36 Burst results for "Dylan"

Oilers score 4 times in third period to defeat Rangers

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 11 hrs ago

Oilers score 4 times in third period to defeat Rangers

"The Edmonton oil is wiped out a three to nothing deficit with four unanswered third period goals to beat the rangers four to three. Leon draisaitl on the power play scored the game winner with two O two remaining. We got to start winning some games consistently and do it the right way. So I thought that third period that we had was a great step. Dylan Holloway's first NHL goal tied it to three, Evan Bouchard scored Edmonton's first two goals in the four goal third period against rangers goalie Igor sherkin. Chris kreider did score his tenth for the rangers. Mike mancuso, New York

Leon Draisaitl Edmonton Rangers Dylan Holloway Evan Bouchard NHL Igor Sherkin Chris Kreider Mike Mancuso New York
Fresh update on "dylan" discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "dylan" discussed on AP News Radio

" The Edmonton oil is wiped out a three to nothing deficit with four unanswered third period goals to beat the rangers four to three. Leon draisaitl on the power play scored the game winner with two O two remaining. We got to start winning some games consistently and do it the right way. So I thought that third period that we had was a great step. Dylan Holloway's first NHL goal tied it to three, Evan Bouchard scored Edmonton's first two goals in the four goal third period against rangers goalie Igor sherkin. Chris kreider did score his tenth for the rangers. Mike mancuso, New York

Leon Draisaitl Edmonton Rangers Dylan Holloway Evan Bouchard NHL Igor Sherkin Chris Kreider Mike Mancuso New York
Irving returns, Simmons scores 22 as Nets beat Grizzlies

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 6 d ago

Irving returns, Simmons scores 22 as Nets beat Grizzlies

"The nets were one 27 one 15 winners over the grizzlies and the return of Kyrie Irving The Brooklyn guard had 14 points in his return from a suspension You're so good to get this game out of the way And now we can move forward with the rest of the season Ben Simmons had his first 20 point game since the 2021 playoffs Finishing with 22 I know I can do I know him careful of And I'm not surprised Kevin Durant chipped in 26 points giving him at least 25 and all 17 games he's played this season The nets led by just three before opening the fourth quarter on an 18 5 spurt Dylan Brooks poured in 31 points for the grizzlies I'm Dave ferry

Brooklyn Guard Ben Simmons Kyrie Irving Nets Grizzlies Kevin Durant Dylan Brooks Dave Ferry
When Will Ryan Gosling Marry Eva Mendes?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:21 min | Last week

When Will Ryan Gosling Marry Eva Mendes?

"These two are very famous. Famously private, they've never revealed whether they're married or not. I don't get this kind of horse shit. What's the big deal? But the other day, Ava Mendes, who's now 48, went to Instagram, and I've been on Instagram. All she does is post pictures of clothes she wore for a certain event. She doesn't answer anybody's not that I wrote her. There's no way the writer back. She just posts pictures of clothes she wears. It's really like, are you in prison? What's going on? So she showed off a tattoo that might offer a clue about their relationship. It's in her inner wrist and it spells out de Gosling. DE Gosling. So in the Hispanic culture, married women often add their husbands last name to their own using deep, DE, which means of, you know, so Mendez might go by Eva Mendes de Gosling after marrying him. Who knows? We don't know. It's not the first time she's flashed this particular tattoo. She did it two years ago. Dylan September again. But it's very prominent in his most recent post. These two have been together since 2011. They met on the movie the place beyond the pines, good movie, really good movie.

Ava Mendes De Gosling Instagram Eva Mendes De Gosling Mendez Dylan
Verlander, Alcantara are unanimous Cy Young Award winners

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last week

Verlander, Alcantara are unanimous Cy Young Award winners

"Justin Verlander in sandy Alcantara are unanimous winners of the 2022 cyan awards Verlander is the 11th three time winner of the award after posting a major league best 1.75 ERA The Astros ace also led the AL with 18 wins and struck out 185 Alcatraz 6 complete games are the most of the majors since 2016 The Marlin standout had a 2.28 ERA while pitching a major league best 228 and two thirds innings for the NL club Atlantis max fried was second to Alcantara in the NL voting White Sox star Dylan cease finished second to Verlander I'm Dave fairy

Sandy Alcantara Justin Verlander Verlander Astros Max Fried AL NL Alcantara Dylan Cease White Sox Dave Fairy
Kari Lake: We've Got Bad Elections and We Need to Reform Them

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:50 min | Last week

Kari Lake: We've Got Bad Elections and We Need to Reform Them

"A can of warpath like they have never seen before and I can't wait. Well, guess what? Why don't we connect 3 million patriots to her right now? Carrie Lake are you there? I'm here, Sebastian. All right, so we need to we need some good news from the ground in Arizona. We had homie Dylan yesterday say the GOP was running things, but they ran out of stinking printer cartridges for the ballots. What is going on, Carrie? You know, it's just the same garbage. We've been dealing with since 2020. And we tried to sound the alarm. I've been talking about it since the 2020 election. And everyone, the press, the fake news, tries to destroy anybody who spoke up. Oh, no, it was a perfect election. Don't look here. No problems here. We've got that elections. And we need to reform them. And what happened on election day was inexcusable, they can call it and mistake and honest mistake it's ineptitude to a level that is unacceptable. And we will no longer accept this in Arizona. It's embarrassing. And it's disenfranchising voters, frankly, when more than a third of our polling places had equipment that didn't work, we've got a major problem. And so now what we're doing is we're waiting for Maricopa County to count votes and they're going molasses slow. And we have over 600,000 probably closer to 650,000 ballots left to be counted. And of those closer to 400,000 are ballots that people had as mail in ballots, they walked them in on election day. They didn't want to put them in the Dropbox. They didn't want to put them on the mailbox. They walked them in. We believe we're going to get the major chunk of those votes, but they are not counting them yet, then slow walking this. And the

Carrie Lake Arizona Patriots Sebastian Dylan GOP Carrie Maricopa County Dropbox
 Svechnikov lifts Hurricanes over Capitals 3-2 in shootout

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 3 weeks ago

Svechnikov lifts Hurricanes over Capitals 3-2 in shootout

"Andre svechnikov scored the shootout winner as the Carolina hurricanes beat the visiting Washington capitals three to two Trailing one nothing after the first period Dylan Strowman and Alex Ovechkin score consecutive goals to get the capitals a two one lead before svechnikov scored at 1542 of the second to tie the game The game saw ten total power plays which hurricanes goalie Frederick Anderson said throughout the rhythm of the game They didn't really fire a lot of easy ones They were battling for their chances but obviously they got something on their power players Darcy Kemper made 33 saves for Washington Dennis Cox probably North Carolina

Andre Svechnikov Dylan Strowman Alex Ovechkin Svechnikov Carolina Hurricanes Washington Capitals Frederick Anderson Darcy Kemper Dennis Cox Washington North Carolina
Experts Alarmed by Trans TikTok Star's Popularity Bump

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:22 min | Last month

Experts Alarmed by Trans TikTok Star's Popularity Bump

"Experts alarmed by trans TikTok star Dylan Mulvaney's fan base bump. Child care experts are expressing alarm over transgender TikToker Dylan Mulvaney's popularity, bump. After her White House debut, saying social media is driving a spike in teens seeking sex change procedures. Why do you think that there is this vast increase in something that was virtually unknown just a few years ago? Do you think it's because they are more young people in touch with their true self? I'm really not a boy. I'm really not a girl. I would like my genitalia cut off. I would like my breast cut off. You think this is normal? You think this is healthy? What do you think this is driven? By a lost societies, social media. Specifically, the left. Which ruins everything it touches, including young people. Clinician same Mulvaney sit down time with president Joe Biden has raised the social media sensations profile, extending her reach and likely influencing teenage fans who may themselves be questioning their own gender identity.

