update from Kansas City. Travis Kelsey did not practice today due to an illness but of course there is some time with the two weeks in between a championship in the Super Bowl. Most important part of the chiefs. Game Plan in your estimation rob will they have the score. I they gotTA play from ahead. They cannot get behind like they have in these previous two playoff games. If you're down twenty four nothing it's over it's over you're not gonNA be able to get back against the forty niners. They can run on the ball really well. They can get after the quarterback so in that case you have to get the ball and scored and you gotta try and score every time you have the ball on the flip outside of the forty niners you try and prevent them from having that football by running the football and having time of possession winning the time of possession battle so that script the I ten to fifteen team plays in this game for the Kansas City. Chiefs is going to be vital that they moved the chains have a long drive and score. I it's going to be huge in this game. Yeah I agree I I feel like when the forty niners getting lead especially in a game like this. They're going to bleed that clock run that ball they got. They got a stable of running backs to do it now. They've proven that so the Kansas City chiefs have to play with the lead. They can't get down twenty four zip no like they did before they have to make sure that they come out of the gate. Firing that that those first fifteen plays are restive. Restive down the field taking chances. I mean it's the Super Bowl you're not holding back for anything else. There's no more games after this. This is you know the big the big dance so to speak. So you WANNA to make sure you're putting your best foot forward and that you're coming out of the gate firing and put some pressure on the forty niners and let them know that this is going to be a long game. We're going to be ready to go here. And you're going to have to match US Dr Dry and the teams that had the bi week early in the playoffs here. They were rusty. Yeah Rusty's weeks to prepare. They cannot be rusty in this game. They have to go out there acute and again Patrick mahomes following up an MVP as and last year. I bet you I bet you he'd take this with a chance. One hundred percent chance to win the Super Super Bowl fifty four the presumptive. MVP Lamar Jackson. Wait what a year for you. I know the season ended prematurely. But I gotta ask you I honestly I think it was every week. We showed a Lamar Jack play of the week. I mean there were hundreds of you. Have a favorite place I really don't I just got a check of you know Any any given place you know. I'm trying to make sure I'm happy to buy off the road trying.

Eli Manning MVP chiefs NFL League football New York Kansas City giants Wendy Jeff Rob Ninkovic Victor Cruz Famer Jones manning Chew Disney NFC
"eli" Discussed on Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"eli" Discussed on Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

