19 Episode results for "E. U"

UK Backtracks on Full EU Border Checks Amid Coronavirus Crisis

Newscast - Africa

01:00 min | 4 months ago

UK Backtracks on Full EU Border Checks Amid Coronavirus Crisis

"You're listening to the news at this hour on Africa. Business Radio. K's government's is expected to apply much less rigorous e you boil the checks on impulse that is initially planned after the Brexit's transition period finishes at the end of this year, the Financial Times reports ministers abandoned plans to introduce fueled checks after pressure from businesses, a government source told the BBC would take a pragmatic and flexible approach due to coronavirus. Had committed to introduce import controls on E. U. Gut's in January the souls of said ministers recognized the impact. The virus was having on businesses unsold pragmatism and flexibility imports made sense doubt, business adjust the changes that win now imminent. And that was the news at this time when Africa Business Radio, you can continue to sin life online at www dot Africa business radio dot, com, all I'm able APP. Thank you for listening.

Africa Business Radio dot Africa Africa E. U. Gut Financial Times BBC
Sunday 3 November

Monocle 24: Midori House

28:38 min | 1 year ago

Sunday 3 November

"You're listening to Monaco's house view first broadcast on the third of November two thousand nineteen Sunday with the U. K. will examine the role of the E. U.'s bad cop in the brexit battle my audience people ext half so stay with us this is Mongols House view starts now gossip Murray bill a journalist for the French media welcome to the stadium gives us this is a deterrent to others well some might say that this is an approach taken by France and it president the same has just happened again with the second deadline of pushing it back from the thirty at the center of the negotiations he wants to be seen as the leader of Brexit in a way and even now having to dos trust parisiens into onto having seen that some MP's were now willing to Consider deals Prime Minister British Prime Minister I wanted to do which is basically forced the MP's that he would be you know the time constraint would be useful in terms of solving and there are three words that have come up in excuse me what you've said in the useful in some other people suggesting that macaroni actually is deliberately being because the good cop was a bit absent you haven't heard really about Merkel's position and compared to last time so I it can't exactly work like that sometimes the the paper talk about but it's true that in a way and that Boris Johnson but at some points even my call sometimes is accused of acquatic basically it's not at all just saying parliament you have a limited amount of time to do something but awesome macaroni and Boris Johnson are in agreement is there any chance that Emmanuel macron the French government is reconciled with the FDA idea of another brexit that's something that's

Monaco E. U. France Brexit Prime Minister Merkel Boris Johnson Murray president Emmanuel macron FDA
Spain Begs EU for 1.5 Trillion

Newscast - Africa

00:58 sec | 6 months ago

Spain Begs EU for 1.5 Trillion

"You're listening to the news at this hour on Africa Business Radio. The Spanish government's plans to propose to its e U partners that a block creates a one point five trillion euro fund to aid recovering countries. Worst hit by the current virus crisis. This is according to an internal documents cited by L. PI newspaper. According to reports Spain's Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez plans to make a formal proposal to his E. U. Colleagues during a summit on Thursday. The newspaper set the funds proposed by the Spanish government's would be financed by perpetual debts. Raised Bar twenty-seven country European Union and the Cash Center Defense Countries would count as buyers and not that that was the news at this time on Africa. Business Radio you can continue to listen live online at. Www Dot Africa business radio DOT COM OFF IR ARABLE APP. Thank you for listening.

Spanish government Africa Dot Africa Pedro Sanchez Cash Center Defense Countries Prime Minister Spain European Union L. PI E. U. Colleagues
Riot Games Expands European Offices, Responsibilities

The Esports Minute

01:42 min | 3 months ago

Riot Games Expands European Offices, Responsibilities

"Ride Games Europe just got a lot bigger empty g reports losses once again amid dreams in the sports minute presented by sports network. Right Games just expanded the European division from overseeing the L. E.. C. E. U. Masters to a much wider scope. The new team will still be covering the L. C. E. U. Masters Bul also be responsible for the Turkish Championship League. The Continental League eastwards initiatives in the Middle East and all regional leagues in Europe. Right has been very successful that he countries run their own version of the legends E. Sports, but there appears to be some centralizing going on in the past few months. Every League operates under the banner of L. O. L. E. Sports the Elsie C. K. being the final of the four major regions moving to a long term partnership model. They technically are franchises. Don't get it confused. There's definitely some increased uniformity going on for had to guess I'd say rights. He's a big benefit and having regionalized. Also cover smaller leaks nearby to the main region that keeps everyone on the same page when it comes to sponsors, format and competitive integrity. Now another east. Sports news modern. Times Group, the parent company of ESL Dream. ACT reported a loss of over two million dollars in announced cutbacks, future events and T G is likely to eastward company, most impacted by this pandemic and live events still cloudy from a fan perspective the companies in for a rough year for sure. That's all these words minute. If you for a company looking to expand its reach, east sports, these sports minute eastwards. Our podcasts are looking for a sponsor. If you're interested, please e mail east sports network CEO. Mark Timoc using the e mail in the bio of this show. Also, if you enjoy the show, please read and subscribe. It helps out a ton as always. I'll be back on Monday with the biggest Ford story today in just a few minutes.

L. C. E. U. Masters Bul Europe Middle East Continental League Turkish Championship League E. U. Masters Mark Timoc Ford ESL Dream CEO Times Group Elsie C. K. L. O. L. T G two million dollars
Brexit  Whose rules are these anyway?

Rewind For More Info

07:26 min | 9 months ago

Brexit Whose rules are these anyway?

"Welcome talk show this is Jack. Blasted misses the rewind for more INFO. PODCAST so episode to here and I'm only record because type. I'm going to have a day so we should avenue the one about a week's turmoil but anyway there was a little spot in the papers that is really about Dominic Robb Saber rattling around the European Union. The House oversight to of a Walter whether we will oh buildings different rules and I just thought that I would actually put in here as is my what I don't know and basically we'll just have a quick look at the The fact that there's a number of documents out there which are Lincoln the show notes which really Put paid to some of these similar log. You'RE GONNA see in the press. So don't worry about those log uments Kazan just absolute Waste of time. So we've actually got a study that has been done on the UK's EU with George Agreement. I'M GONNA lead to that. There is the actual political declaration which sets out the framework for the future relationship between the EU and the United Kingdom and that was published in March twenty nine thousand nine hundred and is violet. So I'M GONNA put a link to that I of course we have the agreement on the withdrawal of the United Kingdom gripper northland with lions from the European Union and crucially the European as MC energy community and that again is March. Twenty nine thousand nine so these are the things that we're actually agreed to and It is I'm black and whites What what what people's duties? He's aw in in in this regard yes indeed absolutely so that being said there's also a bit of talk about about the Australian type trade agreement. I'm the Canadian type trade agreement. An stilted quickly go through vs To try and you know Get to the Muslim What's the difference between them and it won't take very long so Please sit down on it. Asks guilt and so the Canadian style trade. Ed Agreement is quite simple. Really just means that there is no to no tariffs on a number of agreed goods which I Trade between the E U block and Canada as these goods or all pre region in in advance obviously and They've already checked on the standards of these things and they've checked on the Or all of that packaging stuff that needs donors. Well if there is any dispute of course then on the E. U. side it's under the EU governance. So they caught will will make decisions around this and on the Canadian scientists into that governance so any decisions made on a vessel things to say for instance e you send across something which was of a low uh-huh standard that was not set out as agreed then. The Canadian court would take Actions and probably take it to the European call in you know the do they will last stuff but the point being is the governance belongs to the individual entities forms of a better word. So certain number Goodson I this low to free tariff trade and the other side on this as well is basically Canadian. Companies can bid on Authority projects all contracts within the EU. Block example Bob the builder in Canada midday can actually Put forward a bid and say yes. I'll build you the hospital in Munich. which is very good? What so stuff and and vice versa crucially so you have that agreement in place? I'm on the other. One is really around the old favor of placement for names of goods so such aspro and do what they produce in Canada. Maple APL syrup right so Canadian Maple Syrup Awada in Okinawa reproduced in Canada Whereas you know a Palm Tom can only be named and produced in AS Roma's of Italy so those agreements are in place? That's what the Canadian style agreement in is It's not complicated at all. It took several years to get that it was only Agreed upon in in September two thousand nine hundred nineteen however most of the actual companies that the entities involved of boom working I'm to that standard full of you know right now. I'm at the point on the point. I'm clumsily trying to say here is is Donna still hasn't been ratified by all of the EU countries involved and yet it's an action now than the Australian Trade Agreement that is starting to get mentioned in in the newspapers. There is no Australian trade agreement. It's been looked at. It's been pointed at you know effectively at this current stage. It's a WTO rules else. So it's a bit of a red herring to say there's an Australian trade agreement. Not People will default to what they do is they just say. We'll we'll default to WTO rules. Why not saying that? I is probably because it's less palatable to say that you know People people will think there's an Australian type trade agreement a why can't we go for that. Well there isn't so they go that's why and that's it really envelopes. Owed thank you very much for listening and I know is all very short and everything. But that's so I will see you next time again. Jack blast rewind for more INFO dot COM Gals on twitter. On Real Jack Blast and Gezim. FACEBOOK book are rewarded for more info of a great week. That's the loveliest thing I've ever heard

George Agreement European Union Canada United Kingdom Dominic Robb Saber WTO Canadian court Walter twitter FACEBOOK Kazan United Kingdom Lincoln Goodson E. U. MC energy Munich. Donna Okinawa
S1E16: Krisjanis Karins: Latvia Is Primed For Far-Sighted Investors

