14 Burst results for "Dupont Chemical Company"

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

06:47 min | 3 months ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on Planet Money

"Hey, Sarah Gonzalez here. So in 2020, NPR investigative correspondent Laura Sullivan came to us with a story. The story was about the big lie about recycling plastics and she had receipts. We made a show about it with Laura and PBS frontline. And we're going to play that episode again today because it just won a big award. The Alfred I DuPont Columbia University award. So we're going to replay it today in part because we're proud and we want to celebrate, but also because this is a show that changed the way a lot of people, including a lot of us at planet money, think about the oil industry and recycling plastics. This is planet money from NPR. Back in the 1980s, here's how recycling worked. You could recycle glass, paper and metal, but recycling plastic wasn't really a thing yet. The cost of recycling plastic was really expensive. So nobody collected it. This is coy Smith. He ran a recycling business out in San Diego. And even though it was too expensive by the early 1990s, coy decided he was going to let his customers recycle two types of plastic. Milk jugs and soda bottles. But then one day his customers just out of nowhere started throwing in more than just milk drugs and soda bottles. They were throwing in peanut butter jars and strawberry containers and toothpaste tubes, and coy Smith was like, wait, who told them they could throw all this plastic in the bin. He starts looking at all the plastic. He's flipping it over, and then he sees something that he's never seen on the plastic before. This little symbol. The symbol starts showing up on the containers. All this plastic, all of a sudden is stamped with a little triangle of arrows. You know the one. The international recycling symbol. All of a sudden, the consumer is looking at what's on their soda bottle, and they're looking at what's on their yogurt tub and saying, oh, well, they both have a symbol. Oh, I guess they both go in. They were these little numbers inside the triangle, plastic number one, plastic number four, number 7. No one really understood what they meant. But there was this recycling symbol on it, so people just threw everything in, and all over the country, recycling bins were suddenly full of plastic. The recyclers couldn't sell. I would call my buddy Eric at eco cycle in boulder, Colorado and say, Eric, are you having this problem? And he would say, yes, and I call Mary at in St. Paul Minnesota and say, Mary, are you having that problem in St. Paul and she's absolutely we are. And Brooke from Solana recyclers were saying, are you having this problem with the stuff and I'm like, yes I am. This new triangle of arrows with the little number inside. It wasn't some insider Y code that was slapped on plastic containers without much thought. These numbers, the arrows. It was a decision, a very intentional decision. And this stamp made people believe something that wasn't true that all this plastic trash could be and would be, turned into something else. Now, you may remember a planet many episode we did last year where we told you that only a tiny portion of plastics are being recycled. Basically just the soda bottles and milk jugs. It's not that you can't physically recycle other plastics. It's just that it doesn't usually make sense. Economically. And heartbreakingly, it doesn't usually make sense environmentally either. This upset many of our listeners who wrote in and said, no planet money, this can not be true, but it is. So if recycling plastic is not working now. And it didn't work 30 years ago when the numbers and arrows first popped up. Did it ever work? And that, that led us to the biggest question of all. If this has all been a lie, where did it come from? Hello and welcome to planet money. I'm Sarah Gonzalez and I'm Laura Sullivan. Laura is one of NPR's incredible investigative reporters and today on the show. Laura set out with the support of PBS frontline to find out who is responsible for this great plastic lie. And what I found was a paper trail. Crinkled up documents that apparently did not get recycled, long forgotten in old boxes, and the trail leads. Well, the leafs store guy named Larry. Hey, so it's black history month and to celebrate NPR's book of the day podcast is digging into the archives and bringing you conversations from important and interesting writers from our history. Alex Haley, Toni Morrison Octavia butler and more. So listen, to the book of the day podcast from NPR. So how did millions of Americans come to believe that most plastic would be recycled when that's not actually true? Laura Sullivan is going to take the story from here. Okay, it seemed like a good place to start, was the plastic industry. They make the stuff. Did they know the truth about recycling plastic? I headed to one of the birthplaces of plastic. Plastic comes from oil. But really, a lot of it comes from the DuPont chemical company. And some of the plastic industries old records are housed in the hagley library. It's this stone building on the grounds of the first DuPont family home in Delaware. This is a place that actually used to store sodium nitrate back when DuPont made gunpowder, not plastic. There's an archivist with a bow tie in a handlebar mustache, named Lucas clawson. And he looks like someone who would make a cocktails. Lucas wheeled out a cart of boxes. Thank you. Files that documented the discovery of a chemical marvel that changed the world. A product that looked like glass, but didn't break. A product that could also look like lightweight fluff, but keep things hot called styrofoam. And an incredible new film that can preserve food for days called saran wrap. There were a couple clues about recycling inside the boxes from the industry's most powerful lobby group at the time. The society of the plastics industry. Their job was to lobby for the big oil and plastic companies. So think Exxon Chevron Dow DuPont. And there's this one memo from 1973. The environmental movement is just being born, and one of the top people in the plastics industry is talking about how the cost of sorting plastic is high. But it seemed like a lot of the documents were missing. I find a reference to a memo or a report. But then I noticed that someone had drawn a line through it. Hey, Lucas. Hi. Can I ask you a question? Absolutely. Okay. Why? One.