"The United States states. All that stands out. My biggest decision was too great through Jewish communities my precision we started from Arthur next canoeing. We were we originally three ultra-orthodox and maybe some modern Orthodox like myself. But but I decided to open itself to every type person no matter who you are. It was very hard we started. Pa also pushed back well. I haven't move of people from the very old older. You don't worry about community. I Love I love every type of Mersin but some of them don't get and then throws a club and I actually had a very big put from a bunch of people who actually started fighting me about Elliot. How can you join? People are not sure or not only kosher or two vision and I told them that we are when. We're not a Nikola. We're lacing organization and anyone WHO NEEDS HELP. We should call and we only have volunteers and they went pushing back. This and a half ago the biggest robbery and he actually biggest was most respectable. Rabah me in the Ultra Orthodox community was Rabbi Elliot. Sheep and I sat by him and I'm very moderate guy. You see the fear of your pain shirt and I come over to this most religious rabbi Masurian and I told my vision about having non-jewish people nonreligious people volunteering and he was all for and he said of course we need to keep. Alaka mean he says keeping a means that if you how emerging on Shabbat you're not even think for one second you have to run the fastest could that's keeping and said Mesh Danger. For someone's life is more important than the hold for and he says whatever you do the right thing to do and he said you should give the midst of saving lives because if someone should think about how people are their lives change because became a cellphone tears and south. Rabbi Elliot. She was great. Meter is one told me joy any personal loss to save lives? And that's what actually gave me the the power to go against anyone who was about this when I joined Arab Elian crazy what are the liberal left wing then was a whole three of the Rabin everything the whole peace process. This has nothing to do with power with accepting of you mean you see the ones she not the the hurry side flipside is going to serve our community. Said guys come to me. We're going to help save is in your community and beyond like why were they. Lay you know like who are you? Like what validity there were you already saving lives in their communities. And that's Sawyer so it's interesting actually got a phone call from Morale Leon in in other Guy Mohammed Ashley a few Arab on. Here's from East. Jerusalem wanted to join so the funny part is one. Call me up. And he didn't have a good Hebr accident he actually called me up and he said what are they about. He said man. I want to join his eye so he I want to say lives blow is the Guy Opposite and I actually said to him this neat and he told me his story about his father having a heart attack in waiting fifty five minutes for help so they could help. Save my father but I promised myself that I'm GONNA learn to be here and save lives and I want to celebrate because that's the right way and I had chills together. They said you know what this is. This is this is God's call to join this guy I said how in the Solomon let's go ahead and do it and remember the first interview I had cable difference is completely different. You know. Americans varying volunteer on. They're probably the largest volunteer corps in the world. Anything isn't there. Israel is huge. We have forty five thousand nonprofits in Israel. We have thousands and thousands of maybe hundreds of thousands of volunteers in. Hopefully that'd be long. Every kid goes arming the three years. He volunteered pay. You'll get money. For hardly a nothing for Bisley and and you actually Yvonne Teary and people put their lives with Israel to build this country as volunteer. So these Arabs in Group. A little differently they don't army right so I interview them. I remember one of the funniest story. The has guy sites is our love your everyday. I said twenty four hours a day every day. Twenty four hours a day after me up also run up ceases to be. I'm so excited. How much money. We're getting promote here period. And he gets so excited when I told them money now. We got paid for gasoline zone. Target is going to cost them. Money loses his job. If he doesn't come to work your course whatever people more they give the better people. And that's how I created this society. Today we have five hundred fifty Arab gone. Here's in itself and is R- which is outstanding and it's growing more and more you know we have two years in Israel you're GONNA laugh. I don't know if anyone else was listening to this to incredible Arab. Here's one thing. Which is I don't know if you remember the head of the from us they would seen. He's an incredible of are over. There was accuracy. Could you do the other? One is the thraw of the same guys from our neighborhood. That's his name. But these guys are two Israeli. Arabs were very proud to be saving. Hundreds of Jewish allies in Andrew lives and they are partners realization and we have already guys and guys who are in in the Shimron and a meeting in anywhere you want around the country where there got so one last question and then we're going to wrap it up. Is What leadership qualities? Do you look for in people open ended. You see if you any volunteer is somewhat of. You're right they're not taking it upon themselves to lead by example they want to. They don't want to sit back and want to do something that is meaningful to them. So what what is it quite qualities that he looked for? So we have hundreds of leaders disorganization all built around people who are the call. Coordinators were handled the visions or different. It's like if I compare made of leaders right and people actually hundreds of the Rally Hashi who are leaders of divisions smaller. One group is two hundred years on the hands. Ever had someone in charge of fifty. And you know it's a much leaders. The thing I look the most important thing in leadership in my opinion persons from all angles on a humble leader sort of vision. Because I think the key to leadership is a humble person and you could teach a lot of people to do if they have a very egoistic they cannot be leaders in the volunteer organization. They can be good leaders in army because you listen to ours and it's completely different than in. Sala sell us all of that. You have to respect the people who actually your leaders if you don't if you're leaders respect you if you leaders humble..

Israel Rabbi Elliot United States rabbi Masurian Pa Guy Mohammed Ashley Arthur Nikola robbery Jerusalem Hebr Alaka Sala Yvonne Teary Sawyer Andrew Shimron
"eli" Discussed on Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