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

41:56 min | 1 year ago

S1E16: Krisjanis Karins: Latvia Is Primed For Far-Sighted Investors

"This is what's ahead and I'm Steve Forbes in a moment. You'll hear my fascinating conversation with the Prime Minister of Latvia Christian courage courage he was visiting the United States and I couldn't resist the opportunity to have them in for a chat. He's an American born. In American of Latvian parents went to Latvia twenty years ago and is now prime minister extraordinary country. Most people don't know about it but it's a gem and he's a most unusual leader but first here's what's ahead this week. Earnings are starting to come out and they'll turn into a deluge in the next week or so and that will determine how the second quarter went and give investors a feeling of what's GonNa lie ahead in the third and fourth quarters the markets done very well since December people are expected to do even better. All of this bullish sentiment makes me a little leery. I think the market's going to do well but I wouldn't be surprised. If we get the kind of pause that will make investors shaky and that'll be your buying opportunity but you'll probably be too scared scared to take advantage of it prime minister great pleasure to have you here. Thank you very much pleasure to be here. Your Country Latvia's had rather tortured history as you pointed out in the past Christianity came by European Standards Rather late <hes> you've always had to be fending off Poland Sweden Germany Russia and your country didn't achieve independence until nineteen nineteen and how to fight a two year war to secure that nineteen thirty nine it gets divvied up between Stalin and Hitler Russia occupies again Soviets occupy Germany invades Soviets come back. It's nineteen eighteen forty four near the end of the war and the Soviets come in and occupy the country until you achieve independence in nineteen ninety one so were your own family. History is highly interesting. <hes> your mother mother and your father I think was the ages of five and eight got out of Latvia the turmoil of the war near the end and made it to Sweden. Tell us a little bit about your journey here and then to Latvia while <hes> it's is the fall of nineteen forty four is the Soviet armies are advancing over Latvia once again. It's the time <hes> german-occupied and the Soviets are coming back. One western Peninsula of let remained <hes>. How'd you say the German minds <hes> held it against the Soviets and <hes> almost two hundred thousand refugees made it to the West most made to Germany and about four and a half thousand and small fishing boats went across the Baltic Sea at night to Sweden and both of my parents families Emily's they did know each other time independently made it to Sweden? That's where they grew up. <hes> that's where they met married and they emigrated further <hes> to the U._S.. <hes> when do they immigrate to the U._S.. Is <hes> I believe nineteen fifty eight and this was in Pennsylvania or where where would they settle. They settled in Delaware Element and Delaware. That's why was also born. There's a Swedish community in Delaware yes <hes> coincidentally <hes> but it was one of my fathers uncles who was refugee through the <hes> German. <hes> displaced person camps got an entry visa into the U._S. and then afterwards sponsored the small part of the family that had managed to flee everyone gathered then <hes> in Delaware. We lived close to one another <hes> and grew up there and you were born in the end of December nineteen sixty four. Yes sixty four that that's <hes> that's a great year. I think yes so you went to school <hes> in the U._S.. You've got to be a from Saint. John's no might be as from the University of Pennsylvania Saint. John's spent the first two years then I transferred <hes> to the University of Pennsylvania. GotTa be a and eventually <hes> you got the P._H._d.. In nineteen ninety six and it was in linguistics. Yes you speak five languages while I speak a few languages I think people who speak them well would say I don't speak so many languages well but I like to communicate great <hes> so I I don't have any hangups about speaking what are the languages obviously English Latvian German Russian French and Latvia as well as its neighbors Estonia and Lithuania after a rocky start in the in early nineteen ninety s became sort of the Baltic tigers and even <hes> until two thousand and eight your country took a severe hit but recovered from that you you served as Finance Minister I mean Economics Minister Mr Before two thousand four two thousand six. Tell US briefly what you learn from that stint and then <hes> what happened after two thousand and eight while <hes> I think you've you've sort of summed up history very well. <hes> we are a tenacious people <hes> so <hes> when you <hes> learn to take a hitter to you learn to get up afterwards as well and <hes> when the financial crisis came in two thousand eight two thousand nine G._D._p.. Decreased just by about almost twenty five percent of the course of a year and a half so that's that's a nosedive <hes> depression <hes> yes but actually <hes> what everyone did <hes> was simply <hes> hunker down we decreased real real wages so we had the goal of entering the euro zone <hes> so instead of devalue currency we cut our own wages internally starting with the prime minister going all the way down and it was accepted by society joined the E U and two thousand four her and at the time you had a currency board for your currency tied to the euro we were tied to plus minus one percent but we really had a fixed rate of <hes> many years prior and breaking that fixed rate would have <hes> been another sort of hell for households that that had a considerable amount of debt <hes> ninety percent zero denominated <hes> we at the time <hes> were importing a lot more energy than we're doing today and all of those external <hes> <hes> external liabilities would mean that had we devalued the currency <hes> we would have been in a much worse situation than what we instead decided to do so you avoided the opium of economics that you can devalue. Of Your Way to prosperity you knew you had to keep steady and just work your way through it. Well we have an understanding that money doesn't grow on trees <hes> and <hes> If you've been <hes> unwittingly overextended you simply have to consolidate a we did that which means within just a couple of short years we return to growth. It's actually the the opposite of Greece Greece's tried to avoid the pain and for fifteen years they've had trouble including very high unemployment rates still today <hes> Latvia's growing <hes> <hes> roughly four percent a year <hes> our unemployment rate is down to seven percent in the capital city. It's it's below four percent. We have a shortage of labor in Latvia. We don't have an excess of labor. Wages have been going up. Productivity has been going up. <hes> investments have been going up so <hes> we actually are quite convinced that at least for our society we did the right thing and your national debt. <hes> is roughly what thirty five percent thirty six percent of G._D._p.. Yes I it's it's it's in the thirties it. It looks like it has a tendency now to be decreasing again. It'll be going about thirty three percent. <hes> before the crisis <hes> we hadn't even lowered that we had about ten percent that of course we you know the crisis did cost money <hes> but we're certainly not leveraged as a country the way that many European countries are Italy. I think being you know the one in the most precarious situation. They have one hundred thirty hundred forty percent that <hes> to G._D._p.. <hes> so that's that's not a very good the situation for them so you're brought up in the U._S.. And you pay your first visit to Latvia. I believe in Nineteen eighty-four. That's correct and tell US shares with us. The shock you saw when you went there well I <hes> I went to Latvia from at the time a Latvian speaking high school in Germany so after I finished high school in the U._S. I went to a a Latvian speaking high school. In Germany was the last shall we say hold out from the refugee camps. All the other Latvian schools closed this one with help from the German government had not at the time Germany had thirteen years of high school so I went to grade thirteen and from there with three other friends we took a train ride to took forty hours. I remember that <hes> to go from Berlin to Riga and it was like at the time stepping into a completely different world <hes> it was a gray world physically. The buildings were all grey. <hes> everything was written in Russian on the buildings. You know the the the street signs. The you know. Stores is <hes> that that was rushing. It seemed that about every third person on the street in the ego was in military uniform. <HES> DIGA was <hes> the center of of the Big Baltic Soviet military <hes> area and there were many many soldiers on leave walking around the streets <hes> it was quite dismal when you got to the families and you got inside. That's when you saw the true. Latvian spirit opened up people very open very smiling very very <hes> unhospitable but the view on the street was different almost thirty years later that IGA is unrecognizable compared to the the impression it had in nineteen eighty-four <hes> diga is it was a beautiful city then but it's a colorful city now how people are smiling on the streets. People are very open not only at home but also <hes> society is opened up and it is it's it's like when you see a flower bloom. I invite anyone to come to the. It's a beautiful city very hospitable. Were you worried in Nineteen eighty-four that you might get detain there <hes> since people did still WANNA get out we had any worries that they might say oh you really a Latvian well and in Nineteen eighty-four <hes> <hes> coming from the West there was only one hotel in the area where you were allowed to stay and to go outside of the capital city. You had to get a special permit and be escorted by the K._G._B.. <hes> the good news that I realized was that it was such an inefficient system that the escort who is assigned to me asked if <hes> if I wouldn't tell if he simply left because he wanted to visit some friends and relatives and would leave me on my own and I said don't worry I won't tell so <hes> I realized immediately that that the the the system although oppressive in nature was also inefficient reminds one of the story of grimmer story when souls a Nielsen was arrested and the two two soldiers escorting to prison he had to give them directions on how to get around Moscow yeah well I mean the the inefficiencies of the system of the Soviet system and one of the reasons why collapsed I mean was an unsustainable system because actually very few people believed in the system and everyone seemed to be working to undermine it <hes> and remember Latvia. We are culturally speaking. We're part of Roman Christendom <hes> so oh when you took away autocracy <hes> maybe unlike say some countries in the Middle East or North Africa where <hes> you know autocracies toppled and many people thought I including well then democracy wood floors because people long for independence and freedom and I don't doubt that people long for independence and freedom but apparently that's not just a given in the three Baltic countries <hes> it worked out that way because that's fundamentally the kind of people that we are <hes> an even fifty years soulful background yes fifty years of Soviet oppression could not <hes> wipe that away <hes> so we we bounced back a very rapidly after regaining independence similarly bounced back very rapidly after the tremendous economic crisis of two thousand eight two thousand nine. What made you decide to leave the U._S. and live in Latvia? What remembers I was growing up? <hes> <hes> I I grew up. I could say in two parallel societies so one was <hes> you know going going to school. I was the only Latvian except my older sister but we I was the only let me never in any of my classes when I was in high school is the only laughing in the entire high school but on on on the weekends and in the Summers <hes> I would attend to Latvian school. Let Latvian summer camps in there is tremendously well-connected <hes> network of Latvians at the time and still now <hes> in the U._S.. <hes> I grew up with the the realization Asian that that I am <hes> the child of a political refugees and should the opportunity <hes> be we always had the understanding that we would return and help to <hes> rebuild the country that would I need help anyway and when that opportunity came in I had finished my <hes> I moved back really with a with a very general intent. I wanted to be part of the rebirth of a nation that does not come <hes> every day and when you happen. And to be in a generation where that occurs it's really like a miracle I felt it also as as a privilege and a responsibility to participate I of course never anticipated that I would get into politics even less that I would become like got you into politics <hes> well. I was in business before so I I I wanted to <hes> teach at the university but in the in the early nineties there was how should we say some resistance to opening up a teaching posts to competition from the outside. I'm I'm being rather polite and <hes> so I I figured well if they're not playing that does not change well. If if they're not going to give me a job I'll give myself a job and I went into business and to deal with a friend of mine. <hes> we created a frozen boo frozen foods distribution company. I I knew nothing about business. I knew nothing about frozen foods. They knew even less about distribution but I learned a hell of a lot <hes> it was completely exciting but <hes> at the same time when you're in business then you see a lot of the say the regulation that is actually you're quake convinced it's it's hampering you a little bit and in two thousand two thousand one then former Bank of the governor of Latvia <hes> a young guy he's just a couple years older than I am but at the time no he's we're both still quite young. <hes> he said he was stepping coming down from the governorship of the Bank to form a political party to <hes> improve the system and he had one call you know for the people who wanted to join him. He said I will take anyone but no one who has has any ties to the old Communist Party and I thought thought well of all the ties I have. That's what I really don't <hes> so. I got in touch with him. I I wanted to exchange. Some ideas is invited to the table. One thing led to another <hes>. They asked me I would be willing to run. <hes> I got elected. I became head of the parliamentary lamented group than it became a <hes> <hes> a minister <hes> <hes> then I was elected to the European Parliament served there for ten years. <hes> was asked my party to be the to be the candidate to be prime minister and as it turned out <hes> and it worked out that I'm prime minister so in life I see sometimes <hes> you never know where the leads will follow. One thing leads to another. I got into politics because I I wanted to help improve things and sort of is that why you said when you became prime minister. I have absolutely nothing to lose well. I still feel that I have nothing to lose only to gain that is if I can do something good for my country. <hes> I will do that and that's where I'm fully committed <hes> <hes> that's fully committed to doing. How are you coping with the challenge of a coalition government? People pointed out run-up still elections. Everyone makes big promises than you. Come in. You GotTa Kabul government together and then you've got to figure out. Where do we go from here? Well <hes> perhaps I have in some ways an advantage of being in politics a number of years. I've learned that <hes> you have to be a little wary of the simple and big promises because they're usually a little difficult to deliver and I was often criticized for not making taking the out of this world crazy promises and at the end of the day was the only one able to put a coalition Together <hes> because I'm not beholding by <hes> unfulfillable promises now. Some of my colleagues in government are having a little bit of a problem because they some of them promise the moon and you know we're we're it works a little differently in the real world but <hes> I get along very well with all my coalition partners. I think they all have something to contribute and what I'm working working <hes> on a daily basis just to coordinate that activity to help lead it <hes> and to keep everyone on board <hes> you said that <hes> you want to shift away from Latvia as a place with good workers at low wages ages two highly educated workers who can command high wages in other words high tech Estonia's gone into high tech major way up how you moving forward on that while if if you look at the sheer numbers where we actually export more high tech than northern neighbors the Estonians but we also have a larger economy alosha population but <hes> it certainly is heading in this direction <hes> what we have what what used to be just a couple of isolated companies which were quite advanced. We're getting larger and larger ecosystems systems and these ecosystems are starting to interact with each other <hes> and <hes> so what you have remember people who who are pressed for fifty years so say you're bright in Latvia in nineteen sixties or seventies <hes> in the U._S.. If you're bright <hes> you may have gone into you know <hes> based upon your interest may be studied. Philosophy may be stood studied literature <hes> other things like that while the Soviets managed to cripple the humanities so all of the brains went into the stems into the into the sciences <hes> which means that we have tremendous leap positive legacy of people who really know their stuff <hes> we have <hes> a company for example <hes> WHO's only competition in the world is apparently a couple of companies in the U._S.. The deal with <hes> radiation detection devices <hes> these are nuclear physicists who have a tremendous knowledge who've created a company that creates a products. I I've visited them. It's so specific specific they actually tool from from from a metal shop all the way through to the to the software <hes> that has <hes> <hes> devices that can detect <hes> the full range. I it it it sort of blows me away. How such a small country <hes> how we can do that and so again we find these gems and it's because of the of the it's also the creativity that that we as a people have been sort of forced to foster throughout <unk> out the generations? It's not only in the Soviet times but <hes> we have <hes> in our northern part of the world perhaps one of the most innovative and creative societies which shows itself also among other things in the arts show <hes> Latvia's he is very much of an unknown story <hes> one of the things you're doing to try to attract even more foreign investment is <hes> corruption referred to <hes> rats the you want to get the rats out of your house and <hes> you're working with the Council of Europe along committee of experts of anti money laundering measures in the financing of terrorism your <hes> your your combating that what what walk us through to try you say you WANNA create trust. It's not with words but with actions walk through that <hes> well. Let's take the financial sector so our country was hit as many countries in the north of Europe and the banking systems <hes> dirty money <hes> looking for loopholes looking thing for ways to infiltrate into the European banking system right. Unfortunately there are often successful also they were successful in our country. <hes> this is bad. This is bad for a country <hes>. It's bad for business. <hes> it's bad reputation but important. Important