35 Burst results for "Dynamos"

"dynamos" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:39 min | 2 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Millionaires versus <Speech_Male> billionaires in a pandemic. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Okay? <Speech_Male> Baseball's already <Speech_Male> done this once in the 94 <Speech_Male> 95 season. <Speech_Male> It took them <Speech_Male> years to recover <Speech_Male> Seth. And I'm a <Speech_Male> firm believer, the only <Speech_Male> reason they did recover <Speech_Male> was because of the <Speech_Male> steroid era. <Speech_Male> Those home runs. <Speech_Male> That's the only reason <Speech_Male> it did recover. <Speech_Male> They do it again, <Speech_Male> this go around, <Speech_Male> baseball fans, <Speech_Male> fans in general <Speech_Male> are fed up. They're <Speech_Male> fed up with how <Speech_Male> old baseball is their fed <Speech_Male> up with the codes, <Speech_Male> these <Speech_Male> rules, these <Speech_Male> back kind of <Speech_Male> door, things that happen <Speech_Male> within baseball. <Speech_Male> And if this happens, of <Speech_Male> course, it could be a benefit from Major <Speech_Male> League Soccer. <Speech_Male> You know how many <Speech_Male> teams of Major League <Speech_Male> Soccer are in baseball cities, <Speech_Male> Major League Baseball <Speech_Male> cities, 11. <Speech_Male> That's more <Speech_Male> eyeballs, that's more <Speech_Male> revenue that's more <Speech_Male> marketing. That's more <Speech_Male> people in your stands <Speech_Male> as more people <Speech_Male> clicking <Speech_Male> the TV remote <Speech_Male> and finding your games. <Speech_Male> Of course, it's a <Speech_Male> benefit in a <Speech_Male> country. With <Speech_Male> so much entertainment to <Speech_Male> go around, <SpeakerChange> I don't know how <Speech_Male> baseball thinks it can afford <Speech_Male> to lose out. <Speech_Male> And if you think <Speech_Male> about the summer <Speech_Male> months, that's kind of the <Speech_Male> one time where <Speech_Male> MLS doesn't <Speech_Male> have that much competition, <Speech_Male> but they always <Speech_Male> have baseball. So let's <Speech_Male> see how long this lasts, <Speech_Male> right? If it goes into <Speech_Male> the summer, then I think it could <Speech_Male> definitely benefit <Speech_Male> MLS generally, <Speech_Male> though, I think it will be a boost <Speech_Male> for soccer. You mentioned <Speech_Male> the 1994 <Speech_Male> striker. Dude, <Speech_Male> I am a perfect <Speech_Male> example. Before <Speech_Male> 1994, <Speech_Male> I was kind of <Speech_Male> a <Speech_Male> all sports fan, <Speech_Male> right? Any <Speech_Male> major <Speech_Male> American sport <Speech_Male> I was obsessed <Speech_Male> with. In 1994, <Speech_Male> two things <Speech_Male> happened. Yes, there was <Speech_Male> a World Cup, <Speech_Male> but there was also a baseball <Speech_Male> strike. <Speech_Male> My interest in baseball <Speech_Male> never recovered. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> here we are. <SpeakerChange> I <Speech_Male> got a show on ESPN <Speech_Male> doing soccer. Is it <Speech_Male> a World Cup year as well? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> How about wow? <Speech_Male> Yes, it is a World Cup <Speech_Male> year. Yeah, not here <Speech_Male> in the United States, not <Speech_Male> here in the United States. <Speech_Male> We have something to celebrate <Speech_Male> on Monday. <Speech_Male> It's going to be our one <Speech_Male> year anniversary <Speech_Male> of football <Speech_Male> Americas <Speech_Male> and the guest list <Speech_Male> is long. We got <Speech_Male> Julian araujo of the LA <Speech_Male> galaxy. We <Speech_Male> got count of Costa <Speech_Male> from LAFC. We <Speech_Male> got some of the real stars <Speech_Male> of the show, right? People <Speech_Male> like Julie foudy, <Speech_Male> Mauricio Pedro <Speech_Male> so maybe a few others <Speech_Male> we're gonna mix in as well. <Speech_Male> So make <Speech_Male> sure to join us <Speech_Male> on Monday for <Speech_Male> our year <Speech_Male> one <Speech_Male> anniversary <Speech_Male> here on football. We're still <Speech_Male> here, Seth. We're <Speech_Music_Male> still here. <Speech_Male> A reminder you can <Speech_Male> download football <Speech_Male> America's <Speech_Male> in podcast <Speech_Male> form on the ESPN <Speech_Male> FC feed. <Speech_Male> Unfortunately, herc, <Speech_Male> we will leave folks <Speech_Male> tonight with a <Speech_Male> bit of sad <Speech_Male> news from the <Speech_Male> college <Speech_Male> game. And the news <Speech_Male> is the passing of young Katie <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Meyer. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Goalie for the <Speech_Male> Stanford soccer team, <Speech_Music_Male> she helped lead them to an NCAA <Speech_Music_Male> title in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> 2019, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> passed away earlier <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this week <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at the age of <Speech_Music_Male> 22. She was a <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> senior majoring in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> international <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> relations <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with a minor <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> history. Katie Meyer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Music> rest in peace.

Baseball soccer Major League Julian araujo Julie foudy Mauricio Pedro America ESPN football MLS World Cup Seth Meyer NCAA Katie Meyer
"dynamos" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

04:16 min | 2 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Agreement that they thought they had. The men's union had agreed with will Wilson on a particular deal. And then when it was presented to the board of directors, the board of directors said no. We're not going to agree to this deal, and that's created a little bit of ill will on the men's side. So ultimately, I don't think the sticking point is going to be sharing the World Cup revenue, but it's going to be, you know, can the men agree to these terms that they thought they had last summer. So that's a little bit of a tricky dynamic, I think. And again, we'll see what gets agreed to, but the women's deal, as well as the men's deal. Jeff, what's taken so long, you said that last June they agreed and they thought they had something in hand. What's taking so long? Well, I mean, the deal got pulled off the table. And that left a lot of bitterness and a lot of unhappiness on the part of the men's union. Again, the union leadership agree to deal or thought they had agreed to deal with will Wilson. They thought that he was going to be the decision to make her that was going to agree to this particular deal. But then when it got presented to the board of directors, they said no. So I think there's a little bit of confusion and a lack of trust I would say on the men's side, just in terms of, well, if we agree to a deal again, who's to say that the board isn't going to turn their backs on that deal as well. So I think there's been a real breakdown in trust. There was talk of them going on strike. Obviously that didn't happen, but that was a real setback in terms of the men's CBA. And obviously, that's had a little bit of a cascade effect in terms of the women's CBA and trying to come to some kind of agreement on these World Cup bonuses. Jeff, let's get into this presidential election. We got the incumbent Cindy parlow cone and the person that she replaced. Carlos Cordero going head head as you mentioned at this coming Saturday at the AGM for U.S. soccer down in Atlanta. Let's start with a very basic question about this election because I don't feel like a lot of people know this. Who actually votes and where is the power kind of the deciding power and all this concentrate? Because we keep hearing a lot about the athletes council. Yeah, there's four main constituencies. There's the youth state associations. There's the adult amateur state associations. There's what's called the pro council, which includes NWSL, USL, MLS, and then there's the athletes council. And there was some legislation passed the congressional level last year that required the athletes to have one third of the vote in any kind of National Council or on the board of directors. And so some changes have been made in terms of the voting structure and the makeup of the board of directors in the USSF to make sure they abide by that particular legislation. That particular law that's now been passed. So right now, the bulk of the power lies with the athletes council. Again, that's 33 and a third percent of the weighted vote that they're going to be able to wield. In the past, the athletes council has tended to vote as a block where they decide this is the candidate we're going to get behind, you know, this is the person that we're going to throw our lot in with in four years ago, that was Carlos Cordero. But a year ago in the vice presidential election, that was the first sign that maybe the athletes council wasn't going to vote as a block going forward. They didn't on that hearing is that. It's not going to be entirely as a block this time. There have been some public statements from Danielle slate from Lori Lindsay, saying they're backing Cindy parlo cone, but whether the rest of the athletes council is going to fall in line with that or agree with that. That still remains to be seen. I'm told that there's some meetings taking place later this week to try to hash that out and see if they are going to vote as a block or if they're going to allow people to kind of go their separate ways. Jeff, you're one of the few reporters who has actually been able to make contact with both candidates. What are the few of the key differences between both? I'm sorry I didn't catch that. I said, you're one of the few reporters who's actually been able to make contact with both candidates. What are the few key differences between the both between both candidates, excuse me? Well, if you talk to Carl's Cordero, you know, he's basically saying, hey, the grassroots people at the state associations for both the adult.

Carlos Cordero CBA Wilson Cindy parlow Jeff pro council NWSL board of directors World Cup confusion USSF soccer National Council Atlanta Lori Lindsay Cindy parlo cone MLS athletes council U.S. Danielle
"dynamos" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:17 min | 2 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Eastern Time and of course you can see that right here on ESPN+. When it rains, it pours and it is pouring right now on Leone's manager. Santiago solari, who was relieved of his duties as glu America manager on Wednesday, the latest victim after I made a one one draw again. That was on Tuesday night. This season solaris team had earned just one victory in only 6 points from their first 8 games so far. Her glass eyes are dead last with 9 games left. Is there still time to salvage something from the wreckage of this America season? Yeah, there's still time. Let's be honest, Lee got Mickey's is very, very forgiving. That's the way the system is. There are 18th place, but even though they're dead last out of 18 Seb, there are two points behind le peche, the play in position. Two points. And if you want to go further, there are only 8 points out of direct playing for the league, which is one through four. There are four, there are 8 points out of that fourth place. That's the way Liga mecki says you accumulate one, two, three wins in a row. You're back in it because of how the close to playoff system is how short the seasons are, but this is where it gets a little tricky for them, okay? This is, they've already dropped points at home versus get at that. They're winless, by the way. This season. They have Monterey, who will not be easy, one of the most luxurious teams in all of league on monkeys. They've got chibas, which is a classical, never easy. They have to go to cholos in Tijuana who are undefeated. They got Leon who are very good team. They got tigress was the best team not only this decade, but proving it again in ligand making this season the most offensive team. And guess who they closed out the tournament against? It's a very daunting schedule. So can they do it? Is it stable? Yes. But it looks very difficult. No, no, there's nothing to be saved from this season for America. And I'll tell you why. Because of the demand hurt because of the execution. See, America, they're not chivas, okay? America can not save their season by sneaking through the back door into the repet, okay? For America, even you get to a final and you lose, it's a fracasso. So this team is it's a fracas. They're not getting anywhere near where they need to be to salvage this season. And the one thing about America is you can't lower the expectations, right? That's what makes America.

Santiago solari le peche America Liga mecki Leone ESPN chibas Seb Mickey Lee Monterey Tijuana Leon chivas
"dynamos" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

02:45 min | 2 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on ESPN FC

"It's not massive in terms of trying to change your identity, but you're trying to tell me that it's going to put people in the stands. Are you trying to tell me he's going to fill up that stadium? Is that what you're trying to say? You know that market very well, Seb, choose your words wisely. I think it's going to go a long way towards feeling that stadium. Yeah, I don't think he's got the star power but chicharito or a Carlos vela. You want to make if you want to make those comparisons. Obviously he doesn't have that star power. But he's a big name. He's well-known to Mexican fans. And unlike the other two, he's actually a part of the national team right now. So yes, dude, I think he will have an incredible impact. He's a guy. He's a guy who people want out of the national league. Listen, I'm a huge actor at a fan. You know this. I'm a huge proposal. I think that is a brilliant player, a very cerebral footballer. And I think he's got a lot left in this tank and can help Major League Soccer and the Houston dynamo. But if you're going to honestly tell me he's going to put people in the stands. Listen, there's only one Mexican player today today that can put people in the stands. That's not already in Major League Soccer. That's not named Carlos vela or Javier Hernandez. And that is two key lasagna. He's the only player that's going to make people come see the casuals. I want to go check out the Mexican fans. Yeah, I want to be there. Bring out the flags, bring out the jerseys. It's not. And I go back to reported $6.5 million. If somebody actually played a that much money, they should be fired. There is no way you overpay for a 32 year old actor, and not a game changer, not that game changing ability. Javier Hernandez touched about twice in the box. Okay, one was a shot that Sean Johnson got a touch on. The other one was the goal in the 89th minute. Game changer. Game changer. Those are the type of players that you overpay for. That is a very good player. A very good player and a lot of fronts, but you do not overpay for them. Dude, I don't know how you get a very good player on a lot of fronts to go from Atlético Madrid in the top levels of European football to the Houston dynamo without overpaying them. But let's go down that road because let's take it out of the dynamo perspective and go even bigger picture with Major League Soccer. Clearly there's a trend in recent years, herc of chasing, and as you say, overpaying for these Mexican veterans. Should MLS keep doing it? MLS should never do anything that doesn't make sense for them. One tactically and two on the marketing aspect. And that's a reality because we've seen things like this happen before. Rafa Marquez. Wow, make tons of sense, right? Look at all the Mexicans in the United States. Mexican Americans first, second, third, fourth generation. Look at the bars of fans who saw him part of that historic Barcelona team. He goes to New York Red Bull. What happens? Did he put people on the stands? Did he change the culture there? No. So you have to be very careful with these. Sometimes they work out, sometimes they don't. I still think to this day, one of the most significant signings that Major League Soccer was put them at Blanco when he did for that Chicago.

Carlos vela Major League chicharito Javier Hernandez Seb Soccer Houston dynamo national league Atlético Sean Johnson Rafa Marquez Madrid Houston football Barcelona United States New York Blanco Chicago
"dynamos" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

04:56 min | 2 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on ExtraTime

"Not coming over here to just be like, oh, done and dusted all good. Quote unquote retirement league. Now this man has to be sharp for the World Cup. Tata martino is saying in the media recently that he is L tree's best player. This changes everything from how they're seen, what they can be inside and outside the club. It's huge. I think one, it's important to make sure that everyone listening to this podcast understands what Hector Herrera brings to the team, what brings to the club. This isn't a player who's going to score goals or assists in large numbers. I mean, if you look at his stats, he's played 52 games over the last three years. Zero goals and three assists, all right? So this is not a player who's going to light the league on fire. But what he does bring is fantastic positioning, technique, his vision. He's the player who can open up the game for the dynamo. He gets on the ball and he can play those long diagonals. He can combine, and he can strike from distance. It's not that he can't, but that's what he's known for. This is a player who can take control of the game, who wins the second balls. He's going to be the player that relies on the tempo of the Houston dynamo. He controls the tempo. This is a massive signing for the Houston dyno because now you're talking about bringing the Mexican culture of Houston to the stadium. That's going to bring a different dynamic to the Houston dynamo home games, which adds to that home field advantage. This is why this type of signing is a game changer for the dynamo. You look at the recent signings for this team, the biggest one is Albert Elise, and they spent 2.42 million on them. Now, he's the type of game changer with the pace in the athleticism, but when you're talking about the overall hype, their overall command of a match, that's Hector Herrera. He can be a very special player in this league. But Albert Elise, when he joined, was a prospect and who had done some things in Concacaf, of course, but was at Monterey and not getting playing time. We're talking about a guy who's coming off 8 or 9 years in Europe at Porto and Atlético Madrid in the Champions League starting for L three with a massive reputation and earned reputation and the ability to change a club from the inside and the outside..

Hector Herrera Tata martino Houston dynamo Albert Elise World Cup Houston Atlético Monterey Porto Champions League Madrid Europe
"dynamos" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

05:47 min | 4 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on ExtraTime

"I'm gonna throw it out there. Over. Kevin molino over he's back. It's wonderful. It's everything that we thought it might be last year and more. So that's me, let's speak it into existence, baby. Josie to rapids or to Orlando or somewhere fun and Kevin molino like 2100 minutes and double digit goals and assists. Let's just give it to me. This is fine. The meme, the big weakness, the concern the pitfall we might actually were running on time here, I think, well I got two minutes. It's good on paper, but not good in practice again. Yeah, it's 2021. Twice, which is all of our nightmares. Poignant. You get, you know, you get another line on that. That might be a haiku. I think some of it I think I brought it up before, but I was thinking about kind of like the TFC rule where they had MLS cup and then they have this down here and some of its international competitions and you say, okay, well, this is just a fluke and bad injuries and all this. And then it came back for a TFC, but it just kind of feels like right on that edge for Columbus of like, is this actually a bounce back year where they can get back to being I think one of the better teams in MLS and can maybe be the ones that ascend in the Eastern Conference. I have like maybe more questions about Columbus and where they can land as far as my predictions go for the season than maybe any other team in the east right now because I could easily talk myself into them being a top four team in the east or I could say, you know what, this just doesn't work for them and they miss the playoffs again somehow, which seems shocking, but I don't know, after last season, sometimes things don't just click back into gear and so I don't know. It's a tough one for me. I'm gonna probably lean towards with everything that's happened in the east at this team as far as my prediction goes. I'm gonna put that where are we setting the line actually? Take us there. We don't have a line for this one. So you set your own lines. Take us inside the Cleveland car process here. Well, I said it was wide. So that makes it tough to set the line. Do you want to set it, gosh? Yeah, I'll say, I'll say three and a half. A hot potato here. Three and a half. It might be under. I'm sorry, four and a half, four and a half, four and a half. I'd be under 5 through 7. I'm not in a position to say I feel like they're a guaranteed playoff team, but they had all that stuff happened to them and still were a point out of the playoffs last year. I think I feel that they're a buzzer, a playoff too. I'm gonna put I'm gonna go under. I'm gonna put them over. I'm gonna say that I think I'm close to the mindset that I was 12 months ago for them. And if they can be someone else's death romantic, yeah, you are. He's a Roman man. You're at the launch pad. You're like, we're going to the moon boys..

Kevin molino MLS Columbus Josie TFC rapids Orlando Cleveland
"dynamos" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

05:32 min | 4 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on ExtraTime

"But yeah, no. Congrats to Kai Sierra Leone, still pulling for these guys. Amazing so far. Oh, it's great. It's wonderful to watch. All right, let's get into the show here and we'll get to the news and the transfer news right in the last before jumping into your season previews. We're starting the season previous today. It's going to be the most packed in sort of scheduling we've ever done for these. So if you get frustrated that they're not long enough or whatever they might be, that's what the mailbag is for. Please just please tweet at us email us, text us. We will answer questions. We will talk about what you want us to talk about. You just got to force us to do it. Before we get into the news though, we are recording on a Tuesday, putting it out on a Tuesday. Normally, we're Monday, Thursday show, of course. Monday was Martin Luther King Jr. day. I struggled a little bit yesterday, sort of trying to sift through, I don't know, all the things that get said by certain people in positions and I hope you know what I'm talking about here. But what I would say about Martin Luther King Jr. day is it's a good day to go back and read more than just the quotes that you see sort of bandied about a good day to read about legacy. A good data to go think about what's happening in our own little space here. Black players for change, BPC, the diversity hiring policy that happened last year, then all the work that they've done in two years, which is just absolutely incredible. Like, from the ground up, they have built this thing that we all hope and I know that they plan to make serious changes in North American soccer and the worlds that we live in. So go check out what BPC is doing. You can donate on their site. You can buy merchandise from them if you want to support them in that way. But I am really, really encouraged and also looking forward to what they do in 2022 after two incredible years. So go check them out. Best Alfonso Davies. I don't think we hit this on the last show, Dave, but I know you being parking yourself. Yeah, would have forced us to do so. Out for four weeks with heart inflammation following the COVID diagnosis..

Martin Luther King Jr. Leone BPC us Alfonso Davies soccer Dave heart inflammation
"dynamos" Discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

05:30 min | 4 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on ExtraTime

"Extra time is exactly how I find it out. What's going on in the MLS? Maybe this podcast is influenced me a little bit as well. Everybody up here. Every single day goes into the office into the laboratory. They're trying to cook up some great stuff for you guys. That's why he's here. Oh, from New York, New York, you are listening to extra time from the AT&T 5G virtual studios. I am Andrew Lee with my partners in soccer. David goss. Kalen Carr, coming up, a big show. It's a Tuesday. There's been a lot of time for news to happen to be announced. Hit the rumor mill. Count Acosta blockbuster LAFC, Albert rusnak officially a sounder. That one is done transfer scuttlebutt, young money, cash money, Houston splash at Dallas might two. Casper's Shabelle go to the fire Paul areo at a club America, 18 month loans for everybody cold bastard just in Shay. They're moving on and season previews begin today with haikus and much more Vancouver Nashville C Columbus and the union and we are once again ranking the top 5 players at every position starting with goalkeeper Andres is going to have a heyday in the chat telling us to speed it up, boys, what's up? What's up, Caleb in a long time? Finally see him. Good to see you guys. I feel like this is like the first day of preseason where I followed the off season training regimens. I've done all of that. But then you show up and it's the beep test the first day and you're like, nah, I don't really know how to do this. I'm not actually prepared for that. But I know I'm gonna run it out. I'm gonna go until I drop and overall shortest off season I think ever, but we have been enjoying all of your takes on Twitter as far as I think you're trying to start your own Josie rumor mill to each other. Somebody put this stuff up, you know? I need somebody to come after. We got him with a soccer dot com picking up the Josh sergeants of sporting Kansas City absolute BS that I was firing off over like a BLT at lunch one day. But look, it is that time of year. You're seeing what we have the pad on stab. At the training ground, it is a beautiful morning, the dew is on the ground. And you know, the sun is rising shot that I didn't got to get from pat on Twitter. To be honest with you, we got, you know, we've got the barns..