08:54 min | 1 year ago

"eli" Discussed on Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

"Like one of the highlights that you thought like wow you know I did? I even think that was possible when I started so some of the water because I I didn't know anything about water. I become somewhat knowledgeable about it and to change the water catastrophe that this was basically catastrophe. Asif Bowie I didn't notice the recently when I read a book called be watered by a sequel that in the history of the world no civilization -tations faced a water catastrophe and survived. The the Jewish people had nowhere to move so we had to deal with a catastrophe and so prices Mrs presented catastrophe and I said how we were able to make those changes. The negative sixty percent of the land of Israel sixty and only six percent of the population was there today. We started working for Chevron eighteen years ago it was one hundred ninety. One one thousand people losing three presenting a year today. It's two hundred fifty thousand people the fastest growing city in Israel and Jewish National Fund. The bill the seven Mile River Walk just opened a twenty nine Acre Lake Shop where I will tell you where we sat. There was nothing but garbage. There and we Abraham's will. There was the lock fences is three hundred ten thousand visitors we have a thirteen thousand seat. Amphitheater we've changed the the image of Beersheva together with the people showed up and we can walk it are people are lay. People can kill you the streets of show the restaurants and the places because they don't don't stay Justin bieber crucial I am. They're going to Russia. I who would've imagined that when I saw the lane open last month I right and looking at eleven years of my life I tell you the details of the plan. I could tell how deep it is. How many screws and cement we use? But I'm always amazed because when you're able to do it you say well and then you look around at the people that did with you and they're saying well and then they're saying let's go to the next one let's go to the next one and so away. Inspiration comes from that excitement that it's not ever looking at anything anything and saying well done. It is well we done. Let's keep going. That's how the Jewish people been around for thousands and thousands and thousands of years. I agree with that and I told him one more your management style. I mean do do you. you courage creative thinking I mean you you definitely are not a one man shop right. You have a team of all team professionals and executives senior management. So I will tell you that I only want people who are going to come in and challenge. There's no desirer you'd cannot stand to around Russell Robinson if you're not ready to come toe to toe and challenge. I wanted to be prepared. I will in you got any my people work for me. I will challenge. Angela and I will really go toe to toe with you on because I want you to come back and be prepared if you're not gonNA go back to prepare but if you're coming chameleon with the problems without even thinking solutions you will not lasted a Russell Robinson if you're coming to be with problems with potential solutions it may not be the solution that we may have have to work it out. But don't come to me with the problem when you thought solution look at and be part of. We have a great executive management team. So I'm very very proud to. It's not like a token I mean I have the same amount of women I do. Men My new seal always a young woman Aw CBO's the guy's been with me for the day I started. We have all different kinds of people from different backgrounds and we come together and sometimes it becomes some heated pieces. That's great and we're all into that. Let's come come a solutions when you when you bring people on what qualities you will. I view them as leaders in their own right or them you know what are the some of the qualities I mean. There's two part question is you know what do you look for when you bring people on you know into your company besides extending total too. I totally get right. You don't want someone who's just against person. Yes people want people who want to become. I want people who can see issues. I want people. I interviewed a lot. You're telling me why here at such a great place and I'm sure you know that could be part of the addition to