Dylan Mulvaney Trans Tiktok White House President Joe Biden Mulvaney
Dylan Mulvaney Wants to 'Normalize the Bulge' to Your Children

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:52 min | Last month

Dylan Mulvaney Wants to 'Normalize the Bulge' to Your Children

"Cut number one. Day 74 being a girl, round of applause for the makeup, and I wore this outfit shopping today. And I thought that these might be my new shopping shorts, but I was walking around in everyone was staring, and I was like, oh, okay, what's going on? And they were all staring directly at my crotch. And I went, oh, I forgot that my crotch doesn't look like other women's crotches. Because you're a dude. His mind doesn't look like a little Barbie pocket. And I thought, okay, Dylan, you have some options here. Number one, you can stop wearing clothes that fit like this. And in just fine looser fitting items. Number two, I can do a talk, which is going to have to be a whole other video, but it's very painful and involved about, or number three, I just normalize it, and I wear clothes like this, and we all just normalize women having bulges sometimes, 'cause we're coming up on bikini season, baby, and you might see a bulge or two. So lies the bulge, we are normalizing the women can have bulges and that's okay. We're not gonna stare at their crotches while they're wearing their little shopping shores at the mall. I know the country's gone to hell in a hand basket. I get it, folks. I get it. But here we are, and you have to wonder the greatest generation, the greatest generation. Did they ever imagine that one day, the great grandchildren of that generation would be fighting a very different Battle of the Bulge? I mean, just think about that for a moment. There was a very important phrase that we need to pay attention to here. It's normalizing. This is what TikTok is all about. This is what your public school system is all about.

Dylan
Are Women Offended by Men Like Dylan Mulvaney?

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

02:00 min | Last month

Are Women Offended by Men Like Dylan Mulvaney?

"Told people yesterday about this guy. His name is Dylan Mulvaney, and he's on this road to becoming a woman. Which is basically he's making a mockery of I've never that's not how a woman behaves. No. He counts like every day he's a woman. I'm like do you do that? Do you wake up in the morning and you little bar lows, waking you up, licking you on the face? Oh God. The alarm's going off. Mister producers like honey. Take the dog out. Rise and shine. It's day 72 of being a woman now. No, I don't know what day I'm on. A lot more than 200, I can tell you that. You know, I'm wondering, grace, before we play this audio, I'm just curious to know if women are offended by these transgender people. These guys who think that being a woman is about wearing makeup and talking with a high pitched voice. Oh, I'm looking at me. I'm a woman. Todd you're a little too good at hear me roar. I mean real too good at that. Is that what it's really all about? I mean, and dressing flamboyantly and accentuating your parts. That's news to me, but I'm just wondering if women find that offensive, because that's what these transgender guys they're making a mockery of what it means to be a woman. I feel like they're like, oh, it's easy. Look at me. I became a woman, no big deal. So there is one specific well, there are several specific areas of the human anatomy that would qualify one to be a female. This is true. And so this guy Dylan Mulvaney, who's a popular person on the TikTok, and was invited, and this is why this is important. This moron was invited to The White House. He was invited to sit in the Oval Office and interview President Biden. Now, keep in mind, President Biden will not sit down in front of actual journalist,

Dylan Mulvaney Todd President Biden Oval Office White House
Update on St. Louis High School Shooting

The Officer Tatum Show

01:27 min | Last month

Update on St. Louis High School Shooting

"Some updates about the shooter, the article that I read was a little dated. There are some updates. So the 19 year old was identified. I'm not going to say his name. I hope he rests in, you know what? You know, back in the day we say rest and it started with a pee, but it's not peace. It sound like peace. Anyway, you know what I'm talking about. Rest in, you know what? Because and I don't feel sorry for him. I really don't. I mean, I'm a lead up to God to feel sorry for him. I'm glad he's dead. Going in there and killing and shooting people like that. I hope they come and kill you. Can I be honest? You know, I was, I mean, I say not crazy and give me fire. But I don't have mercy for people like this. And maybe because I was a cop, I know how to turn the switch in a switch get turned and you go and kill mode. If I was responding to this call, I would be eagerly anticipating showing up on a scene in eliminating this person as a threat. Nobody should have to be in fear with a gun yielding individual that's hell bent on killing people for no reason. No one should live in that type of fear. And no one deserves to put people in that fear. And that's what a good guys come in because they put you out of your misery, so everybody else can be peaceful. Because you two stupid to act like you got sins.

Three Killed at St. Louis High School, Officers Kill Suspect

The Officer Tatum Show

01:30 min | Last month

Three Killed at St. Louis High School, Officers Kill Suspect

"Earlier this morning, I believe it was earlier this morning. We had three killed in the St. Louis high school by a person who decide to be an active shooter. There's not a lot of information probably because it's a young person under age. The chief of St. Louis came out and made a statement said to the school was locked down, which bought time for school security officers to react. If you look at the article title and this is even a Fox News article title, it says, at least three were killed in St. Louis high school shooting suspect kielbasa security. I think that's a poor usage of the word. Is it security or is it police officers? Because according to the chief, it says about time for school, security, officers to react. Now, I don't know if he's talking about school resource officers. I don't know if he's talking about police or talking about school hit their own private security. In the woke wussification of America, I'm not shocked that the police department is even afraid to say that there's police officers who are heroic enough to kill a guy on campus after he was trying to murder every student in the school. However, thank God that some brave security officers are police officers responding to take care of the threat. Do I think we should ban guns because of the shooting? No, I don't. Because obviously, you got good guys with guns that take care of business. And what did they do that you already didn't do? And don't get mad at me. They actually lock the doors. The doors were locked.

St. Louis High School St. Louis Fox News Police Department America
The Big Lies of the Left

The Officer Tatum Show

01:36 min | Last month

The Big Lies of the Left

"Now let me play this clip from Joe Biden. I think it's clip number four. Let's play clip four from this interview with Joe Biden. Do you think states should have a right to ban gender affirming healthcare? I don't think any state or anybody should have the right to do that. As a moral question as legal question, I just think it's wrong. Of course you do. Do you understand the language sandwich and the nutrition that the Democrats use? Do you believe gender affirming, they say gender? Listen, no state blocks grown ups from doing this, right? No states by grown-ups, if you have grown, you can get hormones. You can get you can't get punitive 'cause you already passed puberty. Gender reaffirming surgery. You show me an adult, they can go get their stuff, cut and zip and fold it up. Show me an adult that can't go get that in any state in the United States of America. You can do whatever surgery you want as an adult. But what she's talking about, he's talking about is kids. Don't let them lie to you. They strategically then use the word kids. But they're talking about children because states like Florida and others are blocking states from allowing children to take puberty blockers and to be able to manipulate their genitalia while their children. States have banned that. Because it's destructive as damaging to the child.

Joe Biden United States Of America Florida
Trans Activist Interviews President Biden

The Officer Tatum Show

01:26 min | Last month

Trans Activist Interviews President Biden

"This food named Dylan Mulvaney was a biological male, is a transgender activist, right? I guess he's trying to be a trans. And he has an opportunity to interview a president of the United States of America. I want you to let that sink in. This fool has an opportunity to sit down and interview a president of the United States of America, with what credentials does this person have to be able to interview the president. All the women that he then stepped on to be able to sit in front of the president of the United States of America and do an interview. Because he on TikTok flashing his sack around, trying to the reason I say that is because he was in a video talking about his bulge because he's a man dressing like a girl and you know you can't tuck the stuff up. And so it's popping out and he's talking about it on television. Everywhere that people can see, this man is talking like this. And he sits down and interviews the president of the United States of America. And according to Dylan, he's been a girl for 221 days.