more importantly it it it's a high risk of corruption and of course <hes> <hes> terrorism financing and and <hes> weapons of mass destruction proliferation so funding <hes> people who you know who do these crazy things <hes> so what what we did is <hes> what I would call a complete overhaul of the bank watchdog system in our country so in the past six months. This is the first thing we actually have completed in terms of full of full <hes> set of legislation which has been signed signed sealed and delivered of amending our laws giving our law enforcement much more power to prosecute financial crime also raising the awareness of what financial crime is and sort of the crowning part is that we're also because we changed changed the remains of our bank watchdog bank watchdog a separate from the central bank. It was taken out <hes> maybe ten years ago <hes> we are now <hes> having a public <hes> an international <hes> competition for a new bank watchdog so if anyone is listening to this podcast feels that they want to take the knowledge that they have learned in the banking system understanding risk assessment et Cetera et Cetera and want to come in <hes> to Latvia <hes>. We have an open an international tender submit your C._V. and if you happen to be a Latvian you'll have a certain advantage because it means you also will already know our country but we're really looking for someone to spearhead to <hes> make the laws now turn over into <hes> implementation so I need someone who's going to implement that which we have already prepared just part of a talk about specialized economic court whereas you say slow and unpredictable proceedings contribute to corruption you want something that can operate with efficiency. Yes <hes> my justice minister. <hes> he's a great guy. He has some wonderful ideas in one that he's proposing and I think it's the right idea. <hes> is that we set up a specialized court for financial crime crime because financial crime <hes> is actually something which <hes> traditional judges have a little bit of trouble sort of understanding. WHO's the victim? What is the crime <hes>? Why is it bad? Who's The you know it? It's not the same as someone stealing a box of pencils. <hes> it's a little more complex than that <hes> and <hes> with <hes> offshore structures etc etc it it can be very very opaque <hes> so if we set up a court of specialized judges and also prosecutors <hes> we want to make sure it's it's a signal I I want that if you have dirty money and you're thinking of trying to wash it into the European banking system <hes> do not come to our country. You will fail great <hes> the purpose of your visit due to the U._S.. <hes> the purpose of my visit is i. I've met with government officials. I've met with representatives of of <hes> industry with various think tanks in Washington D._C.. The main goal is to bring out the message of what great things I think we're doing our country and to increase interest for investment. I am looking for more private investment into our economy. I think Latvia has a lot to offer you can get a good return on your investment because because the environment and the people are such that will help make that happen and what we can really offer as a country generally speaking and you know all generalizations are are a little vague by definition but if you can imagine like a tanker and a little speedboat <hes> Many U._S. companies they're large tankers for them to move to change. You know there's there's a command it goes all the way down and takes time and then someone's turning the big wheel and slowly the tanker Meuse whereas on little speedboat you know it's just one guy you want to go left you just turn the wheel left and it goes left immediately circles around the tanker. We are a country of speedboats so when larger companies want to develop new and innovative products and and and services <hes> we are a great country that can offer wonderful partners to do that. <hes> whether it's in Fintech or other high-tech <hes> areas <hes> we have people and small companies that are waiting to be discovered and to partner up with the larger companies <hes> <hes> in terms of foreign direct investments. It seems like an impressive number for country of your size C fourteen sixteen billion. What is that of all of the figures that we've seen since the crisis two thousand eight and two thousand thousand nine the rebound of the economy? The slowest part has been the private investment. It's going back up but it's not going up fast enough so our country's still has in a sense an over reliance on European Union funds the way the E._U.. Functions is the <hes> everyone pays into the kitty. The regions that have <hes> less development get more of that money coming from the Common Kitty and Latvia's is on the receiving end the net receiving and we pay in but we <hes> get out a little more than we pay. It's a great system but actually this is. This is not our goal. Our goal is not to be a recipient. Our goal is to be a net payer to help other regions. We don't consider ourselves inherently poor unable <hes> we just had fifty years of of not being able to run and now we're running and we're catching up quite quickly so I'm looking for the private investment to complement the investment which is coming from Europe as a whole on the tax side as a attractive place. <hes> your corporate tax is twenty percent but it's unusual in that you don't have to pay the tax to distribute the profits. How does that work? I this is <hes> the previous government change the law on this so <hes> reinvested profits do not get taxed and the idea is to <hes> <hes> encourage courage companies to continue to invest <hes> so the the tax is only hit once you distribute <hes> gained so and we don't companies not to distribute gains but we want to make it more attractive to continue investing and growing because when companies invest that creates more jobs and any possibility bringing the flat tax back to Latvia one of my favorite subjects yeah I I actually also think <hes> it has a lot of advantages ages <hes> some number of years ago we moved into a partially I could say progressive system. I think that if anyone were to try to reintroduce the flat tax you simply would not get enough votes because there's also a sense of <hes> and I think it is it is true <hes> a fairness so that if everyone pays their proportional share <hes> than those who have more can also pay a little more and I think in all societies it's important so for example the way I've your educational system we have top. topnotch educational system for the motivated our top students that they can get into any university around the world plenty studying in the U._S. at the best universities. That's not a problem. They're very well prepared but what I think all societies have to think about its responsibility ability of government. What about those young guys and girls who maybe won't be going to college or you know won't be going to the to the top ten a world universities but we still need them as as useful members of societies still start great companies that they can do great jobs exactly so it's it's looking at how to raise the lowest segment and that's where I'm really focused on because we in our country? We do very well with the elite. If you look at <hes> <hes> sports if you look at <hes> <hes> Education <hes> if you look at the arts <hes> you will see Latvians throughout the world I mean you know the the New York met has Latvian <hes> opera stars singing and people pay lots of money to hear them because they're they're just damned good <hes> but I need to also focus on those who are not going to be the met opera stars who are not going to be running the big companies and to raise that up as well. It's it's more looking towards the finish model of not knocking down the elite beat but raising up the low end and we're such a small society. I'm I absolutely positive we'll be able to do that as well. which is again a very positive signal for any investor? You will have qualified workers at any level that you're looking for so far investors festers you can offer really everything <hes> motivated workers highly educated workers and the government that wants them their banker once said capital goes where it is welcomed and stays words well treated <unk>. I think that's <hes> that's a very good way to say it now. One of the challenges you have is demographic. <hes> one you had a lot of Russians forcibly moved to Latvia and that <hes> horrible phase but also <hes> immigration coming in at you integrate <hes> perhaps it's not as big in your country but it certainly has put huge stress on the E._U.. Could be the rock on which at founders <hes> you've had some thoughts on <hes> how how to deal with that. I your own country still twenty five percent Russian how do you how is that going. How how you truly integrating where the Russians feel? We want to stay here. We don't want anything to do with Moscow. Well <hes> it's about twenty four twenty twenty-five percent today but it was forty nine percent in one thousand nine hundred nine <hes> so <hes> the process of integration Israel. It's happening <hes> so in the nineteen eighties in the Soviet occupation. If those <hes> say a mixed marriage latvian-russian chances are the child grow grow up Russian speaking with a Russian <hes> identity today. It's the opposite if there's a mixed marriage chances are that child will have primarily Latvian identity. Certainly <hes> all young children on the schools are learning the national language means. They're you know the job prospects completely open for them so the process is happening. It's being hampered because we're <hes> continue living with <hes> direct propaganda coming from Moscow you know on on you know it direct <hes> th the people speak Russian they they view Russian Satellite T._v. for free and they see that <hes> <hes> what Moscow is saying do not integrate you don't belong to a another country you belong to mother Russia <hes> the problem that I think Moscow has with his signals. I think it falls is a little bit on wooden years because when we look at <hes> migration patterns we don't see anyone heading from Latvia to Russia. We see also the Russian speakers if they move anywhere they're moving to Berlin or they're moving to London or they're moving to Stockholm. They are not heading west because the east because there. There's no job prospects. They're so Russia is losing. Its population far faster than we are but we still have a challenge. It's also with the wage differential historically ten years ago is it was much worse. We had a lot of people leaving very few coming back today. It's almost at equilibrium so people are leaving and coming back into the same almost what two hundred thousand <hes> we have. <hes> estimates are between two and three hundred thousand Latvians currently working abroad <hes> mostly in the E._U.. Primarily merrily concentrated in Germany <hes> the the U._k.. And Ireland <hes> but you'll find Latvians <hes> working absolutely everywhere and also moving around Europe <hes> so it is a big challenge but <hes> in terms of <hes> <hes> integration. We have a very simple policy. We call it the open door policy. Please <hes> if you're born there <hes> if you're living there you're free to naturalize you can <hes> easily attain citizenship and <hes> it's. It's not a difficult thing it's only a question of whether you want to and what we see well now children who are born. That's that's an automatic thing but if we look at those who are not naturalizing. It's really only people who are considerably older than I am. I was born in sixty four so this is P.. These are people who are born in the nineteen fifties. Maybe nineteen forties who are not naturalizing. My understanding is that many of them may be simply. Don't want to accept the fact that that the the part of the Soviet Union they came to is today. You know an independent country. They don't really want to accept that well. I'm not happy with that fact but shall we say the demographics are changing and and time <hes> does its own anyway but what we're really focusing on is the young kids the school age kids in that. We're seeing very positive trends. You've talked about the immigration crisis talk about the e U <hes>. You said that <hes> the E.. U. is a work in progress. It's it's it's a very diplomatic way of putting things but <hes> the immigration in crisis. <hes> you've talked about one. They've got to integrate do better job integrating as you've done but you also very explicit you got to control the borders while <hes> is he in the E._U.. Our Single Market Single Market of five hundred million so for Latvian company noon who invests in Latvia. Your whole market is not the two million people of Latvia's the five hundred million of the E._U.. But the presupposition is that we keep no internal borders but in order for that to work you actually have to have sound external borders and we saw in the great migration crisis which had you know knock on political crisis so <hes> Anti Immigration Parties Flaring Up and and <hes> disturbing the status quo <hes> I think it is important to control that now the e U is has has a deal with Turkey paying <hes> Turkey money to help <hes> you know support the the refugee camps there so that those people don't just spill over but we also have a responsibility responsibility. It's more difficult part of coming up with a clear set of rules and criteria how you could enter the E._U.. Legally I as a whole and see the E._U.. Is a little unlike the United States in the important way that we are not a country a federal. Federal <hes> Union <hes> we are a union of <hes> very proudly independent member states <hes> but we know that in in many regards we have to pull our our sovereignty to gain the benefits so if you want a single market you kind of have to give up <hes> some some things and it's a great advantage overall but it is keeping making sure the external border is is secure and there are clear rules for how and I think one of the keys is also a development aid so so how can the E._U. is a very wealthy society. <hes> help <hes> also with <hes> well-spent monies to increase the wellbeing so that there's less pressure on people wanting to come to the e U <hes> you've pointed out that <hes> the e you is not like the United States yet. How is your call for removing internal barriers? They're still into discussed the internal barriers inside the e U that don't make it a smooth functioning as the U._S. where seamless seamless to go from state to state well interstate commerce. There's a couple of things so I <hes> the U._S.. No one thinks about it but it could be called has a dollar zone so every state in the U._S.. Uses the U._S.. Dollars knowing people don't think about it because of course everyone does in Europe not all member states use the same currency so nineteen of us have the Euro <hes> and that's called the euro zone but some countries like Sweden and Denmark <hes> while the U._k.. Who still win but maybe seems to be leaving out if they decide <hes> <hes> are outside and that means that on a transactional basis? There's always a little bit of currency risk for companies. <hes> we have a rather certainly a free flow of people <hes> we have a quite free flow of goods although sometimes local so we say <hes> safety or other standards make it a little difficult to get your product certified across although in theory if you've certified in one member state it certified everywhere there little clever ways to have <hes> would effectively our trade barriers but <hes> the the biggest difficulty is still in the services sector is so the ability of e you companies to compete say for public tenders across state boundaries it happens it doesn't happen. I've been freely enough <hes> and this is one of the areas where I'm very <hes> adamant and worked on his parliamentarian the European Parliament now working as as the head of the government in the European Council that we have to tear down the remaining internal final barriers to trade because Europe has become wealthy because we tore down the borders and we have to keep those borders down and I'm also very adamant supporter of transatlantic e You U._S. relationships. I'm convinced it's a win win situation situation <hes> the U._S. and the E._U.. Are Not competitors in the sense that if one is going up the other has to go down a we can both go up and actually we need each other we do you foresee someday say the E._U.. And the U._S. actually negotiating a free trade agreement <hes> yes. I don't think it's conceivable <hes> I it's going to take some time. It seems right now but the U has been quite successfully Eh negotiating free trade agreements <hes> more and more around the world and <hes> but what what is most frustrating is if you look sort of step back from bird's eye view the U._S.. In the e u these are two huge markets that are founded upon the same underlying fundamental principles of freedom democracy and the rule of law not the rule of thuggery but the rule loss or rules-based system <hes> other large markets around the world so let's think of China if you were to say what are the three the basic tenets of the Chinese economy. I don't know if you would necessarily agree that they are the same freedom democracy and the rule of law they they may be a little different three things <hes> so the question is who is going to set the rules rules of world trade in the future if the E._U. and the U._S. worked together. If we work on a free trade agreement those will be the defacto rules of the game if we don't do that it gives other areas of the world much larger leverage and that in ultimately the wrong will be a disadvantage to our free and democratic societies democracies unfortunate not growing on the world. They're shrinking and those of us who strongly believe in these values. We have to find ways to work together. It's not unusual that we have differences of opinion. We have them in Europe all the time but it's a little bit like a marriage you know every marriage hits a little rocky patch now and again and ultimately a couple has to decide is in the underlying love and trust of one another worth fighting for in many cases. It is an I think certainly the relationship between the U._S. and Europe. We have to think and we have to understand that the the underlying similarities far outweigh any differences. Let's work through the differences but let's not let's not endanger the relationship so on the E._U.. If they deal with the immigration crisis secure the borders learn to integrate the E._U.. Can Be saved the U._S.. Relationship you trust NATO you trust Article Five. Yes so if we work together we'll have a great future. That's a that's a great way to uh-huh and our conversation <hes> I think that's obsolete the direction that we have to hit in. Thank you very much prime minister and congratulations. Thank you very much and now here my reach of the week I have bad news for science fiction fans in recent years. We've been filled with stories that there may be intelligent life like us throughout the universe after all. It's a big place but sadly now the evidence is coming in that we are all alone. Commentary magazine has a cover story titled. Are we alone in the universe question mark the answer is yes. It's written by fellow named Ethan Segal and you can find minded on commentary dot com and another piece absolutely related to this is called the human miracle by John Pod Hauritz also on commentary dot com so we human beings don't expect to be bailed out by other human beings. If we mess up here we gotta do it right because no one's going to rescue us not from another planet. Not another celestial body were at thanks for listening to watch ahead. I'm Steve Forbes looking forward to next week.