just. I don't want to change. Thanks no organization should ever sit on wanted has our from our it department small it department but our systems of software where what we've created is something unbelievable every day we're challenging ourselves to be better to our operation weak moment half by the way I have. We have fifty seven offices. This is rallying United States but we have zero square footage. What does that mean? Is that our people work in four administration centers handle awesome so if you call Denver Colorado. You're calling Van Nuys California when you have an event in Denver Colorado with fifteen hundred people coming up. One patient comes out of Denver. It comes out of Van Nuys California. Now what invitation goes back to Denver. It goes to the bench. Platter is in California the Administration. Help all the information sir. I have my people in Denver who are working in the fundraiser in the programmatic but we have four administration centers. That about that means because today's world you don't need to. They have that whole day of somebody's sitting outside of your desk and have to have people that are competent to do the work. So that when you go to a gain of Denver go to Jennifer Ben in Seattle or New York work they look the same they feel the same. It's the same professionalism different ministry centers and by the way when there is a snowstorm in in Chicago which is one of our centers and they can't go to work. The phones are switched over by four. That's a lot of of different kinds of working models that you you have to happen. It's the twenty first century model. All of our communication on marketing. Were were you know we we look at it. How do we share with? What's going on with Israel Moon? Learn to win special in uniforms is putting on a Jane something Janus. It's going the same. Google search thing that comes from our executive management that's great professionalism and that's the challenge. We have to keep changing God and so one of the things that I was reading. I was researching this. You work a lot are with disabilities or working. What made you what made you WanNa go there representing not just one doe for this one aspect aspect right? You're focused on a number of different things and that was back to the Jewish aspect. I mean we're a nation but it had to get involved with the work with disabilities great question because it's A. It's a question about the way you started vision so I constantly get a story that we don't do any projects we do. Vision and under vision are a lot of projects. I'm working disability. They'll give you for instance and how it works. We don't do disabilities in Jerusalem Salaam or Tel Aviv or Haifa. Somebody tell you the difference. The difference is is that we do a one of our affiliates laid negative. It's a place there's nowhere no. We're like it on the face of the earth for people mental Disabilities Rehabilitation Hospital. There and I can tell you for hours. It's the finest place on the face of the earth. The residents for the family for everybody and it was an iphone and talk about it or we shall I more but it's an offer king and when it started off a keen had community of twenty eight thousand with an unimplemented twenty five percent when Ali gives complete with Israel. Bill Taste also be over thousand house. Employees almost three hundred and fifty of them will be dodgers versus when we started of kingdom doctors. Nurses Seventeen now so you get change in the entire area and population and to a triple Mitzvah. Help people disabilities when you were working with our therapeutic riding center for down in the Ara Bob. It's because if you have a family of five and one of the members of the family have disability. What do you do you move? If if there's no services you know what this five we're going to population growth. So we are working with disabilities also a rippling effect of what our vision issues and so. It doesn't come out of nowhere.

Denver Israel Russell Robinson executive Jewish National Fund Asif Bowie Mile River Walk Justin bieber Van Nuys California Chevron Beersheva Abraham Colorado dodgers Aw CBO Bill Taste Disabilities Rehabilitation Ho United States Russia Ara Bob
"eli" Discussed on Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"eli" Discussed on Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