David goss Kalen Carr Albert rusnak Paul areo Andrew Lee New York Acosta MLS soccer Casper Shay Andres Houston Dallas Nashville Caleb Columbus Vancouver America AT
"dynamos" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

05:57 min | 4 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Are sort of the key parameters for helping to drive a decimal. Now, if you put earth on this curve that you've generated, does it match up with what we see here? Yes, it does. Did you look at a handful or a sampling of exoplanets and try to determine which ones were likely to fit this profile and have a dynamo? You know, actually we didn't do that. Our main goal was to really improve our understanding of pure iron, and then allow future planetary scientists and astronomers to take this data and evaluate the specific applications for different planets they observe. Right. A bigger planet might actually have longer lasting dynamo, according to this calculation. Yeah, that was unexpected and really interesting. Plan is larger than the earth. It will take longer to solidify than smaller planets. But what we believe is that the solidification of the cores drives the dynamo and therefore it sets the time scale for which the surface is will have a protective magnetosphere, which protects the surface from charged particles from the star. And therefore habitable. And therefore, have one more component that would make them more likely to be habitable or more time for life to evolve. Very cool. Is there a way to measure the magnetosphere of an exoplanet directly? Yes, there are some methods out there through spectroscopic techniques by looking at the light that is absorbed in the atmospheres of planets, astronomers can help gain information about the strength and whether or not these planets will have magnetic fields. And so they come at it from an observational way and we're coming at it from this is what we predict to happen based on our understanding of material properties. I really thought the fact that the planet was spinning was what was shaking that metallic liquid around and making the dynamo. It's actually all involved. The fact that the planet spinning as well as the fact that you're having this convective flow creates the complex motion of that metallic fluid. The field of generating dynamos is something that's incredibly difficult to study and actually is a very thriving area research. Is it possible that the composition of exoplanets insides or maybe their atmospheres or their distance from the stars or other planets, basically other factors? Could interfere with a working magnetosphere, even though we had the correct proportion of size and pressure and iron and all that stuff. Absolutely. This is not the end all study of whether planets will have magnetospheres. There's a lot of questions about what is happening in the mantle. For example, if the mantle can not remove heat, if the mantle is completely solid layer and it's not convicting, it doesn't have plate tectonics. You're not going to remove heat. And so the core won't cool very quickly. And so that's going to have a lot of implications for what's happening in the interior. One key item I want to make sure is caveat is that we studied pure iron. But we know that the core of the earth is not pure iron. There are some nickel and there's some light elements, maybe oxygen and carbon and silicon. And those compositions are going to change depending upon the composition of the star and the specific composition of the planets. With habitability, the main driver of this researcher, where you also interested in iron and pressure in those kinds of things. When we oftentimes looked about what makes a habitable planet, there's a lot out there. But sort of the first order question people ask was, is that planet in the habitable zone? Is the surface temperature in a region that would support liquid water as we know liquid water is a requirement we believe for prebiotic chemistry to evolve. And so what we're looking to do here was to provide another relatively simple observational metric that would help us understand is this planet to be more likely to be habitable or less likely to be habitable. And that was how big is the planet and therefore is it likely or less likely to have a protective menu field. Beyond habitability, another really important benefit of this work is that this work paves the way for experimental techniques to measure the melting curves of materials with such extreme conditions. And which is a really sensitive test for our understanding of materials in general. Thanks, Rick. Hey, thank you, Sarah. Rick Krause is a research scientist at Lawrence Livermore national laboratory. You can read more about the work we discussed and a related commentary piece at science dot org slash podcast. And that concludes this edition of the science podcast. If you have any comments or suggestions, write to us at science podcast at ORG. You can listen to the show on the science website at science dot org slash podcast. You can subscribe there or anywhere you get your podcast. This show was edited and produced by Sarah crespi, with production help from prodigy, Meghan Cantwell and Joel Goldberg, transcripts or bicycle, Jeffrey cook, composed the music on behalf of science magazine and its publisher, triple AS. Thanks for joining us. This episode is brought to you in part by the fulbright U.S. scholar program. The fulbright U.S. scholar program, 2023 to 2024 competition will open in February 2022. This scholar program offers diverse opportunities for U.S. academics, administrators and professionals to teach research do professional projects and attend seminars abroad. Explore the catalog of awards and connect with fulbright to learn more. For more information about the program, please visit WWW dot CI, ES ORG. That's WWW dot CI, ES dot org..

Rick Krause Lawrence Livermore national la Sarah crespi Meghan Cantwell Joel Goldberg Jeffrey cook Rick Sarah science magazine U.S.
"dynamos" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

07:50 min | 4 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Pretty good at finding exoplanets. And if all goes as planned with the James Webb space telescope, many new and interesting finds are probably coming soon. But how many of them will have signs that we think of as related to life oxygen, water, or maybe something you don't always think about for habitability? A magnetosphere driven by a dynamo. This is basically a shield that protects the planet's surface from ionizing radiation. Rick Krause and colleagues wrote about the possibility of dynamos and magnetospheres on exoplanets in this week's science. Hi Rick. Hi Sarah. How are you? I'm good. I'm excited to talk about earth's little magnetic umbrella that basically protects all life on this planet from a lot of scary stuff. Absolutely. And it's driven by liquid iron in our planet's core. How exactly does it work? From basic fundamental physics, if you have a moving metallic material, you can create a magnetic field. And so when earth core, we have a solid inner core and a liquid outer core. And because earth is cooling, that liquid iron is convecting. And so you have material that's moving up towards the surface, and then as that material cools, it descends. And that motion of the liquid metal, it creates a magnetic field, which extends to far beyond earth's surface. And that magnetic field then protects the earth atmosphere from charged particles from the sun. Most of the rocky exoplanets that have compositions that we think are similar to earth are bigger and we don't know that they're all bigger, maybe that's just what we can see with the equipment that we have now. But so far, we've mostly seen super Earths that have the same composition as us. And that's raised a debate about whether something that big would have a dynamo, similar to ours. Why might they be different? So for planets larger than ours, the pressures and temperatures and their interior get the conditions that are way beyond what we have on the earth also much further beyond what we can measure in the laboratory. At the center of the earth, the pressures are 360 gigapascals, which may be in a more comparable unit. That's 3.6 million atmospheres of pressure. I don't think either one is very understandable for us. But it's a lot a lot a lot, right? It's a lot. It's a tremendous amount of pressure. Temperatures of 5000°, just conditions that are very, very difficult to reach in the lab. And so if you go to what are called super earth, Earths that are one to ten times the mass of the earth, those pressures can get to be thousands and thousands of gigapascals. So pressure's way beyond those in the earth. They're so far beyond what we've previously been able to study in the laboratory. Our understanding of materials is generally an extrapolation of what we know. And so those extrapolations can vary depending upon what assumptions you make. And so sometimes based upon certain models, you could say, well, those planets will always have a solid iron core, and therefore they wouldn't have a dynamo, or maybe they always have a completely liquid core, and so you would never get slip, which would drive a dynamo. And so we really needed experimental data to sort of constrain what would be happening just at a fundamental level. To get a sense for what's going on in the cores of a super earth to get to these extreme pressures, you know that might be found in the cores of larger Iraqi planets, you used a laser to put pressure on iron here on earth. A lot more than has been done before. How much pressure were you able to exert on the iron in these experiments? So we use the national ignition facility, which is the world's most energetic laser. The extreme amount of energy in that laser allows us to get to pressures of nearly a thousand gigapascals, which is about three times more than the pressure at the very center of the earth and about four times greater pressure than has been achieved in previous experiments to measure the melting curve. You didn't just put a bunch of pressure on iron and say, that's what the inside of a bigger planet is like. Instead, you kind of recreated a scenario, the experience of iron inside of an exoplanet. Can you walk us through that? We tried to perform an experiment where we took our small sample of iron and tried to mimic the conditions that a parcel of iron would achieve and would see when it's descending within, say, a super earth. So we would tune the laser pulse very precisely to first heat it. And then we would slowly on a relative scale slowly compress the iron such that it would be compressed like the conditions that she's in a planet. As the iron sinks towards the center of the planet, the pressure changes traveling that distance. Yes, as it cools and transfers its heat to the mantle, that becomes now more dense, and so it sinks. And so what we try to do is emulate those conditions of let's try to compress the material along the same type of pressure temperature path that you would see in that convective super earth, which is do it in the laboratory. And then we would use a diagnostic called x-ray diffraction to evaluate if that iron has solidified or if it stays liquid. And so that allows us to sort of test if you would observe notification or if you've never ceased notification in one of these super Earths. Why do you have to use x-ray diffraction to see whether iron is liquid or solid? This is actually complex question in the community. What is the best way to evaluate if something has molten or if it's solidified? And actually some of the recent research has shown that probably the most robust method is to use x-ray or fraction. Because what x-ray diffraction does is it tells you if there's any long-range order in the system. And so for a liquid, the atoms are moving around at random. And so it doesn't have a lot of long-range order, whereas a solid crystalline solid is by definition has long range order. So x-ray diffraction is somewhat the optimal diagnostic to tell you the difference between this randomly moving liquid and highly ordered solid. The setup of these experiments is an imitating or recreating one exoplanet in particular, but instead it's more of a generalized super earth. Because there's so many planets out there, what we want really wanted to say was improve our model for what happens in pure iron. And so what we did was we performed a series of experiments to map out the conditions at which iron solidifies. And so what we were able to do was show that four different initial temperatures in the iron sample, which represents different, say, temperature profiles in a planet. We then mapped out the pressures at which that iron would solidify. So we were able to show that if a planet has this temperature profile, it will solidify at this death. And that's actually a really powerful statement because it allows us to say, well, for planets hotter than this, they will never be solid or planned cooler on this. They'll be all solid and also give us an idea of the dynamics at which a planet solidifies. Because we have ideas for how quickly planets will cool and then with this experimental measurement, we can also then say, how quickly they'll solidify. So they're now kind of a defined set of characteristics that you can say, well, these planets, if they fit into those parameters, will have a magnetosphere, or will likely have a dynamo. There are other controlling factors, but it's certainly helps us say, yes, we will have a solidifying core, which will drive convection. And those.

Rick Krause James Webb Rick Sarah
"dynamos" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

07:08 min | 4 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"Ann, the ferret that was recently cloned. For the most important ferret in this story, Elizabeth Anne, who was born last year, actually has most of her mitochondrial DNA from a domestic ferret. But the hope is that when she has her own kits, she will have some male kids who will also have her mitochondrial DNA, but then when they breed with a female block fluid ferret, the kids that they create should be 100% black footed ferret with all of their genetics mitochondrial and otherwise. That's great, really interesting. And so that's kind of the big step here is that not only has Elizabeth Ann been cloned, born, survived, and maybe even to breeding age, then breeding her will kind of be the big step. Yeah, so like if she gives birth this year, she's going to be the first clone who's really integrated into a conservation program, and that's the thing that's really never been done before. Breeding a clone of an endangered species, especially breeding with this eye towards how can it help the conservation effort and really taking care to make sure that it taxes as big as a kind of biodiversity punch as possible? Do you mention that this one ferret, one Elizabeth Ann black footed ferret? We'll introduce a lot of diversity into the black footed ferret population. Is there a way to quantify that? Yeah, so they've actually done genomic analysis of the current captive bred population and of willa, which is the ferret that died in the 1980s that Elizabeth Ann was cloned from and they found that will is DNA actually has ten times more unique alleles than DNA from the captive bred ferrets. What that means is that her chromosomes just have more traits and more combinations that can be introduced to the population much, much more than any Farrah alive today. Is this something they can do again? Are there other black footed ferrets in the freezer somewhere? There is one other block food ferret at the freezer somewhere. What's his name? Oh, stud book number two. That one actually died of a disease called canine distemper. So right now they're working on trying to figure out how to get that out of any samples that they use, but they do have high hopes that they will eventually be able to use that sample as well. There are two things to kind of look for down the line which is more cloned siblings from the same founder ferret as Elizabeth Ann. And a clone from this male individual as well. There's some great names in this story. Elizabeth Ann and stud book number two, maybe could be introducing some serious diversity into this population. So what other species might be eligible for this approach of introducing the diversity? Yeah, so another species to watch for, I guess, is the horse. And they're actually, was this your balls key's horse clone born the same year that Elizabeth Ann was born? His name is Kurt. His name is Kurt, Kurt is named after Kurt Bennett, who was actually the researcher who founded the San Diego frozen zoo where the DNA of the horse that Kurt is cloned from was preserved. That's great. So these special horses and then also maybe rhinos could be eligible for this. Northern white rhinos were obviously incredibly endangered. There are only two living individuals left, neither are capable of giving birth at this point. I think several groups around the world who are looking at options to make sure that that rhino subspecies does not go extinct. Luckily, there has been DNA from several northern white rhinos that have been cryopreserved in a way that could allow for future clones, but the process is not nearly as far along as it is in the straws horse and the black footed ferret, obviously rhinos don't have something like the domestic horse or the domestic ferret act as a surrogate, which makes things a little bit trickier and I think rhinos are also a bit notorious for being more challenging to breed, I think, in captivity. I'm curious about this frozen zoo. Do they have a really big collection at this point and really wide ranging selection of animals? Yeah, it's crazy. So the entire frozen zoo is basically in a room the size of a master bedroom. And it's just this really unassuming looking room full of these sort of big deep freezers. But those freezers contain cell lines from over 10,000 individual animals from more than 1200 different species. That's really cool. But this gets to the next point, which is cloning is not the solution for all endangered species. Is there a concern that this will become the go to technique approach instead of habitat preservation, for example? I think that while cloning for instance for black footed ferrets can have these huge benefits, right now there's probably a small handful of species that it can really be applied to. And it's never never going to be a replacement for keeping species abundant in the wild, protecting their habitat, protecting the diversity of ecosystems that already exist. It's much, much harder to build things from scratch as black footed ferrets themselves are evidence for cloning isn't something that means, oh, it's fine as a species. Get super rare or goes extinct because we can just clone them back into existence. So it's really more something that will be helpful in the case that species do become extremely rare as a kind of last resort. And as the thing that keeps them from going completely extinct. Thanks, Rachel. Thank you. Thanks so much for having me. Sure. Rachel Fritz was the news intern for science. Today is her last day, the state that we're recording. And I hope you'll join me in wishing her well. Thank you. You can find a link to the article we discussed at science dot org slash podcast. Stay tuned, up next we have researcher Rick Krause. We talk about dynamos and.

Elizabeth Ann Elizabeth Anne Kurt Elizabeth Ann black Kurt Bennett Farrah Ann San Diego Rachel Fritz Rachel Rick Krause
"dynamos" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

07:37 min | 4 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"This is the science podcast for January 14th, 2022. I'm Sarah crespi, each week we talk about the most interesting news and research published in science and the sister journals. First up this week, we have news intern, Rachel Fritz. We talk about using cloning to bring back genetic diversity in an endangered species. Next we have researcher Rick Krause. His group used a powerful laser to compress iron to pressures similar to those found inside some rocky exoplanets. If these so called super earth cores are like our earth core, they may have a protective magnetosphere, which increases their chances of hosting life. What do you do with an endangered species that has a tiny population and very low genetic diversity? Basically, the whole population is made up of genetic first cousins or siblings. One surprising solution to this involves cloning. Rachel Fritz is a news intern for science. She wrote about the first endangered species that has been cloned in order to be integrated into a conservation program. Hi, Rachel. Hi, thanks for having me on. Oh, sure. I'm excited to talk about ferrets. Even rare ones that I've probably never run into in the real world. Black footed ferrets have actually been on the ropes for a long time. Basically, since the U.S. started protecting endangered species, these have been under threat. How big is their population these days? Right now, as a species, they are still really dependent on captive breeding. So there are usually about 300 ferrets in captive breeding programs in the U.S. and Canada at any given time and about the same number in the wild. They're not a lot. And unfortunately, there is a serious lack of genetic diversity in these guys. Is it starting to cause problems with the population with breeding? Every ferret alive today is actually descended from just 7 individuals who are captured from the wild in Wyoming in the 1980s. And I should say every individual except for elizabethan. Okay, we'll get to that in a second. They've seen some decline in what they call reproductive fitness. They are just getting a little bit worse at making babies. And then the babies that are born still mostly, I think, coming out healthy, normal black food, ferrets, but some problems have started to crop up like their tails will have a little kink in them or their sternums will be a little bit deformed, mutations that are cropping up because all of the ferrets are basically as related at this point as siblings or first cousins. Okay, here's a question. So they're very kind of uniform. They're cousins or siblings to each other. How can cloning help increase diversity in a population like this? There were 18 ferrets that were initially captured for the captive breeding program and just 7 were able to reproduce and pass on their genes. So there were actually two individuals who were captured who did not breed, but their DNA was cryopreserved somewhere called the San Diego frozen zoo cloning is a way to unlock the biodiversity that's been frozen in time at the frozen two. We've had this type of cloning since the 1990s, right? Dolly the sheep. Yes. And it's been used for sheep for pets for more kinds of livestock. Why is it just now being applied to conservation? You know, several wild animals have been cloned. Even a few endangered species have been cloned the first kind of right at the turn of the 21st century, but in all of those instances, it's just been one or two individuals cloned as a proof of concept. One of the challenges with endangered species is they don't necessarily have the infrastructure, the facility, the resources that, for instance, agriculture does to try a sort of riskier form of breeding. We're pretty good at keeping sheep alive in breeding sheep. Yes. Maybe it's a little bit easier than some rare animal that people have almost never read in captivity. Right, we have so much more practice with sheep. Why are black footed ferrets a good early test for this? They actually have a lot of things going for them that make them kind of perfect to be pioneering this as a potential option for other endangered species down the road. One thing was just that they happened to be lucky and have these two individuals that happened to be able to make a really big difference for black food for genetic diversity. Part of it is that black food ferrets were very unlucky. They have this genetic basis that is so slim that even help from one extra individual can make a ton of difference for them. They also have close relatives that can support the cloning process. Yes, so one of the things that makes cloning endangered species challenging is because each individual is so important. Another animal is usually used as the surrogate mom. So in the case of black footed ferrets, that's actually the domestic ferret. So any cloned black food ferrets will be born from a domestic ferret mom and luckily black food ferrets and domestic ferrets are very closely related and because domestic ferrets are used in, for instance, biomedical research and bred as pets. We have a lot of experience, breeding them as well. When you say that domestic ferret is the surrogate mom, it's not just that the fertilized embryo are put into the mom. But the embryo itself comes from the domestic ferret, right? Basically when I say cloning, I'm talking about something called somatic cell nuclear transfer. That's just a fancy way for saying you take an egg cell and you suck out the nucleus that contains that egg cells, DNA. And then you take a cell from the individual that you want to clone and you put its nucleus in that egg cell, and then you kind of give them a little jolt of electricity. If everything has gone well, they start to reproduce, divide and form an embryo. The tricky bit there is that there is mitochondrial DNA hanging around that's inherited from the domestic ferret mom. Yes. That's an added complication of using this form of cloning where you're using a surrogate mom from a different species. The mitochondrial DNA always comes from the mother. So if you use a surrogate from a different species are going to have the mitochondrial DNA from that species, but there is actually a way to deal with that. This is when we finally get to mention Elizabeth.

Rachel Fritz Sarah crespi Rick Krause U.S. Rachel Wyoming Dolly Canada San Diego Elizabeth
J.John's New Book 'Will I Be Fat in Heaven? And Other Curious Questions' Has a Special Endorsement

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:15 min | 5 months ago

J.John's New Book 'Will I Be Fat in Heaven? And Other Curious Questions' Has a Special Endorsement

"I'm talking to canon J John, the new book is will I be fat in heaven and other curious questions. So you're telling us a story of being in Australia? Is this many years ago? Yes. Quite a few years ago. And so this young woman comes up to you at the end and says, I hated what you said, church destroys people. Absolutely. So I said to her look, have you got a few minutes and she was like, why? Really angry. I said, if you've got a few minutes, can we go and have a coffee? And she like, all right, let's go. So we just went to the cafeteria. We sat there. We got a coffee. I said, why, why are you so angry? And all this stuff just came out. And I just listened. I said, that was a Monday. I said, come and hear me Tuesday and we'll have a coffee. And she's like, I don't know. Anyway, she came went for coffee. I said, come and hear me Wednesday, we'll go for coffee. She came, we went for coffee. Come and hear me Thursday. We'll go for coffee. She came. We went for coffee. I'd say one meeting left, come and hear me Friday. We'll go for coffee, Friday. She's ransomed hilled restored and forgiven. That girl's name, Christine Kane. Ladies and gentlemen, on the back of this book, will I be fat in heaven and other curious questions? There's a blurb. An endorsement from Christine Kane. Some people because we have a very mixed kind of crowd who tunes into this program. Some people know who Christine Kane is many do not. So tell my audience who Christine Kane is. Well, and the interesting thing about that story, Eric is 5 coffees. 5 coffees help this restless girl and counter the tune living God. Well, she's a little dynamo. I think one of the most incredible things that she and her husband are doing is that they founded a ministry called a 21, which is anti human trafficking and has made such a difference throughout Europe and around the world. And she's a speaker. I mean, she's an ambassador for Jesus. Oh, she's a big she's a big

Canon J John Christine Kane Australia Eric Europe
"dynamos" Discussed on Konfus

Konfus

02:28 min | 11 months ago

"dynamos" Discussed on Konfus

"Skype now vesco disavow of the idea. Yes some syllabus gowda putin sushila so so div digital into guys like to go go meaningless to tamar full skeletal. Dense scale. Had job yes. He inmates to pilau micromax audio audio. Singapore the the singles dead austin. Not all new edna goes mosquitoes for been released. My drink hot bill So but on ed kalamitsi life yemen. Yakutsk would smell became blake blackman min ignored legal basis. Donde invitation first yours again. Come or yakov scott or some young men do you suck dick bubis permanent basis so can go to class. Was there as well lino Tomatoes on min mini sudden manasseh. What ski on c. Many stevenson dynamos drapeau. To attack from.

vesco gowda putin sushila ed kalamitsi blake blackman min Skype yakov scott Singapore dick bubis austin manasseh stevenson dynamos drapeau
"dynamos" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"dynamos" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The Republican Party. Individually. Matt and Mercedes slap our Dynamos but together wow! They run the American conservative Union and put on CPAC every year. Both have worked in the White House and established a love of country and conservative roots. Despite very different upbringings, First up Mercedes whose family roots come from outside of America. My parents lived in Cuba. My father was, you know, pretty much started. His own business is really became very successful when he was in Cuba back and you know the fifties and early fifties and was a self made man. And then all of a sudden Fidel Castro, the Cuban dictator takes over the country and literally talk about chaos in this country. All of a sudden, you find that by father loses everything. He loved America that the the chance that America gave him and his family to restart a new life, and he always taught us early on. That this country was a very special country that this was a country that stood for freedom that stood for opportunity that some that a family can come from Cuba with just with nothing and rebuild their lives and be and have us and had the American dream and live the American dream. I remember my father did Telling in telling me that, he said, Remember, these freedoms are very fragile and remember, you can lose the nation in just a matter of decades. And and that really stuck to me, because that is when I realized that my vocation of my calling in life was to defend this country to protect our freedoms to protect our constitution and to remind Americans that We live in the greatest country in the world and that we can't take our freedoms for granted. Match slaps background was a lot more traditional, but no less impactful. Living in Ohio, Texas and New Jersey as a boy before finally settling in Kansas, where his political roots were established in the 19 eighties, Ronald Reagan's president, when I'm a young boy, and he seems to stand for all the things that I'm told her, right I just love to miss a person. I actually really loved Vice President Bush Shoe. I thought he was a really great man. And he had been our congressman when we're in Texas. But for me, I'd say the most overriding impact on my life. Was my mom watching her. She was a tennis pro, which was a job that like no women did back Then She was a real Trailblazer in her own right and taught me what was right and taught me what was wrong. Both Matt and Mercedes wound up working for George W. Bush's campaign in 2000 and would eventually work at the White House. He became a couple in 2001, and we're married shortly thereafter. Mercedes was back at the White House during the Trump administration, and now they're not only two of the leading conservative voices in the country there, Amy to make sure that future generations have the necessary appreciation for America. What are mostly worried about with our kids? Is, um you know, Will they understand how great America is? I mean mercy story with what happened in Cuba. Is very relevant to what's happening in American. I just I worry that my kids won't understand what a beautiful and unique country it is, because almost everything they listened to, or almost everything they may watch. And you know the things they counter in the swamp where they're growing up. Is all pushing on this idea that America such a yucky, terrible place that we have to transform it. We have to change you. We have the Like almost like a rebirth, and I'm just worried that they don't understand all these great stories, including all the great immigrants and our families. They just you know, they have these great stories, so We actually do love it when they spent spent time with my mom who was probably a feminist, and probably she grew up in a pretty liberal Democrat, and she became a conservative Republican. Because of the values that make this country great. My God, she loves this country. Your parents feel the same way. I think that's the most important thing. We get hands of the goods. Yes, we want them to understand our faith Tradition. Yes, we want them to love the things in life that we love. But more than anything else. I really want them to be proud of being an American. I think that's very out of style by worry when my father comes to me and he's 84 years old, and he says, I'm really concerned we're gonna lose America, and he sees the writing on the wall. And so I fear for our Children about that. But at the same time, you know I have great faith and believe in prayer and really focus on talking to our Children and their friends about why we stand for what we stand for, which is freedom, Faith on opportunity. Which is so special here in America on and which, Of course, we're concerned about losing for longstanding voices in the political movement to a new one now. Burgess Owens is a Republican freshman congressman from Utah. You may know that he is a former NFL safety. And you may even know that he won Super Bowl 15 as a member of the Los Angeles Raiders. But I'm willing to bet you don't know as much about his family background that led him to where he is today, beginning with growing up in a segregated area. Of Tallahassee, Florida, and it was really simple. The message I get from my parent's generation very simply that way would talk to love our country. God country, family respected women in authority, so maybe, like pretty simple. And if we if you deviated from that we just had they had to deal with the nation was stable track, even though my parents voted Democrat and I was a Democrat until the Reagan days. The conservative values were always there is about work at this about honesty about faith is about the idea that the American dream is alive and well after football. Burgess built a successful business, which sold Electron IX to other businesses to track their expenses. That is until the business failed. Leading him in a new direction. And providing a new opportunity to teach.