Dylan Mulvaney United States Of America Tiktok Dylan
It's on Us to Change This Country

The Officer Tatum Show

02:10 min | Last month

It's on Us to Change This Country

"One person can be changed by something you say. And that one person can change millions of people. Think about the person who woke me up. Think about it. Somebody woke me up. That's one person. And then I am now influencing millions of people. It only takes one person. It only takes one person for you to talk to. It's almost like the gospel of Jesus Christ. Jesus told us apostles go to the door knocking on preach the gospel if they turn on you. Dust your shoulders off. And walk to the next place. Don't waste your time with idiots. Who sit there and cry by Trump. He's a racist, just walked past that person. If auntie is like, Donald Trump is raised, don't even talk to auntie. Auntie is lost. Go to your cousin. Go to your neighbor. Go to your friend on the job. They say my pronouns or she and hers and his skip that person. Go to the person next to them that's reasonable, rational, and that may actually make a difference. I want us to go full throttle. Y'all going to hear me talk about this every single day to the election. And then I'm going to throw the election party and we're going to watch a red tsunami. But we want it to be a tsunami. We don't want to be a wave. We want to be a red Armageddon. We want to whip them so bad though, the world ends. That's how bad we want it to be. It's world changing. This is over. This is the Guinness Book of World Records. We don't want to just be mediocre. We don't want to just be status quo. We don't want to just run through them like they did under the Obama administration. When he lost, I don't know how many seats in the House and Senate. I want you to understand that Obama had a greater approval rating than Biden could ever dream of and he still lost the House and the Senate. By a ton of people to imagine what's going to happen to Joe Biden, but we need to put the nail in the coffin and make sure it happens, and there's no chance for them to come up for air, we need to outvote them, outperform them, out preach them, and we need to change this country.

Election Party Donald Trump Auntie Obama Administration Jesus Senate House Biden Barack Obama Joe Biden
Conservatives, It's Not Enough to Just Win

The Officer Tatum Show

01:27 min | Last month

Conservatives, It's Not Enough to Just Win

"I want us to understand this. And before I get to this break 'cause I know it's coming soon. We're winning, but winning isn't enough. We have to put our foot on the gas. It doesn't matter that we're up 30 to nothing. Because it ain't over to the fat lady scene. You put your foot on the gas, put your foot on the neck and we gotta go for it. Winning by 30 points isn't enough. We need to beat them 500 to zero. We need to beat them to oblivion. We need to vote them out of office with a recognized that they will never be in office again running on the principles in which they're running on. Bashing the church, bashing white folks, bashing Christians, you will never win another election. Pushing pedophilia on our kids, teaching CRT, raising gas prices being woken and woke, you will never get a position in this country again. We have to set an example. Especially here in Arizona. I don't care what you feel about Republicans aren't you vote Republican all the way down the ballot. You know why? Because the Democrats telling they people vote Democrat, we then a ballot. I don't care nothing about your feelings. We got a country to save. You vote Republican all the way down the ballot. Don't it's the easiest election you've ever done. It's the easiest way to tell your Friends to vote. How do you vote for the person that's Republican all the way down the ballot?

Arizona
Get Out and Vote

The Officer Tatum Show

01:32 min | Last month

Get Out and Vote

"It's time for us to be motivated, ladies and gentlemen. It is time for us to show up and show out. And I'm gonna spend the first few minutes talking about that because I think it's an incredibly important and invaluable. We are better than them, we're smarter than them, our ideas work better than theirs too. And we love our country. These people that were up against are complete nut jobs. They hate America, they want to push pedophilia. They want to push racism on our children, children. They are the scum of the earth. And the way in which state legislate or the way they vote for people who legislate. We can not parse words. We can not be nice. The time has come where we can not be politically correct. Our country is on the line. We will lose this beautiful place which we call home and which we call the land of the free, if we don't step up and we don't vote. Let me give you some pointers here. Nick, I need to turn the air up. Let me give you some pointers here. You need to vote in any way you can vote. I know that there's people that's been out here and they have been saying, do not mail in your ballots. Do not participate in early voting. Show up on election day. Well, let me give you some realistic common sense to put into the spectrum here. Don't wait to election day unless you absolutely have to.

America Nick
Why Is Joe Biden Meeting With the TikToker Behind 'Girlhood'?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:13 min | Last month

Why Is Joe Biden Meeting With the TikToker Behind 'Girlhood'?

"There is this very sick person. He's very demented, and he has a show called girlhood, kind of learning alongside you. I know a little bit about this. So it's a comedian turned influencer famous for a TikTok series of a hundred days of girlhood. Which tracked the biological man's journey from being a non binary to being a girl allegedly, was just invited to The White House Thursday to speak to President Biden. In a TikTok video showing the before and after meeting with the president, Dylan Mulvaney, giving a signature over exaggerated performance of woman, squeals with delight at the prospect of meeting the leader of the free world, and France is about showing off the outfit in the colors of the trans flag selected for the all important meeting to discuss quote unquote trans issues. I'm reading, by the way, from the post millennial dot com. So let's just kind of get an idea of what this person believes, meeting with the president of the United States, play cut one 25. But I was walking around in everyone was staring, and I was like, oh, okay, what's going on? And they were all staring directly at my crotch. And I went, oh, I forgot that my crotch doesn't look like other women's crotches sometimes, because mine doesn't look like a little Barbie pocket. Like a little Barbie pocket. So this person is participating in a equivalent of gender blackface, which is trying to pretend to be something that he is not. Appropriating an identity that is not his own. It's so funny. They always get so upset about blackface. You can't do that. Why is it you could appropriate womanhood then? And by the same time they say, it's going to be the year of the woman, you know, what is a woman exactly? But what we don't know what happened in the meeting, the interview will air Sunday Night. So is this kind of Joe Biden's new get out the vote strategy? Recent projections from RealClearPolitics shows Republican take Senate 53 47 winning an Arizona Georgia Nevada holding Pennsylvania Wisconsin. I tend to agree with that trend. So it's now the Biden geo TV strategy. Hey, I know that we're struggling with plumbers and coal workers in central Pennsylvania. I know that moms in Paradise valley don't like what we're doing. I know what we'll do. We'll go get the dude who thinks he's a woman who's on TikTok to go drive voter turnout.

President Biden Dylan Mulvaney White House France United States Joe Biden Pennsylvania Senate Nevada Arizona Biden Georgia Wisconsin Paradise Valley
The Enemies List of the Secret Sensors

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:57 min | Last month

The Enemies List of the Secret Sensors

"I'm continuing my discussion of investigative reporter John Solomon's bombshell report on the outsourcing of censorship by the Biden, well, Biden regime. I'm not gonna hesitate to say it. They're acting like totalitarians. They don't really deserve to be called anything other than a regime. So they have an enemy's list. And who's on that enemies list? This is what is kind of revealing because the enemies list is now been disclosed. It's been uncovered. And here's who's on the list. I'm just going to read some of the names. Real James Woods. Gateway pundit, Donald Trump Jr., Tom fitton, Jack bishop. Eric Trump, Charlie Kirk, Mark Levin, James O'Keefe, Richard grenell. Harmeet Dylan, a Breitbart News. Robbie starbuck. So you have this list. These are the bad guys from the point of view of these of the Biden administration. They're also the bad guys from the point of view of these left wing nonprofits. So the working together to shut down the opposition and let's remember some of these guys, Robbie starbuck was running for Congress. So you're talking about election interference. You're also talking about silencing important influencers in the days and weeks leading up to a presidential election. Think about this. And they don't hesitate to do this. So to look at some concrete examples, well, Marjorie Taylor Greene is also on the list. I'm a little disappointed. I'm not on the list. He goes, no, no, no, no, no. But hey, I'm a little surprised I'm not on it, but nevertheless, to look at a couple of examples. They're going off, they want to restrict Paul gosar. Why? Because he's sharing project veritas videos about the about the Minnesota cash for ballot harvesting scheme.