"About the Zionistic Opportunity as put getty to that point and Saint Yourself. You know what you Don Alley is just not good enough for me. I want to help others make all and this is the has this vision. I have you know when you take you to come to come to that so a few weeks after the tragedy and a few weeks of just feverish conversations with people. I registered as a nonprofit. I didn't say anything to anyone in my shoe or anyone on my board and And I took a good look. I think for their two different types I leaders. Are you talking about our leadership. PODCAST leaders who have genetic code that their foreign to lead and they just have that charisma that people follow them anything. There are other individuals that have maybe that dormant genetic code and that when they attach themselves to have caused and they're honest to their strengths and weaknesses and they linked themselves to that. 'cause they tried to move mountains and I did a true real bill analysis of what my strengths and weaknesses were and I think besides being passionate about a cause and knowing fully every detail about that caused because the worst thing is suspend all your effort and and energy into something realizing that thing exists two blocks now is equal to those two components is finding a partner due to complement and supplement some of your your your talents in your skills and a couple Tony Gilbert at that time share temp shared with him dream of doing something Tony was in Boca's well Commun- of Mine Hill shared with him after some of the research that I did I did a lot of research I wrote an on a sign nondisclosure with the Jewish Agency I went up to New York for a couple of weeks looked at all the doormat files of people who made alley who wanted to make didn't move. How'd you even get how'd you? How'd you get there? How the headphone the end? No pump sharing with you. Find Away Person. Okay keep on knocking on doors when you are a Michigan to something when you Michigan on something you don't take no for an answer Found a someone to donate their time in the market research company. BBDO someone has some time on their hands and they did a full analysis of some of the statistics that to their table. The files of people who who wanted to go and never actualized are Elian people move came back looking at the retention rate instead of them as well and analyzing it and then once I realized that there could be a solution presented to this. And I bought it to Tony Gilbert and I said and my crazy here my crazy where am I in something. And he kicked it around for a bunch of days zone team came back and said not only. You're onto something but I'll be your partner and that was not where I was addressing but it was fantastic because I realized how much I needed him in certain holes that I had for my own. Well what was always Tony's his background Tony's background is as a marketing genius And he's a tremendous least successful businessman and his detachment from day. One is I'll be connected to this if we run it as a business business with a heart but this is not the run like a non-profit which we'll get to a little bit later on which has really up my game a bit of how I what I've learned over the years and how wage rest this institution and I think a lot of our successes that we don't treat it as it's a regular non-profit but we treat it and run it like a business Business with a heart and so once once I got Tony on board. Then we then we went to Israel and we want to make sure that there was a relativity on Israel's side because what we're doing to stop you basically saying since nineteen forty eight you guys don't really know what your that your entire orientation into Elliott in Israel has been this and we Americans sitting comfortably in Boca Raton. Florida coming to teach you how to do it differently even though we have never than anything anything in the world and immigration took a lot of guts in a lot of Chutzpah. And in retrospect it was ridiculous that we actually did it and we've bounced around from different personalities. The president of Israel. It's the Prime Minister of Israel to economic minister. Israel's foreign affairs chief rabbi and and through Tony's connections as well and other connections we were able to manage orchestrate these meetings and the resounding response that we got from everyone is. We need this desperately. We don't know how to do this. And that mitigated the risk of it for me. It's still an what are we. HOW ARE WE GONNA put it into action action and then slowly getting traction and then we've raised like every every dollar I was raising was raised? Ten MM fifteen thousand dollars for me. That was astronomical took out a few bunch of full-page ads the newest Jewish newspapers just to see if there was a response to to my email to my mailing address post office address. Hundreds of applications hundreds of letters started coming in so so empirically hit an artery. Not only was there a statistically on the Israel side from that incredible Chutzpah but we hit an artery of a neat. So once you have passion doc and once you know that there's a need on both levels on the Israel audience in the immigrant and the clients themselves and you have a partner that's willing. Who complements some of your strengths and weaknesses I felt that after a few more months of kicking the tire on this idea that it was time to tell L. my congregation that I was leaving and I left them in January two thousand and two and exclusively focused on neff. FM The two thousand and January to July ninth two thousand and two six seven months and made Ali on the first plane. I plan on four hundred. Nineteen people are jumbo debt. Prime Minister of Israel is waiting for us on the bond didn't anticipate that at all huge fanfare chunks of Energy and celebration and then the next morning like what the hell do I do now. Four hundred nine thousand people move through different countries because you promise on something. And what about the next cohort. That's coming and you might have had a shoestring budget and you might have had four or five staff members working for you now. This is is this just a fluke or is this a real institution the next seventeen years just until modifications except but again so a lot of it in business also a lot of it is follow your passion. Follow your the best type of businesses. Something that you're passionate about you're able to really. It's not considered work per se. It's considered just you try to build and fulfill the fill your dream etc and so you know getting to that right and you know the first plane like you're saying you had forty nine people follow you because that's what they were doing and and then as time went you know I it. It became really a out. Say like What I'm looking for? It became like A. It's escaping me now but you know it. Spread like wildfire became it became. It became exactly so that it became something where people are really following it saying you know what even I remember back then. I had a friend of mine. Who seem like? Oh you know what I wanted to make all yup but servers to able to really help me out. And he made Aliyah and he's been here ever since You know so you know. When did you realize that you know you had to do more than just what you you do? The fourteen of the one plane came and then the second plane. And when you start sending even more so as you head to build a following following that'll eat it really there in America great to finally getting out there speaking getting people to buy into the dream by what to do and there's a a ton of skepticism. I'm sure I mean skepticism. When I started a Leon with a four letter word I remember when I was trying to garner support not only financial support within community I spoke at A? I'M NOT GONNA say institution that we all love spoken institution and I start speaking about North American Elia somehow bribes some until me to speak for five minutes at their board meeting and the CEO of the of the institution said. We don't say that word. We don't say North.