Latvia Europe Prime Minister Germany United States West Moscow Latvians Russia Steve Forbes E U European Parliament Delaware John Pod Hauritz Pennsylvania Berlin Estonia Sweden Baltic Sea
TBT  Graham Sessions Founders Interview w/ Steve, Drew & Patrick.

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

23:41 min | 1 year ago

TBT Graham Sessions Founders Interview w/ Steve, Drew & Patrick.

"I think we're going to see them at the National Student Conclave and C._S._M.. Their leaders and travel seriously if you WanNa do what you WanNa do is be a P._t.. Or anywhere in the fifty states Arias they can get you there her short term assignments thirteen weeks or long term assignments test out where you want to do what you WanNa do with travel physical therapy. That's a U.. R. E. U._S. MEDICAL DOT COM and if you're thinking well housing is going to hold me back because I don't know how that works or how to tax work if I lived somewhere but work another during they've got you covered from getting you the placement to everything that comes with it. Arias is the leader in travel P. T. A. U. R. E. U._S. Medical Dot Com. Listen Up. Here's a throwback Thursday episode that you will enjoy this recorded about two years ago at the Graham sessions to small conference. That's actually put on by the private practice section. It's been going for ten years and the deal. It's a very small conference about one hundred fifty attendees and you've got to be invited to get in with only one rule when the topics and ideas are discussed at the conference the ideas and the discussions can leave but you can't say who said what and this let the people say whatever they want without fear of things coming back to bite them. It's pretty innovative so we talked to a three founders of the Graham Sessions Steve Drew and Patrick why it was created and what it's done. Its decade long run so for now just to keep in mind. This conference is still going. We were just lucky enough to be asked to do the founders interview at the tenth anniversary with some insight. You definitely can still take away from episode is brought to you by Owens recovery signs a single source for looking for certification in personalized blood flow restriction rehabilitation training and the equipment. You need to apply find out more about BEF are at Owens Recovery Science Dot Com whether you want to escape the snow or Planet Arias Medical. has you covered ever try rewarding travel assignment during the holiday season with Arias Medical Group Call Arias at one eight hundred three four zero twenty-sixth nineteen or visit Arias Medical Dot Com. That's a U.. R. E. U._S. MEDICAL DOT com. This is the P._G.. Jazz podcast that talks about physical therapy over here bringing together clinicians researchers and four thinking in a show. That's anything but boring. This is the P._G.. Pine cavs with your host Jimmy Mackay Conference Ten Years in the making a decade of physical therapy discussion all under one name. This is Graham sessions. Today we talked to the people who have been there since the beginning we look back over the last ten years of Graham sessions and asked what did I believe in. What do I believe now live onstage from the gun Cesar at Saint Pete Beach in Florida? This is Graham sessions 2017 view with your hosts Teheran Lizzy McCain when you brought me on a new I was GonNa do the intro before you have to introduce everybody else here for the guys on stage right now. Let's here for the guy not on stage right. Now which is drew boss who is in the land of ten thousand lakes aches awaiting the birth of a grand shots drew. Let's get a little bit of a better intro for these guys how about Steve Anderson C._E._o.. Therapeutic associates for nineteen years founder one of them and facilitator of the Graham sessions and recently retired. And we know that because he never stops telling US living the dream state paget Graham Mary P._T.. Classmates Susan mcklusky Graham P._T.. For Twenty five years this Marshall's here for that guy doing it for a quarter century. The beautiful girls oldest is it Mercer P._T.. School and we think she might be I third generation ever like that and not on stage we mentioned your Boston physical therapists with over twenty seven years of experience and we're currently awaiting the word to here the addition to the Graham sessions family so it's we're excited to be here. Thank you for having me to my right and your radio dial Karen Lizzy. Are you excited or what you clap. It's okay so now we're off-script so what brings us here what he got we think we've been under a decade under the influence as they say started in two thousand seven and where are we in two thousand seven two thousand seven Barry Bonds breaks the home run record and then indicted. That's a good yeah. Let's hear for the giants and the needle three dollars and seven cents. A gallon gas little lower now in some places little higher ducks over the senators the spurs sweep Lebron and the cavs drew Carey takes over for Bob Barker more than six thousand shows for the man with the long microphone and Britney Spears went crazy cut off all her hair that was in two thousand and seven since then some things have changed. So what are we want to lead with. What do we want to know? I don't want to get inside their heads so I think one thing that a lot of people that I've spoken to want to know about ah about the Graham sessions is when it first started ten years ago. It was exclusive like a bit more of an invite only now. It's a little more inclusive. There's more people involved so why the change probably because because we were so exclusive we couldn't get enough people here we the idea was that we wanted people in the room that were <hes> good speakers and good thought leaders and people that could really add the conversation that everybody can't but that was kind of the idea so we tried to select people that we thought would be in that category. The one thing I've learned about the Graham sessions is that it's very hard to explain what they are until you've been here okay good because as a student. I just grabbed five months ago so I've been in this business for like ten minutes. I've heard of it. I've seen the name of seeing things online Hashtag and I didn't know what it was and you would call for for us to come here and I was like I still don't after a half hour of you kind of explaining I kind of get it so that was the idea launched it is now or has it become what you thought it would be then. What do you think Patrick definitely just to confess? I was in the House of delegates for about seven years and we're sitting with five hundred of our smartest and brightest list and I just felt like we were in quicksand. We'd just nothing was happening. I'm sitting around with Stephen drew and said God if we could just get a room full of people that we could be off the record and we could just really talk about the issues that are in front of us and of course these guys then made it happen I think today this trip is been exactly exactly what I envisioned. It would be the thoughts the ability to listened to other people speak about ideas. You've been struggling with and kind of help you form. Maybe some new ideas is exactly what I envisioned. It would be when I first heard and try to figure out what actually Graham sessions was fight club talk about it but you're not supposed to talk about it. You're supposed to show up. You don't really know where it is pretty pretty accurate. We just waiting for the APP. Is this show because I really use that related to the fight club so just a little side stories I remember I went to a leadership chip at the time and say you know. Would you like to be involved in this and whatever and they said well. What is it so? I tried to explain it. I won't say names but there were you you can't do that. They're going to kill each other. You can't facilitate. P._T.'s like that just talking whatever they want to the coolest. Louis Conversation Meeting. Oh My podcast say the best conversations happen and happy hour and I feel like as soon as the beer came out yesterday the kind of mood kind of change in this room. I don't know I got really excited and things started to be discussed more freely more openly and I think that little tweak of of kind of treating it like fight club which is where you can say whatever you want when you leave the room it's off the record kind of makes people feel like all right. I'll get up and I'll say that because I'm not going to have to defend what I just said. I felt but the end of my days so it feels so Kudos for you guys for thinking of that which is great we all have those crazy ideas after seven or eight Martinis but actually going through and doing it isn't isn't necessarily easy so so Kudos on you guys and you know you so it's been obviously ten years and there's been a lot of talk and a Lotta Exchange and a lot of what I believes in so looking back on the ten years. Is there any whether it be a particular I what I believe talk or or maybe a discussion that really stands out for you the most they're all like your babies we're asking you. which is your favorite child? No no no. What was your favorite stood out? Here's here's one I told the story yesterday <hes> so I came it was probably the maybe the fourth Graham sessions and I came as bridget you said yesterday with a very strong bias. The topic was why is a P._T.. School so expensive and so I came with a biased attitude of cheesy schools are making a Lotta money off this and they're you know they're just kind of taking advantage of the system and it just costs too much and that's not fair the Lisa slide and who has an educator's you know came up and you're very eloquent beautiful way that she speaks basically said to the private practitioners she said what would you do if overnight fifty percent of your revenue was gone for the next year and we all sat there like Whoa you know he'd probably be out of business and she goes. That's what happened in public education in my world so we had to do something different and so we had to make some decisions so I came out of the Graham sessions thing and I really learned something that I did not know and understand. That's what to me. The group sessions is about what about you stands out. We'll have to confess seeing John over there. I can remember to landmark conversations with John. You know you're not supposed to say sorry. We're recording this but I'm going to believe that I'm also GonNa make you sound like Darth vader so I'm going to know who you are. There's a lot of John's out here but anyways correct me if I'm wrong but I think the whole program that that developed really the idea Kinda was bad at around at some of the first Graham session. I know a lot of people in here have been through that that program something that was very beneficial for our profession really developed or was at least hatched out of some of the discussion knowing that what you had done what you created what you've kind of said motion now doing the thing that you set out when you said you kind of felt like when you're in the just kind of in quicksand sand and not moving the ball WanNa move the ball forward towards the end zone whatever end zone that might be for the profession and actually seeing that come to fruition has to feel prideful moment absolutely and this should be really called Anderson says I mean Steve is made. This thing flocked to don't beautiful job. What's been the hardest part about over the ten years to keep this? It's not easy to put on a conference and it's not easy to continue it successfully. So what were the hardest parts looking back well. I think the hardest part was to kind of come up with things that you could after just a couple of. Ears you could fall into talking about the same four five things every time and <hes> if I heard any criticism about <hes> the Graham sessions it was from a few non private practice people that said all we talk about reimbursement so I get that so just to talk about that same anything so to come up with ideas and ways to to look at our world <hes> in different ways and talk about different things I think is the hardest thing which is why <hes> this year we we had a keynote speaker with Dave chased why we did the debate. It's why we had the skit so we're trying to do different things so that we don't just rehash the same thing over and over and over well. We've we've got a call on the phone jury their morning good morning drill. Everybody really bummed out that you couldn't be here but but <hes> we're glad we're. We're glad you're not here for good reason so any news. Do you have a new addition to the family yet. You know I'm not a patient guy. This is not on my schedule by any means. I think I swear to God. I'm probably more anxious right now than we worked thirty years ago. It's it's clearly a waiting game at this point well. Hey Good luck out there with the family. We were just asking on stage favorite moment. Something look back over the last decade. What do you got what some of that comes to of it to top of mind to lap? When I came on and started listening I figured that had to be Patrick? Talking to slow getting laughs from Minnesota. Keep going what is particularly for the for the two guys up front today number one for Patrick having division to to think the whole concept could go and and then honestly Steve. Who's you know over the last decades put together program after program? I mean it's it's no small task. It's been great to be a small part of it and have always enjoyed it. I think it serves a role within our community of therapists that <hes> is unlike anything else that would serve spoken that I'm sure but <hes> I would just say congratulations particularly. Jabil sounds very drew. We'll let you get back to the family. Appreciate you calling in from Minnesota and good luck out there. Okay Okay my hung up. You can talk bad about them now. Anything Eh Dirk okay. Can I just add one thing. This is your show whatever you want yeah Steve was talking about Lisa's Latin and when I think back through the years I've had the privilege of asking some colleagues from some of the schools in Georgia that were associated with to come and they've been willing to come and I think the bridges in the relationships for them to get to here as educators here the struggles of a lot of private practice people but private practice people to really understand the struggles of educators and with their students and I think I think you would agree that has been a really healthy relationship that has developed out of this. I'm grateful for for for me as a first timer. I just graduated not long ago but seeing some students in the room seeing some people in their first five years of practicing. I just see people who N._P._T.. As long as you guys longer that's a cool mix of people in this type of mix. I think happens at C._S._M.. It happens at next but it's different scale and it's a different setup. People people come into this room expecting something different. This looks like any other conference room but I think you guys walk walk in this room and you expect something different and set the tone and you get something different. That's what I've taken from my first day at Graham sessions yeah I would agree. This is my second Graham sessions and I was a so obviously so oppressed last year that I came back again but I just think it's great that the thing that struck me the most is the wide range of people from different parts of the country different age ranges. I mean you have people who've been Peter for sixty years which I found out which I'm like Kamei's by that out you know and then you have students and it's such a small setting that you can actually talk to people and get to know them get every episode we release delivered fresh subscribe. Subscribe to the podcast and Itunes will play or stitcher radio and never miss an ice cold episode considering a travel assignment over the holidays or ready to escape the cold weather for some Winter Sunshine Arias S. medical group is the leading healthcare staffing agency offering travel and fulltime career opportunities for P._T.'s nationwide call Arias at one eight hundred three or four zero twenty-sixth nineteen or visit Arias Medical Dot Com. That's a U. R. E. U._S. MEDICAL DOT COM podcasting. It's a great way to reach a huge audience. We're portable free to download and can be heard across the planet here on the P._T._o.. podcast we can paint a picture for your company to help spread your message to physical therapists across the world with our show. We can put pictures into people's minds here. Let me show you what I mean like. If I push this button right here I take you back to Jurassic era when T. Rex Rome veered and when I click on this Ashton we pay pictures with sound and contain a picture of your company on our show that leave an impression to have us paint for you and spread your message across the world is contact just online at P._t.. PODCAST DOT COM. Let's see what this welcome to back. It's so great to see you. Let's get back to the show I I guess we have time for what maybe good. Insurance paid for the whole we could say up here for another hour so before elaborations cleberation as a whole within in the profession but the tube you in drew have obviously had a successful collaboration for for years drew mentioned you guys specifically in his dykes award a couple of years ago at the P._B._S. through the section. So what advice do do you have for us to create and sustain a successful collaboration you know I think our friendship started this more than mentorship. You need people that you can be hundred percent transparent and one hundred percent percents. Tell them exactly what might cost per treatment is exactly what I pay. My people exactly what you do seem get feedback about how to improve things and that's the relationship we have and so we kind of had just a little mini <hes> ah group were we were trying to help each other figure things out out of the mentorship grew very strong friendship and I think that's that's kind of answer yeah my father in law who's a P._t.. He had what he called around tape. WanNa Steve's predecessors T._I.. was part of that regionally regionally people around there's about four five hundred and once a year they would go to vacation each other's houses he provided for me to be able to do the same thing with Drouin Steve. We've all been each other's houses. We've all spent time together. We've taken trips together. selfishly me being the minor in the crowd. I always felt like I got a whole lot more than I ever gave but <hes> you know they were gracious enough to to lead US along and share their knowledge but yeah I mean I think anyone who has ever been to or even this meeting. I hear all the time the time out of session around the bar around the dinner great idea you know that's where he that's where you get just the the nuggets. August that help you change your your practice in Your Business and whatever you're doing all right so on my podcast every episode we wind up with parting shots so I actually arranged for the bartender to bring in some alcohol made you look some alley we're looking and so if you were to wrap things up your some things give a parting shot for the last decade but since this is actually violating the first rule of Graham sessions fight club recording this and we're GONNA release it and other people are going to be able to hear this. What would you want people who have never been in this room to know about what happens here and how it's going to affect the profession you know I would just say that the success of this meeting people willing to be honest and vulnerable? I think we heard every what I believe speech. This session has been very vulnerable. I mean people have laid it out there and just said this is what I believe in and you not only heard it but you felt it to me. That's what the Graham sessions is about the willingness to just add make you don't know everything and then you got you to me. That's what it's about and so that's what the first ten years has been about and if we can keep that role and I think that that's what we learn as great I think if people who are listening to this who might never come as a gram sessions would do that. You don't have to come to a conference to pull that off. If you start your own roundtable within your own practice or your your own circle of friends you do that you go into wanted to get something constructive out of it. You can do some great things and this is an example so thank you Patrick. Had you sum it up. You know I wanNA thank. The leaders of our profession I mean Steve was was president at the time when we started this. I think it was Paul Rocker Ata President The Times actually Scott Words Scott was the continued support of our leadership to embrace something. That's not of the norm says a lot about the two boards in about the leadership and their vision for the profession but then I got I got to say to people like Peter and my father-in-law and those I mean. I don't know how many of Y'all younger people know this but when they were in school they couldn't begin to tell their professors they're going into at a private practice or they would've never graduated. They had to go work for the hospitals. I mean think about that that they were such pioneers in the fact that they continue to invest their time and share their wisdom. I know a lot of times people. I think that you know the new generation has all the answers. They don't WanNa hear anything. You know. They're going to break the mold or whatever there's a lot of things that have been done. That was already the same way sixty years ago so I would just say that you know it's been ten great years news of a lot of knowledge. I totally agree with Steve. I think everyone who gave the what I believe speech. I hope you feel safe. In expressing your opinion I agree. They were fantastic. They were heartfelt and there's nothing like hearing true screw honest conversation. A Lot drew just texted me his parting shot. He said whatever Steve Said just repeat that well you see pick Stephen. I what's here for the guys on stage. Thank you for creating something so cool for this profession appreciate that let's see thank you guys for coming out fantastic. I don't have anything else. This is true the P._T.. Z podcast is packing up the cooler and taking the show on the road again going this big. The empty pint cast is headed to the lone star state. Everything's bigger in Texas Bryant. This will be the biggest collection of physical therapists of the year abtei's combined sections meeting in San Antonio this February we'll be recording. Our Show live all over the conference from the Pack Party to P._T.. Pub Night and maybe even find US hosting an after hours party somewhere actually most likely going to happen. You can find us every day with our sponsor.