Robbie Starbuck John Solomon Biden Donald Trump Jr. Tom Fitton Jack Bishop Eric Trump Charlie Kirk Richard Grenell Harmeet Dylan Breitbart News Biden Administration James Woods James O'keefe Mark Levin Marjorie Taylor Greene Congress Paul Gosar Minnesota
"dylan" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

04:16 min | 5 months ago

"dylan" Discussed on Popcast

"The basement tapes and the 80s there was his box set called biograph, which is a very interesting product because it was kind of one of the first archival box sets, like it wasn't just greatest hits. It has unknown tracks, alternate takes. It has a lot of detailed information. And so it's kind of this little box that you can sort of poke through as a fan to learn like, um, here's some stuff I didn't quite know. And it's also a way to monetize fans because even if they've bought the 25 previous albums, there's gonna be a reason for them to buy this. Then Dylan does his own bootleg series, which has been going on for 30 years, where basically he's releasing outtakes. The Martin Scorsese film, et cetera so there's been this long process where Dylan or at least the people who work for him have had this reason to start going through the archives, organizing stuff, even taking that crumpled up piece of paper and saying, you know what, let's keep that. That might be something someday. And my assumption. And I don't know it for sure, 'cause I don't know what, obviously, what's going on in his mind. But I think that's kind of how the Dylan archive ended up as the mountain of material that it is now. As opposed to like, maybe he would have just chucked a lot of it. Over the years and only kept the things that are really sentimental and important to him. He's not really shown any interest Dylan in going through this stuff himself. He'll never talk about it. He doesn't care. You mentioned your piece on the Dylan center that he performed recently in Tulsa and didn't even mention the fact that he's like 5 blocks away from the Dylan senator, but I like the idea. It's almost like you're sending a doppelganger out on the road, like do twice the work..

Dylan Martin Scorsese Dylan center Tulsa
"dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

09:34 min | 6 months ago

"dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"Sleeping beauty with Angelina Jolie, featured an unnamed captain who spoke for 18 seconds. The popular movie musical into the Woods featured no speaking roles for actors of color at all, neither did the movie Noah with Russell Crowe. These movies that were supposedly telling universal stories were cast as white, as you say, by default. None of the movies were about race, per se, nor were these stories inherently white, yet they were told with all white actors. So a minute or two of dialog from people of color in two hour movies really telegraphs the inequity in a much more profound way than any diversity study might. Do you feel like things are changing or do you feel like if you did this again with the most popular movies right now? It might be a little bit more encouraging. I think they are. I think people are aware of this and I don't think every single word is solely responsible. In fact, the year I created every single word, April rain had started the hashtag Oscar so white, you know, Franklin Leonard has been doing amazing work in this space for a long time. But I do think that every single word as a project got to join the conversation. I do think it offered an accessible way to see it empirically right before your eyes. Do I think it's gotten better? I do when you're in a TV production office and you see posters of old TV shows that they've worked on when you're looking even like in the 2010s, you'll see an all white cast. And you think to yourself, oh, this would never happen today. Like, you just wouldn't see an all white cast. That being said, a lot of our protagonists are still white, you know? Spider-Man is a great example, right? Like you have Zendaya and you have Peter Parker's best friend, you know, and it feels like, oh, diversity, but they're still this thing of like, well, Spider-Man will always be white. Yes, the side players are getting to be not white. They're getting to be not straight. In many thrilling cases, they're getting to be not cis, you know? Like it's all happening. But I think sometimes we're still dealing with the white protagonist problem. Dylan all of your work up until this point in your trajectory, the tumblr posts that you wrote to night Vale fans about coming out of the closet. Navigating your biracial identity on stage, the every single word speeches you gave about racial representation on screen. They all reflected your voice. Your authentic voice, which you've described as deeply earnest and sincere. But you've also said that you've learned that this was this deeply earnest sincerity was a cardinal sin on the wider Internet. Why is that? That's a question I'm still exploring myself to be honest. I think sincerity can come off as insincere online in this really vexing way. You know, like sometimes when you get on to say what you are actually feeling as you actually feel it, it feels like you're not speaking the language of the Internet, right? Because I also think that the Internet rewards the most hyperbolic thing. It rewards the most extreme thing you can say. So this is why I think we're now operating in this larger problem where everyone is either iconic the goat queen king or they are the absolute worst piece of trash person that you've ever seen on the entire Internet. Because to express something in the middle of like, oh, I mostly like this person's work, but I found fault in this just as a boring phrase to share out there onto the world. And so I think the structure of the Internet and what travels best online has shaped how we speak. And so I think earnestness sometimes doesn't have a place in that because earnestness is often about expressing something as honestly and as emotionally as possible and that doesn't play well. So I think I had to, as I started making digital videos for seriously TV, I kind of took it upon myself to figure out how it could traffic in this world, how I would be able to succeed in this world. So would you say that apathy and snark and sarcasm are really the vernacular of the Internet? I think so. I think largely because they're the most extreme way to say something. And that's typically the take that wins is not necessarily the most nuanced, but the one that cuts right in. And I also think that there are a lot of very legitimate reasons for this. I mean, we're living in, I mean, what a time to be alive, to witness it as all of the things are being reported constantly to us. So there is certainly cause for cynicism. There is certainly cause for the apathy is understandable when there's just so much going on that all we can do is shut down. But I do think that is part and parcel to the language of the Internet. You then had to make a decision about how you wanted to be portrayed on the Internet. You had to figure out how to maintain your success on a platform that would shun you for, as you put it daring to express your true self. How did you go about navigating that? And how did you go about making a decision to begin to change your person at that time? Well, so my early work at seriously TV felt in line with my voice, sitting in bathrooms with trans people is a sweet, sincere interview series. What I wanted to really kind of dive into was the more directly politically charged work, right? Like obviously sitting in bathrooms with trans people is politically charged and that I'm saying these laws are about human beings. Let us meet these human beings that these laws are about, right? And every single word is about the lack of representation on screen and what it means when we're not even exercising our empathy for people of color. But I think there was something that I saw being rewarded, which was like the sharper take the sharper jab at someone. And so I found that opportunity when I came across this video of a young conservative woman who was her video is called dear millennials and she was talking about all the ways that her generation in mind, the millennials were not living up to yesterday's standards. And, you know, she was espousing pretty standard conservative views. And I decided that it was time to make a biting response video. And so I wrote a video where I used all of her lines, a setups to my punchlines, kind of bit back, and I adopted this snarkiness voice snarkiness than is natural for me to kind of bite back at her. I posted the video, and it posted through seriously, and it blew up. It just blew up. It was the first video of the network to get a million views. And I was just enamored. Like I was just, there's that scene in Aladdin where apu, just like you see the dollar signs in his eyes. His eyes become dollar signs. But he does that too. It's so good. But that was me with the likes with the, with the view count. And I was just like inject this right into my veins. This is what I want. I took the success of that video as a kind of set of rules that I would apply to future videos. You know, like, oh, this succeeded so much. Me stepping out of my comfort zone and being snarky and making jokes at the expense of someone else who I disagree with ideologically is good for me, you know? And I think there was also a nobility to it too that I thought of at the time. I thought there was a nobility because in attacking someone who was espousing conservative points, I thought I was a warrior for my side. I thought I was like doing something big for my people. When you're getting that many coins from the Internet praising you for this, it's really hard to see it differently. When did you begin to realize that you were actually helping to amplify this vitriol?.