Israel Tony Gilbert partner Prime Minister Don Alley getty Mine Hill Florida Michigan BBDO Boca Raton America Jewish Agency I Leon Boca president Ali Aliyah Elia
"eli" Discussed on Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

09:50 min | 1 year ago

"eli" Discussed on Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

"About being part of a state that's insistently you know de-legitimize and attacks everything everything I do. It was done with my Zionist because of love for this country to slam people L. History Segue into the I was reading. I think one of the interviews with the GTA no the coli very zillah old users responsible. Another another who resonates with you. Well and I and I definitely hear that you know you know one of the things like you are almost like a default fought leader without even knowing it though I mean you know i. It's taken quite by. They said I mean because you know a lot of people argue and the people are fooled was a great one of them. zillah recall there are a lot of people here but no one has a big of a voice in a sense that you do in terms of I and I'm saying now in sense of you know you have over fifty thousand people following you and giving you Israel Jewish Congress giving your stature in terms of what you're doing now on the community side you know there are a lot of people looking to you in terms of what you say carries weight. Do you feel feel pressure with that. I mean did you feel that there's or you say you know what I am am. I'm GonNa do what I believe in and I don't really care. If they follow they follow I believe Churchill Churchill Churchill once said reporte but you have enemies good that means you stop something some time in your life you know. I wear my heart on the sleeve. I everything. I've tried everything I say. I mean you know. He comes out of a desire to make Israel's case he comes out of a desire to not just important sort of in this dichotomy it's not just as is a way to to respond to the haters detractors. Let's spread lies in you know Trying to get them is the very essence of the Jewish state Whether it's boy could attacks Semitism Holocaust denial misinformation about what's happening with a rockets could But on the other hand it's also as a way to promote his and it's critical for me. It's a platform to tell Israel's story and and we have an amazing story we have compelling story of a powerful story detail you know. It's not only an indigenous people who change our homeland two thousand plus us through pogroms exile and Holocaust and Anti Semitism. But you know where people that have rebuilt a nation built land. Where our economy Al Entrepreneurship innovation is the envy of the world? We have incredibly dynamic cultural seem We have a musical artists confirmed the world we had Argentina's Lionel Messi Plan Be God himself in came here to supply power via religious is. Okay have but we have an incredibly beautiful storytelling. This incredible diversity you've of people of a melting pot of cultures of Jews that have come from all over the world literally me from Australia. America juzef come from Europe. Europe come from North Africa have come from Arab countries South America South Africa. And you know we've come here because we are at the last minute where we're united by a common history common action to the Slann to a religious faith our history our very identity. which for me stems from him and and you know when I go online online all his proudly as someone who is a proud Zionist than someone who will always tell the truth however difficulty it might be sometimes but I will tell the truth and I will make sure that I correct those spread lies and misinformation trying to take us but send Tom? Also China Nine on engage with people trying to tell our story and you know what it means to live here and you know why this is such an incredible place so you know and everything. You're saying I agree with you. Just want to point out give it to give it time. So with Israel Jews Congress so and why don't you tell us more about it. I don't know how many people are familiar with it. But give a little bit more background on on the objectives you doing and some of the outreach and some of the things that your combating worldwide and he get others to get more involved in New York I should probably say no when I'm when I'm online I'm online sqi and wear many hats but when I'm online primarily mine in my personal capacity but of course I also many other hats with respect to the Jewish Congress. I think it's a very unique. In very special organization it was started in two thousand twelve by number of AH prominent. These came together and my found something that was missing. You know we have many very unique so many fantastic organizations Pro Israel Jewish organizations outside of his. That's tremendous important work. In terms of supporting reporting Israel in terms of reaching out to his thing is many ways they look from the outside towards Israel whereas an Israeli based organization look from Israel to the outside we look to them so the primary purpose You know we start off to act as a bridge between Israel and Jewish communities in the desperate focusing specifically on Europe because Europe has found those spas mechanism or infrastructure should those lectuing riches in America behalf that presence in Europe it was lacking on the one hand within Europe itself to connect the Jewish communities but most specifically also connect those communities here with Israel. So many ways you know we've sought to act as a as a voice to those Jewish communities in the best in Europe to bring back concerns is ready officials. Might this lead us. We bring a lot of allegations whether it's focusing focusing right now in December bilious on Jewish life tampering on the island all sorts of different things But also Outside of it is very critical to work is to support his intention community and that includes everything from Going to the UN where you know been fortunate or unfortunate speaking number of times on behalf. it's so can we the parliamentarians from Europe It's also by the way working closely with American Jewish community and American league should because because we also understand that you know again Augusta the coal. We're doing we are one people and you know. Take the view that if Ju- is assaulted tittle attack in Europe. It's the same as if you anywheres attacked and we all need to come together because what had what starts off corner right. A pocket of Europe will then spread like disease like cancer throughout the rest of the society. So you know we work closely with American Jewish community in in different elements and also with a American elected leaders because Africa's is mostly urban exclusive move but also understanding that America has tremendous tails well has tremendous influence. What is happening in Israel and the effect of the You know how we can use that In a European audience help provide Israel's position of greater understanding. So so what are the some of the stuff our responsibility you know. In a sense offense representing Israel to the to the Jewish community right so are you educating them on different aspects of Life or your life or you try to teach them some of the culture like what are you going to the communities for you teach them what the talking points like what needs. I'm just just try to a little bit more of you know if so what the messaging any sense I'm looking. We'll subjective you that day those communities on the ground Nor what works. Best for them. I don't presume and would for seconds to go in any community whether it's in Europe or America And tell them what's best for them. I know what's best for them. We work with them to chime funnel way to amplify that and to empower them. Essentially so they say You know sites initially Semitism oral or disobedience campaign We ask them Kay. How can we help you? And you know whether it's to bring Israeli lawmakers and officials places in Europe to tell that case to tell that story whether it's to act as a as a conduit for information right now give you very concrete example right now. We had the last week made the rocket bombardment. And you know we all sit communities and friends friends and allies. It's not just Jewish approach rock groups in Europe as well Jewish community. Especially asking you know. What can we do you stand with us? We want to stand with Israel's well how can we help so you know..