Graham Steve Patrick private practice Arias Arias Medical Dot Com R. E. U._S US Steve Anderson Minnesota Susan mcklusky Graham Owens Recovery Science Dot Com Steve Drew Stephen drew Arias Medical Group paget Graham Mary Peter Planet Arias Medical.
The Evening Briefing: Thursday February 27

The Briefing

02:27 min | 8 months ago

The Evening Briefing: Thursday February 27

"Good evening I'm Chris. Price with the briefing from the Telegraph. It's Thursday February the twenty seventh and the E. U.'s being told to agree brexit trade tens by June or risk. No deal so. Brexit seemed to go wife for a while but now we have a new e you face off the government published its mandate for trade negotiations with the block this morning and it says. Britain will begin to prepare to leave the EU without a deal in just four months time. That's unless Brussels to the UK's key demands by June apple editor. Gordon Reiner details. All the red lines in the thirty page documents. Of course the other big news today has been about a third runway at Heathrow campaigners have won a victory at the Court of Appeal. It blocks plans to build a third runway on environmental grounds. The government said it won't appeal the decision although he throws says it will take the case to the Supreme Court at Politics Live. Blog has the latest the hot topic around the water cooler remains the outbreak of corona virus and emerged to more people in England have the disease takes the UK total to fifteen but crucially one of the new cases picked up corona virus in ten ARIEF. You'll remember that's where one hundred sixty British people are on lockdown in a hotel after guest tested. Positive the government's telling people to self isolate. But what does that mean? And how do you get food? What do you do if you had kids? And can you take the rubbish out? Ben Got side out once. The self-isolation do's and don'ts and you may have seen images of a desert locust outbreak Pakistan but. I'm sure you've never seen an army of one hundred thousand docs. That's what China's planning to dispatch to Pakistan to help deal with the massive infestation. Apparently one duck can eat more than two hundred locusts a day. You can see a picture of the quack squad right. Stay put if you're listening on. Whatsapp will send you those links. Now if you're listening on spotify Polo wherever you get your posture find them in the show notes as well as links to David Beckham's revelation. He still kept a romantic trinket from his first meeting with why Victoria Twenty three years ago. And Noreen wainwright's on. Why farmers are the victims of an ideological war against meet that sits. You're up to date. I'll be back with more tomorrow morning.

Pakistan Court of Appeal UK David Beckham Supreme Court Noreen wainwright Gordon Reiner Brussels Brexit E. U. EU spotify England Britain China editor Ben Whatsapp Twenty three years four months
euphoria

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

02:04 min | 9 months ago

euphoria

"The Marion Webster's word of the day for January twenty fourth. Today's word is euphoria. Spelled E. U. P. H. R. I. A. Euphoria is a noun that means a lot of well being or elation. Here's the word used in a sentence from rolling stone by Rob Sheffield. The floor became a dance off in one corner. Dozens of girls put all their bags and backpacks in one one giant pile so nobody had to worry where their stuff was and then danced around the pile in a circle that was really moving to behold an example of how a Harry recyles concert creates crucial moments of Utopian unity and shared euphoria health and happiness are often linked. Sometimes even etem apologies. Nowadays euphoria generally refers to happiness but it derives from you for rose. A Greek word that means healthy given even that route is not surprising that in its original English uses. The word euphoria was a medical term. It's entry in an early eighteenth century dictionary. Mary explains it as the well. Bearing of the operation of a medicine that is when the sick person finds himself eased or relieved by it. Modern physicians still use the term. But they aren't likely to prescribe something that will cause it in contemporary medicine. Psychology euphoria can describe abnormal abnormal or inappropriate feelings such as those caused by an illicit drug or an illness with your word of the day. I'm Peter Sokolski visit Mary. Name Webster Dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups

Marion Webster Rob Sheffield Harry recyles Peter Sokolski Mary E. U. P. H. R.
Israel Daily News Podcast Ep. 11 Tuesday, June 30th 2020