Franklin Leonard Zendaya Russell Crowe Angelina Jolie Peter Parker Noah Woods Oscar Dylan
"dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

06:45 min | 6 months ago

"dylan" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"At that time and feel like I had a sense of control and a sense of ownership of something. While you were in high school, you actually met with agents that kept telling you that they weren't sure how many parts there were for you as a biracial man. And that you'd never play a romantic male lead. Yeah. How did you make sense of that determination? And how did it impact what you thought was possible for yourself? Well, at the time, it didn't really make sense, right? It just didn't make sense to me of like why I was being invited into these meetings and having the talent to be invited into these meetings. And then being told that they weren't really that interested in representing me because there's probably not going to be much work out there for me. And they told me this and very clinical ways, right? It was just kind of a matter of fact, unemotional. Well, this is just something I'm telling you. You're not going to get a lot of work. I don't think there's a lot of work out there for you. Obviously, I have so many more tools now to unpack that and understand the larger systemic implications of what it means to tell someone that because of who you are, there are no parts out there for you in this canvas through which humans understand each other and ourselves. And to tell someone that they can never play the romantic lead is to say, we can't believe you in romantic experience. We don't see that for you. We can't envision that. And so I didn't have the ability to articulate that. I didn't even have the ability to articulate that internally. So I just accepted what they were saying because I was a teenager and they were adults. And that changed later on. Despite the discouragement, you earned a bachelor's degree in theater and sociology at wesleyan. And while you were there, you also worked at several talent management and casting companies and assisted the casting director of the 2008 HBO film taking chance. Were you considering casting as a career? I was in the sense that I know that I loved this medium so much that I just wanted to be close to it in any way possible. I also think the casting rooms were what I was not allowed into because the agents were telling me I wouldn't get the roles and so I wanted to see what was happening there. What is happening in this room that you're telling me I can't go into. And the truth was that those came pretty organically, people who I had met through the auditions that I did get, which were always direct and through friends, I was offered those internships. And I think it was like, it demystified the room to me. Did you find the racial restrictions that you were warned about earlier accurate for the other actors that you were working with and trying to find parts for? Yes and no. So legally and factually, I will tell you that they did see a diverse array of people, which is to say many colors, many races, sexualities to, but what I really learned was that the spectrum of diversity allowed within marginalized groups is very slim. Whereas the spectrum of diversity among white actors was vast, and it was showing the nuances, the complexities, the character descriptions for these characters were long and it got into their backstories and who they were and who they are and who they're becoming. And so while they did see many Latin men, for example, there was a very thin understanding of what a Latin man looked like. And if there was a gay character, you could almost be certain that he was going to be white. And he was going to be a man, right? This was still coming off of the era of willing grace when it was like, you take what you can get, you take whatever representative you get at this mythic table that we are all angling for a seed. So what I learned was like, oh, maybe I'm not the right kind of brown man. Maybe I'm not the right kind of gay man. And that feels dispiriting to put it mildly. Yeah. While you were a freshman at wesleyan, you joined a comedy group, and it was there that you stated you first learned how to write creatively for community. And through that group, you met Joe firestone and wrote a play together called ridgefield, middle school talent night. Feels like at that moment in your life, Dylan, all of your interest converged into this one sort of pinpoint in time. And you took your first semester of senior year off and went on a college tour of the play, how confident did you feel in the sort of potential of this play to go ahead and actually take time off from your senior year in school to do this? You know, we wrote this play that the campus really loved, but I needed to push myself to see, okay, is anyone else going to respond? Yes, I feel like a superstar in this little contained cushy college campus. But I want to do this for a living. I think I was feeling so terrified that I didn't understand anything about the world in a practical sense. I knew how to sit around a beautiful wooden table and communicate ideas about the beautiful complex dense sociology text that I had just read, but I needed to know how to like get out there, like how do I, how do I do this thing? How do I prove those agents wrong? From high school who are telling me that I was never going to play the romantic male lead. Not that I was in ridgefield, but in ridgefield middle school talent night, I got to play, you know, half of 17 roles. And so it proved them wrong in that sense. But it was a play that we were so proud of. It was well received and what we were pleased to find was that everywhere we did it, it continued to get that kind of reception..

wesleyan HBO Joe firestone ridgefield middle school Dylan brown
"dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

02:18 min | 8 months ago

"dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"When I was a young person, it's what you're describing. It's the first time that because they show that character as a child and that child felt like me as a child and then there's an adult relationship that is with another woman that's domestic like they live together and they're like having an experience of domesticity together and definitely that like blew my mind. Even though it's like not over no you know the codes and pick up but yeah and also that I think something else that's a little wild is like Mary Stuart Masterson is not an out. You know, she's not a queer person. So it's interesting to have had the experience that you're talking about and it gets to be Wilson Cruz, who like is this fantastic person in it? It's complicated when it's then like just straight woman. But in terms of like the first time I ever saw myself, that is the moment that I saw myself for the first time. Yeah. Well, fried green tomatoes. Yeah. Mary Stewart masters so good. Queer coded domesticity. Oh my God. It's beautiful. They're beautiful together. Plus, they kill a man. You know, it's like, it's just, it really gives, it gives you some context for what an adult lesbian relationship is going to be like, which is that you're going to kill somebody is going to have an ex-husband that you kill and then people eat that body. And that's part of it. And it's just. It's fun. But I want to send you back into your day and tell you that I thank you so much for the way you showed up for this conversation today. I loved talking to you and I just let's just be actual Friends. I'm ready. I would absolutely love that. I feel ready. I wasn't ready before. I'm finally ready. I'm ready. I'm ready. And the book? I'm ready. Okay. Just to say, again, it's called conversations with people who hate me. And I think anybody who likes this show would be fascinated by everything that you talk about in it. And a day because I was, I was very curious to see what your experiences had been. So thank you so much for writing it. Thank you for saying that amazing thing. I'm going to remember that for the rest of a long time..

Mary Stuart Masterson Wilson Cruz Mary Stewart
"dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

05:57 min | 8 months ago

"dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Who had never expressed that to me expressed it to me. Yeah. Yeah. I hear you. Yeah. What was your middle school high school experience like? In terms of bullying. Yeah, I mean, it's so confusing to me because I think women and their parents were actually always not always but regularly pretty awful to me. Because. There was something going on that just none of us could express that just made me different and I think people just really wanted me to like get like get it together and just get between the lines. So like when I was a kid but it's confusing because they were my best Friends. Like that's what's confusing about it. It wasn't like a group of other people. I mean, there was a guy one guy who was shitty to me in high school, but he was my boyfriend's best friend. But anyway, say all of that to say, generally like men weren't terrible to me. I like dated a lot of I had a lot of boyfriends who had social clout because they were athletes. Okay, brag. Interesting go on. Well, I mean, by the way, if you are a moderately Butch odd woman and you're trying to figure out like, how am I going to survive high school? May I recommend the captain of the football team? Because nobody will fuck with you. Nobody will fuck with you. And I didn't really realize that that's what I was doing. But my best friends were so shitty to me, like very, very regularly. And I think that that is something that I've had to work through and on as an adult is because then I'm just kind of used to friends and crappy. And I only realized a couple years ago, oh, that's not the, that's it. It doesn't have to be the vibe. I also think I was really, really scared of women. And like way less scared of men, especially straight men, straight men like, I know this is so weird, but straight men have sort of fucked with me the least of any people. Like, and also the guy that I'm talking about leading that campaign, like that's a straight guy. So it's a weird combination. Maybe it's also that maybe I have less invested in those relationships, like I'm not going to be probably in love with the cis straight dude and so it's like I can kind of keep a silly distance. Where I'm just like, we're all doing the best we can, but like it's heartbreaking. You know, coming from like a woman, especially a woman that I had feelings for before I realized that that's what that was. Like, I'm even thinking about what you were saying. I had the weirdest thing happened that I think I've talked about on this show, but maybe not. A comic who is who I was friends with. I would have considered him a friend, but he was such a dick to me. He was such a dick. And he was part of this whole bullying thing he wrote me an email apologizing, just out of the blue. He's still very successful person. So whatever, he wrote me an email apologizing, owning all of the shit that he did. I mean, the last conversation we had had before that was me screaming at him that he was like, just leave me alone kind of a thing. And then I didn't hear from him for years. But I would run into him sometimes at places. And then he wrote me an email apologizing, and then this is where I was at, I didn't respond to that email. For 6 years. Wow. But months ago? You said it's time. I responded, and was just like, hey, this means a lot to me, and I wish you the best. That's actually, that's actually what I felt that way. I responded. You waited a long time? Yeah. I waited, and then I responded when I felt like, I like hope I do see him. I really, I care about him, and I do wish him the best. Yeah? Well, it passed through your system. That's exactly right. No longer this core thing that was part of, you didn't need to process it anymore. Yeah. Exactly. And I think and this is not to bring it back to my project, but what I can relate to in that is like, you know, there is this unspoken undercurrent theme of my work, my show, my book, you know, pick your media. Which is forgiveness. And for me, forgiveness is one of those things that everyone has to define on their own terms. I can't tell you who you should forgive. You have to figure out when you're ready to forgive someone who hurt you. But for me, them coming on the show. Them coming into the space of a conversation and even if they're not going to own up, even if they're not going to radically change their minds, which by the way, I have, I've tried to express through this 5 year project is not possible. You can not radically change someone's mind in the course of a single one hour phone call. Yes. But when they don't change their minds, I still immediately forgive them. Internally, when they come on to simply acknowledge that they wrote me something, right? And it's like, because for me, that was what I needed to move on. You wrote this thing. Tell me why you.