Israel Europe Jewish Congress America Churchill Churchill Churchill South America Lionel Messi Argentina Australia Al Entrepreneurship Semitism UN Tom haters American league New York Africa South Africa Ju
"eli" Discussed on Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

09:37 min | 1 year ago

"eli" Discussed on Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

"You really feel it as a nation right you feel and it could be a good or bad you know you feel it even and it's something that I always find amazing things in America Australia to you'll have all happy holidays and Christmas and Chabad Shalom. I mean you you feel much more. A part of an that's for me. Is that aspect that comfort that that ability I agree completely not the Jewish holidays when I was living outside of his roller respected understood appreciate but didn't quite have an instructor. It didn't strike the National Court. But you know again on this things at once I moved. I'm living here. I stand and I feel that all these whole it is at the end of the data that tied to connection to this land to thousands of years of connection to the to the slanderous. This country was people the other example I give because Two thousand twelve months Mallya We had Of course the war with a US November two thousand twelve fan myself in a bunker. Shelton's there at the time and and the guy next to me Housework us were from US probably really regretting now. Making I in Sydney way. My biggest concerns way. Knock which pub to regard the team deluge but I was absolutely not. This only reaffirms might decision because this is my country missiles. Some people and I'm going to be with them when they're under fire and I'm going to be with them when we are rejoicing and celebrating and heavy because of the day. As you said we are one people and its community so our that. No this is a pitch for those listening. I'm saying to myself at every we're very proud. WanNa come home. He speak to us. We're happy to help you out to our pleasure is it's not. It's not a problem we'll even again. If you're looking for a job we'll hook you up with it but let let's keep moving so you know it's interesting you're saying you know so you organize rally and that really struck something in you so you make all these then. Did you start really really getting more involved than we're going to talk a little bit about digital presence. It's really strong. I mean not only that but you are taking all your talents that you have outside the digital world debate skills etc and you bring it there and you don't back down from anyone. I mean you are just like which which is I mean. It's good was there aren't a lot of people out that do that right. People are timid and people are a little bit afraid people are like. I don't want to rock the boat and I'm not sure if it's the right thing to say I mean but there is a responsibility and again I don't think I don't know if you realize it or not but people definitely look to that and say okay. What is he saying right? What are you saying that we can then use as other people go and debate other people? I mean so how did you start. How did you start seeing that In using using twitter as a platform to really fight anti-semitism. I'm looking man. I started picking up on social media as a professional tool Probably around two thousand eleven doesn't tend to living. I chose working ton as a research fellow and a lot of time with the UN the Palestinians of time which is starting their whole Medal statehood. You know a lot. A lot of things were happening and understood. You know not everyone gets the news from the radio or through print press which time it's it's published sorority old press Especially especially dealing with young people and you want to reach the audience You have to use the language took platforms and you know they. Were you know people that are looking to social media for that means. They're looking for their. You know Cuba social issues. You'll having a lot of influential people from diplomats government officials in media Our online trying to Make their presence. Who are trying to connect trying to present their that position saw understood that's a platform You know that I need to be present and you know just you know. quit with fighting on semi battlefronts today. Now with fighting with soldiers. Fighting guys The terrorists in Gaza with fighting in the diplomatic notes that were fighting in diplomatic circles the UN of fighting and courts through with fighting economically. Through through boycotts. That's but nor less important fighting on the on the digital battlefront which the come increasingly crucial meets. It's always been something very important from more or less about ten ten years ago in suppose time and we can talk more fuel and sort of building that presence about engaging people about representing what Israel means to me in In in when it comes down to what am dates It's a it's a platform for me to util Israel's story and what my what my vision idea of that story is and you know. It's something that I think. We're fine increasingly prevalent increasingly out there Whether it's funds computers harms people. You know what I'm looking for the news no one I wanna find what's happening the well. I'm not gonNa tell them the TV or pick-up newspaper. I'M GONNA I'M GONNA go. Online friends are saying. I'm going to see what's happening tweet. I'm GONNA see original posting online before they before it gets published in the papers. So it's become you know a second I got it and so you know. When did you start seeing the platform? Really you know be effective for you as a voice and then and from there let's transition into what you're doing now right so you know you you came in two thousand twelve you know and your plan to get you started using using twitter as a tool in two thousand eleven so a year is not a lot of times so you started using it and when when you made Ali what did you start doing here right. What did you you end up with again? This is it takes time to build a presence here when I stepped off the plane. And you you know when I when I look back now so much to laugh and cry with family I did not know What my plan is going to be when I got plane I did not have a clear career. Pound heroes fantastic could still do much better. You know what I was going to do but I knew that I had surely Skiba because I could always regret later But I knew I had to at at least come here and make a go at it and I was confident enough in my abilities. Um and the ability to spend network and I find us Those doors That I'll be. I was okay so the first half year so it was a really climatize ing It it was really trying to find my fema ground you know I did. A lot of independent works writing consulting but did did you have a network here by limited friends over the years but as a special limited network You know look now and I'm so grateful to have somebody friends and people in and not just family but friends who mean the Wilton colleagues from the pro Israel community from different circles so that I can rely on a personal level first of all but I'll send a proficient level when something's happening in order to collaborate together to To advance castle mutual goals. But I came here with richly my My two bags my copy of Hertzel's that you were stay in which aren't read a read on the flight to Israel and things started falling into place within a bad half year here you know and then I stepped into this organization. AMAC now to Congress wearing many hats now with zydus councilman South Wales as well as human rights attorney until it writing little. You know ooh wherever I'm wearing now. This was the main hadn't wearing what was first and foremost as a as a family which is good because forgotten Hebrew right. That's left but in in every had in every sort of position I'm in it's it's all for one purpose. It's out of a deep sense and love and respect for the state of Israel out of my Zionist ideals. And you know I want my daughter to my children. You know my family family to grow up not having to worry about rockets. Having to worry.

Israel twitter UN Sydney Chabad Shalom America instructor National Court US Australia Shelton Gaza Hertzel Cuba research fellow Congress Skiba South Wales
"eli" Discussed on Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"eli" Discussed on Follow the Leader w/ Eli Mandelbaum