Israel Daily News Podcast

08:06 min | 4 months ago

Israel Daily News Podcast Ep. 11 Tuesday, June 30th 2020

"Good Morning Booker tove boy DS Sabiha Hair. This is Shana fold here from Tel Aviv with the Israel Daily News podcast I'm here to give you the daily headlines, so you can get caught up quickly. Today is Tuesday June thirtieth twenty twenty and this podcast has been recorded at eight zero six. A M Israel time. Now we have historic annexation related news this morning. What many supporters of the annexation said would happen happened? The Palestinians are coming to the table yesterday. The Palestinian Authority sent a note to the UN International Peacemaking Corps Tet saying they are ready to pick up peace talks where they left off in two thousand fourteen, and maybe agreeing to some minor land concessions huge news, a little history lesson the court. Is made up of the e U Russia, the U. N. and the US, the four entities came together in two thousand and to facilitate Middle East, peace processes the four page letter from Palestinian Authority. Prime Minister Mohammad Sta said no one has as much interest in the Palestinians in reaching a peace agreement. No one has as much to lose as the Palestinians in the absence of peace. Here's the big one. He also said we are ready to have our state, a limited number of weapons and e powerful force to hold law and order. Adding in that it would allow for an international regulatory force to oversee that things run as planned. The letter also said that might be in the market for border changes from the nineteen sixty seven lines that were drawn up around the West Bank. The Palestinian PM had said on June ninth he was drafting something up in response to the US peace plan, but did not specify that it would be an appeal to Israel that report from the Times of Israel. Now to the illness that no one and everyone wants to hear about the corona virus is climbing in Israel. And because of it, there are new restrictions. Thanks the Jerusalem Post for getting this out very early morning on Monday. There were nearly five hundred eighty eight new patients in Israel that was yesterday. Weddings will have a maximum number of two hundred fifty guests permitted with all other events to be capped at fifty and some cultural events at two fifty. The new ruling is effective immediately. That's I after. After July tenth weddings and Bar Mitzvahs, we'll have a cap of one hundred some other guidelines including just twenty eight children to a group at a summer, Camp University exams to be taken online and thirty percent of the public sector to work from home. More sick people are dying. An elderly people are catching the illness. Three hundred nineteen people have died and twenty four are currently using ventilators to breed now I, say twenty four people are using ventilators breathe instead of saying are on ventilators because I. I really want to draw that image for you what it would mean for you to need a ventilator to breathe a very interesting story from the Times of Israel. Many countries are dealing with covid nineteen outbreaks in their prison system, but it appears not Israel. Since the corona virus came to Israel prisons have been locked down keeping visitors out and away from their loved ones, while the tactic has proven successful prisoners have not seen the outside world since March. Seventeenth inmates have not seen their families their lawyers. Lawyers or been able to take permitted leaves of absence from their jail cells guards who usually come to work for twenty four hours followed by two days off are now working one week on one week off with high monitoring to make sure that do not come back to prisons with the virus. The wife of one inmate told The Times of Israel that previously she and her children only got to see their dad once every two weeks for twenty eight minutes now. It's been more than three months. She says she does not think this is justified. This is a very tough story. Send me a message to let me know what you think. Moving on Israel's Philharmonic Orchestra has taken a major hit. Since Corona virus began, and so a live virtual gala was held for thirteen thousand registered guests, world wide, and guess what it was entirely interrupted by a suspected cyberattack. The? Event was held Sunday afternoon as a way to raise funds that were lost during the pandemic, the website used to show the performance crashed as well as the website of the gals partner. The Orchestra shared a taped version of the show on Youtube after the fact that report from the Jerusalem. Post I am going to check out that taping of the Philharmonic today after I do the show I can't wait to hear it. For our last story of the day, many women have informal qualifications in Jewish law, but are not recognized by the Chief Rabbinate of Israel well, that has now changed for the first time. The seat will recognize women, Torah scholars which will get them. An equal chance at applying for seat paid employment. There are a slew of jobs in the religious sector funded by government agencies that previously women could not apply for, and the court saw this as a discrimination issue. The Chief Rabbinate says this move is not in its role description and has asked for Israel's education department to deal with it. Call a code. All the respect goes to the women who drafted this petition and got it up to the highest courts. Well that is it for today's news? Today is Tuesday. June thirtieth we've got a low of twenty two and a high of twenty eight degrees Celsius. In Tel Aviv, that seventy two degrees Fahrenheit for the low, going up to eighty two in the central city of Tel Aviv, you will never believe this, but the weather forecast is predicting some rain today highly unusual for this time of year, but it makes sense due to all of the history that is being made into these report and thanks so much for getting caught up. Up with me, don't forget Thursday I'll have a special report. Subscribe to my podcast on spotify or apple music, or wherever you're hearing it from I am everywhere I'm looking to speak with some hardcastle listeners to try to understand how I can make my podcast better. What you like what you don't like what is working for you. Send me a message on my instagram at Channa fold or drop your name into our email box. I have a link for that in the show notes now will have some tunes from Levy Robin. Here's his song. Patients have a great and productive de. Share. Leg. Scene. Waiting? Never seen the. Spurs.

Israel Tel Aviv Israel Daily News Chief Rabbinate of Israel Palestinian Authority US The Times Prime Minister Mohammad Sta Shana UN International Peacemaking C Middle East West Bank Youtube e U Russia Jerusalem Chief Rabbinate partner Spurs Camp University Philharmonic Orchestra
#A182 (aneurism to angel-hair pasta)

The Dictionary

07:59 min | 1 year ago

#A182 (aneurism to angel-hair pasta)

"Hello word nerds. Welcome to another episode of the dictionary. Let's get to the words i is. Aneurysm spelled two different aren't ways a. n. e. u. r. y. s. m. or r i s m. This is a noun from the fifteenth century an abc normal blood filled bulge of a blood vessel and especially an artery resulting from weakening as from disease of the vessel wall wall and your original is an adjective. It's not that's not a cool thing to have happened to you <hes>. I hope that never happens to any of you. <hes> the first i part of the definition has kind of a tongue twister. An abnormal blood filled bulge of a blood vessel. Lots of bush sounds next. We have a new a. n. e. w. this is an adverb from before the twelfth century one four an additional time synonym him is again as in begin a new two in a new or different form as in a story told a new on film next. We have an info all caps a. n. f. o. this is a noun from nineteen sixty five a compound pound made from ammonium nitrate and fuel oil that is used both as a commercial explosive and in the manufacture of improvised bombs. The etymology says this is taking the a from ammonium the n. from nitrate the f. from fuel and the oh from oil anthro and now that i think about it <hes> i feel like maybe i've heard this word or a very similar word used in shows was like mythbusters. They're known for blowing things up <hes> so i don't think i ever really understood what the word was but now that i see this word all written out with the definition and everything. I think that might be what it is next. We have a funky word to me at least and frac chihuahua acidy yeah a. n. f. r. a. c. T. u. s. i t. y. This is a a noun from fifteen ninety six one the quality or state of being and fractious to a winding channel or course <music> especially an intricate path or process as of the mind ooh. This is very fascinating to me. I might need to look into this word a little bit more but we do have the word and fractious next so maybe that'll give me a little bit more information. This is an adjective from sixteen nineteen eighteen full of windings. An intricate turnings synonym is torturous. <hes> this word it is becoming more and more interesting to me. The etymology says this is <hes> from the french and friends show. How do you say say this word a. n. f. r. a. c. t. u. e. u. x. and frac and frac to i don't know any of you. French-speakers helped me out <hes> that is from the latin fracture whoa seuss <hes> which is from the latin and fructose which means means coil or bend and that is made combining <hes> an or m b which means around plus fractious <hes> which is from the verb fron jerry which means to break and there's more at the prefix ambi and the word break next. We have angel a. a and g e l. This is a noun from before the twelfth century one a a spiritual being superior to humans is in power and intelligence especially one in the lowest rank in the celestial hierarchy one be says it's plural in order of angels and then it says see celestial hierarchy so i guess celestial hierarchy is its own separate entry in the dictionary mary so we'll get there in the seas. <hes> what is the celestial hierarchy. I'm not sure i know of angels and i don't know maybe they talk about demons and ah god gods and saints and i don't know that's about all i can think of because i don't know that stuff too and attendant spirit or guardian three a usually white robed winged figure of human form in fine art and <hes> winged in this situation in could possibly also be pronounced <hes> wing. Did i emphasize the g. too. Much winger said something like that four we have these synonyms messenger and harbinger as in angel of death five a person like an angel as in looks or behavior her six. This says it's a christian science its inspiration from god seven one as a backer her of the theatrical venture who aids or supports with money or influence eight we have the synonym angel fish angelic lick or angelico are adjectives and angelic. Lee is an adverb. The etymology says this is from. Oh what's the most important part art here. <hes> looks like it's from the greek and jealous or angelos which literally means messenger next. We have angel dust. This is a noun from from nineteen sixty-nine and we just have these synonym fence cycle dine. I not sure if i pronounced that correctly but it is spelled p. h. E. n. c. z. y. C. l. i. d. i n. e. I think that is some sort of drug. I probably should know but i really don't next. We have angelino. We know this is a noun from eighteen eighty five a native or resident of los angeles california next. We have angel fish all one word. This is a noun from sixteen sixty eight one any of several laterally compressed brightly colored bony fishes <unk> of warm seas and there is a family name poma kantha die to a black and silver laterally compressed arrest south american cyclic fish popular in aquariums called also scullery or scholar probably scholar. I'm not sure <hes> and the scientific name is tara feilim scullery next. We have angel food cake three separate words. This is a noun down from nineteen o eight a usually white sponge cake made of flour sugar and whites of eggs and next and last word word for this episode is hair pasta. Angel hair has a hyphen pasta is its own word. This is a noun from nineteen seventy-five pasta made in long thin strings smaller in diameter then vermicelli. That's going to end these. These dust deuce this. This episode is done. What is my word. My word <hes> is <hes>. I'm just gonna pick two because they're very related. <hes> they are an fractious and and frick to as'die. Did i say that right and fracture acidy yeah. Those are my words. I'm super curious to <hes> more what they mean gene. What sort of situations are they used in. <hes> yeah interesting to me. I'm going to go look that up but not until i record this next episode. Thank you and goodbye.

Angel hair e. u. r. y. s. m. bush los angeles angelos angelico tara feilim a. n. f. r. a. c. T. u. california c. t. u. e. u. Lee p. h. E. n. c. z. y. C. l.
The Evening Briefing: Wednesday, October 14

The Briefing

02:07 min | Last week

The Evening Briefing: Wednesday, October 14

"Halloween Danny Boyle with the briefing from the Telegraph as the chances of short-term down grow. So he wants to avoid what is called the misery of national lockdown. But Boris Johnson's ruling nothing out. He's defended his three tiered system of regional restrictions in the face of opposition Labour leader success. Dharma. But if those massages fail to combat the second wave of Covid or the prime, minister couldn't say he would not impose a short term lockdown known as a circuit breaker were expecting a decision to hold the end of next week. At the same time, the UK's recorded another nineteen thousand, seven hundred cases of bio most two and a half thousand in a day Downing Street's pressing local leaders in New England to accept tougher restrictions so far the Liverpool Sissy regions the only area to enter tier three measures. We've got video of huge crowds dancing in the streets before midnight deadline. Now in the middle of all this uncertainty holiday makers rushing to cancel all postponed their October half term trips. If you've got one booked look no further than our travel teams going to refunds, and if you'll staying at home and have children to entertain, we've got sixty five fun ideas to combat boredom. and. Tomorrow was the deadline for a brexit trade deal to be incites both the U. K. E. U. agreed that target will be missed. So what now? Well, the prime minister's told Brussels the e you must ramp-up talks or he'll carry out he's no deal threat to walk away the clock's ticking and now Brussels correspondent James Chris says negotiations will go on through the night. I can also recommend some other bits two including the new head of my phone on the Changing Threat Britain faces and a look back at the C. Houria the one, the Falklands war. Right you're up to date from the Telegraph I'll be back with your next briefing.

Danny Boyle Boris Johnson Brussels prime minister New England UK C. Houria Britain James Chris U. K. E. U.
200 BM Daily Vocabulary #172 | flaunt

BM English Speaking Radio

05:52 min | 1 year ago

200 BM Daily Vocabulary #172 | flaunt

"Beaming live speaking radio channel presents b. m. english word of the day. My name is not an i'm your host for this episode. You are listening to episode number one hundred and seventy two of season three two days what flaunt flaunt means to shoyer possessions beauty abilities to get admiration to go out of your way to displease something to attract attention attention or to ignore or treat with disrespect with v._m. English speaking radio channel learn one new word every day and impressed the world in this english workout plenty lesson you learn how to use the word flaunt via shaw that this year so lessons will help you to enhance her english cabinetry and speak english fluently and confidently flaunt is felt as f. l. e. u. n. t the word flaunt and indicates deliberately trying to make people notice your possessions beauty abilities etc so that they admire you for example the rich man's attempt to flaunt his belt was noticed by his friends and they winked doc each other listen carefully how we can use the word flaunt in eight different situations in eight different sentences <music> example number one of eight. Mr gerald invited guests from overseas to visit his new farmhouse near the c. Show show them around the property. In order to flaunt his positions moving onto example number two hit the region was facing a severe drought and people were suffering from loss of income and poverty. The social organizations appealed appealed to the affluent people in the region to avoid flaunting threw lavish weddings and celebrations. Let us understand don example number. Three of eight raghavan had a good knowledge about the indian penal code and he would flaunt his knowledge in front office his colleagues and society members why everyone appreciated his expertise. No one liked his attitude is in this relevant example uh-huh moving onto example number four of it dr dacosta worked as a professor at a university he was bestowed talked with several academic honors however he was very humble and never flaunted his knowledge ooh how humble and down to what he was isn't it do you own that. You can speak in english just like your mother tongue. Get in touch with that rina's us for free evaluation of your english and train you to build on your english fluency to know more about english fluency courses log onto our web site w._w._w. Dot bmc instance india dot com example number five of eight the the owner of a business empire had come from a modest background. He respected the value of money and never flaunted his riches moving onto example number six of eight. The bollywood superstar kept everyone waiting. At the premiere of his movie then he ensured that the fans and everyone from the media were present he arrived at the venue flaunting his new who sports car example number seven eight the newly recruited technician would flaunt as technical knowledge to his colleagues but soon it was clear that he was not competent enough in the relevant field. Let us understand and example number age of it people would be surprised to see the chief minister of the state standing in a queue at the airport along along with them. People appreciated the fact that he never flaunted his position to devi learnt the word flaunt which means things to show your possessions beauty abilities to get admiration to go out of your way to display something to attract attention all to ignore or treat with disrespect. Can you frame three sentences with flaunt and type in the vox v. awaiting clear shaw this lesson has helped to boost your english walkability and speak fluent english. You can download the script of this episode and all our episodes from w._w._w. Dot b. m. english speaking radio dot in stay you too and for new english workout bloody lessons. We are on a mission to train one corinthians in english fluency. This was episode number one hundred and and seventy two of two hundred emba cab daddy episodes that we have planned kindly note that we will be publishing one vocabulary episode would daily. It's exam indian standard time so meet you tomorrow at six o'clock with the new would then take care.