Butch football
"dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

06:30 min | 8 months ago

"dylan" Discussed on QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

"Live in I live in New York, but I wanted to join you in the morning experience because I was just going to yes and whatever you said. Well, in I was attempting to ignore the reality of your time zone. And I love acknowledging the reality of time and I thank you for that. Would you introduce yourself? I always have folks introduced themselves in the show. Yes, I'm familiar with this podcast. I love this podcast. My name is Dylan marron. I host the podcast conversations with people who hate me. In which I do exactly what the title suggests I do. And I also am the upcoming or recent depending on when you're listening to this author of the book, also titled conversations with people who hate me. Yeah, that's such a great, I think it's next week, so I have it right here. So it comes out on the 29th. Oh. She's got an arc. We got to get you a hardcover as well. So we got to get you every addition. So this is happening. Well, that's true. Actually, I will say the number of books that I own every edition because of this job that I do called this podcast. It's very funny. Oh yeah. Someday there's going to be a queer library that I donate all of this to all of the important to have the full compendium. It's vital. You have to have the arc. You have to have every draft you have to figure out which typos were fixed for the publication of the hardcover so I got it. But I read your book conversations with people who hate me is also what it's called. It's the book and also it is the name of the podcast. Yeah, absolutely. I read it over the weekend and I got to say, I don't want this job. I respect that and I support that 100%. I think a lot of my friends would agree with you. That's in the book. That is in the book that many of your friends would. So can you talk to me a little bit about for folks that haven't read it yet or haven't listened to the podcast? It's pretty self explanatory via the title, but I do think, you know, many people can hate us. But who's specifically are we talking about him? Where did you source those folks? Because I think that's important. What a terrific question. Yeah, so let me give you the quickest backstory. I started making work on the Internet if you've heard of it. But I started by so the first big thing I did on my own, I was first cast in a show called welcome to night Vale, and I toured around the country with them. And it was very exciting. And also wait, hang on, I just want to jump in here for a second. Before that, you were a near futurist before, right? Yes, yes. And so, and I'm from Chicago. So oh my God. I am super aware of The New York Times. And then also I played one in a movie that is called oh my God. Operator, where they use the future. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. But I had seen a show, I had seen shows there before when I lived there. And then when I did the movie I went and it was shot at the place and I played a new future. So I know what you're talking about. I need to see this film operator. You should see this film. I'm actually canceling this interview. Totally. Martin Starr star in it. Wow. Great. Yeah. Oh my God. Okay, well, I'm there right after this. Okay, great. Afternoon plans canceled. So yeah, so well, I'm glad no, I'm actually glad you brought that up because the story truly starts there. I was a member of the neo futurists. It was there that I met Joseph Fink and Jeffrey cranor, who are the creators, writers of welcome to night Vale, and I wanted, well, I was so fascinated that I saw my friends who I found to be and find to be present tense, incredibly talented, amazing. They made a thing on the Internet and it blew up. And this is 2012, 2013 when this is a novel concept where you can make something and it can blow up and then it becomes this thing that you then sell out theaters for people to come see. And I saw that a community was being formed through a podcast. I saw that an audience was being formed through a podcast. So I think it planted a seed in my head that this Internet thing was real. And it was a really potent way to make work as an independent artist to be specific. And but you know, in welcome to night Vale, I was an actor on tour. And so I felt like I was part of a thing that wasn't my thing. And I realized I wanted to use this thing, I realized I sound like I'm 500 years old when I talk about the Internet this way and maybe no, I don't think so. I think it's just acknowledging that just a decade ago, it was a different situation in terms of so different. Well, now, I mean, this is, we're rebuilding the same systems again. And again, like once large companies find out there's money to be made in different areas, they're going to find a way to sort of build that up and turn it into a different thing. But there was a bit of a gap between when social media launched and when everything had a more professional and monetized version where stuff was a little wild for a moment. And this is the time that you're talking about this like wild in between time. This wild wild wild west in between time of feeling like the Internet was a place of possibility and it hadn't fully been corporatized yet. I think that's a really important thing to point out and this podcast that I saw my friends make on Google Docs and microphones that you can buy for $40 on Amazon and just recorded in closets. And here we are, still recording in the closet. But it just felt just so full of possibility and promise. And at the same time, though, I felt like I was so lucky to be on board for this project that they had created when the truth is I saw this thing was so fertile with possibility for independent art. But I was, I was a guest essentially. You know, I was an artist traveling with other artists doing their thing. And.

Dylan marron Martin Starr Joseph Fink Jeffrey cranor New York The New York Times Chicago Amazon Google
"dylan" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

03:18 min | 8 months ago

"dylan" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"I'm not the first to say this, but I don't think we were meant to see this many people. That one time, I don't think we were meant to interact with this many people. So I'm a big advocate for making our digital world smaller. I think the problem is we are all famous now. And I don't mean that in the kind of like, and they were all right. But I mean that in the way that what is fame other than just seeing images of someone over and over again so you don't know if you care about them because you know them or you care about them just because you're seeing images of them over and over again and then they become projection screens onto which you can project whatever you feel about them positive or negative. I think that's fame and so in that sense we're all famous now because we're all seeing just repeated images of each other over and over again. I don't think we were meant to see this many people and deal with this many people because there's no way to actually get to know these people, right? Like there is a reason that in the physical realm. I don't want to differentiate between the real world and the Internet because I think both are the real world. But the physical realm is different from the digital realm and in the physical realm we're just naturally limited with how many people we pass like even when we're in a crowd, we can't tap on that person's forehead and just see like what they're aunt said about spaghetti. You know what I mean or like what movie they saw two years ago to the day in a memory that they share. And it sounds cool and fun, but I think we're seeing the consequences of that. Our brains are working well when in a crowd we psychologically kind of shut down and kind of have to shut everyone out and we're just like, okay, who do I know, right? Rather than like, okay, I could potentially know all of these people around me. We'll be right back. Hello, dear terribles, I wanted to thank our sponsor for this episode, better help online therapy. Better help's mission is to make professional counseling accessible, affordable, and convenient. So anyone who struggles with life's challenges can get help anytime anywhere. My conversations with Dylan are always amazing and this one has been truly insightful. We're both somewhat public people and that does mean higher exposure to criticism and scrutiny whether or not it's fair, but even if you aren't a content creator or a mega influencer or a celebrity, you've likely experienced some weird feelings of your own when you've waited into social media. People can seem antagonistic or super negative even if they're not, and as Dylan reminds us, it's really hard for us to pull apart how we interpret something, how we understand our own position, or how we should even react or respond. Dylan also brings up a great point about empathy, it's something we have to intentionally encourage between ourselves and others. It means we listen and try to understand where the other person is coming from. And even though we hope it's something we've been encouraging here a terrible thanks for asking, it's also easier said than done..