Ronald Reagan Cuba 2001 2000 Kansas Fidel Castro New Jersey Ohio Utah George W. Bush America 19 eighties Matt CPAC Amy two Super Bowl 15 Trump Republican Democrat
Why Talking About Puberty Starts When Kids Are Toddlers

Raising Good Humans

04:54 min | 1 year ago

Why Talking About Puberty Starts When Kids Are Toddlers

"I mean there's certain things that you start kind of as soon as a kid is chocking understands language. First of all you use the anatomically correct terminology finance vagina vulva testicle and that can feel strange to people who didn't grow up using that terminology. Right some people. Lots of people were up in families where everyone had different nicknames. Right so i know some people who call vagina a mushy for instance. But it's really important to know the correct terminology and there's a bunch of reasons why that is true so in terms of age appropriateness as soon as your child soon as you're talking to your It's their penis vagina. nets there. Ball bats testicles. Not that there isn't room for other terms because once they go to school once they start socializing once they can't they're gonna come home with all sorts of stuff but you wanna make sure they actually know the terms and are able to say the terms and understand that there is no shame associated with the terms. Another thing that starts really early is the issue of consent. His consent isn't just about saying yes or no having sex with someone before we go into consent. I was just gonna say that even on the changing table. When you're doing body parts you knows your is your mouth your penis. These are not these. These things feel uncomfortable. They'll only get more comfortable as you practice so even with little babies practice but also there is some research when you mentioned the number of reasons to know the body parts imagining one of them that you're referring to is the fact that we know that in some research kids are less likely to have someone to be victim of a predator right so our abuse. It considered an issue of safety to know and be able to name all of the parts of your body. There is research that bonnie ralph's sites in her book that there is a corollary between children. Who know how to name. Parts of their bodies and lower rates of being victims of predatory behavior. There's also a safety issue in terms of if your child has a health issue. Discomfort appeanas a staying in inch. It's important that they be able to describe exactly where in their body it is. You tell your kid. What they're elbow is what their ear is. There's no reason that you shouldn't accept people fianc comfortable and the things that we don't mention right if we don't talk about something it sort of it infers. Shame onto that particular body part which we don't wanna do. Everyone has a comfort level about where and when they talk about body parts genitalia puberty. Life changes all of those things. But if you never talk to your child about these things they are going to assume that it is shameful announced why you don't talk to them about our one of our favorite quotes is from mr rogers dynamo girl. We talk about this all the time that would mentionable is manageable right. If you saw it from your perspective the the more you name it. The last big battle emotion feels manageable with puberty. It's also the emotional stuff but also the physical if you can mention it. I mean when we run our workshops and this is this is a very interesting phenomenon. If you say the term vaginal discharge to group of eight year old girl this is this is exactly case in point. If you say the term vaginal discharge. I have an eight year old girl. You're not because an eight year old girl won't laugh. She'll say oh that's what that is. I have stuff. I see my underwear and when it dries it kind of white and crusty. I never knew with that was right. Matter fact no big deal. Thank you for letting me know if you stay at word to rupa five year. Old women like you did. They put their heads down. They walk out of the room. So in many ways just like naming the body parts also just across the body process body process it normalizes it and if you get to them early enough by the time there's roughly the shame the skepticism the embarrassment into the twin and ten years. At least they're armed with the information you've already been able

Bonnie Ralph Nets Mr Rogers Rupa
A big year for Bad Bunny

Pop Culture Happy Hour

09:41 min | 1 year ago

A big year for Bad Bunny

"Welcome back here with me from her home in washington. Dc is npr. Music and latino contributor. Stephanie fernandez hi stephanie. Hey steven great to have you so as we mentioned in. The bad bunny has released three albums in two thousand twenty the first y h l q. Md l. g. That's yoga lo que. Mais della ghana. Or i do whatever i want came out in february not long after bad bunny performed with jennifer lopez shaquille and j galvin at the super bowl halftime show. You'll find your haga made lagana at number seven on. Npr music's list of the fifty best of twenty twenty then in may bad bunny put out an odds and ends compilation called los que. No iban asa lear or the ones that were not going to come out. And now he's released ultimo tour del mundo which translates as the last tour of the world. The new album was written and recorded in quarantine and bad bunny had said it would be his last album not surprisingly he has already walked. That back a stephanie. Near the beginning of this year you interview. Bad bunny for a pitchfork profile called day in the life of bad bunny introverted superstar. Let's start with your thoughts on the new record which feels more restrained and reflective than the album. He put out earlier this year. Absolutely well let me start by saying that. It's been a crazy year for bad bunny. Output has been insane and prolific. and he's proven more than once that he can put out a great record. I really liked this album But i'll confess that i i i. I felt some fatigue at the fact that this is the third bad album coming out. And i'm a big fan of bad bunnies. I've been following him for a long time now. But i also believe that there's time for an artist to slow down into you don't need to put out so much music that being said. I really liked this album. It's really grown on me. Since i first heard it definitely appeals to the mo and may clearly bad bunny has also been listening to a lot of new metal and pop punk in quarantine. Well let's talk about the differences between this record and the one that he put out at the beginning of this year. That was kind of a more hard charging album in this one. As you said is is a little bit more mo absolutely. I think you know there has been this temptation to compare the two albums because they've been his two biggest releases. This year i think at the end of the day. they're such different projects. He was really trying such different things with them. That album iago looking at it. I was really focused on going back to the heart of puerto rican thrown from the early two thousands in the late nineties. The kind of music that bad listen to growing up the latin pop landscape now sounds a lot different than the music. Bad bunny loved growing up. And you know john that has historically not been widely accepted in latin pop and latin mainstream until the last decade. And one thing that he acknowledged to me when i interviewed him as well as you know something that was really the main focus of this record. Was you know undeniably making this sound of the music that influenced him growing up the artists that really deserve the shine when it comes to the strides made in this genre and this album is more about honoring a different kind of music that he loved growing up which is rock and rock and program spaniel and pop punk and i think what you really can see across. His body of work is just the deep respect that he has different kinds of music that he loves as well as this nostalgia. I think both records really have a lot to do with nostalgia in this way. That's really interesting to me especially in a year. That's been so difficult for so many people. Some many of us are finding comfort in music. That's not new music. That reminds us of more comfortable more simple times as it were. Even though these two albums are really different they both have really special offerings. Well one thing. I wanted to talk about it about this new record wanting that immediately jumped out to me as somebody who did a certain amount of coming of age in the nineties there a couple of songs on his record like to deseo loma harder. And you'll vito c. That are very tinged with all rock. Sounds like really kind of nineties. Rock sounds taught me talk. Yeah you know. This album has a lot of guitars. Sad guitars brad guitar. He's kind of teasing out this kind of pop punk and nu metal side that he has actually alluded to in previous work on his debut album sandra he had a song called dynamo moscow allowed which was really a pop punk song and people were so surprised to hear that from bad bunny and on your looking like he had llamas mignano which is like one of my favorite songs this year and a that just absolutely bursts into this new metal rage moment that is just so so registered so good and i think you know i i. I didn't think anything could match with those two songs. Made me feel. But i couldn't stop listening to to the settled on my heart. I really think it's like that. Riff is just so heart. Sick and tortured and cathartic. It's a little bit of that success. Mada below gun mental burden sep putra dot com the company. I think you can kind of get a sense of the exact angst. That's at work here but can you walk us through what that's about. Yeah you know. That song is kind of a classic reflecting on a break-up ballot and it's kind of a self torturing acknowledges wasn't great to you and i hope that one day you can forget about me but it's also just really indulging in that feeling and i think that's something that somebody people can relate to maybe a lot of people who've spent a lot of time alone in this year of in thinking about so. It's got a lot of sad. Bob's for reflecting on on these sad moments but also got a lot of really happy moments. I wanted be just kind of give people a sense of place about where he kind of fits into the latin music world like he is a boundary pushing artist. He's pushed a lot of these of gender presentation He sings about gender relations in ways. That feel really fresh absolutely. I think you know for several years now. Bad bunnies kind of establish this reputation for himself as a political or outspoken artist. And it's a label that he wrestles with. I think he is breaking a lot of barriers in terms of challenging masculine in latin pop. And he's really kind of an outlier. In terms of how vocal he is about these issues in two thousand nine hundred and he was really involved in the protests import. The frigo demanding the resignation of prepared for ceo in the past. He's also really challenge these ideas of gender presentation as you mentioned. You know he'd paint his nails and he'd wear skirts and bad. Bunny received a lot of praise for that and it was a big statement to a lot of his fans as much as he's gaining so much praise especially this year he's also had a lot of moments of public learning you know he's resisted this idea of becoming like a spokesperson for any group of people or report the frigo and earlier this year. You know a lot of fans were disappointed that he took several weeks to respond in support to the black lives matter movement and eventually he released a letter expressing his feelings and kind of saying himself. The thing that so many of us had already come to the conclusion to which is that. You know you can't rely on celebrities at the end of the day to lead us forward and social movements to be the voice of progress. I think bad bunny has made a lot of big statements that challenge how latin pop's most visible stars approach politics but then again on and trap have always been political and bad bunny is not the first and i know he won't be the last. Yeah you mentioned. His relationship with puerto rico. I think that's one thing that really jumps out about him. Could you talk a little bit more about that. Absolutely i think what definitely sets bad bunny. Apart from all of his peers in the industry is just how committed he is doing right by his community and worked to recall. Specifically i think in all of his music you can tell that. He's striving to remain authentic. And there's so many little love letters to community on this album samples the legendary astrologer welton on the penultimate track. His famous sendoff muccio more. He shouts out puerto rican and latino legends in general like leveaux the ruben blah the song and then latinos like real manna. You can tell that. He's he's aware that he's operating within a lineage. He never leaves any doubt about who he's trying to uplift and who is trying to represent here and he closes the album on a classic puerto rican christmas song comparison performed by today obama hegna which is a group from his hometown of vega baja. Your old it's kind of odd. Because it's like he's not on the song. Obviously it's recording from the fifties. But it's a song about how some people have jubilant joyful christmases and others spend it in sadness or in poverty. It is a farewell to a year. That i think all of us are happy to see go and i think you know though. He sits at this place of enormous wealth and privilege and fame. I think he's really at the end of the day driven by this desire to remain

Stephanie Fernandez Hi Stephan J Galvin Lagana Iban Asa Lear Haga Deseo Loma Vito C Shaquille Brad Guitar Llamas Mignano Jennifer Lopez NPR Ghana Super Bowl Steven Stephanie Puerto Rican Washington Sandra
Magician Calen Morelli on 'The Piano Card Project'

The Insider

06:23 min | 1 year ago

Magician Calen Morelli on 'The Piano Card Project'

"Yesterday burst onto the magic scene with smash hit. Releases had a huge magic prank show and then went onto consult for the biggest magicians. Tv shows in the world. It's kayla morale kevin. How is money this evening this afternoon. Whatever i mid day in las vegas and it's it's great okay. What's your origin story. You've got twenty one seconds. Origin story is my parents. were religious. Didn't let me do magic. When i found magic at ten found it when i was in high school Became very popular. Unlike most magicians in high school. My dad went bankrupt. We moved into my the basement of my grandma's house. When i was just graduated high school and in those six months i started taking magic extremely serious and i created pretty much all of the content that put me onto the scene in those six months in a basement and then i just continued with a lot of work from there and stuff happens six months. Meanwhile let's dive straighten. I want to talk about your creative process. Now let's take new release the piano project when antitax start. What was the journey like. And how did you end up where you ended up where it's not as as sexy as i would like it to be but sexy man. I'm not overly honest person. this. Let's see i- i created it during my time in london when i was working on dynamo's season three that hired me to come out there and we had I think our seeing in blake and their team had worked on the first episode and then they hired me to come. In and create all the magic for the last three episodes. So that was a huge work load Shell has like seventy five effects in a few months. Like for tv magic like like. Let's be real. This was i like when people say that. They've consulted and worked. I respect a very short list of people like Garcia blake rico. Michael weber like many many people that are excellent and kim have. I've seen work under fire like okay. I'm like these people can handle it. And yeah i think that this this whole dynamo thing was just like whoa. That was a that was a crash course in magic and i. I was so crazy at that point. And that's this is coming up to the piano cardi question but there was a point when i was just for fun week. Creating an extra hundred ideas day on top of the hour. I would write down a list. The one of the guys that work for dynamo challenge me. He's like he likes to do comedy do gersh. So we're like yo. Maybe we just push ourselves and we write down a list of hundred ideas a day for seven days in a row so on top of the eight hour workday with dynamo and we were going out to open mic night. Just for fun and london and try and shit out Yeah i like seven hundred ideas down in a week just one week with dynamo and that was even that was just for myself so like you can see like the level of of obsession that i have for this art and the piano card was just it. It probably took three minutes to create at one time. And i was just like i literally. There was two times when i was going over analyzing flap cards and there was the the borderless flap and the piano card concept that i Figured out like around two thousand eleven two thousand twelve thousand and thirteen. I saw in that span. I i really don't remember the month or year but yeah I don't hundred percent remember if it went into dynamo's show or not. I think it might have been a quick clip but yeah so it just. I ended up putting it online on youtube. Because i had a youtube back then That was just popping off. And i was just like getting into it and it was wild because like the youtube like out when i was getting to the end of the gig with dynamo. My youtube had landed me a pilot with mtv but they spent money on a pilot. That wasn't even on wasn't even supposed to air but this guy saad dress code. The old president of mtv was a fan of me because he saw dress code from syria. Lebanon and he was like this dude. I like his magic. I think he's cool so he found me on youtube and he saw like making content and he saw potential so we ended up making a pilot. Right after that. And like everything just like snowballed from there but I put it on my youtube the piano card concept and then i ended up deleting my youtube so all those videos are gone. I deleted them back in. Like two thousand sixteen. Maybe it was like right. After i put out the sun we cops Video and that like exploded. It exploded past i could comprehend. Because like that was like a level that was like a level of lake There's like worldwide viral hits and then there's like worldwide viral hits that stick around and like people talk about and this was one that like people would recognize me when i went out at a bar. Oh well like. I sat next to like a girl on the plane and she was like you look familiar and i'm just like this is dumb. This is not real. this is not real life. Stop it

Garcia Blake Michael Weber Youtube Gersh Kayla London Kevin Las Vegas Cardi Blake Rico KIM Dynamo Saad Dress MTV
"dynamos" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"dynamos" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"We'll have to keep the Dynamos By Tuesday of 70 Wednesday. Sonny but much cooler high of 48 It's 60 degrees in Milwaukee at 7 31. CBS News Special Report a major development on a Corona virus vaccine, Visor says it's version has proven 90% effective in late stage trials. CBS NEWS Medical contributor Dr David Vegas clinical trial will be ongoing, but they're going to file the data with the FDA over the next days, and then we could have a vaccine available to the general public next month. President Joe Biden Call's it excellent news but cautions it will be many more months before there's widespread vaccination. Dr. William Schaffner at Vanderbilt University First Priority Group will be health care workers who have direct care of patients with covert or who might have coped with President Trump's tweeted stock market up big Such great news. Dow futures are ahead 15 81. Or than 5.5% business analyst You'll Schlessinger. I think investors are sort of wise. They're saying, Hey, I'm not investing for the next six minutes. I'm looking at the next six years we're going to get beyond this. This is great CBS NEWS Special Report. I'm Deborah Rodri. W T. M J News time. 7 32 from the W T. M J Breaking news senator for consideration for a recount could be taken in Wisconsin. The results of Tuesday's election need to be certified. That process begins today. TMG force Sean Gallagher, individual municipalities are certified its results to make sure the results they Leaved on Election Night match up with the physical counselor tallied. Then they send them to the county in Milwaukee County. They oversee for 178 wards. They will go through the same stringent process to certify those results. And then the third step, every single one of the 72 counties in the state will send their certified results to the capital for one last check at that point. Presidential election will be set in stone. Joe Biden won Wisconsin by about 20,000 votes. That's well within the 1% margin it allows. The president asked for a recode. It certainly is the president's right to ask for a recount. What election Attorney Tom Spencer, who is co counsel for the Bush Cheney, Florida recount of 2000 says his claims of voter fraud or something else, telling Wisconsin's weekend morning news many elections. You hear anecdotal? Information coming forward from lots of people about allegations and suspicions of vote fraud, and normally, they don't really develop into anything. In other words, it's possible but unlikely that those claims of voter fraud will go anywhere. A lot of forensic evidence. I mean, it's a really high bar, probably one of the highest bars in all types of Litigation. So far, the president has not yet conceded to President elect O Biden City in Milwaukee, surpassing its record for most homicides in a calendar year. The most recent happening last night near to Tonia and Keith, A. 38, year old woman, the victim Office of Violence Prevention director Reggie More telling T. M J for news. The pandemic is playing a role in the spike, so the conditions that we traditionally see Where we see concentrations of violence has now affected communities across the city. Previous record. 1 65 set back in 1991, Wisconsin, reporting 4200 New Kobe 19 cases Sunday that brings the weekend totaled over 17,000. On Saturday, the Department of Health recording a record 7065 cases, along with 11 new deaths that brings the total to 2312 Wisconsin's positive.

president Wisconsin Joe Biden CBS Milwaukee Dynamos President Trump Dr. William Schaffner Milwaukee County Sonny Dr David Vegas Visor fraud Deborah Rodri Department of Health Sean Gallagher business analyst
U.S. Supreme Court's Ginsburg, a Liberal Dynamo, Championed Women's Rights

WTOP 24 Hour News

04:01 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Supreme Court's Ginsburg, a Liberal Dynamo, Championed Women's Rights

"Of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. She's passed away at the age of 87 from complications from cancer. A little earlier, I spoke with the U of D. C is executive director Monica Hopkins about the legacy of Justice. Ginsburg, obviously like much of the nation were saddened and shocked to hear of the passing of Justice Ginsburg She devoted so much of her life and career to advance in the quality girl. It gives us time to think about her legacy. Both weapon. The A C l U, but parasol she was dedicated to ensuring that we understood about equality wasn't just about getting women. They're equal rights but that it actually have impact were the sexes in total talk a little more about how she worked with the Luo and made some achievements for women's rights. Prior to starting the women's rights project Up the hill, you she actually served as professor Rutgers law. And she, additionally thought important legal battles before the Supreme Court back establish the foundation for currently legal prohibitions against sex discrimination. And then in 1972 later, Ginsberg sounded today. So you women's rights project. And she directed that project throughout the decade of the 19 seventies, but case after case to the Supreme Court and also establishing constitutional protections against sex discrimination, and you know her legacy continues today. Throughout the feelings, work to advance women's equality and employment and education and housing, and in all It's just it is. She was a Supreme Court justice, which is such a monumental achievement, right? But she was so much more than that. He really waas so much more than that. It's securely interesting she became. I've heard and seen, And then the news people calling her a feminist icon. You can see people now carrying tote bags with state against Bird's image on it, she has come to symbolize Stalwart and dedicated vision of equality and what could be achieved through the law. Her legacy she just had such a dramatic and lasting impact. Not only I think on the Supreme Court, but in the lives of many women across the country, and it's great to see that multiple generations have been graced her legacy and what she accomplished on the port and you mention her becoming a cultural icon. It's really fascinating to me because I don't think we can say that about any other Supreme Court justice ever. I mean, there may have been T shirts with faces on them and things but not to this degree. Yeah, One of the things that I think about is the quiet power up Justice Ginsberg had and how she You know, would wear her descent color, which became in pop. I can obviously you know, you see necklaces with her descent color on a she would wear that on days when the court where she would descend on DH. All of those little things but sort of picked up on by people who not only followed exactly what the court was doing, or may have read the brief stores things like that. But I understood some of these decisions and how decisions that are made with the law. And at the highest level of the court of our land. Ah, really impact our lives. Monica Hopkins Thie, executive director of the U of D C sports at