"I'm your host Ellie Mandelbaum. This is a podcast. It's about leadership. And what makes one a good leader if they're born or made in follow the in. Follow the leader. I interviewed a variety of leaders. Tennyson how they became the leader. They are and what makes them effective in Kosovar speaking with arson Ostrovsky and international human rights lawyer and executive director of the Israel. Jewish Congress is based NGOs serving as a bridge between Jewish communities in in Europe and Israel leaders and officials while supporting the Jewish state around the world in the fight against anti-semitism and diligent position our sin as testified Frieden spoke in support of Israel before the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva done nations in New York the European Parliament the Knesset and in many high level forms in Europe and the United States. If you haven't don't realize he's done a lot. He's considered an expert on anti-semitism and as well as an international law and Middle East foreign policy. Beyond the arsonist's actions is a deep sense of designees commitment to advocating for Israel and the Jewish people lastly in two thousand twelve rbis in originally from a Shirley mean Elliot from New York and on top of that I started follow Arson on twitter. And really as I would say opened my eyes to what I need to do as a better person to fight and all the naysayers series of Israel ours. Welcome to the show. I hope I covered everything. There is a lot in their. If not you could fill in the blanks on your background. Thanks depending on your values. Definite uncovered is a few other things. But you've definitely definitely covered a lot of it and it's certainly has not been has not been a dull moment. Requirements solidifies stepped off. The planet might have so so. Why don't we start there? What were you doing before you made Aliyah I you you as active it is as you are now you know? Why don't we start there? Look I definitely wasn't activism now for me the process of evolution I suppose You My family originally from Ukraine. From this. So we left when I was very little in eighty seven and we went to spend so I grew up in Sydney contest clubs Oh look we we left because you know we was egregious and we ever knows how difficult it was And we found refuge wjr Pechiney Australian fantastic large growing up But also a little bit detached from Jewish life. You know my parents. My family very proudly Zionist. But they'll send you awesome was like and sorry in many ways you know they wanted me to also to blend in like every everyone else had every opportunity life and uh-huh for me. The turning point was was around to win. If you remember the Jewish journalist American journalist Danny Run Around Wall Street Journal He was covering Pakistan and he was taken by the Pakistani Taliban and executed life on camera. And he's tamous famous very deeply jarring last words were my father is Jewish. My mother's Jewish. I am Jewish and that really really In my head and got me thinking what does it mean for me to be Jewish. What does it mean design? It's what is this sinus. Even had Israel Israel fit until this really led me into path of spicy self Education learning about my identity. You are at family family history and spent a long story short I wanNA birthright you know in two thousand and three. I thought I'd wait until it was peace and quiet time. There's no first time first time and it was. I thought I'd wait until it's all nice and peaceful but I said could be waiting for a while so I went in there really in the peak of the second and but I mean from my flip that you know. This is a deeply deeply special unique place classic film. It took a few more years before I got to the stage Roy. Correction my Kellyanne. Good Jewish thing and finished my grief rate practice the practice as a corporate litigation attorney strategy for many years when tweets real Musab Perga- nine which I mean defied my connection to this land But time I made Aliyah was immediately before then I was actually Working York as a research pillow at a from tank. My focus was really on the United Nations Administrative Palistinian conflict. But the whole time it was for me just a transit stop as a on the white on white back to Israel so let me know when I stepped off the plane in many ways. tournament Fishman also tremendously grateful analysis seven message message board here in Israel and others realize dreams but for me that dia step of a planet right Elliott. It wasn't as if my dream had come true which did but is is just the beginning at least in my train no. It's funny because I I see that it to myself. My wife doesn't like it when I say but my dream. You know my my my book school before out to make all the problem is when you make that you have to come up with new goals booth. You're here until you have to say what are you going to do here and Before we get into what you're doing now. Ah taking a leadership role is never easy. And it seems like it'd be the turning point in two thousand three birthright trip hip and then the Musab program but you know footing you were working in New York as lawyer. Did you have any like we just like another person Jason. Just doing their job. What did you feel that you had a leadership tendency and you just tap deadline or or or or as it is now became a de facto leader? Just because ause you're out there and people follow you and now leading the Jewish Congress like. How did that happen? Caribbean some I stumbled upon it I I classify myself as a leader. That's very humbling. But I think that's more APPS for others golden once famously said you know W so humbling very wise woman and you know you might interesting sort of an allergy and I can tell you you before I moved in your calls work as a corporate attorney in Australia and doesn't nine. We had one huge huge multi multi million dollar precedent-setting case case and When Hohmann rested and foot you know tomorrow? It's going to repeat and then again and again and again same time it was also the remember the two of them and even strategy became maximus protests Lot of participation contempt to attack Israel and in the space of today's with the Steiner's council With whom I'm actually will so these are affairs director for the Zionist cancelled susceptible. Living straight anymore. Still very much. A stretch still has deepened. My Haden's tilting. Little things to try and sort of strengthen strengthen that relationship which is very critical So that time to nine together the show the people we immediately literally sprung to action. You know in the community debate. How do we respond public not public? What do we do so we organized a massive rally with like several thousands of people within forty-eight hours to come out of Charvis support the solidarity with Israel with Jewish people in during this difficult time and when I came home from that I thought well bets something meaningful that's something that's really important and me the unreal sort of difference living in Israel being caught of life here? I always thought that deep appreciation respectful those in the desk mazing tremendous does things necessary critical things to support Israel's to strengthen the bone but for me personally I decided this is sort of a real turning point on the watch. Sure everything's happening here as an outsider or a could be here. Could be part of the change. I conferred I could speak. Could be both in all aspects of society and things are a truly really really matter for me being here now. It's this incredible attracts plans to people's sense of vibrancy in meaning of life and purpose for me. It's something deeply import so I always say I always go back to the point that a lot of people ask me you know what are the things you like about aaliyah and there are a lot. Ah Them but one of the things I really find it different than you. Don't get in the American community or probably the show as well as part of an don't feel part of the nation right. You're your own silence in each community. I live in teaneck. I've my Schule. I have my schools here. You know something happens.

Israel Arson Jewish Congress New York Musab Perga Europe Ellie Mandelbaum UN Human Rights Council Congress Tennyson Middle East European Parliament United States teaneck aaliyah twitter Geneva executive director Frieden