shaw rina Dot Mr gerald dr dacosta f. l. e. u. n. t professor technician three two days
caduceus

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

02:10 min | 6 months ago

caduceus

"Merriam Webster or of the day four April sixteen. Today's word is could. Ucs Spelled C. D. UC E. U. S. Qadissiyah's is a noun that means the symbolic staff of a Herald specifically the representation of staff with two entwined snakes and two wings at the top. It can also mean a medical insignia bearing a representation of a staff with two entwined snakes into wings at the top as in one sometimes used to symbolize a physician but often considered to be in a row niyaz representation or the emblem of a Medical Corps Department of the armed services as of the US army. Here's the word used in a sentence from the Indianapolis Star by Zach Ostermann. The Tattoo starts at Harry. Crowder's left shoulder. It's a caducity. Us along staff wrapped by intertwining snakes and topped with a pair of wings. The Greek God Hermes who served as Herald and Messenger to the other. Gods carried a winged staff entwined with two snakes the staff of Escalate Pius. The God of healing had one snake and no wings. The word could do see his from. Latin is a modification of the Greek word meaning Herald. Strictly speaking ducey's should refer only to the staff of the Herald. God Hermes Mercury too the Romans but in practice the word is often applied to the one snake staff as well you might expect the staff of escalate b-best to be the symbol of the medical profession. And indeed that is the symbol used by the American medical ration- but you'll also quite frequently see the to conduct is used as a medical symbol with your word of the day. I'm Peter sokolow scheme visit Marian Webster Dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups.

Merriam Webster Medical Corps Department US army E. U. S. Qadissiyah Zach Ostermann Indianapolis Star Peter sokolow Crowder ducey
New SpaceX Mars Landing Site Data

SPACE NEWS POD

08:01 min | 1 year ago

New SpaceX Mars Landing Site Data

"If you're listening to this you obviously like podcast and you probably like music to on spotify. You can listen to all of that and what place for free. You don't need a premium account. Spotify has a huge each catalogue of podcasts on every topic including the one. You're listening to right now. Uh spotify you can follow your favorite podcast. You never miss an episode download episodes to listen to off-line flying wherever you are easily share what you're listening to with your friends via spotify integrations was social media platforms like instagram so just search for space news pot on on the spotify app or browse podcasts in your library tab and follow me so you never miss an episode of the space news pod spotify is the world's leading music streaming dreaming service and now it can be your go to for podcasts to hello and welcome back to the space news pot daily podcast about space science and tech. I'm your host will walden this episode. We're going to be talking about spacex and their mission to mars so they're gearing up to launch starship this year for the first time ever over <hes> starship should be launching by late october and those are the first test flights. There's going to be kind of test hops. The gonna make sure that everything works right. The ultimate goal of starship is to get to mars space x the initial plan for spacex. I should say is he elon musk stating that he wants to send a rocket to mars and he wants to put a plant on mars basically so he wants to put a plant on mars. Take a photo of take a video of it. Living things on mars send that photo that video back to earth and that was his spark that led him into the foray that we all know as spacex now now now when they get to mars they don't just go there and land somewhere randomly right so they have have to <hes> have to figure out where to land and high-rise orbiter around mars. They've been sending back check data to spacex data to nasa for a long while now about the landing sites possible landing sites for spacex x.'s <hes> starship so <hes> these images that were sent back were labeled recently and the arcadia region is the <hes> is the area where they're going to be landing or katya plescia to be exact. It's it's a low lying area. It's very flat area compared to some mounteney regions like olympic mons on mars and it's somewhat close to olympus mons actually in these photographs that you can see but the other cool thing is that there's ice there arcadia <hes> plenty shia. It's a flat landing site which is great so that means. There's not a lot of debris there and when you're sending sending a whole rocket to another planet you don't want a dodge boulders on your way onto the surface so it's a region of plane specifically low plains for the i. E. u. standards the international astronomical union is has been described by nasa <hes> as one of the few regions of mars were abundant shallow isis present at relatively low altitude shallow ice okay so that brings us to another point when spacex goes there will they have scientific experimentation on board will they be able to drill into this ice and i'm not very familiar with arcadia plenty shia but if there's surface ice <hes> is it capable of drilling in the surface taking samples and sending them back to us starship is supposed to be able to go to mars in returned to earth that is insane. That's very very cool now. The the idea of drilling a sample returning to earth that would be immensely groundbreaking for science now arcadia plenty. She is a region of low. The planes like i said before one of the lowest plains on mars. It's a much higher atmospheric pressure which means that the region <hes> from some of the extremes of the weather. It'll be insulated by that and that's a really great thing for landing because of this crazy weather happens during landing while it scrubs the mission it may destroy the space craft and per september twenty eighteen eighteen updates starship is set to rely heavily on a series of atmospheric maneuvers to slow down which significantly cuts the amount of propellant the the spacecraft must use to land softly on mars and back on earth but nothing is it costs a lot of money to launch things with fuel fuels heavy so spacex they want to save a little bit of money and if they can do these atmospheric maneuvers slowdown that's even better her so arcadia plenty shah also offers warm summers and winters due to its latitude compared to the rest of the planet which is great when you're spacex because even know that it's not going to be a crazy stormy the area it is not going to be freezing cold all the time when you're trying to land your rocket on another planet there you go my friends if they can and drill down into this water ice though it'd be insane that'd be really great. I'm going to get some more information for you about that and of course if they can do that they'll be able to <hes> get samples for water of course hydrogen and oxygen which they could the in situ make into oxygen to breathe water to drink and <hes> hydrogen for rocket fuel and that's the plan and then build build up a civilizations on mars eventually so my friends when i get more information about this i will share it with you but for now i want to say thank you to who <hes> everyone who's listening to the show. Thank you so much for all of your continued. Support also thank you to my patriot. Patrons patriot dot com slash space news podcast i and also my sponsors. I couldn't do it without your help and here's a message from one of our sponsor. I host my podcast on anchor f._m. Anchors the easiest way to make a podcast an anchor gives you all the tools that you need in one place for free which you can use from your phone or from your computer now these creation tools allow you to record and edit your podcast so it sounds amazing in they'll distribute podcast for you so it can be heard anywhere. Spotify apple podcasts casts google podcast in many more in you can easily make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership so download the anchor up or go to acre dot f._m. To get started and thank you for taking the time out of your day to spend two here with me on the space news pod. My name is will walden and i will see you soon.

spacex spotify walden elon musk instagram international astronomical uni shah katya plescia us nasa google E. u.
longueur

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:42 min | 5 months ago

longueur

"Merriam Webster's Word of Day for May twenty seven. Today's Word is longer spelled L. O. N. G. U. E. U. R. Longer is down. That means a dull and tedious passage or section as of a book play or musical composition. And it's usually used in the plural. Here's the used in a sentence from the New York Times by Jesse Green. Small clever musicals are fragile things though and I don't want to oversell this one in praising it Scotland. Pa still needs to cure a few structural hiccups. The First Act seems to end twice and to address its longer and lapses of logic. You've probably come across long tedious. Sections of books plays or musical works before. But perhaps you didn't know there was a word for them. English speakers began using the French borrowing longer in the late eighteenth century as in English French longer are tedious passages with no longer itself literally meaning length. An early example of longer used in an English text is from Eighteenth Century Writer. Horace Walpole who wrote in a letter. Boswell's Book Is Gossiping. But there were woeful launderers both about his hero and himself with your word of the day. I'm Peter chuckles. Visit Merriam Webster Dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups.

Merriam Webster Merriam Webster Eighteenth Century Writer Boswell Horace Walpole Peter chuckles Jesse Green New York Times Scotland Pa L. O. N. G. U. E. U.
APTAs Health Policy and Administration AKA The Catalyst with Matt Mesibov

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

18:48 min | 1 year ago

APTAs Health Policy and Administration AKA The Catalyst with Matt Mesibov

"Thank you thank you thank you can't say thank you enough to our longtime supporters keeping us on the air artis medical staffing if you're a student physical therapist approaching graduation a new Grad if you're a seasoned professional and you're looking for short-term travel assignments maybe WanNa move about the country with your T. license we got you covered with Arias in and around our professional association make sure to use the tash tag choose pt to see how far the influence can go within physical therapy the Ira Gorman there was a marketing marketing research on that we hired a consultant settings all fifty states see what they have to offer no obligation or anything weird like that plus they have all the information you need like licensed transfers or housing or dot com aureus medical staffing the leaders in travel physical therapy a you are US medical dot com we guys are working with all the major sports teams big colleges in the US and around the world so check it out more information owens recovery science dot Com let's do this is it. His team travel the world certifying clinicians and personalized blood flow restriction rehabilitation training along with access to the equipment you need to apply in clinical practice her HBA because we really wanted to figure out who are we and what is the public perceive says and the long story short what it came down to is Kinda sore us what I like to call it an incubator just like out in California where the tech companies our past Jimmy Mackay Right Still in PT month all month long celebrating the other profession that year in when that'd be a physical therapist physical therapist assistant I we bring in Matt Masimov to show welcome to the program Jimmy Hey how are you doing I'm doing all right you're the president of the Health Policy Administration section had contrary to all the other component sections and academies we are not really clinically focused section Bring you out to all these really smart men and women with ideas people come to inch PA with ideas a place where they don't really feel like they sit in within really exist to transform the culture of physical therapy through initiatives that enhance professionalism leadership and advocacy to foster excellence in autonomous a PTA necessarily but where they can incubate ideas with people that might be interested in that and help it to grow so that but you got I think you're the only section or Kademi you got your own nickname man that are great observation Jimmy and there's you have passionate about that passions being a physical therapist so for instance let's say advocacy for different areas of our profession is important the the best conversations happen at happy hour welcome two hours for this is the P. T. cast here's your host physical ending the continuing education courses this is a big time for people to become more and more familiar compliant with treating people we're definitely a section that can meet your needs so as for instance one of our committees which used to be a catalyst component parts of the a PTA as we continue on now looking at the inside the section of Health Policy and administration also known as H. A. The catalyst demons I mean they are involved in making comments on legislation they are involved in creative resources the are Creamy Matt Masimov Today Matt's the president of HP a the catalyst one of the components of the American Physical Therapy Association here in PT Month as we take a look who might identify with the obt coupons community and that committee is the one that's GonNa help get you information that you need so nations maybe part time maybe it's a hybrid career or maybe it's going in some other direction but they're looking for that support community academy what we what we really are is you know Europe Professional European Pta for instance but there are other things in life that me was Ricca Wenda H. e. a. and during the end a rich president transitioning to the president right before Rg is where you can find the website and then as well as on twitter on facebook on twitter at hp a PTA HP a PTA. Oh I think back to when I was running for president and how I would describe HP ADA people which stands for Health Policy Administration and one thing I would say is that this for the benefit of members of society that's that's from the website but how do you describe what they're catalysts is does so when I other group might be involved in beyond clinical practice but guess what there are things that technology knows that can help the on clinical allergy to advance our profession telehealth is an example he's young people that are really interested in that and I could go on and on about it so we actually a couple of years ago tasked all of our groups within HDA to come up with two webinars a year in your students admission researcher anything in and around the profession celebrating the all month long taking a look inside the taxes when you move from state to state they've been doing this for a while they got you cover online it's a you are a US medical dot com that is a U. R. E. U. S. medical so for instance if you're the payment and practice committee which is led by the chair John It's a lot this past year the payment practice committee that helps them to research and identify ways of going about doing what they want to do with their careers so those are just some exam that's one for instance we have a text special interest group or Sig- people who are in interested in all kinds of applications and the age but guess what they found out they wanted to do something different in life maybe related so they're not necessarily looking to be full time and hasn't been involved in what we call the Pack Collaborative Post Acute Care Collaborative and that's where hp a collaborated with The handle I like that two thousand three hundred members as of this August according to a PTA the website a h. p. a. Dot Org Is there handle I love that I love that way you put that really makes it feel like the catalyst is a place for Round pegs in a square hole world yeah you know reimbursement motto for the Home Health World so our three components home health geriatrics. HDA felt like we needed to be proactive. You Re Resources Free Webinars for members of these components that deal with readers should change management how does the actual to these new reimbursement model changes so that's one example but there's technology all kinds of educational tools You know reimbursement model work all kinds of things that will help both staff clinicians and leaders within different organizations adapt Sir why they should join let's go through all the different reasons access to be sections educational resources programs webinars events talk just a little bit about what some of those are group is called PP prouduction Yobe Gt Q.. Plus community and these these guys they are working like this home health section and the economy of geriatric physical therapy because many of the listeners out there might know starting tomorrow as a matter of fact on look out the hood to see what the catalyst is what does and maybe why you should get involved episode is brought to you by our longtime sponsors owens recovery signs johnny and we actually help each other out clan and achieve different goals that we have and one group might be involved in technology and actors grow and so that's the way it works the everybody's kind of helping each other out and collaborating elephant ideas yeah when someone asks there've been collaborate with eighteen getting resources out there and each of our were sections or academies Ata now have ranged with the diverse backgrounds of the catalyst absolutely dramatic fact as you were just saying that one of the largest joys to h PA Ashley Amongst Younger Therapist Younger therapy assistance is our special interest groups of global health and The Pro Bono therapy a bit of a story behind it if you want to know always WanNa know cool stories hit