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Executive Director Monica Hopkins Monica Hopkins Thie D. C Professor Bird
Robotic Process Automation with Antti Karjalainen

Software Engineering Daily

09:23 min | 1 year ago

Robotic Process Automation with Antti Karjalainen

"How do I describe RPI, task in robot corporate. How do you define an opiate task? You set up a new project let's say you're using the lab you create new project. You'll import a few libraries depending on what kind of tasks you WANNA do a walk on technology she want to interact. And Right Staw Staw tasks, Star Star, and then start writing instructions. you might use a building keyboards. Some library keeps that you have available all you might define your own keyboards. So let's say you start with open. Browser. Browser then you start defining, you'll building Keyword Logan to knit. And then goes on from there that keyboard should then probably piping new RL heavy gate lot island do some logging tasks. That might lead you to use volt, which is in the cloud. Not Cloud Service that provides you secure storage, drove us a credentials and you'll use another library to access the walt and so forth. That's Kinda, the basic process can you give a few more examples of tasks? That so many different tasks usually say that kind of snowflakes each company. Each user has their own particular need. In one company actually was company that had done the box boxing in the question they. They used. To automate the process of doing on last talk purchases. In Japanese websites. That was a good use case I think and. So kind of the typical. Financial Institution, use cases that you could imagine. That let's say you need to update a lot of customer. Once an and people are calling in on the phone and you know updating, let's say their phone number for your records. you might use. To navigate through the internal applications that you useful customer Carson and go through multiple locations. Wayne opted the information. That's one of use schedule is saw and it was actually Danica. So great volume, the bank that it said that they saved. What it was like seven years of customer waiting time on the phone by automating the process. Very impressive. In when a task is processing in it fails in the middle. What happens Yeah. So typically you probably want to retry. So just get the input that you had. Andrey retried if that's how you configure it. You probably want to notify somebody so you'll send out an email. Alerts through some other service desk. Application. Depending on obviously kind of depends on why failure happened. So was it a business exception? So unit the application that you've automating did something wrong or and. Your data was incomplete that she used something like that. So that kind of guides you if it's just flat out failure, just exception on court. Then you probably want to. Get the developer to look at it. Does something happen like when the I of the website changes that can sometimes mess things up or do most of these sites tend to keep their you is static enough that your tasks don't go out of date. Yeah. So that's a bit of author that. So you WANNA try to use locate us that almost stable. So if you if you use like absolute expand references, those might get messed up pretty easily if you use like low element ID more stable. So typically. Yes, sure. I mean sites changing us an issue for you can do something such developer to make it more robust but ultimately, if site and some changing completely, there's nothing that you can do about it. Typically I tell people that you know if you have the option to use an API instead course that's more stable or west goal where you have the most stable route. Tell me more about the libraries that are built into Robo Corp.. Yes we are we actually developing fairly large library that we call the. Framework. And consists of. Of you'll basic tool kit essentially as you need us an opiate developing. So. You'll have things for the browser things folk desktop applications, immigration you'll have. integrations with all the major cloud platforms, aws azure. Google cloud. And probably forget like eighty percent of the stuff but we we keep adding to it. Multiple Times a week become a new release that adds new functionality to be a framework right now at the moment. But Yeah I some multitude of different kinds of Kiva statute categorized by different technology domains. there. Are Lots of API's out there for machine learning. Tell me about how machine learning API's can be used with Robocall Corp Yeah. So the industry term for that is intelligent automation and you to be his call up intelligent does as soon as you who into some machine learning API. But sure I mean the kind of the basic I think most frequent use cases to do something like send a document to aws extract or other similar Google Cloud Vision Api you have a pdf in moist than want extra someday to out of it. You can easily use cloud services to do that for you if you don't want to try to do it locally that's I, think the most common use guests that I see all the time. When an ARP task gets spun up, what is actually happening on Robot Corp? Yes. So when a not B task at Spun Up. If you look at the architecture that we have with the cloud platform. And we have what we call the work us the workers, essentially an application that's installed in the target system. So he can be on your laptop, it can be on a virtual machine on. or it can leave inside a container that we can hopefully. So depending on where the work is. Say That the workers is on my laptop. What happens is that the cloud will send a package of code and some instructions to the work. The work will get the package on Pakistan and then initiate a fresh condign women fall by the libraries that. You have inside your robust cold, and then it'll stop fresh every time to make sure that you don't have any side effects from previous executions and then when you environment done, he'll execute the task stream. The console tries to cloud account, and then when don is Kinda you're execution Audifax you might have produced some documents or you at least have a file stream those to the cloud and report the results of the execution. So a lot of the stuff that we provide is really the east convenience of. You know you WANNA run by Tom. based. For a frame of coordination. Good just install one APP in the Environment Logan and you're good to go. You're all set. You'll have a stable execution environment each time and is pretty fast to. And what are you using under the hood to orchestrate these tasks? So, the orchestration service on our cloud is we are working actually mostly several s so it's on aws is pretty. This know like we are not using any the ready project to set up the orchestration scheduling. Those we do it ourselves. And then it's a fast growing platform of different features so. So he's one of the call pieces that we develop. We'll tell you more about that the service orchestration stuff like how much can you offload? What kind of leverage do you get by going server less? What does that look like? So we started developing that early twenty nineteen and I doubt time we made the decision to kind of go s cutting edge that we could because we have dealt with unity. So might be be of engineering just made the decision out. If you don't have the host anything sales, we won't do it. Then I might have a few service here and there, but most is hundred percents less and the idea is that we should be able to scale up pretty nicely with that decision. Obviously you're. GonNa always have some some issues hand but for the most part, we think that that will allow us to. Maintain certain level of service as we. Continue to grow and scale and and really some of these processes are pretty business critical company. So we need to be careful with operations. Tell me more just want to know more by your infrastructure in like how are using lambda are there any other service services that you'd like to discuss? is typical host, but really I'm not too deep into architects are close to its basic like `scuse Dynamo DB, Lambda all around US plan for monitoring data dog as well I. Think. Yeah It's a complex and growing piece of software.

AWS Developer Google United States Robo Corp Danica Financial Institution Carson Andrey Robocall Corp Pakistan Wayne Robot Corp ARP DON Tom. Audifax
The Good Parts of AWS with Daniel Vassallo

Software Engineering Daily

07:52 min | 2 years ago

The Good Parts of AWS with Daniel Vassallo

"Can you just go a little bit deeper on why architecturally Dynamo DB is not well equipped to fulfill the same semantics of a sequel database. Oh, it was designed to dissuade I. Don't know if you know do the member simple to be what it used to be. A the dissenter of Dynamo DB back in I think it was launched in two thousand, ten nine. And it's. It's a significantly more ambitious than Donald. Debates was meant to be slow inequity. Relations was more like you know like Mongo documents based you documents so aquarians essentially the answer. And this is actually it's probably one of the few. I can't think of any any other service. One of the few implicated services from aws. It's technically supported of your salon and gets. You send using simple debate. API still work, but basically almost hit it under the carpet side. You don't find any and there were. You won't find us in the console. It's not it's not a new. The send things like that. And the problem was that. Amazon founded super hard to make this type of database Kale and to have predictable performance guarantees, one of the biggest problems that was happening. That would simply be. You might throw in some complex square. You might not have an index about it. And the declare would take two minutes, timeouts and lay. It was completely unpredictable. Some quays take two hundred milliseconds. Some will take minutes. And it was very high. On the service side to these about site to locate the sources so talking about capacity, so not the be was the answer to that and TWAS, radically different perspective like completely predictable versus completely unpredictable, so there's two operations gets put the listed going to bt index behind the scenes and updating single lighten very predictable. They all take. Just, a few single digits milliseconds identify typically, and there's this query API, which again just goes to the starting point of a beat the sequence of cards after megabyte so again like the the the upper bound per addicts, how much expensive Dakota can be ends attested dissolved, and that set of to to continue to participate you. You go with the next token. megabyte that I, so it became very easy. For the service provider to these about how expensive it can be how fast it can be how to allocate resources, and it became huge success successful, but numbers on itself, because I remember we used to on services on top of relational database address to have the same problem so sometimes the relational database at an all. It's a complex machine is my star choosing? It's it's my start to use suboptimal query, and suddenly acquitted that used to take a second is now taking twenty seconds and suddenly using all the memory. When we started thinking in terms of much more primitive technology, like beatings become easier to these in about as long as you managed to model your queries and what you needed to do. To its limitations. But then. Today's were you're fighting your database. Because suddenly spiking two hundred percents, appeal and everything is slowing down disappear so that that element of predictability is highly highly available, so they were defer the. It was designed to be this way that I just wasn't. Designed to be so inequity, of. Arbitrary complexity and will give you the answer. What do people do when they have built their infrastructure around Dynamo DB and it's not fulfilling the requirements that they have. I think you will struggle the limitations and up subsidizing you I. I think the problem is up become became being discovered very early in development. Like for example, if you're expecting to be doing lots of recommendations on amounts of data, doing development you to realize that you're going to be downloading everything out of Dynamo and doing it locally, not so. Hopefully yearly allies airily that this is worth considering Golden, considering that they should use another type of database or relational, database or something. I don't have any first hand experience for example where delimitations and and adopt sort of surprising later, which is I think is a good thing again like the fact that it's significant distinctive. Had few. It's very hard to. Abuse it sight and sort of expect more out of your life. You realize immediately that these are the limits. which again I think these tend to be sometimes that. And more sophisticated database aside because during development your. Attention like hundred minutes seconds, and then once you have lots of data or things are in Qatar. They start to become more unpredictable. Dynamo just elements that issue just just there's no unpredictability. It's actually incredibly predictable at the cost of the constraints the comes with. You right in some detail about s three and s three I think of for obvious use cases as slow file system. It's BLOB. Storage it static website hosting its data lake. Told me about the other applications of s three. Yes. Yes, I. Think One of the lists. Values of trees that you can think of as having infinite Benguet for all. Practical purposes that so, if you have terabytes of data, you could basically an estimate. You could download it as fast as you as you want to. Basically always many to that says he wanted many servers. You want to tell you can chunk it up in pieces and just download the terabyte like in a second. For example one of my biggest project Thomason was launching and working gone. Cloud Watch watchdogs incites, which is basically a monitoring tool that allows you to arbiter the complex queries against your log data. And much entirely built on top of the and this is it surprises? People because this unlike Donald to be, we actually chose to support. Give me an arbiter equality of complexity, including regular expressions and things that are super cost to evaluate and. To dissolve, and we built it literally on top of us today and in in a very cost effective way because we relies on the assumption that. For example log data tends to be. Very big generalized especially nowadays like application censored. Tonight's like gigabytes and terabytes of logs. You want to start them somewhere where it's cheap and us these the perfect place for that and you tend to Kuwait infrequently, though when there's a problem I want to something about your application. And I think one of the ideas that works with s threes, this technique where you separate compute from the data so basically once. Does no question. There's no compute so basically you can just have the data sitting in streeter, just paying the to censor gigabytes per month, and there's no other costs. And if you open up the consulate insights and you do Equa they. Spin up some. Is it Winston while I mean behind the scenes like some pool of warmest. But fundamentally you can think of about it does like spin some ephemeral instances and we enough such that we can download data. As they wanted to. And then you can sort of just turn over the data very quickly I just because. I can listen to such as your network

Donald Trump AWS Dakota BT Amazon Streeter Kale Winston Qatar Golden Thomason Kuwait
Prisma: Modern Database Tooling with Johannes Schickling

Software Engineering Daily

20:28 min | 2 years ago

Prisma: Modern Database Tooling with Johannes Schickling

"Honest welcome back to the show. It's great to be back under so thanks so much for having me. Of course you run. PRISMA and PRISMA is involved in workflows for accessing data. Can you describe the AP? Is that sit between the front and the back end database layer, and where PRISMA fits in sure so I think that's a pretty complex questions. It's always. Always depends on what your application architecture looks like, and there's so many angles to take does feed for example, take a more mortar jam, stag texture, or if you take a micro services architecture, the onset is always depends. What's always the same as if you build application that requires state of assistance? Then chances are you're using database and how PRISMA fits into. Is that it tries to help application developers built applications more easily was working with the databases so typically that means you're using a part of PRISMA. What's called the prisoner client that sits typically in your application server? That's typically an API server and talks to your database. Typically, this part of the stack is known as an or layer or data access layer. PRESI-, in particular is not an Orem can talk about that separately. The pretty nuanced topic, but prison up to. The main function is to serve to access state. I'm more easily in your application language. Can you talk about that in more detail? Like? Why would I need a additional layer of access I? Mean I think in general? I if I'm sitting on the front end and I want to access the database I m hitting some service that services talking to a database and the service is requesting the data from the database. Why do I need prisma to help out with that database access so this setup just to recap one more time, so you have your fronton application. Let's say you have reactive of you up on the other end. You have database. Let's say you have a more traditional postures, my sequel database, but would also apply to same for more modern. Modern Dynamo DB etc, and then typically have this middle tier that's let's say an API server, and where you would use prisma for is just having an easier time building your API server in order to talk to the database, so let's say you're using pastas. The most barebones thing you could do is implementing your Api Server and just writing implementing your points, or let's say rebuilding a graph gals over implementing overs, and then just talking directly to the database by writing raw sequel. Curry's and that works, but that comes also was some problems. Problems typically in terms of productivity, and does not quite abstraction level that you want as an application developer to be productive and confident in what you're writing the same way as fronton applications are built through abstraction layers. Let's say react angular view. It's the same on the back end that you also want more application at U. Matic obstruction layer for away you talking to the database, and historically there's been many forms of the most common one is in Orem, and they're on more modern ways of how you build a better abstraction on top. Top of fear database for data access, and that's a pattern that implementing was prisma that to be referred to as careerbuilder. Can you explain in more detail? What is the difference between a query builder and an OEM right? So that comes down to the way how you're thinking about these application patterns, an Orem stands for object, relational knepper, and the idea behind an orum is mapping a typically a database table to a class in typically object oriented programming language, and this is a pretty intuitive model and is widely used in tons of. The most prominent one of be being active record as part of friggin rails, but there tons of other ones as well and the Java world. There's hibernate and the idea there you have tons of tables in your database, and you want to map that somehow and Julia programming language and your programming language. You're typically working with classes as opposed to a career rebuilder with looks more like sequel way, but maps you sequel statements into statements in your programme language and the difference really come down to how much flexibility and control you need, but they're tons of downsides of or and that as Good more widely used became more and more well known, so there's a great block posed called the Vietnam of computer science, which is all about or ems and the problems behind orum's most importantly one thing called the object relational impedance mismatch. Talks about the problems of mapping databases database tables to objects where he's just a big amount of oven, impedance mismatch, and the way around that is that you should think about the craziest that you're writing a database instead of obsessing too much about the classes and objects, and your curry should really determine the shape of the data. You're getting back in the same way as the British striking analogy to how gruff LDL's was the sort of pattern where draft, but L. is all about the quarry writing that you need in your components, and it's a pretty similar pattern that you're now applying the way how you do. They access on the back end. If I was to set up PRISMA for Miami application. What would the life of a query look like and the structure of a query look like? So what you'd be using concretely, there is prisoner. Database took. And what you would use to career database is a part of prisma called the PRISMA Klein's. The prisoner client is basically just a Java script library that you installed installed from NPR. And you're. Writing that query ones in your coat. One great advantage is that it's fully type safe by leveraging type script, so you're writing that query and then strode run times when your application is deployed. That code gets invokes that under the hood generates a database dependent query, typically a sequel query, but as we were supporting of databases, swell could generate dynamo queries, Atra, and these queries are centered underlying database, and the data's returned, and then returned injury application code. Got It and. What the difference between using PRISMA AND USING GRAPH KUNAL! So, it's a really two fundamentally different technologies for different use cases I. think a good way to think about is where into application stack. These technology said so graphic. L. is typically used for fronton applications to talk back end up locations whereas prisoners specifically the prison. My client is used for typically your backup location to talk to your database so analogous in this way, but typically the different layers of the stack. However, it always depends was newer approaches like the jam stack your friends and education can statically directly talk to

Prisma Orem Prisma Klein AP Developer Curry U. Matic Julia Careerbuilder NPR Orum Miami
Alex DeBrie - DynamoDB for Relational Database Diehards

Full Stack Radio

05:50 min | 2 years ago

Alex DeBrie - DynamoDB for Relational Database Diehards

"I guess maybe the best place to start would be. How do you describe what Dynamo DB even as if someone was just GonNa ask you like? What is this thing for? What do you use it for? Yep share so it's a no sequel database like you were saying and and that's not super descriptive because it basically just says what it isn't right. It's not a relational database. That a sequel. But you saw a lot of these sort of no sequel databases popping up in the last ten or fifteen years and one common thing about all these relational databases is They were they were built for larger scale you know as as he's sort of. Internet enabled platforms are happening where you have thousands or millions of of users around the world Like the single instance relational database just wasn't keeping up As well so polices started building these no sequel databases and I think one thing in common with most of these. No single databases is that they they charge your data across multiple instances so rather than having like this one monolithic database. You know you're you're my sequel instance. Your postcards instance. You'll have you know maybe five different shards of Mongo DB or with something like Dynamo DB there starting that behind the scenes sort of transparently to you Across a lot of large variety of machines The big thing that you need to do there with a no sequel database. Then is that data's going to be sharded and you need to make sure you sort of design your data correctly so that you're only hitting one Charlotte and doing efficient query rather than queering across like four or five different shards and having network calls. So that's that's a super high level but Yeah okay that makes sense so the the my sort of exposure to Dynamo. Db guests has been almost like guys have rightous alternative in a lot of situations. So I see a lot of times. People use read us for like a cash just like a key value store and I see people using Dynamo. Db FOR THAT A lot. If you're hosting your stuff on Amazon because a lot of the tools designed to work with us in that way can also interact with Dynamo. Db In that way But it sounds like a lot of people are also using Dynamo. Db is like their primary data store as Australia. Replacement for a relational database. Is that true in your experience. Yeah absolutely I think you know. A lot of people think it's only used for key value store like type Type Actions Media Session store and you can use it for that. But you can. Use It for highly relational models. You can handle one to many relationships. Many Dominion relationship all that in Dynamo. Db I show how to do that. And and there's a bunch of people doing that at a pretty large scale If if you're talking about like Amazon. Aws any of the Amazon retail. Any of the AWS stuff they. If it's a tier one service at one of those places which means if it's down it's losing money they're required to use. Dynamo. Db and they have relational models there. They have shopping carts with items in them and they belong to customers or or they'd aws stuff. That's all relational as well. So you can definitely handle these. These complex relational models not just a key value stores. Yeah cool that's really interesting so I think it'd be cool. It'd be sort of get into I. Guess like just understanding some of the core concepts and stuff around this technology. What some of the terminology is how some of it may be maps. Back to the relational database world for people who come from that. Same background as me. I'm familiar with the old tables and columns and rows model. You know what I mean. So what are some of like? What are the sort of terms and concepts that you have to understand but Dynamo DB to even get started with in the first place? How do you build like the right mental model for what it's doing? Yep sure so I'd say the four or five basic terms you want to start with and I'll just compare them to to relational houses. Well first of all. There's the notion of table which is going to be similar to a table in a relational database With some differences that get into on such as holds all your all your data in it and then each record in a table is called an item sets a row in a relational database or a document in Dynamo DB but just like a collection of data each when you create your table. What you're GonNa do is declare a primary key for your table and each item that you put into that table must have that primary key and it needs to be uniquely identified by that primary key so so there is that like is that is that auto generated by the database for you like it would be like sequel or you always have to provide it from the client yet. You need to provide it by the client. And it's usually going to be something meaningful as well. Like win a relational database. You know you might just have an auto incremental primary key like you're saying but this is GonNa be actually something meaningful life maybe username or In order ID or or something like that but you can actually use to identify that particular item because that primary keys actually gonNA drive your access patterns as well. You're going to be queering directly on that primary key. Okay interesting so I think. Like in the relational database world the advice that. I've often heard it's been like the opposite right like don't use your email column as your primary key in your users table because it's it's going to be inefficient or whatever in different ways compared to just using an auto implementing. Id but in in this case if as long as there's some existing unique identifier for the record the best practice leverage that don't add like some additional unique identifier. Yep generally and sometimes you might want to use something like a you. Id or or similar like if something like an order. Id you know you don't really have Anything meaningful about the order. You can generate a unique unique. Id and use that. But then you'll probably also refer to that that d like in your url path or whatever to help find that they'll be accessible to the client. If you needed to go do that look up. You know if someone goes to slash orders slash whatever that idea is then. Then you're back in knows. Hey this is order yet. I need to go fetch from the back end.