Dylan
"dylan" Discussed on The Dork Forest

The Dork Forest

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"dylan" Discussed on The Dork Forest

"Still is. It hasn't gone anywhere. You said was. Yeah, yeah, presidents. We're not doing it. And you're like, I wish I took a shower. And I was like, you look like your dork. You look like that rugged Bob Dylan. Yeah. That's fine. You got that vibe going. It's nice. You have that. That's true. You're right. Thank you. Thank you for the compliment. I was feeling self conscious now I feel good. Now you feel good because you're it's a good-looking Bob Dylan, because that dude absolutely always kind of a goonie looking dude. But I don't know why do you think about Bob Dylan, by the way? Except for that he was was he a Rolling Stone? He was not in the room. He had a song called like a Rolling Stone. That was it. That was it? No, nothing about bob. You know nothing. I know that my brother Phil really likes him. Now, I know some of your brothers seem cool and at least one of them based on our conversation. One of them I might not jive with is Phil a cool brother. Oh, Phil's a cool brother. He's been on the dark forest twice. He has talked about hitchhiking. Which he and Eddie also talked about. Lord of the Rings. Oh. So those were his two organs. One of the rings is basically an epic hitchhiking tail, isn't it? It's really doing. Truly, truly an epic hitch I can tell that he is. He couldn't be more interested. He wants to come back on and talk about fly fishing. My brother Russ has been on talking about the hallmark channel. My sister Darla has been on talking about sort of preparing a quick meals. She enjoys she joins fancy meals done quickly. That's who doesn't. I mean, isn't that what fast food is? I mean, when you think about it, one of the sandwiches is pretty elaborate. It's got three buns, two patties. Properly. Yeah, it would take it would probably take you know 45 minutes and here we live in a society where you get it in three minutes. It's true. It's just out and it's been nuked into a gray color that who doesn't want any part of that. Absolutely. Yes. What do you know about Bob Dylan? Well, you can't see them, but to my to my left. We're on a video chat thing here. I have every single Bob Dylan record and box set. All of them are here. Is there redundancy? No, not no, not in the Bob Dylan realm. Okay. For instance, I have four Beatles box sets of that are ostensibly the same. The mono box set, and then I have the stereo box set. I have them in both CD and vinyl formats. So you're not wrong to ask this is a valid question. It's what you're telling me. But there's duplication in the sense that they'll put out a bootleg series. Bob Dylan will and it'll be kind of an alternate version of an album we've all come to know and love. But I mean, it's really alternate. It's like outtakes and the original album might be 12 songs. The bootleg series will be like 80 songs. So it's not really, it's like a whole other universe. Right, right. So yeah, I have everything. And then again, everything on CD with Dylan. I became I found out about Bob Dylan. When I was a little boy because I would read a lot about The Beatles. Okay..

Bob Dylan Phil hallmark channel Darla Eddie bob Russ Dylan
"dylan" Discussed on The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"dylan" Discussed on The Hull Show ? 1310 KFKA

"Welcome back to the whole show powered by pd energy. Now's the time. I love these segments. And we catch up with dylan mccaffrey. It is our quarterback corner or quarterback room right with With mccaffrey presented by first advantage dylan first off man. The jacket man. It's it's working. where did you. What did you snag. that bad boy appreciate it. I got it online is looked up. Bad news bears jerseys. I don't even remember what website but you know. Yeah had to get one..

dylan mccaffrey mccaffrey dylan
"dylan" Discussed on How to Be a Better Human

How to Be a Better Human

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"dylan" Discussed on How to Be a Better Human

"Enough right for not hitting every mark but to accept that like every apology is going to be imperfect right. I'm sure one day. A celebrity will write a notes app apology. That people will be like. Actually this was good but the truth is like yes. Don't over police apologies. They're all going to be imperfect. And we can edit them till we can edit them till the day we die we can knock them until the day we die but like we're not going to create a sustainable path forward if we mock and reject every imperfect attempt at trying to be better. I also just want to add one thing. Which is that i think. Sometimes we are afraid to accept. Someone's apology because we think that in doing so. We absolve the person of of the wrong that they did and we are raised. The wrong they did and we then negate the real feelings of hurt we had from. They're wrong but that's also not true. You can both accept someone's apology and still have been hurt by the thing that they're apologizing for and also see them as a full three dimensional human and also give them the grace to change and all of those things can be true at the same exact time. I love a so perfect. And i think that really hits it hits the nail completely on the head right there. Yeah there's so much nuance around. All of these things can exist simultaneously. Yes well i apologize for the fact that this interview is going slightly over time but a few things that i want to continue. Thank you for accepting my apology and process. It was an immediate acceptance. Okay excuse me. Great okay so What is one idea or book or movie or piece of music. Or what's something that has made you a better human Gonna hear this question. And i always think of a different answer for it okay. There is this incredible. Incredible documentary called the painter in the thief. Quick synopsis is that this artist had big show Two men stole her most expensive paintings or her most highly priced paintings from the show She couldn't find them eventually. They they arrested the thieves. Were i think they arrested one thief and she established this friendship with him. And then i don't wanna give too much away but there is a scene in the movie where now that they are friends her and the man who stole her painting and her paintings are still at this point i believe they have not been recovered and she paints his portrait and then she shows the portrait that she painted of him to the man who stole what was heralded as her masterpiece and he looks at the painting and he just starts crying. I think that is like one of the most moving pieces of anything that i have seen. Maybe in my whole life. I loved that so much and i please go watch the painter and the thief and then what is one way in which you personally are trying to be a better human right now. I'm trying to be away from my phone. More often. And i think for a long time i was very addicted to my phone and i would just pull it out at meals. That would put out unknowingly like i cringe retroactively thinking about this now but i would put out when i was talking to someone you know. Now i mean this really helps that. I've been off social media for a year. But i put it in another room. I don't even think about it. I don't have something to mindlessly scrolling on and it just allows me to be more present with people we'll dylan. Thank you so much for being on the show. Thank you for talking to us about your work. Thank you For being my friend and thanks for doing such thinking around empathy and forgiveness and how.

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"dylan" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"dylan" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"It's interesting because we think of the christian period as being a thing unique to dylan but in a way it was a moment where he became a part of this larger community of contemporary christian music. And so kind of thinking about those albums. In that period from the perspective of his relationship to ccm's contemporary christian music really made me see even those albums in a different way and kind of helped me understand more of what he was doing. So for instance just to give you an example. I love snow training. I think it's a really good album. I mean musically. I think it's incredible a lot of it not at sons. I have nothing to argue with. But i think it is not certainly his finest work and i think what keeps it from being his finest work is that it is so miserable it is so unfo- addict right even when the lyrics are good. It doesn't have that of poetry. That the best dylan songs have. I think and i was talking to some christian music fans about what they liked or didn't like in a song and people would tell me christian. Music cannot have any ambiguity irony because her purpose of christian music is to lead people to jesus..