US HP Home Health World Health Policy Administration Arias Ira Gorman president consultant John It johnny researcher R. E. U. two hours
S2/E11: Consider This: Moments in My Writing Life After Which Everything Was Different by Chuck Palahniuk

The Rookie Writer Show

08:38 min | 7 months ago

S2/E11: Consider This: Moments in My Writing Life After Which Everything Was Different by Chuck Palahniuk

"Hi Welcome to season two episode eleven of the rookie riders. Show I'm robin carnaval. And I will be your host today. I am a fiction author of quiet horror and I have a twisted love of proof reading as well as red ink pens. My twitter name is at Lacan to use. That's L. A. C. O. N. T. E. U. S. E. and I'd love to have some followers on there to get to know you better. I'd also like to thank dare for allowing me to guest host this week I am really excited to announce that we are going to be reviewing the book. Consider this moments in my writing life. After which everything was different? It was recently published in January twenty twenty by author Chuck Politic Chuck Politic has been a nationally bestselling author since nineteen ninety six when his first novel? Fight Club was made into a motion picture and author of numerous novels and short stories. He describes his writing as transgressions fiction. He is also a fan of a minimalist approach to writing which is using short sentences and a more simplistic style his fearless in his writing resulting in fainting spells at some of his life readings. You can hear a little bit of that in the book. Transgressive fiction is a genus of literature that focuses on characters who feel confined by the norms and expectations of society and who break free of those confines in unusual or illicit ways. This book was originally suggested to me by a local writer. Thank you Leah was lamenting the fact that my story simmer in more of a creepy visceral. Macab STU and it makes for awkward feedback in certain settings. I sometimes felt like I didn't belong in some of the writing circles. I was in because of this. She told me that I needed to read. Consider this so. I took her advice and I was thrilled to find an anecdote early on in the book about the author being asked to leave a writing group because as he said due to my fiction no one felt safe around me and this led him to his mentor. Tom Span Bauer a minimalist author and that became the point for him and his writing in which everything was different and after reading that I felt I had found my tribe that clan of people who write from darker places with no regrets originally. I got the book from the library but quickly realized after I started reading it that I needed it for my own personal collection so I purchased it and now have it on my shelf. Consider this is filled with writing craft nuggets as well as anecdotes from many of his book tours as well as experiences with mentors and authors who have helped shape his writing. One of my favorite things he did was the inclusion of if you were my student comments at the end of sections giving bits of his own wisdom on how to handle different crafts situations the three things that I have gleaned from this book to share with you today are the clock versus the gun. He says if your stories tend to amble along lose momentum and fizzle out. I'd ask you what's your clock and where's your gun. The clock and the gun or tools used to move the story along and also bring tension. The clock can be anything. It can be a pregnancy a length of time a series of events that act as a countdown such as maybe assembling something or perhaps a voyage things that will indeed come to an end in a timely manner. O'clock is set to run for a specified time period and can be in one scene or it can span the full length of a book. It's functioning to limit time and heightened tension along the way it tells us what to expect so that we as the readers can focus on the emotion of the story. The gun however can be pulled out at any moment to bring the story to a climax. It's something you introduce and then hide early on in hopes that your audience will forget about it until it is brought forth again later in the story the reveal should feel both surprising and inevitable an example he uses is the faulty furnace in the shining. That later does explode in the book. Chuck gives a myriad of excellent examples of both clocks and guns in his chapter on tension another item that I found helpful was attribution and he used a quote from his mentor. Tom Span Bauer. Language is not our first language and check explains that dialogue is our weakest storytelling tool attribution is described as the little signposts inserted in the dialogue. That tell us who said what he believes. You should combine gesture action and expression with your dialogue. Readers have a tendency to rush over the words he said or she said and land on the following dialogue without giving it the proper pause or the weight that it needs as a writer. You can control your characters. Delivery of dialogue in the same way and actor might insert a dramatic pause in a scene. You can create tension by pitting the characters opposing gestures with their words. He says that characters have arms legs and faces. Use them to accentuate the dialogue. The physical actions give insight into the motives of your characters and check brings up a study from UCLA that found that some eighty three percent of what people understood came from body language tone of voice and speaking volume actual spoken words only accounted for seventeen percent of the information that passed between people so learn to inject attribution into your dialogue. And there's a bonus hack check suggests making a list of all the quick wordless gestures you do every day. The third thing is to unpack the big stuff. If a plot point is worth including it's worth depicting in a scene. Don't deliver it in dialogue. He doesn't believe in furthering. A plot with dialogue. Just giving away a reveal that should have been delivered in a process of discovery for the reader. As a matter of fact he refers to it as being cheap and lazy having a character spout off. The plot leaves a reader feeling a bit cheated. Allow your readers to take the emotional journey with the characters in the book when you are writing important scenes that will further your plot. Don't distract the reader with comforting memories or unfold. The scene as a tasteful snippet of memory. Get your hands dirty unpack. All of the details of the scene without holding back. Have the courage to write the tough stuff and if you were student he would tell you that. That is your job. The Heck I got from this book is to read out loud. He says there is no more honest feedback than laughter or groans or the motionless. Silence that genuine tension actually creates reach. A story allowed. Listen for where it plods along or falls flat. It's also great practice for reading in public on your future book tour and a quote from Chuck as mentioned you know he is a minimalist to the point kind of guy and the quote today definitely reflects that he says do not right to be liked right to be remembered. This book is a concise two hundred and thirty five pages. And if you're like me you will get your hands on a copy and find yourself jotting down notes and ideas and ways you can revise your current work in progress. There is a lot of beneficial information. That can help your writing in this book. I hope this was helpful to you next week. Dare will be back. In applying the same approach to kneel games masterclass Neil. Gaiman teaches the art of storytelling. So until then happy writing people.

Chuck Politic Chuck Politic Tom Span Bauer writer twitter Leah L. A. C. O. N. T. E. U. S. Fight Club UCLA Gaiman eighty three percent seventeen percent
#A210 (anti-inflammatory to antimony)

The Dictionary

07:43 min | 1 year ago

#A210 (anti-inflammatory to antimony)

"Hello word nerds. Welcome to another episode of the dictionary glad you could join us. Thank you very very much. <hes> let's see he just a day or two ago. <hes> this podcast hit five thousand downloads. That's not incredibly impressive considering that <hes> at at the time of this recording it has a just under two hundred episodes <hes> posted <hes> but hey. It's something it's a big round number so let's see if we can hit ten thousand in less than that same amount of time. That was a weird sentence all right. Let's get to the words. I is anti inflammatory. There is a hyphen after anti this is an adjective from seventeen thirty six counter interacting inflammation anti inflammatory is also a noun next. We have anti intellectual again. There's a hyphen after anti anti this is an adjective from eighteen twenty one opposing or hostile to intellectuals or to an intellectual view or approach. You gotta really wonder why somebody would choose to be anti intellectual <hes>. That's that's an interesting one there. <hes> anti hi intellectual is also a noun anti intellectualism is also a noun now. We have anti lou chemic- a. n. t. t._i. L. e. u. k. e. m. i. c. Adjective from nineteen zero five counteracting the effects of leukemia <hes>. That's a good thing to have around next. We have anti life all one word. It's an adjective from nineteen twenty nine antagonistic or antithetical medical to life or to normal human values next we have antilock this is an adjective from nineteen sixty three being being a braking system designed to keep a vehicle's wheels from locking by electronically controlled pulsed application of the break for each wheel next. We have anti log l. o. g. It's all one word <hes> it's a noun from nineteen ten and we have these synonym anti anti logarithms which as you may have been able to predict is our next word. Let's see this is a noun from sixteen eighteen the the number corresponding to a given logarithms next we have anti makassar. I think that is how it's pronounced a. n. t. i m. a. c. A. s. s. a. r. anti makassar something like that. This is a noun for eighteen forty forty four a cover to protect the back or arms of furniture. This is made by combining obviously anti plus makassar <hes> and it says <hes> oil in parentheses after the word makassar and then again in parentheses it says a hairdressing <hes> so i should probably look up. What makasiar is i. I'm not really sure <hes> but i guess anti mukasa as a cover to protect the back arms of furniture next. We have anti magnetic. It's an adjective from eighteen eighty three in parentheses it says of a watch having a balanced unit composed of alloys alloys that will not remain magnetized next. We have anti malarial. It's an adjective from eighteen forty three serving to prevent control or cure. Malaria anti malarial is also a noun. This is another one of those things that we are really glad exists. It's next. We have anti-matter m. a. t. t. e. r. It's a noun from nineteen. Fifty matter composed of anti particles calls or anti particles. This is an interesting one. <hes> if i remember correctly hearing about this stuff which i think technically does exist exists or can exist. <hes> the only problem is what do you hold it in. This is something neil degrasse tyson brings up every once in a while <hes> <hes> it cannot <hes> come in contact with matter because it does there will be problems <hes> and all of the things that we have love that are containers to hold things are made of matter. So how do you put anti-matter into a thing that is made of matter next next. We have anti metabolite. It's a noun from nineteen. Forty-five a substance that replaces or inhibits organisms utilization of a metabolite next is anti microbial. It's an adjective from eighteen ninety one destroying or inhibiting the growth of microorganisms uh-huh and especially pathogenic microorganisms. It is also a noun next. We have anti might totic a. n. T. see i m i t o t ic- <hes> by the way <hes> as i've mentioned in the past a lot of these could be anti or an t- <hes> i don't always look at the pronunciation guide <hes>. I just <hes> assumed that you are aware that i am aware that it could be either and honestly a lot of them. <hes> i think say that both are totally fine to say all right so anti psychotic is an adjective from nineteen forty eight inhibiting hibbing or disrupting might hostess as in anti mytalk agents or anti might totic activity and no my i toast. This is not talking about my toes. It's something else anti psychotic is also a noun next. We have antimony will a. n. t. I m. o. N. a. l. this is an adjective from sixteen o five of relating to or containing antimony eh. It's also a noun next. We have anti monoxide a. n. t. i. m. o. n. D. e. visited they now from eighteen twenty five a binary compound of antimony with a more electro positive element and in the previous this word i might have said antimony <hes> but here i said and timmy i don't know which it is but it is our next word so let's learn together. It is antimony yep a. n. t. I m. o. N. y. This is a noun from the fifteenth century. I think this is the first i word we've had all episode that has more than one definition and we will say that this is our last word for the episode. One just has the synonym stab night s. t. i. b. an i t. e. I have no clue what that is number. Two eight try vaillant and and penta vaillant metal lloyd element that is commonly metallic silvery white crystalline and brittle and that is used especially in alloys roy semiconductors and flame retardant substances and then it tells me to see the element table. The word of the episode food is going to be anti matter because i think the concept of that is pretty interesting so that is the end of the episode. Thank you very much for listening until next time. This is spencer reading the dictionary goodbye.

makassar neil degrasse tyson lou chemic Malaria roy semiconductors hibbing leukemia L. e. u. k. e. m. spencer m. a. c. A. timmy m. o. N. a.