Dynamo Amazon Australia AWS Charlotte
Scientists explain magnetic pole's wanderings

BBC World Service

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Scientists explain magnetic pole's wanderings

"Scientists in Europe say they can now describe with confidence what's driving the drift of the north magnetic pole the shift in recent years toward Siberia has made it necessary to update global navigation systems more frequently our science correspondent Jonathan Amos reports at the top of the world as a place where a magnetic field lines point vertically into the earth's surface this north magnetic pole wonders over time in the early nineteenth century it was cited in the north of Canada drifting slowly to slightly higher latitudes then in the nineteen nineties he charged across the arctic towards Russia the team discovered this dramatic movement is driven by specific changes in the flow of molten iron in the earth's out to cool the Dynamo that creates and sustains its magnetic

Europe Siberia Jonathan Amos Canada Russia
Atlanta - Georgia Governor Kemp Defends Decision to Begin Phased Reopening of State Economy

Clark Howard

45:08 min | 2 years ago

Atlanta - Georgia Governor Kemp Defends Decision to Begin Phased Reopening of State Economy

"Brian camp addresses criticism from those concerned he's opening businesses too soon despite the criticism governor Brian can't received last week from president trump for his decision to begin re opening Georgia businesses he still supports them I appreciate his leadership I appreciate all that the administration has done to support our state and like the president can't lashed out at the media for trying to divide there will be no dividing we're going to continue to work with the administration and the president and the vice president in the task force in he said today I wish the media could just see how good these calls go with the governor's Xander parish ninety five point five WSP Georgette meantime is headed rough milestone a thousand people have died so far in the state from the corona virus only ten other states have the same numbers some restaurants here in Georgia really having a hard time finding the supplies needed to re open for indoor dining Catherine a server here it is all Mexican restaurant says there's so many rules to follow in order to reopen including providing masks and hand sanitizer for all staff there's no where where we can find this hand sanitizer and then there's being able to serve and social distance at the same time is it even possible it will be really difficult for us like a a servers to to put put put the the the food food food on on on the the the table table table if if if we we we are are are not not not allowed allowed allowed to to to be be be less less less than than than six six six feet feet feet apart apart apart it's it's it's ridiculous ridiculous ridiculous in in in Peachtree Peachtree Peachtree city city city robin robin robin will will will lead lead lead Steve Steve Steve ninety ninety ninety five five five point point point five five five W. S. B. fifty nine degrees in Atlanta mostly clear and cold tonight lows forty seven to fifty one mostly to partly sunny tomorrow high seventy eight Atlanta's most accurate and dependable forecast is coming up top local news every thirty minutes and when it breaks ninety five point five W. S. B. depend on it small businesses hit another snag when they tried to get a loan help today the online loan application process had technical problems and three hundred and ten billion dollars is expected to go quickly here's ABC's Mary Bruce how experts tell us this fund could run out of money again it within a week and we are already seeing calls from some of the nation's top banks for Congress to fully fund and expand this program they won't have any hope of meeting this huge demand the first round of funding ran out in just thirteen days W. SPT use time eleven oh two is Georgia begins to reopen all things are sure to get confusing what's open and what's not what are the rules take on ninety five point five W. S. V. as we band together and help each other get back ninety five point five W. S. B. everywhere you go this is the time local news really matters which is why now more than ever more people turn to channel two action news this is Jovita Moore every day there is new and complicated information about the corona virus and it's changing quickly and this is George Estevez we're here to make sense of it all for you with live in depth local coverage investigations it give you a better perspective and a look forward to the impact on you and they were kind of me stay local stay informed stay with channel two action news man of the effects of hypertension diabetes or prostate cancer preventing you from having a satisfying love life in just one visit the doctors that priority man's medical center can help you overcome ET or PT to regain your confidence and have you last longer in the bedroom name brand pills don't work for many men and can have serious side effects the highly skilled positions that priority man's Medical Center provide custom blended medications that are safe effective and work immediately regardless of your medical history age you'll see results on your first visit guaranteed for your consultation is free so if you have problems in the bedroom call now for a private consultation one call one visit one simple solution to regain your love life call priority men's Medical Center now at four oh four six two zero one nine five nine four four six two zero one nine five nine that's four oh four six two zero one nine five nine you're spending more time at home than ever before assured comfort will make sure you're comfortable and cool but the fifty nine dollar spring tune up and get a pound of freon at no cost it's free offer ends soon details at assured comfort dot com guaranteeing service all the time done right and priced right I'm Jerry hall and I sure you'll you'll love love W. W. S. S. B. B. triple triple team team traffic traffic alerts about three hours that's run by your traffic experts at ninety five point five open the app and send your smartphone aside for your specific road ahead thank you Michael Reyes lifetime parts and labor warranty W. S. B. triple team traffic alerts the Winslow was in the W. S. B. twenty four hour traffic center we see a slow zoom in sandy springs on four hundred south on Jennifer it's the the roadwork roadwork to to setting setting up up between between the the two two eighty eighty five five reps reps and and the the Glenridge Glenridge connector connector exit exit number number three three through through the the evening evening hours hours allow allow for for extra extra travel travel time time south south of of Abernathy Abernathy road road right right now now no no delays delays getting getting to to I. I. two eighty five also the northbound work on four hundred still blocking right lane past Abernathy toward the north springs marta station entrance wraps stated the far left if you make your way toward Roswell and Alpharetta twenty east and west bound east expressway to cap county WSJ became showing wetland still blocked both directions for the media work between Wesley chapel and Panola road Steve Winslow ninety five point five W. S. B. M. W. S. B. Rochester college within months most accurate dependable forecast for tonight mostly clear and cool lows forty seven to fifty one tomorrow mostly to to partly partly sunny sunny and and warm warm high high seventy seventy eight eight low low fifty fifty nine nine Wednesday Wednesday showers showers and and thunderstorms thunderstorms eighty eighty percent percent likely likely afternoon afternoon and and evening evening high high seventy seventy three three low low fifty fifty one one Thursday a mix of sun and clouds cool high sixty five lows forty six to forty nine fifty nine degrees on Peachtree street at ninety five point five WSP Atlanta's news and talk is an NBC news special covert nineteen what you need to know here is ABC news correspondent Aaron Katersky it's been weeks since most of us have been out to eat today restaurants in Georgia we're allowed to open for dine in service as the state continues to loosen coronavirus restrictions Tennessee's re opening retail stores Kentucky's re openings of health care services dog groomers can reopen in Wisconsin we're corona virus has hit harder it's different the governor of New Jersey said today restrictions continue indefinitely and the governor of New York said he expected to extend them for the city and its suburbs but the lunch crowd came back in parts of Georgia as our affiliate WSB found a chance to eat inside a restaurant Kim Kucera says this Brookhaven waffle house was her first choice the family hang out we are talking about the whole field in this family in the champ wasn't here this day but the company says no matter who walks in some things haven't changed they're going to get that welcome the waffle house the greeting that we're all excited to be able to give them for when they come in it'll be very clear where they can and cannot said company spokesperson in Gerry boss showed us the big red tape strapped across some of the books and some of the schools are also off limits to maintain safe social distancing the cooks and servers are all wearing masks and X. marks the spot where you can stand as you wait for a seat some don't like governor camp's decision to allow restaurants like this to re open their dining rooms but boss believes many of the critics may be able to work from home while still collecting a paycheck to say that when they still have all of those things we want to be here to make sure that everybody who wants to go and have the opportunity to can take care of themselves and their family that's the American way as for Kim cassette as she feels comfortable eating inside says there's a sense of home here and it all starts off with waffle house what can't get any more American the waffle house right many will never feel comfortable venturing out or re opening a business without a vaccine and most experts think that's at least a year away some scientists are considering rather unconventional ways to speed up the process one of them raises some moral questions we're joined by Dr Angela Baldwin of Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx is also part of our medical team here at ABC news Dr Baldwin this method involves injecting healthy adults with live coronavirus correct so this is called a challenge trial where healthy adults are divided into two groups one group received a placebo and the other group receives the potential vaccine but both groups are injected with the virus and the point is for them to for researchers to see how effective the vaccine is against the virus and this kind of speed up the timeline because normally in a normal situation what somebody receives a vaccine the researchers just have to kind of wait for that person to naturally be infected with whatever virus or disease that the vaccines intended to treat is it the only way to do this definitely not this normally vaccine trials go through three phases phase one phase to help determine the specific dosing that safe and then you know an overall kind of safety of the vaccine and then in phase three is when they do these large very large trials for the enroll thousands of patients and a half receive the vaccine the other half isn't but then they just kind of track them and follow them throughout their daily lives and see okay all this group you know they were exposed to the virus and it looks like the vaccine worked the problem is these are just very long and then kind of a bit cumbersome and so that's why some researchers are proposing this challenge trial the kind of by pass phase three doesn't raise any moral dilemmas definitely a moral dilemmas they do try to mitigate the risk but the fact of the matter is we are taking otherwise healthy adults and injecting them with a virus that could have serious consequences including death the other side they do try to mitigate the risks they would only be enrolling healthy adult volunteers without underlying medical conditions but the problem is we do know that unfortunately there are young people who are still dying from call the nineteen you may also not have any underlying conditions there's still so much we don't know that just makes it's completely unsafe and the other problem is if somebody does get very sick you know we're dealing with a health care crisis right now work the critical care that one may need may not always be readily available and resources may be scarce so to inject somebody of the virus and the potentially kill them and put them in a situation where they urgently need critical care that might not be available raises a few eyebrows from from office I guess it's tempting though when everyone wants the vaccine this seems like the speediest way you know if they could and and one of the questions we ask ourselves is how much does this speed up the the normal course of us finding a vaccine right so if it only speeded up by one month maybe not that great of an idea of the speeded up by six months eight months okay maybe but also the thing to realize is that the challenge trials only one part of a of a two step process these researchers are suggesting would replace phase three so you still have the challenge of trial where the people are given the live virus but then in the second part they would need to test the vaccine on the most vulnerable members of the population right the elderly people under my medical conditions these are the people who really need the vaccine so we need to make sure it's safe in them so during the second phase they would give each of those types of people the vaccine but they would not be injecting them with the with the virus so that means we still in this kind of things were waiting for these people to in the natural course of their days be exposed to the virus so it's really not short meaning that the for the third phase by that much if you think about it who's going to decide ultimately you know that's a very good question I think ultimately we have these things called internal review boards RBC and they are designed to look out for the welfare of participants in subjects in studies and I think it's basically going to fall on the individual IRB's to decide whether or not they're going to allow this to to commission their institution Dr Angela Baldwin of the ABC news medical unit while the world waits for a vaccine all of us adapt to new routines out of our offices and working from say the kitchen table firms are now debating how and whether to repopulate offices small workers are deciding whether they're comfortable taking off the sweat pants and putting back on the suit consumer minute vices law firm said soy Hauser group you joins us from Chicago we're all kind of getting used to this aren't we yes you know I think this is going better than many law firms thought it would technology working well generally people are productive at home some people even like it what's not to like you can be in your pajamas and still accomplish the same kind of work you know in a candid moment a lot of lawyers would probably tell you that and I think that there is upside for both lawyers and for firms to do that the flexibility is something the people of wanted since before the crisis in some law firms before the crisis we're taking small steps towards being more flexible about where people worked and they saw upside both in attracting talent who wanted to be working where they were comfortable where they were where it was convenient also for the law firms there's a big expense of course on the real estate side real estate for most law firms is their second biggest expense behind paying lawyers so they're interested long term many law firms are in using less space why would any firm go back to renting expensive space again if this is working it's that's a great question different firms are different so some firms before the crisis we're happy to move towards less space and I think that the crisis will accelerate the move towards less space for those firms other firms the before the crisis had a culture of being in the office together they placed a premium on facetime and I think after the crisis some of those firms will revert to form and they will want to be in the office more so there will be some that accelerate towards work at home more and take on less space and I think others will want to snap back to how they were previously law firms like many other firms can be notoriously inflexible though about people's time has the shortest that it can work differently I think that this crisis has proven that actually can work pretty well for many lawyers in many firms different lawyers have practices that lend themselves to working remotely so for example a lawyer who needs to appear in court or take depositions in person that doesn't work as well remotely of course others though K. and worked quite productively from anywhere and that works for the firm in for their clients when you ask people what the impediments are to remote working some of the things that come up are things like whether working remotely as an impediment to mentoring opportunities for young and up and coming lawyers they asked about whether working remotely as an impediment to a training those lawyers and they also ask about whether working remotely is an impediment to collaborating together and so some firms will find ways to address those impediments and work around them others will feel the need to be a person more often Kent Zimmerman a principle that's only because our group joining us from Chicago coming up our chief medical correspondent Dr Jennifer Ashton answers your questions about corona virus I'm Erin to Turkey you're listening to an ABC news special this is a commercial announcement picture this scenario a shortage of fuel has closed your electric utility or any possible disaster is just devastated your town you're out of power no lights and no news that's why federal and state agencies urge every home to have an emergency radio now you can get a free Dynamo world bad emergency radio this 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S. B. Jack to charge cell phones or other devices the Dynamo emergency weather band radio retails for almost thirty dollars but newsmax wants to make sure you get this radio so check out the free offer for the emergency radio by going to get the radio dot com that's get the radio dot com or call eight hundred newsmax this radio could save your life this is a limited offer in may end soon so order today diabetes high blood pressure anxiety meds everyone's on them if you're a fifty year old male maybe it would be for your even with type two diabetes a million dollars of term insurance may only cost you about two hundred Bucks a month affordable term life insurance is out there called term provider and speak with big Lou at eight hundred four eight one at fourteen fifty eight eight hundred four eight one fourteen fifty eight or visit big Lou dot com remember big lose like you he's on meds to the world needs more heroes more action oriented do gooders here's how I can help right hand side kicks the world of circle is no different if you're thinking let's circle we're glad you're listening sarcomas are rare cancer of the body soft tissue and bone cancer affects tens of thousands of Americans in the sarcoma foundation of America partners with like minded heroes fifty percent complications to funded research and widespread awareness learn how you can join forces ninety five point five W. S. B. latest news and talk you're listening to an ABC news special copay nineteen what do you need to know in the B. C. news correspondent Amy Robach and with me now is ABC chief medical correspondent Dr Jen Ashton and there is some big news about colleges and universities considering re opening in the fall let's go through this systematically how it would work well first of all I mean we have to acknowledge is a complex situation in the health and safety of not just this population but the entire college and university community is obviously priority number one but here are some things that we know at this point medically we know that the college age group is at a lower risk of severe covert nineteen disease we also know that in this age group and in this environment social distancing is definitely going to be uniquely challenging and we also know that there are people in these communities whether they're college students with pre existing medical conditions or the staff or faculty that worked in and around colleges that could be vulnerable and may be at higher risk as well what options should be considered well I think there are some theories that are worth really exploring the first thing is is can we modify the timing of the spacing some of the classroom activities some of the other activities they shouldn't be looked at like an all or none decision in terms of sports theatre dormitory dining all of those things could be modified it's not an all or one situation and we have to remember that masks once the CDC recommended that for the general public they may be a key tool in reducing the transmission of this virus in the college communities from a health standpoint what do we still need to figure out well look luckily we have a little bit of time to do this but I think there is still a lot of things we don't know where to begin with we don't know what the role of rapid testing on a college campus can look like we don't know whether to college students and whether our kids will actually be compliant with some of the social distancing measures and we really don't know when you talk about risks which is worse right now going back to college in some way shape or form or take taking another year plus and not going back you both have to weigh those risks head to head and it's not an easy answer all right Dr Jenna you're sticking around to answer questions in just a bit in the meantime we turn out A. B. C.'s kera Phillips in Washington DC with the latest headlines for us hi Amy well these are some of the stories that were watching plans to re open the economy are taking shape in a number of states restaurants in Atlanta starting up again with new rules in place for diners today including tables six feet apart and servers wearing masks and in New Jersey governor Phil Murphy is unveiling what he calls responsible re opening driven by quote data science and common sense and Texas governor Greg Abbott also detail in the plan for ending his statewide stay at home orders and re emerging for the first time today after pretty brutal bout of the virus British prime minister Boris Johnson apologizing for being away for three weeks and warning it's too soon to end the locked down in the U. K. speaking outside number ten Downing Street Johnson says we are now beginning to turn the tide on this disease but says he refuses to throw away the public's effort and sacrifice by relaxing the lockdown too soon thank you well the mayor of Las Vegas made headlines last week when she volunteered the city as a control group to see if social distancing is working joining us now to talk about how and when Las Vegas will reopen as Clark County commissioner Marilyn Kirkpatrick welcome commissioner and I want to first start by asking how you feel about mayor Goodman's comments well I don't agree with her you know my colleagues and I who oversee the beautiful Las Vegas Strip bill that we have to our highest priority needs to be the health and safety of not only our residents we work on this trip but the visitors who come to visit us yeah and that said the mayor also feels hotels casinos restaurants should reopen right now when do you think they should reopen and what will the economic impact three well we've been working every single day with our medical experts across the state a resort association are McCarron airport and the convention that's already so we are working in that direction testing is the key to getting us back open and we are in the middle of expanding that testing opportunities so we will open only when it's safe and we have the most stringent priorities and policies in place can you talk a little bit about specifically how the county is working with the casinos there and other businesses to prevent another outbreak when you do eventually re open well I thought back to we we have been successfully doing social doesn't change we are ramping up casting today we can do up to two thousand tests today we anticipate by June first being able to ten thousand task our hotel partners and our airports they're making some adjustments so that our visitors bilberry see it coming back and that is our priority and we'll invite everybody back when we feel that we can meet those and do you do you how do you feel the people of Clark County are doing in terms of doing that social distancing and following the guidelines you know we're doing a great job every single day we look at different ways I mean even as we bring back our own stops we have to think about how do we have that social distancing and the grocery stores we have lines out for running grocery lines one way I'm so I I'm very proud of what we're doing in our community on the social distancing face while commissioner Marilyn Kirkpatrick we know it's a tough job thank you for leading the people who use Sir we appreciate your time today thank you get back to work some schools may still be close so where do we go from there the CEO of childcare provider bright horizons Stephen Kramer is here to tell us and Stephen thanks for being with us I know that you have locations daycare locations across the country how many of your facilities remain open so we have a hundred and fifty centers here across the United States that are continuing to be operational and are clearly working under covert nineteen protocols yeah that is pretty surprising I think for a lot of us and and I'm sure so helpful to so many who need your facilities how are you able to keep them open safely absolutely so first and foremost we are focused on those hundred and fifty centers on providing care for essential workers most typically healthcare workers in so first and foremost we are really focused on that particular population in terms of keeping our staff as well as children safe we have implemented processes and procedures in conjunction with a medical expert Dr Kristen Moffett from Boston children's hospital whereby we are ensuring that we are able to keep children safe keep staff safe and really make sure that we are operating both from hygiene perspective as well as from a safety perspective really in an appropriate way so hundred fifty centers open right now what changes will need to be implemented though when day cares fully open back up yes so I I think families can expect a number of changes from what they experience prior to the pandemic also examples include pick up and drop off so often times they will be seen either staggered pick up and drop offs or alternatively it may be curbside pick up and drop off I think certainly I health checks either being asked to be done at home or being done at the centre when they arrive is an important element of keeping everyone safe in addition to that the teachers they will be wearing masks when when families returned and certainly in the bright horizons centers that are open today our teachers are wearing masks also those are the kinds of things they might expect in addition to enhanced hygiene protocols yeah it's Stephen is there anything parents can do now to be prepared for what's to come I think there are things that parents can be doing I think first and foremost it's really important for parents to make sure that they are checking the health of their child each morning and each and every day to make sure that they are not bring their child if they have any sign or symptom of a health issue I think in addition to that children won't be used to the teachers wearing masks that's not something that they would have experienced previously and so my recommendation would be to as a parent start wearing masks around the house start to educate your child that heroes wear masks and certainly the teachers in the centers are heroes and so experiencing and exposing them to that concept is important and then finally I would encourage pet parents to prepare themselves they need to have a little bit of extra patience and I would encourage them to show appreciation for the teachers who are working tirelessly through both now and in the future in the child care center environment I think so many parents are home right now have a absolute renewed appreciation of teachers and I love what you said heroes wear masks that's awesome Stephen Kramer thank you so much for being with us today we appreciate it thank you for having me UP next right here those masks are suddenly everywhere and officials say it's a good idea but the sight of them can frighten our children some techniques for helping them deal when we come back this can be seen news special continues after this eleven eleven thirty thirty in in the the core core rate rate carrier carrier W. W. SP SP twenty twenty four four hour hour traffic traffic center center to to cap cap police police respond respond to to reports reports of of a a disabled disabled vehicle vehicle in in the the median median of of I. I. two eighty five by highway seventy eight exit thirty nine watch for left lane restrictions in both directions north and southbound along the perimeter on the east side while we have road work on six seventy five northbound in Clayton county blocking right lanes as you approach and will block roads to the far left toward I two eighty five this report from the Crohn's and colitis foundation which has been the forefront of inflammatory bowel disease research and care for over fifty years learn more about research education and support and Crohn's colitis foundation dot org Steve Winslow ninety five point five W. S. B. this is Jovita Moore everyday there's new information about the corona virus at channel two action news we are on top of every local development with live in depth coverage that gives you a better perspective stay local stay informed stay with channel two action news you're spending more time at home than ever before assured comfort will make sure you're comfortable and cool but the fifty nine dollar spring tune up and get a pound of freon at no cost it's free offer ends soon details at assured comfort dot com guaranteed service all the time done right and priced right I'm Jerry hall and I sure everyone's got advice on how to protect your health right now hi I'm Rick Adelman what I want to do is show you how you can protect your wealth right now for you and your family first make sure you have ample cash reserves this way you won't have to sell investments while prices are down second make sure your portfolio is diversified having only a portion of your money in stocks helps reduce your risks third rebalance your portfolio this lets you turn market volatility to your advantage by buying assets that are suddenly available at lower prices than before if you're at all concerned about your situation give us a call here at element financial engines we've been helping our clients get through financial crises for more than thirty years from the crash of eighty seven to the dot com bubble of two thousand one to the a credit crisis so call us a triple eight plane wreck extrapolate plane wreck or visit Rick Adelman dot com that's rice Gelman dot com call us and call us right now redbox says top entertainment when you need it most will Smith and Martin Lawrence are back for one last mission in bad boys for life visit redbox dot com for all the ways to watch prices may vary by location subject to applicable taxes additional terms at redbox dot com one eight hundred got junk is proud to announce no contact full service junk removal how does it work when a truck team arrives at the home don't pick up the junk from wherever the customer decided to put this but what if it's still in the home are healthy happy truck team will only touch the junk they're hauling away and they never get closer than six feet from the customer it is clean and open when you want Joe to disappear call one eight hundred got junk is the one eight hundred got junk dot com we've had our lives flipped upside down recently and for many of us things just got a lot rougher but we face tough times before and we're going to pull through this because that's what we do in America and term provider big blue has a message for you if all this craziness has you protecting the ones you care about don't let it stop when we get through this keep the protection rolling with a life insurance shield around your family for over thirty years term providers been providing affordable term life insurance at better prices and with better service including policies that don't need it in home exam as for big blue he's just like you spending time at home with his kids too no matter what your medical history prostate cancer heart conditions high cholesterol or if you're taking prescription medications at term provider we can help you find a million dollars or more of term life insurance at affordable rates to fit your budget there's no obligation so call now for your free quote call eight hundred five six eight twenty seven ninety that's eight hundred five six eight twenty seven ninety eight hundred five six eight twenty seven ninety ninety five point five W. S. B. latest news and talk listening to an ABC news special Kobe nineteen what you need to know once again here is ABC news correspondent Amy Robach new questions every day about this pandemic emergency Dr Jen Ashton is back with us with some answers to your questions and Dr Jenn we've got our first question I have a family member who needs to fly for work are there any other safety measures besides gloves and masks that you would recommend that is really the most important for the passenger you can try to plan the time of that travel maybe to lower peak hours if that's possible but what's interesting about travel is that some degree of travel is not gonna be optional or elective in the near future so we're starting to see as we've heard before airlines start to play around with how they can help reduce the risk so again cover your mouth and nose clean your hands and for now as an individual that's the best you can do all right our next question our sinus drainage and post nasal drip possible symptoms of cold at nineteen even without a fever interesting because we're hearing the CDC revise the symptom less straight they added six symptoms to cope in nineteen he used to be fever cough shortness of breath now they've extended it to body aches headache loss of smell taste sore throat even headache but here's the important thing with the post nasal drip and allergies we are an allergy season and as I always say you can have more than one thing at a time so yes it's possible that you could have a mild case of cobit and allergies and one of the new symptoms the CDC added was a sore throat so again above the neck symptoms it is possible and I'm sure we're gonna be seeing that list of symptoms get expanded in the future next question I'm a college professor recovering from coded nineteen and I'm struggling with sudden loss of secondary language fluency has there been any research on cognitive impairments related to cope with nineteen no formal research and data out yet Amy but you can imagine how frightening that would be if you start to notice these we you and I've talked here about neurologic manifestations to cove in nineteen there have been reports in the medical literature of people presenting with headache seizure dizziness loss and smell and taste are neurologic symptoms so cognitive function we may see that certainly and seriously cove in nineteen patients who have been in and I see you that's to be expected but we'll we'll hope that those things return back to normal okay next question we've been talking a lot about pregnancy this one about new moms is it safe to vaccinate babies or give booster MMR shots without testing them for cove in nineteen any expected complications like fever or anything else a couple of things with this because it's really important for the American academy of pediatrics talk about the risks of delaying infant immunizations in the setting of the covert nineteen pandemic number one fever is a possibly a good reaction of our body to anything whether it's a vaccination for exposure to something like Kobe right now pediatricians offices are not testing babies for cove it before they administer routine I mean ations but that may change in the future and we have to remember those immunizations are important so any concerns really want the parents to talk to the pediatrician all right great advice as always Dr Jan thank you and if you have questions for Dr Ashton you can submit them on her Instagram at Dr J. Ashton will masks and face coverings have become such a familiar sight around the country in this corona virus pandemic with a number of states now requiring them during visits to essential businesses and on public transportation but the sight of them can be scary especially for children A. B. C.'s Ariel Russia has more on what you can do to help lessen their anxiety Hey there any as you know kids can ask some pretty tough questions and this can actually be scary for them as you mention when they see people out there wearing masks they see their parents wearing masks but experts say there are ways to help them adapt to this new normal and some of them are not only just educational but they can even be fine faking street shuttered businesses empty playgrounds the images of this covert nineteen pandemic are hard for even adults to process but for kids like four year old alley and five year old Adriana Alfano seeing people wearing masks is perhaps the most jarring it they just I was really strange a new normal forcing families like the L. fan I was to have some tough conversations it does open up both a big can of worms and a lot of different questions public face covering now recommended by the CDC for adults and children ages two and up how do you think the imagery of people wearing masks can affect kids well initially when kids see someone wearing a mask depending on what they associate it with before it could bring up some beer new dad and entrepreneur Trevor George and his wife Morgan wanted to help ease that anxiety we believe that in order to solve this everyone has to do their part Michigan based teacher company struggling when the pandemic hit economy it had the two created mass club issues like it has to be a way you can help and work with your branch at the same time retiring more than fifty percent of their furloughed employees or adults with a lot of characters like hello Kitty Wonder Woman Batman and Superman we have an eight month old and when my wife and I put on our Batman or Wonder Woman masks he reaches for the colors that has a familiar logo can help your child more east club a passion project with added and for every mass that's purchased we donate a medical grade version two first responders in partnership with the first responders children's need and creating a bright spot family having some fun some levity and then mixing them with information Trevor says that they have donated nearly one hundred thousand masks already any clearly this idea of wearing a branded logo mask and also doing some good while you're in the process of that is really resonate yeah it's a win win I was even saying I know kids it's scary to them it's scary to me sometimes when you see people because it is jarring seeing circle in masks all of a sudden what tools can parents use when they talk about this with their children well doctor Taylor says it's important to impress upon your kids that they're taking care of themselves they're taking care of others this is a safety precaution just like wearing a helmet when you ride a bike or buckling your seat belt when you're in the car and she also says that it's important to have these honest conversations with your kids just be up front with them lead by example when you're comfortable wearing your own mask children see that and they're more at ease as well makes sense and kids are certainly resilient aerial thank you so much for bringing us this we appreciate it for gonna turn out to Dr Jen Ashton for some thoughts on this for some perspective here I mean we have to remember it was just recently that the CDC made a major change of revising their guidelines recommending face coverings for the general public not to protect the person wearing the mask but to protect others so as the saying we're so used to hearing here in New York City it's not about me it's about a week but here's the interesting thing from a medical and scientific standpoint remember that the data on face coverings or masks protecting you was done in a lab right that's why we say in a hospital setting we put masks on sick people with a different kind of mask on health care workers but there's a big difference between scientific research done in a lab setting and those done in a real life setting so we're seeing one of major Boston Medical Center has dropped the rate of its staff cases of covert nineteen dramatically once they instituted a policy where everyone staff patients and visitors started wearing masks so we'll see how it plays out in our country Dr Ashton thank you and when we come back the army of volunteers in one city working hard to help frontline heroes shine these special continues after this about half of all men will experience ET or PT fact both E. 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E. are highly treatable fact a safe effective treatment is just a call away at priority men's Medical Center our highly skilled doctors guarantee results on your first visit or there's no charge listen to a specialist in men's health I'm doctor Schwartz if I Agra Cialis or Levitra have let you down the treatment that priority men's Medical Center work immediately regardless of your age or medical history you'll receive custom blended medication designed just for you they're safe and effective with no pain and no surgery patients are lasting thirty sixty and ninety minutes or longer and best of all treatments are affordable ma'am if you want to last longer in the bedroom schedule a private consultation with the experienced physicians at priority men's Medical Center four oh four six two zero one nine five nine four oh four six two zero one nine five nine that's four oh four six two zero one nine five nine everything you know about buying and owning your new air conditioning system Josh change cool ray is breaking the rules and changing the game by your new high efficiency carrier system from call ray and you'll never pay for any repair again ever this is not a lease offer you own your system I'm Dave Baker from WSP home fix it show this new offer from Korean carrier is the ultimate game changer in the heating and air business call raise lifetime parts and labor warranty includes every part all the labor even service call fees Korean carrier zero repair costs for life there's just no safer way to own your new heating and cooling system get Cory's lifetime parts and labor warranty break the rules change the game never pay to repair your system again Korean carriers turn to the experts this is rob Babin president and general manager of **** media group radio stations there are so many people from the Atlanta region we're committed to keeping all the same and they deserve our gratitude thank you all the first responders healthcare professionals and so many others providing essential services I also wanted a few seconds to think those local media especially the ninety five point five W. 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Brian Camp Donald Trump President Trump Vice President Georgia WSP Georgette
Atlanta - Georgia Governor Kemp Defends Decision to Begin Phased Reopening of State Economy