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"dylan" Discussed on Talkhouse Podcast

Talkhouse Podcast

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"dylan" Discussed on Talkhouse Podcast

"You almost certainly no because each of these guys has had a pretty incredible career richard marx. And jacob dylan marks of course wrote and performed some of the most indelible pop hits of the late eighties and early nineties including and listened night's launch the nights and the super smash right here waiting which comes up in this conversation. But even the era of mullets and jeans faded marks couldn't be stopped or rather marxist songs couldn't be stopped he's continued releasing music over the years and his influence can be felt deeply to this day. Just check out the audio and visual of john mayer's latest album which basically pays tribute to marks. And it's not just music marks recently released a funny candid. Memoir called stories to tell in which he details some of the incredible memories. He's made in the music business over the years. And that's jacob dylan entered the picture as you'll hear though the two didn't know each other dylan went on joe rogan's podcast recently to praise. Marx's book and a friendship was born now dylan. Is no slouch in the music department. Either you can't be with that family name..

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"dylan" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"dylan" Discussed on Pantheon

"People from all over the world. And i recommend to everybody why dylan matters. I don't know if richard if you've been able to answer the question but you've given a really good college tribe. I'm i am convinced. I will stay publicly. Yes dylan does indeed matter. But great writing about dylan Such as yours mainly a mix matter even more so thanks for that. Thank you steve..

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"dylan" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"dylan" Discussed on Pantheon

"How everything exists at once looking at different angles and time does constructed but the music is is like that i think improper burlesque and it's very difficult for me to get through that for empire burlesque. I i try to listen. But after about the problem with the listening to dylan dylan album all the way through. It's actually a big mistake. A lot of the time like listening to empire burlesque. All the way through is kind of a fool's errand. It's or it's more than i can take whereas listening to an individual song from empire burlesque. That's why you know just listening to clean cut kid on its own. I think it's great but when it's in the middle of the album. I i'm already exhausted and i just think it's sort of trite but Yeah that's i should. I should put everything on shuffle and start again basically. Yeah a great way to especially when when you've done a lot of it as we have in your and what i find. So what i love about about dylan is the great revisitation that he brings home just a his work but to your life as the as the listener because he's about reinvention he's about revocation he's got this incredible ability to even when he just lie down and diamond seventy five. You've done the best work in the will. He says not on another album got this new thing called rough and rowdy ways. You've got to listen to it guys. And you're like whoa. I'm we as as humble partake is in in his art. Get of that intravenous whatever. It is intravenous revocation into all veins. So i'm sitting around listening to that thing on on the train. Everyone's in what it came out. And i'm thinking my god this man's alive. This man is so alive and it made me feel revivify. Made me feel like okay. Okay you gotta you gotta keep going to be not afraid you to turn up for me. That's a blank page for for you guys. It's a new show..

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"dylan" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"dylan" Discussed on Pantheon

"That every little detail you don't remember it all the time we knew who would remember better than you. And it's so direct so to himself so full of that grandiloquent snaring but at his own expense and so dark and so lost and then and then he kinda comes round and he sort of going through the i need and he always stands up right at the front when he sings as he any puffs his chest if you watch him and he goes you know you'll it's been so long now your content to let the days go by. You're not writing good songs when you were there. You were the answer to my prayer forgetful hop and he's it's a companion song. I think to Heart of mine. I love it when he talks to his his own half. And it's about precisely what you're talking about. Which is has he lost it again. And i think that that song lifts the whole album biot- also absolutely defend three or four other songs on. I mean i think beyond here lies. Nothing is a tremendous song. I don't love the don't love the music hate again. But it's got this kind of hot and how it's it's got a kind of what is he saying. I'm trying to remember the words that my ship is in the haba. The sales of spread this me. Pretty baby lay your hand upon my head. It's like i'm ready for death. There's a lot more darkness in their others. Another line about the mountains of the past and is talking as he's always talking about his own work and the thing about dylan album which is a a six or seven hundred foot and ten is always talking about them if we go backwards. There's modern times. Which i think is is in the top five and then if you go forwards..

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"dylan" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"dylan" Discussed on Pantheon

"He's he's got no control. It's just i mean. I fought with my twin. The enemy within till both of us fell by the road does. It does no one left standing in the album. And i don't mean to say in a way. It's my favourite album. I don't even mean to say. It's the one that i listened to the most. It probably isn't but it's the one where i feel. Greatest kinship with his autistic defeat. Am i think that that honesty doesn't i don't think he's defeated again. The next time he's defeated which is down in groove He doesn't try he just he. He leaves the battlefield. And says i'm going to have some a cup of tea but in street legal. He's not he's not dead yet. Well as beautifully put. I couldn't i couldn't argue with that With exception i think of is your love in vain which i think is embarrassing in the stands the test of time as song which i am embarrassed for him. But it's honest There's no way it's not honest. And i take my hat off to for that but isn't an album. What is the album that you go to. I'm interesting 'cause i say i don't go to st legal. Probably won't go do it again for quite a while for my bob dylan fix you know some days. My bob dylan fixes one of the early ones some days. It's highway sixty one some days. It's together through life. Which i think is a very listenable album. What's your go-to well. I mean i. I've become one of those people who it's so profoundly in me that i don't if you ask me. How does it feel. It feels like communing with somebody who in all seriousness is trying to figure out something incredibly profound about what it means to be human being undoing that through the medium all of poetry and actually through the medium of sung patry. And so what. I've done to myself is. I have a kind of rule which is kinda strange. But i stick to it. Which is i have the whole of dylan shuffle. And i do it for precisely the reason you sort of intimated there which is i don't want to have something i'm not gonna listen to and i know if it to me i'll choose stuff out. She's albums and i were. I won't go to but anyhow it on shuffle and suddenly I'd no let me let me think of a good exam. Ugliest on the world. Yeah ugliest girl in the world comes on on you and you got this deal with yourself. You've gotta listen to listen. You're you're not getting out of it what we're listening to menu just and you have to and it's what you get so much from that because he's the leading you suddenly hear it. I mean i know. Because i've read so much about him and i've read books about news having i mean. I think that was the worst time for him. Creatively and i read this terrible book by by someone who is one of his girlfriends then and it was just desperate but it was desperate without without even the kind of grandeur street legal it was just you know i always think stillness is great. Train ride across america. Let's just say from bad with meal metaphor. But you going from new york to los angeles. And i think one of the mistakes people make is you have to be on..

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"dylan" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

05:43 min | 2 years ago

"dylan" Discussed on Pantheon

"I mean you're you're both no joke amount. of course. i'm sure you both love that. It's also it's not coherent in the sense. Solve modern times or omer see all highway sixty one but i think he reaches i would put two or three of the songs certainly in the top twenty. It's got some of his best work on it but that's how it got started from me. That was that was infidels. And that's that's where i began. And then this neighborhood bully. I know i can stand up for neighborhood bully guys. I'm well how to spend a lot of time. But i think actually it's it's a he's very passionate when he sings it soon. And at the time it it to me it was a relief from the jesus songs that's all. I don't think it's a great song. And i certainly don't think it's dated well. But he's written much worse. I wonder if there's list of dylan songs that we can reasonably defined as dodgy as fuck it. Is you love vein. Possibly i don't know see i think is your love in vain is is is dodger as far as far as well wake up. We're going to have to come onto the street legal. Because i'm not gonna i'm not i'm just not gonna let either view try it street. Legal might be in his top two albums over st street. Legal is the moment in. Dylan's career when it all comes down to it and i think that the passage through the seventy s you know the false flag of Of new morning and then the kind of odd and the the the the feeling in in blood on the tracks that there is blood on the tracks and then the kind of spanish inflected disorder and all of that blood on the tracks really leads to street legal in in street legal. You get incredible moment where everything coheres but in a dark way so it's a deeply religious or spiritual and yet it's about the absence of god you know that song senior. Where is the god That he's appealing to nowhere to be seen. The journey through the heat and at the same time this kind of dark eroticism with with new pony and then on top of that is kind of auto sense of abandonment. And i think he reaches in street legal a synthesis of his gifts albeit played in such a dark and grim for him way that he never gets to again. I don't think till maybe maybe modern times will rough and rowdy ways to too soon to know about that but that's the album where in a strange way..

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