Clark Howard

45:08 min | 2 years ago

Atlanta - Georgia Governor Kemp Defends Decision to Begin Phased Reopening of State Economy

"Brian camp addresses criticism from those concerned he's opening businesses too soon despite the criticism governor Brian can't received last week from president trump for his decision to begin re opening Georgia businesses he still supports them I appreciate his leadership I appreciate all that the administration has done to support our state and like the president can't lashed out at the media for trying to divide there will be no dividing we're going to continue to work with the administration and the president and the vice president in the task force in he said today I wish the media could just see how good these calls go with the governor's Xander parish ninety five point five WSP Georgette meantime is headed rough milestone a thousand people have died so far in the state from the corona virus only ten other states have the same numbers some restaurants here in Georgia really having a hard time finding the supplies needed to re open for indoor dining Catherine a server here it is all Mexican restaurant says there's so many rules to follow in order to reopen including providing masks and hand sanitizer for all staff there's no where where we can find this hand sanitizer and then there's being able to serve and social distance at the same time is it even possible it will be really difficult for us like a a servers to to put put put the the the food food food on on on the the the table table table if if if we we we are are are not not not allowed allowed allowed to to to be be be less less less than than than six six six feet feet feet apart apart apart it's it's it's ridiculous ridiculous ridiculous in in in Peachtree Peachtree Peachtree city city city robin robin robin will will will lead lead lead Steve Steve Steve ninety ninety ninety five five five point point point five five five W. S. B. fifty nine degrees in Atlanta mostly clear and cold tonight lows forty seven to fifty one mostly to partly sunny tomorrow high seventy eight Atlanta's most accurate and dependable forecast is coming up top local news every thirty minutes and when it breaks ninety five point five W. S. B. depend on it small businesses hit another snag when they tried to get a loan help today the online loan application process had technical problems and three hundred and ten billion dollars is expected to go quickly here's ABC's Mary Bruce how experts tell us this fund could run out of money again it within a week and we are already seeing calls from some of the nation's top banks for Congress to fully fund and expand this program they won't have any hope of meeting this huge demand the first round of funding ran out in just thirteen days W. SPT use time eleven oh two is Georgia begins to reopen all things are sure to get confusing what's open and what's not what are the rules take on ninety five point five W. S. V. as we band together and help each other get back ninety five point five W. S. B. everywhere you go this is the time local news really matters which is why now more than ever more people turn to channel two action news this is Jovita Moore every day there is new and complicated information about the corona virus and it's changing quickly and this is George Estevez we're here to make sense of it all for you with live in depth local coverage investigations it give you a better perspective and a look forward to the impact on you and they were kind of me stay local stay informed stay with channel two action news man of the effects of hypertension diabetes or prostate cancer preventing you from having a satisfying love life in just one visit the doctors that priority man's medical center can help you overcome ET or PT to regain your confidence and have you last longer in the bedroom name brand pills don't work for many men and can have serious side effects the highly skilled positions that priority man's Medical Center provide custom blended medications that are safe effective and work immediately regardless of your medical history age you'll see results on your first visit guaranteed for your consultation is free so if you have problems in the bedroom call now for a private consultation one call one visit one simple solution to regain your love life call priority men's Medical Center now at four oh four six two zero one nine five nine four four six two zero one nine five nine that's four oh four six two zero one nine five nine you're spending more time at home than ever before assured comfort will make sure you're comfortable and cool but the fifty nine dollar spring tune up and get a pound of freon at no cost it's free offer ends soon details at assured comfort dot com guaranteeing service all the time done right and priced right I'm Jerry hall and I sure you'll you'll love love W. W. S. S. B. B. triple triple team team traffic traffic alerts about three hours that's run by your traffic experts at ninety five point five open the app and send your smartphone aside for your specific road ahead thank you Michael Reyes lifetime parts and labor warranty W. S. B. triple team traffic alerts the Winslow was in the W. S. B. twenty four hour traffic center we see a slow zoom in sandy springs on four hundred south on Jennifer it's the the roadwork roadwork to to setting setting up up between between the the two two eighty eighty five five reps reps and and the the Glenridge Glenridge connector connector exit exit number number three three through through the the evening evening hours hours allow allow for for extra extra travel travel time time south south of of Abernathy Abernathy road road right right now now no no delays delays getting getting to to I. I. two eighty five also the northbound work on four hundred still blocking right lane past Abernathy toward the north springs marta station entrance wraps stated the far left if you make your way toward Roswell and Alpharetta twenty east and west bound east expressway to cap county WSJ became showing wetland still blocked both directions for the media work between Wesley chapel and Panola road Steve Winslow ninety five point five W. S. B. M. W. S. B. Rochester college within months most accurate dependable forecast for tonight mostly clear and cool lows forty seven to fifty one tomorrow mostly to to partly partly sunny sunny and and warm warm high high seventy seventy eight eight low low fifty fifty nine nine Wednesday Wednesday showers showers and and thunderstorms thunderstorms eighty eighty percent percent likely likely afternoon afternoon and and evening evening high high seventy seventy three three low low fifty fifty one one Thursday a mix of sun and clouds cool high sixty five lows forty six to forty nine fifty nine degrees on Peachtree street at ninety five point five WSP Atlanta's news and talk is an NBC news special covert nineteen what you need to know here is ABC news correspondent Aaron Katersky it's been weeks since most of us have been out to eat today restaurants in Georgia we're allowed to open for dine in service as the state continues to loosen coronavirus restrictions Tennessee's re opening retail stores Kentucky's re openings of health care services dog groomers can reopen in Wisconsin we're corona virus has hit harder it's different the governor of New Jersey said today restrictions continue indefinitely and the governor of New York said he expected to extend them for the city and its suburbs but the lunch crowd came back in parts of Georgia as our affiliate WSB found a chance to eat inside a restaurant Kim Kucera says this Brookhaven waffle house was her first choice the family hang out we are talking about the whole field in this family in the champ wasn't here this day but the company says no matter who walks in some things haven't changed they're going to get that welcome the waffle house the greeting that we're all excited to be able to give them for when they come in it'll be very clear where they can and cannot said company spokesperson in Gerry boss showed us the big red tape strapped across some of the books and some of the schools are also off limits to maintain safe social distancing the cooks and servers are all wearing masks and X. marks the spot where you can stand as you wait for a seat some don't like governor camp's decision to allow restaurants like this to re open their dining rooms but boss believes many of the critics may be able to work from home while still collecting a paycheck to say that when they still have all of those things we want to be here to make sure that everybody who wants to go and have the opportunity to can take care of themselves and their family that's the American way as for Kim cassette as she feels comfortable eating inside says there's a sense of home here and it all starts off with waffle house what can't get any more American the waffle house right many will never feel comfortable venturing out or re opening a business without a vaccine and most experts think that's at least a year away some scientists are considering rather unconventional ways to speed up the process one of them raises some moral questions we're joined by Dr Angela Baldwin of Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx is also part of our medical team here at ABC news Dr Baldwin this method involves injecting healthy adults with live coronavirus correct so this is called a challenge trial where healthy adults are divided into two groups one group received a placebo and the other group receives the potential vaccine but both groups are injected with the virus and the point is for them to for researchers to see how effective the vaccine is against the virus and this kind of speed up the timeline because normally in a normal situation what somebody receives a vaccine the researchers just have to kind of wait for that person to naturally be infected with whatever virus or disease that the vaccines intended to treat is it the only way to do this definitely not this normally vaccine trials go through three phases phase one phase to help determine the specific dosing that safe and then you know an overall kind of safety of the vaccine and then in phase three is when they do these large very large trials for the enroll thousands of patients and a half receive the vaccine the other half isn't but then they just kind of track them and follow them throughout their daily lives and see okay all this group you know they were exposed to the virus and it looks like the vaccine worked the problem is these are just very long and then kind of a bit cumbersome and so that's why some researchers are proposing this challenge trial the kind of by pass phase three doesn't raise any moral dilemmas definitely a moral dilemmas they do try to mitigate the risk but the fact of the matter is we are taking otherwise healthy adults and injecting them with a virus that could have serious consequences including death the other side they do try to mitigate the risks they would only be enrolling healthy adult volunteers without underlying medical conditions but the problem is we do know that unfortunately there are young people who are still dying from call the nineteen you may also not have any underlying conditions there's still so much we don't know that just makes it's completely unsafe and the other problem is if somebody does get very sick you know we're dealing with a health care crisis right now work the critical care that one may need may not always be readily available and resources may be scarce so to inject somebody of the virus and the potentially kill them and put them in a situation where they urgently need critical care that might not be available raises a few eyebrows from from office I guess it's tempting though when everyone wants the vaccine this seems like the speediest way you know if they could and and one of the questions we ask ourselves is how much does this speed up the the normal course of us finding a vaccine right so if it only speeded up by one month maybe not that great of an idea of the speeded up by six months eight months okay maybe but also the thing to realize is that the challenge trials only one part of a of a two step process these researchers are suggesting would replace phase three so you still have the challenge of trial where the people are given the live virus but then in the second part they would need to test the vaccine on the most vulnerable members of the population right the elderly people under my medical conditions these are the people who really need the vaccine so we need to make sure it's safe in them so during the second phase they would give each of those types of people the vaccine but they would not be injecting them with the with the virus so that means we still in this kind of things were waiting for these people to in the natural course of their days be exposed to the virus so it's really not short meaning that the for the third phase by that much if you think about it who's going to decide ultimately you know that's a very good question I think ultimately we have these things called internal review boards RBC and they are designed to look out for the welfare of participants in subjects in studies and I think it's basically going to fall on the individual IRB's to decide whether or not they're going to allow this to to commission their institution Dr Angela Baldwin of the ABC news medical unit while the world waits for a vaccine all of us adapt to new routines out of our offices and working from say the kitchen table firms are now debating how and whether to repopulate offices small workers are deciding whether they're comfortable taking off the sweat pants and putting back on the suit consumer minute vices law firm said soy Hauser group you joins us from Chicago we're all kind of getting used to this aren't we yes you know I think this is going better than many law firms thought it would technology working well generally people are productive at home some people even like it what's not to like you can be in your pajamas and still accomplish the same kind of work you know in a candid moment a lot of lawyers would probably tell you that and I think that there is upside for both lawyers and for firms to do that the flexibility is something the people of wanted since before the crisis in some law firms before the crisis we're taking small steps towards being more flexible about where people worked and they saw upside both in attracting talent who wanted to be working where they were comfortable where they were where it was convenient also for the law firms there's a big expense of course on the real estate side real estate for most law firms is their second biggest expense behind paying lawyers so they're interested long term many law firms are in using less space why would any firm go back to renting expensive space again if this is working it's that's a great question different firms are different so some firms before the crisis we're happy to move towards less space and I think that the crisis will accelerate the move towards less space for those firms other firms the before the crisis had a culture of being in the office together they placed a premium on facetime and I think after the crisis some of those firms will revert to form and they will want to be in the office more so there will be some that accelerate towards work at home more and take on less space and I think others will want to snap back to how they were previously law firms like many other firms can be notoriously inflexible though about people's time has the shortest that it can work differently I think that this crisis has proven that actually can work pretty well for many lawyers in many firms different lawyers have practices that lend themselves to working remotely so for example a lawyer who needs to appear in court or take depositions in person that doesn't work as well remotely of course others though K. and worked quite productively from anywhere and that works for the firm in for their clients when you ask people what the impediments are to remote working some of the things that come up are things like whether working remotely as an impediment to mentoring opportunities for young and up and coming lawyers they asked about whether working remotely as an impediment to a training those lawyers and they also ask about whether working remotely is an impediment to collaborating together and so some firms will find ways to address those impediments and work around them others will feel the need to be a person more often Kent Zimmerman a principle that's only because our group joining us from Chicago coming up our chief medical correspondent Dr Jennifer Ashton answers your questions about corona virus I'm Erin to Turkey you're listening to an ABC news special this is a commercial announcement picture this scenario a shortage of fuel has closed your electric utility or any possible disaster is just devastated your town you're out of power no lights and no news that's why federal and state agencies urge every home to have an emergency radio now you can get a free Dynamo world bad emergency radio this powerful radio lets you stay informed during any type of emergency it doesn't even need batteries and comes with a hand crank generator and super bright LED flashlight the Dynamo emergency radio includes the NOAA weather band a long range Hey am receiver a high sensitivity FM band and even the U. S. B. Jack to charge cell phones or other devices the Dynamo emergency weather band radio retails for almost thirty dollars but newsmax wants to make sure you get this radio so check out the free offer for the emergency radio by going to get the radio dot com that's get the radio dot com or call eight hundred newsmax this radio could save your life this is a limited offer in may end soon so order today diabetes high blood pressure anxiety meds everyone's on them if you're a fifty year old male maybe it would be for your even with type two diabetes a million dollars of term insurance may only cost you about two hundred Bucks a month affordable term life insurance is out there called term provider and speak with big Lou at eight hundred four eight one at fourteen fifty eight eight hundred four eight one fourteen fifty eight or visit big Lou dot com remember big lose like you he's on meds too attention all authors page publishing is looking for authors have you written a book and want to get it published page publishing will get your book into bookstores and for sale online at Amazon apple I tunes in other outlets they handle all aspects of the publishing process for you printing cover art publicity copyright and editing call eight hundred five zero one thirty six eighty nine now for your free author submission kit that's eight hundred five zero one thirty six eighty nine for your free author submission kit again eight hundred five zero one thirty six eighty nine this is the commercial announcement picture this scenario a shortage of fuel has closed your electric utility or any possible disaster is just devastated your town you're out of power no lights and no news that's why federal and state agencies urge every home to have an emergency radio now you can get a free Dynamo world bad emergency radio this powerful radio lets you stay informed during any type of emergency it doesn't even need batteries and comes with a hand crank generator and super bright LED flashlight the Dynamo emergency radio includes the NOAA weather band a long range Hey am receiver a high sensitivity FM band and even a U. S. B. Jack to charge cell phones or other devices the Dynamo emergency weather band radio retails for almost thirty dollars but newsmax wants to make sure you get this radio so check out the free offer for the emergency radio by going to get the radio dot com that's get the radio dot com or call eight hundred newsmax this radio could save your life this is a limited offer in may end soon so order today diabetes high blood pressure anxiety meds everyone's on them if you're a fifty year old male maybe it would be for your even with type two diabetes a million dollars of term insurance may only cost you about two hundred Bucks a month affordable term life insurance is out there called term provider and speak with big Lou at eight hundred four eight one at fourteen fifty eight eight hundred four eight one fourteen fifty eight or visit big Lou dot com remember big lose like you he's on meds to the world needs more heroes more action oriented do gooders here's how I can help right hand side kicks the world of circle is no different if you're thinking let's circle we're glad you're listening sarcomas are rare cancer of the body soft tissue and bone cancer affects tens of thousands of Americans in the sarcoma foundation of America partners with like minded heroes fifty percent complications to funded research and widespread awareness learn how you can join forces ninety five point five W. S. B. latest news and talk you're listening to an ABC news special copay nineteen what do you need to know in the B. C. news correspondent Amy Robach and with me now is ABC chief medical correspondent Dr Jen Ashton and there is some big news about colleges and universities considering re opening in the fall let's go through this systematically how it would work well first of all I mean we have to acknowledge is a complex situation in the health and safety of not just this population but the entire college and university community is obviously priority number one but here are some things that we know at this point medically we know that the college age group is at a lower risk of severe covert nineteen disease we also know that in this age group and in this environment social distancing is definitely going to be uniquely challenging and we also know that there are people in these communities whether they're college students with pre existing medical conditions or the staff or faculty that worked in and around colleges that could be vulnerable and may be at higher risk as well what options should be considered well I think there are some theories that are worth really exploring the first thing is is can we modify the timing of the spacing some of the classroom activities some of the other activities they shouldn't be looked at like an all or none decision in terms of sports theatre dormitory dining all of those things could be modified it's not an all or one situation and we have to remember that masks once the CDC recommended that for the general public they may be a key tool in reducing the transmission of this virus in the college communities from a health standpoint what do we still need to figure out well look luckily we have a little bit of time to do this but I think there is still a lot of things we don't know where to begin with we don't know what the role of rapid testing on a college campus can look like we don't know whether to college students and whether our kids will actually be compliant with some of the social distancing measures and we really don't know when you talk about risks which is worse right now going back to college in some way shape or form or take taking another year plus and not going back you both have to weigh those risks head to head and it's not an easy answer all right Dr Jenna you're sticking around to answer questions in just a bit in the meantime we turn out A. B. C.'s kera Phillips in Washington DC with the latest headlines for us hi Amy well these are some of the stories that were watching plans to re open the economy are taking shape in a number of states restaurants in Atlanta starting up again with new rules in place for diners today including tables six feet apart and servers wearing masks and in New Jersey governor Phil Murphy is unveiling what he calls responsible re opening driven by quote data science and common sense and Texas governor Greg Abbott also detail in the plan for ending his statewide stay at home orders and re emerging for the first time today after pretty brutal bout of the virus British prime minister Boris Johnson apologizing for being away for three weeks and warning it's too soon to end the locked down in the U. K. speaking outside number ten Downing Street Johnson says we are now beginning to turn the tide on this disease but says he refuses to throw away the public's effort and sacrifice by relaxing the lockdown too soon thank you well the mayor of Las Vegas made headlines last week when she volunteered the city as a control group to see if social distancing is working joining us now to talk about how and when Las Vegas will reopen as Clark County commissioner Marilyn Kirkpatrick welcome commissioner and I want to first start by asking how you feel about mayor Goodman's comments well I don't agree with her you know my colleagues and I who oversee the beautiful Las Vegas Strip bill that we have to our highest priority needs to be the health and safety of not only our residents we work on this trip but the visitors who come to visit us yeah and that said the mayor also feels hotels casinos restaurants should reopen right now when do you think they should reopen and what will the economic impact three well we've been working every single day with our medical experts across the state a resort association are McCarron airport and the convention that's already so we are working in that direction testing is the key to getting us back open and we are in the middle of expanding that testing opportunities so we will open only when it's safe and we have the most stringent priorities and policies in place can you talk a little bit about specifically how the county is working with the casinos there and other businesses to prevent another outbreak when you do eventually re open well I thought back to we we have been successfully doing social doesn't change we are ramping up casting today we can do up to two thousand tests today we anticipate by June first being able to ten thousand task our hotel partners and our airports they're making some adjustments so that our visitors bilberry see it coming back and that is our priority and we'll invite everybody back when we feel that we can meet those and do you do you how do you feel the people of Clark County are doing in terms of doing that social distancing and following the guidelines you know we're doing a great job every single day we look at different ways I mean even as we bring back our own stops we have to think about how do we have that social distancing and the grocery stores we have lines out for running grocery lines one way I'm so I I'm very proud of what we're doing in our community on the social distancing face while commissioner Marilyn Kirkpatrick we know it's a tough job thank you for leading the people who use Sir we appreciate your time today thank you get back to work some schools may still be close so where do we go from there the CEO of childcare provider bright horizons Stephen Kramer is here to tell us and Stephen thanks for being with us I know that you have locations daycare locations across the country how many of your facilities remain open so we have a hundred and fifty centers here across the United States that are continuing to be operational and are clearly working under covert nineteen protocols yeah that is pretty surprising I think for a lot of us and and I'm sure so helpful to so many who need your facilities how are you able to keep them open safely absolutely so first and foremost we are focused on those hundred and fifty centers on providing care for essential workers most typically healthcare workers in so first and foremost we are really focused on that particular population in terms of keeping our staff as well as children safe we have implemented processes and procedures in conjunction with a medical expert Dr Kristen Moffett from Boston children's hospital whereby we are ensuring that we are able to keep children safe keep staff safe and really make sure that we are operating both from hygiene perspective as well as from a safety perspective really in an appropriate way so hundred fifty centers open right now what changes will need to be implemented though when day cares fully open back up yes so I I think families can expect a number of changes from what they experience prior to the pandemic also examples include pick up and drop off so often times they will be seen either staggered pick up and drop offs or alternatively it may be curbside pick up and drop off I think certainly I health checks either being asked to be done at home or being done at the centre when they arrive is an important element of keeping everyone safe in addition to that the teachers they will be wearing masks when when families returned and certainly in the bright horizons centers that are open today our teachers are wearing masks also those are the kinds of things they might expect in addition to enhanced hygiene protocols yeah it's Stephen is there anything parents can do now to be prepared for what's to come I think there are things that parents can be doing I think first and foremost it's really important for parents to make sure that they are checking the health of their child each morning and each and every day to make sure that they are not bring their child if they have any sign or symptom of a health issue I think in addition to that children won't be used to the teachers wearing masks that's not something that they would have experienced previously and so my recommendation would be to as a parent start wearing masks around the house start to educate your child that heroes wear masks and certainly the teachers in the centers are heroes and so experiencing and exposing them to that concept is important and then finally I would encourage pet parents to prepare themselves they need to have a little bit of extra patience and I would encourage them to show appreciation for the teachers who are working tirelessly through both now and in the future in the child care center environment I think so many parents are home right now have a absolute renewed appreciation of teachers and I love what you said heroes wear masks that's awesome Stephen Kramer thank you so much for being with us today we appreciate it thank you for having me UP next right here those masks are suddenly everywhere and officials say it's a good idea but the sight of them can frighten our children some techniques for helping them deal when we come back this can be seen news special continues after this eleven eleven thirty thirty in in the the core core rate rate carrier carrier W. W. SP SP twenty twenty four four hour hour traffic traffic center center to to cap cap police police respond respond to to reports reports of of a a disabled disabled vehicle vehicle in in the the median median of of I. I. two eighty five by highway seventy eight exit thirty nine watch for left lane restrictions in both directions north and southbound along the perimeter on the east side while we have road work on six seventy five northbound in Clayton county blocking right lanes as you approach and will block roads to the far left toward I two eighty five this report from the Crohn's and colitis foundation which has been the forefront of inflammatory bowel disease research and care for over fifty years learn more about research education and support and Crohn's colitis foundation dot org Steve Winslow ninety five point five W. S. B. this is Jovita Moore everyday there's new information about the corona virus at channel two action news we are on top of every local development with live in depth coverage that gives you a better perspective stay local stay informed stay with channel two action news you're spending more time at home than ever before assured comfort will make sure you're comfortable and cool but the fifty nine dollar spring tune up and get a pound of freon at no cost it's free offer ends soon details at assured comfort dot com guaranteed service all the time done right and priced right I'm Jerry hall and I sure everyone's got advice on how to protect your health right now hi I'm Rick Adelman what I want to do is show you how you can protect your wealth right now for you and your family first make sure you have ample cash reserves this way you won't have to sell investments while prices are down second make sure your portfolio is diversified having only a portion of your money in stocks helps reduce your risks third rebalance your portfolio this lets you turn market volatility to your advantage by buying assets that are suddenly available at lower prices than before if you're at all concerned about your situation give us a call here at element financial engines we've been helping our clients get through financial crises for more than thirty years from the crash of eighty seven to the dot com bubble of two thousand one to the a credit crisis so call us a triple eight plane wreck extrapolate plane wreck or visit Rick Adelman dot com that's rice Gelman dot com call us and call us right now redbox says top entertainment when you need it most will Smith and Martin Lawrence are back for one last mission in bad boys for life visit redbox dot com for all the ways to watch prices may vary by location subject to applicable taxes additional terms at redbox dot com one eight hundred got junk is proud to announce no contact full service junk removal how does it work when a truck team arrives at the home don't pick up the junk from wherever the customer decided to put this but what if it's still in the home are healthy happy truck team will only touch the junk they're hauling away and they never get closer than six feet from the customer it is clean and open when you want Joe to disappear call one eight hundred got junk is the one eight hundred got junk dot com we've had our lives flipped upside down recently and for many of us things just got a lot rougher but we face tough times before and we're going to pull through this because that's what we do in America and term provider big blue has a message for you if all this craziness has you protecting the ones you care about don't let it stop when we get through this keep the protection rolling with a life insurance shield around your family for over thirty years term providers been providing affordable term life insurance at better prices and with better service including policies that don't need it in home exam as for big blue he's just like you spending time at home with his kids too no matter what your medical history prostate cancer heart conditions high cholesterol or if you're taking prescription medications at term provider we can help you find a million dollars or more of term life insurance at affordable rates to fit your budget there's no obligation so call now for your free quote call eight hundred five six eight twenty seven ninety that's eight hundred five six eight twenty seven ninety eight hundred five six eight twenty seven ninety ninety five point five W. S. B. latest news and talk listening to an ABC news special Kobe nineteen what you need to know once again here is ABC news correspondent Amy Robach new questions every day about this pandemic emergency Dr Jen Ashton is back with us with some answers to your questions and Dr Jenn we've got our first question I have a family member who needs to fly for work are there any other safety measures besides gloves and masks that you would recommend that is really the most important for the passenger you can try to plan the time of that travel maybe to lower peak hours if that's possible but what's interesting about travel is that some degree of travel is not gonna be optional or elective in the near future so we're starting to see as we've heard before airlines start to play around with how they can help reduce the risk so again cover your mouth and nose clean your hands and for now as an individual that's the best you can do all right our next question our sinus drainage and post nasal drip possible symptoms of cold at nineteen even without a fever interesting because we're hearing the CDC revise the symptom less straight they added six symptoms to cope in nineteen he used to be fever cough shortness of breath now they've extended it to body aches headache loss of smell taste sore throat even headache but here's the important thing with the post nasal drip and allergies we are an allergy season and as I always say you can have more than one thing at a time so yes it's possible that you could have a mild case of cobit and allergies and one of the new symptoms the CDC added was a sore throat so again above the neck symptoms it is possible and I'm sure we're gonna be seeing that list of symptoms get expanded in the future next question I'm a college professor recovering from coded nineteen and I'm struggling with sudden loss of secondary language fluency has there been any research on cognitive impairments related to cope with nineteen no formal research and data out yet Amy but you can imagine how frightening that would be if you start to notice these we you and I've talked here about neurologic manifestations to cove in nineteen there have been reports in the medical literature of people presenting with headache seizure dizziness loss and smell and taste are neurologic symptoms so cognitive function we may see that certainly and seriously cove in nineteen patients who have been in and I see you that's to be expected but we'll we'll hope that those things return back to normal okay next question we've been talking a lot about pregnancy this one about new moms is it safe to vaccinate babies or give booster MMR shots without testing them for cove in nineteen any expected complications like fever or anything else a couple of things with this because it's really important for the American academy of pediatrics talk about the risks of delaying infant immunizations in the setting of the covert nineteen pandemic number one fever is a possibly a good reaction of our body to anything whether it's a vaccination for exposure to something like Kobe right now pediatricians offices are not testing babies for cove it before they administer routine I mean ations but that may change in the future and we have to remember those immunizations are important so any concerns really want the parents to talk to the pediatrician all right great advice as always Dr Jan thank you and if you have questions for Dr Ashton you can submit them on her Instagram at Dr J. Ashton will masks and face coverings have become such a familiar sight around the country in this corona virus pandemic with a number of states now requiring them during visits to essential businesses and on public transportation but the sight of them can be scary especially for children A. B. C.'s Ariel Russia has more on what you can do to help lessen their anxiety Hey there any as you know kids can ask some pretty tough questions and this can actually be scary for them as you mention when they see people out there wearing masks they see their parents wearing masks but experts say there are ways to help them adapt to this new normal and some of them are not only just educational but they can even be fine faking street shuttered businesses empty playgrounds the images of this covert nineteen pandemic are hard for even adults to process but for kids like four year old alley and five year old Adriana Alfano seeing people wearing masks is perhaps the most jarring it they just I was really strange a new normal forcing families like the L. fan I was to have some tough conversations it does open up both a big can of worms and a lot of different questions public face covering now recommended by the CDC for adults and children ages two and up how do you think the imagery of people wearing masks can affect kids well initially when kids see someone wearing a mask depending on what they associate it with before it could bring up some beer new dad and entrepreneur Trevor George and his wife Morgan wanted to help ease that anxiety we believe that in order to solve this everyone has to do their part Michigan based teacher company struggling when the pandemic hit economy it had the two created mass club issues like it has to be a way you can help and work with your branch at the same time retiring more than fifty percent of their furloughed employees or adults with a lot of characters like hello Kitty Wonder Woman Batman and Superman we have an eight month old and when my wife and I put on our Batman or Wonder Woman masks he reaches for the colors that has a familiar logo can help your child more east club a passion project with added and for every mass that's purchased we donate a medical grade version two first responders in partnership with the first responders children's need and creating a bright spot family having some fun some levity and then mixing them with information Trevor says that they have donated nearly one hundred thousand masks already any clearly this idea of wearing a branded logo mask and also doing some good while you're in the process of that is really resonate yeah it's a win win I was even saying I know kids it's scary to them it's scary to me sometimes when you see people because it is jarring seeing circle in masks all of a sudden what tools can parents use when they talk about this with their children well doctor Taylor says it's important to impress upon your kids that they're taking care of themselves they're taking care of others this is a safety precaution just like wearing a helmet when you ride a bike or buckling your seat belt when you're in the car and she also says that it's important to have these honest conversations with your kids just be up front with them lead by example when you're comfortable wearing your own mask children see that and they're more at ease as well makes sense and kids are certainly resilient aerial thank you so much for bringing us this we appreciate it for gonna turn out to Dr Jen Ashton for some thoughts on this for some perspective here I mean we have to remember it was just recently that the CDC made a major change of revising their guidelines recommending face coverings for the general public not to protect the person wearing the mask but to protect others so as the saying we're so used to hearing here in New York City it's not about me it's about a week but here's the interesting thing from a medical and scientific standpoint remember that the data on face coverings or masks protecting you was done in a lab right that's why we say in a hospital setting we put masks on sick people with a different kind of mask on health care workers but there's a big difference between scientific research done in a lab setting and those done in a real life setting so we're seeing one of major Boston Medical Center has dropped the rate of its staff cases of covert nineteen dramatically once they instituted a policy where everyone staff patients and visitors started wearing masks so we'll see how it plays out in our country Dr Ashton thank you and when we come back the army of volunteers in one city working hard to help frontline heroes shine these special continues after this about half of all men will experience ET or PT fact both E. 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E. are highly treatable fact a safe effective treatment is just a call away at priority men's Medical Center our highly skilled doctors guarantee results on your first visit or there's no charge listen to a specialist in men's health I'm doctor Schwartz if I Agra Cialis or Levitra have let you down the treatment that priority men's Medical Center work immediately regardless of your age or medical history you'll receive custom blended medication designed just for you they're safe and effective with no pain and no surgery patients are lasting thirty sixty and ninety minutes or longer and best of all treatments are affordable ma'am if you want to last longer in the bedroom schedule a private consultation with the experienced physicians at priority men's Medical Center four oh four six two zero one nine five nine four oh four six two zero one nine five nine that's four oh four six two zero one nine five nine everything you know about buying and owning your new air conditioning system Josh change cool ray is breaking the rules and changing the game by your new high efficiency carrier system from call ray and you'll never pay for any repair again ever this is not a lease offer you own your system I'm Dave Baker from WSP home fix it show this new offer from Korean carrier is the ultimate game changer in the heating and air business call raise lifetime parts and labor warranty includes every part all the labor even service call fees Korean carrier zero repair costs for life there's just no safer way to own your new heating and cooling system get Cory's lifetime parts and labor warranty break the rules change the game never pay to repair your system again Korean carriers turn to the experts this is rob Babin president and general manager of **** media group radio stations there are so many people from the Atlanta region we're committed to keeping all the same and they deserve our gratitude thank you all the first responders healthcare professionals and so many others providing essential services I also wanted a few seconds to think those local media especially the ninety five point five W. S. B. at **** media group team we're deeply committed and work very hard to provide timely and relevant information helping to keep the public safe informed I couldn't be prouder of the resilience and efforts of our team at ninety five point five WSP thank you for listening and please support our advertisers will make our services possible we are stronger together when I every single knows that darkest moment mission is a time when you need to be called this is your objective you must be called you must be complied with all your technical skills or physical power and your inner strength must be brought to bear this is your objective

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The Batavia

Casefile True Crime

04:37 min | 2 years ago

The Batavia

"As the Dutch republic its wealth and power flourished through the importing of goods from overseas with huge ships sent to Asia and Africa to bring back textiles tease grains and spices popular proverb among the Dutch during this period. Was Jason. Cross these good but trade is bet on the Dutch east India company known in its homeland as the VOC was a charted company established to coordinate trade in India and other countries throughout Southeast Asia. Monopolizing all trade to the aced at boasted tens of thousands of employees and it's I- Improv at army ships operating under its Lawson's were enormous vessels called aced. India man built to carry large amounts of cargo as well as passengers and equipped with cannons and guns in case pirates launched an attack due to this ause white. They ships moved slowly at an average speed of five knots. Paraly- and typically took eight months to complete a voyage in sixteen twenty eight the VOC commissioned the construction of an expensive new flagship to travel to the company's major tried settlement of Batavia located in. What is today the city of Jakarta in Java Indonesia? Nine after its destination the Batavia was a grand vessel. That was built in just six months at the exorbitant. Cost of one hundred thousand guilders more than four point five million Australian dollars in today's currency the approximately fifty five made it till and fifty-six made a long ship was made of Oak and featured four decks three mosques and thirty guns and had the capacity to carry six hundred tons of supplies. That's up works. Were painted Pale. Green with gold and red detailing and its figurehead. A wooden carving positioned at the bow was a lion leaping upwards in late October sixteen. Twenty eight that Batavia set sail from Amsterdam with a fleet of seven other ships carrying three hundred and forty one people he ranged from bay. Oc officials sailors and soldiers to relatively well off passengers. Traveling with their families. A number of young passengers were cabin-boys ranging from children to adolescence. Who were employed on the ship to white on others? The Batavia was also packed with valuable cargo including stern to build factories with silverware jewels and auctioning coins. That would amount to almost forty one million Australian dollars in today's currency life on the ship was harsh perilous and unpleasant sleeping. Orders were krant and barrels of drinking. Water were contaminated with worms dowding outbreaks of infectious into nutritional deficiency diseases were common resulting in the deaths of ten passengers. Twenty seven year. Old Passenger. Lucretia yawns was traveling from her home city of Amsterdam to be reunited with her husband. Hey was employee of the visa and had left the work in the company's Batavia settlements several years Zolia shortly after he's departure the couple's three young children who contracted a disease and dodd. It was unusual for merchants waft to follow her husband. Diva's but Lucretia was heartbroken and divinely. She was born into wealth and occupied highest social status resulting in her traveling on the Batavia with a maid and having her own. Private Cabin Lucretia. Who was regarded as exceptionally beautiful consistently rebuffed unwanted attention from a number of men the long voyage on the evening of May. Fourteen Lucretia was preparing to retire for the night as she made her way back to her sleeping quarters. She was confronted by eight men wearing masks. Though she couldn't see their faces they spoke to one another and she heard their voices demoss to silence drag to Lucretia to a quiet corner on the ship's deck with Rached under her skirt to grope her and smeared her face legs and genitals with TA and Dynamo. Dong the assault was IVA in a matter

Batavia Lucretia India Dutch East India Company VOC Southeast Asia Asia Amsterdam Lawson Jason Deficiency Diseases Africa Jakarta OC Paraly Assault Rached TA Java Indonesia Zolia
52-Year-Old Former Navy SEAL James Hatch On His First Semester At Yale

All Things Considered

08:03 min | 2 years ago

52-Year-Old Former Navy SEAL James Hatch On His First Semester At Yale

"Back in September on the show we introduced you to James hatch ex navy seal wounded badly in combat in Afghanistan and now at the age of fifty two a college freshman at Yale an experience that hatch told me can feel pretty terrifying my first class I was ten minutes into it it was a seminar class I'm sitting there was essentially you know thirteen other teenagers an instructor who I'm I'm probably the same age maybe a little older than my instructor and I thought man I I really have no business being here but then you know things progressed and I I can actually contribute well with the first semester it now behind him hatch sat down and wrote an essay for medium titled my semester with the snow flakes so we have called James hatch back to check in on how it's all going and James it is great to hear your voice again how how is it going man thanks thanks for having me back it's going really well it's shocking and very rewarding and I feel quite fortunate that you finish the first semester right exams now behind you yeah I mean I did finish it I have a couple of grades and I'm still waiting on so we'll see we'll see how well I finished what were your expectations of what students at Yale would be like and and how accurate were those expectations couldn't like paint the whole place with a brush but was worried about is that there would be people who would be threatened or offended by me being there you know having been spent you know sometime in combat and serve my country for over twenty five years and I was worried that there be people that would say Hey man we don't want you here you were worried about maybe some anti military viewpoints yeah yeah for sure especially somebody like me you know like I wasn't you know I wasn't going overseas and trying to help the locals by doing research are you not my job was to go out and capture and kill bad guys you know I just I was worried that people would you know kind of reject my presence there in that environment not that is not been my experience you wrote in this essay about one young woman who you're in class with you who came out to you after class one day and want to talk about her granddad yeah yeah tell me tell me a story she's an exceptional young woman even among exceptional people she's just a lot of energy and being class so there's great she's struck and later but at any rate she grab me after class and said Hey you know I'm really glad to be here with you my grandfather was here at Yale in World War two started and he went off and flew airplanes for the navy flew in the Pacific and came home after the war came back to Yale and he couldn't finish he he locked himself in his dorm and and you drank a lot and he had to leave she said so I feel like I'm kind of Phoenician for him and I'm here sorry and I'm here with you you know our veterans so I was really really compelling you know the connection between you know me and this guy who flew airplanes in the Pacific in the second World War through this young woman who's just a you know just a Dynamo you know it's it was amazing he had I guess maybe what we would describe today's PTSD after fine yeah I mean I'm certainly not capable of diagnosis or I'd be willing to bet that he struggled with things that happen when using you know combat you know for sure note for people who didn't her earlier conversation you if you find out for yourself you came back and and struggled with alcohol and drugs and trying to re acclimate after after combat that's true I did yeah I mentioned the the essay that you wrote reflecting on how this first semester has gone and that the title that you gave it is my semester with the snow flakes the snow flake reference being to the stereo type of superb liberal super young people who melt on contact with with real life and society and it sounds like you haven't you haven't met so many of them I have not I have not and you know I said this is not there these kids don't think they're any more special than any other eighteen to twenty two year okay and I mean I remember when I was that age and I thought the world revolved around me and the difference is these guys work a lot harder to eighteen than I did at least academically nose in the military and you know that was tough this is tough to and these guys are there really in it there and hard it's really it's really neat to watch I call myself a snowflake now it's just it's just funny you know we talked before about what you were hoping some of those teenagers who you're in class with no might learn from you and your life experience are their stories you tell me about kind of how that has been a two way street I think one day actually philosophy class I said something just cut off the cuff that really I think made an impact on a lot of people and I said you know in combat your your greatest fear isn't that you're going to die your greatest fear is that you're going to do something wrong and it's gonna let down your team and it might get somebody else her killed and that that's the at the forefront of your mind and I think it's instructive was regarded teams and especially when the circumstances are high in in the professor even mention that in the semester we were kind of going on the room talking about things that impacted us and he brought that up he said that's not something I would have ever known eight it sounds as though in a way you're making the case that there maybe should be more fifty two year old tattooed combat veterans wandering around campus is sharing a very different perspective on what you know starting in what you're reading yeah I think I would agree with that I think but further I think it's important have different lives different experiences from as many angles as you can get on and in that environment there has to be a place where you can be uncomfortable hearing things that you disagree with or thinking about and talking about difficult subjects that are affecting our culture there has to be a place where you can do that in order for things to improve you know just screaming at each other across you know Twitter feeds or you know Facebook at it's just not gonna solve anything sitting down in a room with people and dumping these ideas out from these ancient texts you know I think that's the great gift of the university and I think we're fortunate serve you know having veterans area I think it's important when we are when we talked back in September you were on your way to literature class and you were reading the Iliad and it was really pissing you off your words and I forget to follow openers did you did you really I mean did you use with former Brady I did I really did I just didn't get it you were struggling with the way that Homer top rates about honor and saying that they are willing right and I see it is a little more a little less shiny is what it was being painted in the first part at least my grasp of the first part of the elite but as we got going and as the professor started you know discussing kind of how things should be read it was clear that yeah I think everybody ought to be deleted especially if you wanna grow up and not be in the military and if you want to be in politics and make decisions about sin and other people's kids to war he probably got to read the Iliad and why but you know all of the questions on the craziness all of the madness that goes along with that kind of stuff it's difficult to translate and I don't know who Homer was I don't think anybody else does but I think he had a pretty good idea of all the madness that goes along with it and you know we used to joke about in these great flowery working on yeah and you know you talk to the guys that were fighting and those guys can eat honor they're hungry you know what I mean their fight for different reasons so I feel like it covered all the bases really when I got to the end of it well James hatch it's been great to

Afghanistan Yale James Hatch
Earth's Magnetic Field Initiates Pole Flip Many Millennia Before The Switch

60-Second Science

02:31 min | 2 years ago

Earth's Magnetic Field Initiates Pole Flip Many Millennia Before The Switch

"North North and South Pole is far from fixed in fact the field is quite active sometimes weakens and even reverses causing earth polarity to switch reversals. Don't happen very often though only about every one hundred thousand two million years that's part of why this phenomenon has largely remained a mystery for scientists scientists however a recent study may help researchers better understand how long and how complicated. Earth's magnetic field reversals really are. You're the last polarity reversal took place some seven hundred seventy thousand years ago and a new study researchers use a lava flow records along with sedimentary an Antarctic ice core data to examine that event they found that the reversal took about as long as many scientists previously believed it did just a few thousand years but the researchers also examined the period prior to that final reversal process and they discovered that a lot was happening with earth. I know field thousands of years beforehand. There's clear evidence from the volcanic rocks of a major excursion happening at about seven hundred ninety five five thousand years ago. Brad Singer do scientists at the University of Wisconsin Madison who led the study that was followed by another excursion which is the unexpected ended finding of this study at about seven hundred eighty four thousand the two excursions that we've discovered in the lava record in our seed in some of the sedimentary records are a sign that the Dynamo was beginning to undergo the reversal process twenty thousand years earlier than the final reversal took place so our arguments would be that the rehearsal gristle process is complicated long lived and it gets underway gets initiated well before the final reversal takes place all this activity deep prior to the final reversal vital for our grasp of the process. The ultimate goal here is we want to understand what drives reversals what HAPP- what really happens in the Dynamo. Oh and if you just start and look at this short period right around the reversal you're missing all this unusual behavior that happens in thousands of years prior prior to that we need to know of singers findings hold true for magnetic field reversals in general alterations in the field will mess with critical human systems as such as the GPS satellites that help us navigate fortunately whenever the next reversal happens. It looks like we'll have plenty of time to prepare. Thanks for listening

South Pole Brad Singer University Of Wisconsin Seven Hundred Ninety Five Five One Hundred Thousand Two Milli Seven Hundred Seventy Thousand Twenty Thousand Years Thousand Years
On This Day in History: Pearl Street Station Began Generating Electricity

This Day in History Class

04:46 min | 2 years ago

On This Day in History: Pearl Street Station Began Generating Electricity

"I'm eve and welcome to this day in history class a show that uncovers a little bit more about history every day. Today is september fourth twenty nineteen <music>. The day was september fourth eighteen eighty two pearl street station. The first commercial central power plant in the united states started generating electricity building on the work of other inventors. Turn edison created an incandescent lighting system. He had already constructed experimental power installations. He used a dynamo now. No known as a generator to deliver power to each of these small installations but incandescent lighting in homes and endorse was becoming more popular and a substantial source of power was needed in eighteen eighty the same here. He received the patent for his incandescent lamp. Thomas edison established tablet the edison electric illuminating company of new york to build power stations in new york city edison decided to build the first permanent central power power stations for supplying incandescent lighting in new york's financial district in lower manhattan construction of the station began in eighteen eighty one the mechanical and electrical part of the plant was at two fifty seven pearl street since the building was constructed for commercial use. The structure had to be strengthened. Thanks to hold all of the necessary equipment. The flooring was replaced with a floor of girders supported by columns. The building used for storage ridge. Sleeping and offices was at two fifty-five pearl streets. Each building has four floors edison chose this location because it provided a good mix of commercial and residential business and was home to many major newspapers. It was also close to the western union telegraph telegraphy company in city hall the company paid around three hundred thousand dollars to buy the properties and built the station and distribution system constructing the network of wires and conduits that delivered energy to customers was one of the most expensive parts of the project after administrative expenses canvassing and patent license fees the cost came to about five hundred thousand dollars or two hundred and i'm forty horsepower babcock wilcox boilers were in the basement of two fifty seven pearl street fix engine and dynamo assemblies were on the floor above that the dynamos were driven by reciprocating steam engines supplied by coal fired boilers each assembly wait about about thirty tons and was raided for around twelve hundred lance. The third floor housed wooden frame wrapped with copper wire resistances that were used used for manually regulating the dynamo fields. The fourth floor was home to a thousand lamps that were used to test dynamos that needed inspection or repair. The first engine and generator assembly was tested on july fifth eighteen eighty two the station went into service on september fourth pearl street street station used direct current which is an electric current that flows in one direction with alternating current on the other hand. The electric current changes direction periodically. Atakli customers were not charged for current until eighteen eighty three after the system for accurately recording the flow of current proven reliable so the first bill was to antonia brass and copper company for fifty dollars and forty four six the new york times officers were one of edison's since first customers pearl street station did not become profitable until eighteen eighty four other direct current low-voltage central station electric systems were later built around new york city in january of eighteen ninety. A fire destroyed some of the station but it was back up up and running not long after and stayed in operation until eighteen ninety four though edison defended the use of direct current. The rest of the world was gravitating toward alternating current. Either tom pearl street station shutdown. Other power plants have been designed to service larger areas edison sold the buildings and they were later torn down. I'm jeff code in. Hopefully you know a little more about history today you yesterday saturday.

Pearl Street Station Thomas Edison New York Edison Tom Pearl United States New York Times City Hall Atakli Three Hundred Thousand Dollars Five Hundred Thousand Dollars Forty Horsepower Fifty Dollars Thirty Tons
Earth's Last Magnetic Pole Flip Happened Much More Slowly Than Previously Thought

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

06:33 min | 2 years ago

Earth's Last Magnetic Pole Flip Happened Much More Slowly Than Previously Thought

"Any study suggests earth's magnetic poles may take far longer to flip than previously. I thought a new analysis reported in the journal science advances shows. The process may take up to twenty two thousand years to complete. That's more than twice as long as the nine thousand years. He's previously estimated this growing evidence that earth's magnetic poles are about to flip the north magnetic pole will become south and the south magnetic pole will become north last time. This happened with some seven hundred and seventy thousand years ago when it does happen. It'll be the first magnetic field polarity reversal in modern times times and that raises some serious questions about how today's technology with coq with the change to us me mortals on the surface of this revolving planet around the sun first magnetic field seemed steady and true reliable enough to navigate by your largely hidden from daily life less your pilot. The magnetic field drifts waxes awesome wayne's constantly when i'm flying one of the first things i do when i get in the cockpit of an aircraft is to readjust the cockpits compass to the latest readings for true north both for years. The magnetic north pole was wandering around pats of northern canada but more recently it's been careering towards siberia which recently forced the global positioning positioning system which underlies old model navigation updated software sooner than expected to account for the shift on average the magnetic pole shifts and reverses versus. That's polarity roughly every hundred and fifty thousand years or so that with the last one occurring some seven hundred and seventy thousand years ago with long jude for the knicks flip and there are some early signs that a possible paul reversal may be about to occur the accelerating movement of the north magnetic pole is one sign another other is something known as the south atlantic anomaly a weed pad of the south atlantic ocean between brazil and africa compass needles go nuts pointing south instead of north north and it's not just compass needles affected the south atlantic anomaly region causes earth ina van allen radiation belt to move closer to the earth surface dipping down onto just two hundred kilometers in altitude this results in an increase flocks of energetic particles in this region exposing orbiting spacecraft the high than usual levels of radiation listen effect the international space station required extra shielding just deal with this problem nashes reported that modern laptops of crushed aboard space shuttle flights as they a pass through the anomaly and the hubble space telescope doesn't do any observations while it's passing through the anomaly whether or not the south atlantic anomaly really does mean a polls colds are about the flip polarity is yet to be saying the problem is scientists have only a very limited understanding as to exactly why the film reversals occur or how they happen now new research by university of wisconsin madison geologist brad singer suggests the most recent short reversal seven hundred and seventy thousand years ago took at least twenty the two thousand years to complete that several times longer than previously thought and the results further color the question some controversial findings that some polar reversals could occur within inhuman lifetime than you analysis is based on advances in measurement capabilities at a global survey of lava flows ocean sediment at arctic ice coast rose providing a more detailed look at a turbulent time for earth's magnetic field of a millennia. The planet's magnetic food weakened partly shifted stabilized the game and then finally reversed for good to the orientation we know today. The new results provide a clearer m._o. Nuanced picture of reversals at a time when some scientists believe we may maybe experiencing the early stages of paul reversal and you other researchers dispute the very notion of a present day. Paul reversal singer says unless you have the complete accurate accurate in high resolution record of water filled reversal really's like it would be difficult to discuss the mechanics of generating one. We know that earth's magnetic field is produced by the planet's molten alton liquid metallic out of core as it spins around the solid. I and inigo generating powerful electromagnetic currents. What's coda jet dynamo this year dynamic in a creative field. That's most stable going through roughly the geographic north and south poles but the field shifts in weakened significantly during reversals. We know this because <unk> asni rocks formed typically other volcanic lava flows or a sediments being deposited on the sea floor they leave a record the magnetic field the time they were created and geologists can survey this global record piecing together. The history of magnetic fields going back millions of years. Their record is clearest for the most recent reversal that one seven hundred seventy thousand years ago for the current analysis singer and colleagues looked at lava flows from chile to haiti hawaii the caribbean and the canary islands and they collected samples from these latter flows of several field seasons lava flows are ideal records of the magnetic field they have lots of iron bearing ring minerals and as cool and solidify they lock in the direction of the planet's magnetic field the research is combined magnetic field readings and radio acid type dating samples from seven lava flow sequences to recreate the magnetic field over a span of seventy thousand years centered on las reversal they found the final reverse was quite quick by geological standards less than four thousand years but it had been preceded by an extended period of instability included excursions which are temporary partial reversals the polls stretching back another eighteen thousand years. That's more than twice as long as suggested by other studies which claimed reversals wrap up within about nine thousand years the lava flow the data was corroborated by magnetic readings from the seafloor which provided more continuous but less precise source of data than lab iraq's single and colleagues also used at arctic ice core samples apples to track the deposition of beryllium which is produced by cosmic radiation colliding with molecules in the atmosphere. You say when the magnetic reversing weakens allowing more radiation in from space to hit the atmosphere producing more beryllium since humanity began recording the strength of the earth's magnetic field. It's actually decrease in strength by about five percent century century and his records like singing shows. A weakening field seems to be a precursor to an eventual field reversal although it's far from clear that a reversal is imminent reversing planetary magnetic food would significantly affect navigation as well as satellite and terrestrial communications but if the current studies right it means society would have many generations to adapt to what would be a lengthy period of magnetic instability stewart gary. You're

Paul South Atlantic Knicks Canada Wayne Siberia Brazil Caribbean Brad Singer Geologist University Of Wisconsin Madiso Chile Iraq Haiti Seventy Thousand Years Nine Thousand Years One Seven Hundred Seventy Thou Twenty Two Thousand Years Eighteen Thousand Years Two Hundred Kilometers
Wilmer Cabrera, Davey And Matt Jordan discussed on ExtraTime

ExtraTime

06:14 min | 3 years ago

Wilmer Cabrera, Davey And Matt Jordan discussed on ExtraTime

"Let's talk about women. Cabrera in the dynamo wilmer the fourth with coach to lose his job this season houston. They've struggled. They lost their last four to eleven and one in the last fourteen ten losses in their last twelve. That's not good made. The playoffs in two thousand seventeen when you took over did not make the playoffs last year but they didn't win u._s. Open cup looks like they will not make the playoffs this year they're six point out and there are fading and wilmer is no longer the head coach as a result thirty to thirty nine and twenty two is his record as the head coach of the dynamo and now to help us understand the decision is matt jordan the general general manager of the club. It's our a._t. And t. call to the field matt. How's it going. Hey guys. I'm doing andrew david charlie susannah. Thank you very much rob me on. I appreciate it. We appreciate russia you coming on and remembering everyone's name well done well done. Let's dive right in here. Of course the big news. Wilmer cabrera dismisses the head coach of the dynamo. Why why let wilmer go and why now yeah look. It was a very difficult decision. We have as a club that tremendous amount of respect and appreciation tation for everything the wilmer has done in the last two and a half years is the head coach of of the dynamo <hes> really coming off his last road trip <hes> in communication with our ownership group our board <hes> we collectively felt that it was the the right time to make this decision <hes> and really now how with with this being a challenging week with change comes opportunity so now the focus has shifted to supporting davey and the south the players as they prepare for the game this weekend against colorado. We know that the results especially recently we're not there. Is this strictly strictly results. Excuse me is there a coaching issue the way that you guys were getting x._y._z. out of your talent. Is it a roster problem well. What was the big issue here that led to wilmer just not getting what he needed to stay on the job. Well you know i think that you know wilmer the whole staff of i've been putting a lot of work into things <hes> in looking at really from the end of made the beginning of june we dropped eleven of fourteen games in m._l._s. play and we were three twelve and two in all competitions and and you know looking at everything holistically you know we we have the best start in club history this year <hes> and and we're off to a good start. Obviously we had a tough off last couple of months but i don't think anybody feels that <hes> the results. The last couple of months is a reflection of the quality of the roster. You know it's it's been challenging and there's a lot of factors. There's that play into this you know and so <hes> you know and obviously you had you know the the dog days of summer and the m._l._s. and everything that you guys guys no real well <hes> but really collectively felt that this was the right time to texas decision and and we wish wilmer nothing but the best moving forward so matt that tell us where are you at in the interview process right now for the next coach has begun already. Yeah well really once once you. You know any change like that occurs. I mean you're you know everybody is reaching out to your phone's blowing up and and we've had a tremendous amount of interest in that position i i think the key at the moment is is that we want to focus you know you you really wanna make sure that the group is has all the communication necessary a and and the coaches and davey in particular how to support to prepare for the weekend i think for us what's important is we're not going to rush into any decisions. We're not gonna make any reactionary harry decisions. We're gonna take our time. We're going to do our due diligence and it's going to be a very detailed process. You know we have a lot of you know key characteristics. We're we're gonna keep in mind that we're gonna evaluate as we're going through this process. You mentioned the due diligence. What have you learned from the past processes. You've been a part of hiring wilmer. Hiring is up in montreal as well and what are those characteristics. You're looking for well. I think the most important thing is that you have to find a head coach that that fits within the strategic plan of the club and within your within our core values that just strong leader <hes> and for us also understands understands our structures. You know we obviously we put a lot of work in our kademi are u._s. L. setup and a first team you know so i think a big part of this and we we believe big part of this is also the next candidate is committed to continuing to build on the infrastructure. That's in place and shows that level of commitment to to build build a culture of development. Those are the key factors that that were were focusing on in this process and and we'll take our time <hes> you know we're we're very fortunate that davey the <hes> you know is someone is very well respected in the locker room and amongst the staff and with the club and he's he's ready to do whatever possible all the help support. The club meetings very hard working. He's very committed got strong strong values <hes> and most importantly. He's got a growth mindset <hes> so i think i think that you know he's he's stepped right in you know and and is doing everything catalog with his staff and our support shop to help the guys prepare for this weekend matt. Is there so anyway that davy arnaud could win this job if he's to guide them to the playoffs. After this rough start <hes> you know towards the middle of the season. Could he's still win this job yet. Charlie no davey for sure is gonna be inconsideration for for the job <hes> you know and while we're we're doing and we're doing a very detailed search as well. <hes> and i think you know we feel we feel. We've got a good roster. I mean this is the same roster that had the best start in club history the street and i'd argue we were one of the most aggressive teams in the summer transfer window with the trades of christian ramirez nico hanson and the transfer of opposed jose bislama who's up and coming with the knossos team so we're not sitting back and and resting on anything you know we got a good group. We've got a good team. <hes> and these new editions we feel will give us a boost to make a good push and yeah davey will will be considered for the role as well davies a certain kind of candidate a guy from within the

Wilmer Cabrera Davey Matt Jordan Andrew David Charlie Susannah Davy Arnaud Houston Russia Montreal General Manager Nico Hanson T. Texas Colorado Jose
"dynamos" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"dynamos" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Brought not only zookeeper from the Moscow zoo, but a bunch of. A train dynamos there. And they one Red Army general managed to put, basically it was like a baby's bottle filled with champagne for one of the train bears, then managed to get drunk and follow the guests and everything else. So that was kind of a high bar for subsequent entertainment. I replicate that in your tenure but you did you did host a very young, Senator Obama does this was a week gift. I got there. So shortly after this meeting with Putin, I described so then Senator Obama came with stick Lugar. Revered, Senator from Indiana who recently passed away. In Louisville was clearly grooming, Barack Obama to be his new Sam Nunn of his new partner on a lot of arms control issues and. You know, I remember being struck first by Senator Obama's attentiveness to my daughters who are very young, then they were in middle school, his daughters were a little younger than that. But he knew very much the experience of taking young Kip himself moving to new places around the world. And he was totally unpretentious at that time. I don't know what his expectations were running for president. But he knew anything about Russia, direct by his foreign policy knowledge, nobody was quite curious, and he was quite interested. He wanted to talk about lots of other things. We spent a lot of time must go traffic is pretty bad. So a lot of time in the car talking about Iraq, two thousand three he was quite interested in the George H W Bush foreign policy with Baker Scowcroft and.

Senator Obama Senator Kip Moscow zoo Red Army Sam Nunn Putin Baker Scowcroft Louisville George H W Bush Indiana Iraq president Russia partner
"dynamos" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"dynamos" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"One hundred some polls are split down. Maybe ten goes to a ten goes to be ten goes to see and then the injustice take care of doing the compression. So it it's getting complicated of this part. That's two parts of the distributor is responsible for receiving the samples and figuring out which ingested they go to distributors completely stateless, the ingest or is billing up time series in memory. So it's it's not stateless. It's it's important that we talked to the right one each time. So it's built the each gesture is building up time series data in memory, and then periodically batching it out into compressed loads. Right, right. We typically build a few hours into what we call a chunk and ship that off to the store that that'd be like, a Cassandra dynamo DB like I mentioned earlier, and these compressed chunks. These are. Did they have some readable metadata associated with them? Yeah. The meta data's is essentially all the name of the metric, and all the labels all the label names and values, and so the chunks get stored in a database, like Casandra, dynamo DB or big table. So these are the dynamos style masterless, eventually consistent databases, no sequel databases. Why is this class of database of good fit for the cortex workloads? It's question fundamentally because again, it's horizontally, scalable, you can continue adding capacity in the data store, you know, not not have a limit on the size of your database. There's no. Coordination between different parts of the database. So yeah, that's it fits really well. We we throw these chunks the store. I mean, we've cloud we're we're storing many thousands of second of chunks where each chunk several hours of data in it. And it it just just works. Now. It's so these chunks are pretty big. So it doesn't actually it doesn't matter. If they're well how how do you need to arrange the chunks in the database? I mean, do you because if you have user issues a query to it, you know, I had imagined the user wants to know everything that happened along the span of time. So you would wanna know you'd wanna have these events in or I should say these time series samples in the database arranged in some fashion that you could query any time span, the you would want to and, but if you're to this we have we do that in a few ways. I mean, the the first thing we do is divide the time. In two buckets, which are by default one day. So we in some sense, we actually arranged the database dozens of one day databases. So so we start with what is the time span you're trying to look at and that'll give you a day or give you multiple days. I will go look there in the in the database, we build an index. It's special kind of index on inverted index but fundamentally that lets us go to the right set of data. Once we got the the right day. We go to the right name of the metric like HDTV response time, I used as an example earlier generally in impromptu, all your skin about one metric at a time. And that one metric will have maybe tens of thousands of time series on that day. So you might have narrowed that down you might have asked about you might have given the label for one service that gives us a narrowing there. And the inverted index lets us go straight to the set of time series that match. That label. So now, we have a set of time series on what's in the index at that point is a set of of chunk ideas. So the chunks themselves are pretty much Paik. And you can you can as an option in cortex, you can store the chunks in another kind of store like S three like a which is sort of a bucket style..

dynamos one day