Laura Sullivan coy Smith Sarah Gonzalez NPR Alfred I DuPont Columbia Unive Laura PBS St. Paul Eric coy Mary Solana Octavia butler San Diego boulder Brooke DuPont chemical Minnesota Colorado hagley library
"dupont chemical company" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:42 min | 1 year ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on KQED Radio

"So how did millions of Americans come to believe that most plastic would be recycled? And that's not actually true. Laura Sullivan is going to take the story from here. Okay. It seemed like a good place to start was the plastic industry. They make the stuff. Did they know the truth about recycling plastic? Headed to one of the birthplaces of plastic plastic comes from oil. But really a lot of it comes from the DuPont chemical Company and some of the classic industries. Old records are housed in the Hagley Library. It's this stone building on the grounds of the first DuPont family home in Delaware. This is a place that actually used to store sodium nitrate back when DuPont made gunpowder, not plastic. Is an archivist with a bow tie and a handlebar mustache named Lucas Clawson. And he looks like someone who would make good cocktails. Lucas wheeled out a cart of boxes. Thank you. You won't right. Miles. That documented the discovery of a chemical marvel that changed the world a product that look like glass but didn't break a product that could also look like lightweight fluff. But keep things hot, called Styrofoam and an incredible new film that could preserve food for days called Saran Wrap. There were a couple clues about recycling inside the boxes from the industry's most powerful lobby group. At the time, the society of the plastics industry, their job was the lobby for the big oil and plastic companies. So think Exxon, Chevron Dow DuPont And there's this one memo from 1973. The environmental movement is just being born and one of the top people in the plastics industry is talking about how the cost of sorting plastic Is high. But it seemed like a lot of the documents were were missing. I find a reference to a memo over report. But then I noticed that someone had drawn a line through it. Hey, Lucas. Can I ask you a question? Okay. Why in this section are all plus disease have so many of these sort of cross outs? Because those records are no longer happy. They're not here anymore. They're not. Where did they go? The society of the plastics industry asked for them back. Thank you. They really Yes. It's an unusual It doesn't happen often. Yeah. Do you know? Do you know why they took them? Did they say I do not know, huh? Okay. Of course, there are all kinds of reasons why an industry lobbying group might want its records back. I did call the society the plastic folks and ask them. If I could see the records they took. They said no. So I headed to another library this time at Syracuse University, and they're buried in its stacks are boxes of files donated from an industry consultant. Actually, the industry consultant died and the wife found the boxes and gave them to Syracuse and inside these boxes. I found what I was looking for A report was sent to top oil and plastic executives in 1973. It says recycling plastic is nearly impossible. There is no recovery from obsolete products. It says. Recycling is costly. Sorting. It is infeasible. Plus, it says plastic degrades every time you try to reuse it. So the oil in plastic industry new they've known for almost 50 years. And then I found more confidential memos and meetings that echo decades of this knowledge Inside thousands of pages of courtroom discovery, There's a speech from an.

Lucas Clawson DuPont chemical Company DuPont Laura Sullivan Chevron Dow DuPont Hagley Library Saran Wrap sodium nitrate consultant Syracuse University Delaware Exxon Syracuse
"dupont chemical company" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And welcome to planet money. I'm Sara Ellis and I'm Laura Sullivan. Laura is one of NPR's incredible investigative reporters and today on the show, Laura set out with the support of PBS Frontline to find out Who is responsible for this great plastic live and what I found was a paper trail crinkled of documents that apparently did not get recycled long for gotten old boxes, and the trail leads well, believe store guy named Larry. Support for NPR comes from this station and from at Lassen, makers of collaboration software like Kira and Trail 0 83% of Fortune 500 companies use that last year. Help team stay Agile, aligned and connected. Learn more at lassen dot com. So how did millions of Americans come to believe that most plastic would be recycled when that's not actually true? Laura Sullivan is going to take the story from here. OK, it seemed like a good place to start was the plastic industry. They make the stuff did they know the truth about recycling plastic? I headed to one of the birthplaces of plastic plastic comes from oil. But really a lot of it comes from the DuPont chemical Company and some of the plastic industries. Old records are housed in the haggling library. It's this stone building on the grounds of the first DuPont family home in Delaware. This is a place that actually used to store sodium nitrate back when DuPont made gunpowder, not plastic. Is an archivist with a bow tie and a handlebar mustache named Lucas Clawson, and he looks like someone who would make cocktails, Lucas wheeled out a cart of boxes. Thank you Miles that document to the discovery of a chemical marvel that changed the world a product that look like glass but didn't break a product that could also look like lightweight fluff. But keep things hot called Styrofoam and an incredible new film that could preserve food for days called Saran Wrap. There were a couple clues about recycling. Inside the box is from the industry's most powerful lobby group. At the time, the society of the plastics industry, their job was to lobby for the big oil and plastic companies. So think Exxon, Chevron Dow DuPont And there's this one memo from 1973. The environmental movement is just being born and one of the top people in the plastics industry is talking about how the cost of sorting plastic Is high. But it seemed like a lot of the documents were were missing. I find a reference to a memo of a report. But then I noticed that someone had drawn a line through it. Commence.

Laura Sullivan DuPont chemical Company DuPont Lucas Clawson NPR Chevron Dow DuPont Sara Ellis Saran Wrap sodium nitrate Delaware Larry Kira Exxon Miles
"dupont chemical company" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

11:28 min | 1 year ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on Planet Money

"How did millions of Americans come to believe that most plastic would be recycled when that's not actually true Laura Sullivan is GonNa take the story from here. . Okay, , it seemed like a good place to start was the plastic industry they make the stuff. . Did they know the truth about recycling plastic? ? I headed to one of the birthplaces of plastic plastic comes from oil. . But really comes from the dupont chemical company and some of the plastic industries old records are housed in the Hagley Library. . It's this stone building on the grounds of the first dupont family home in Delaware. . This is a place that actually used to store sodium nitrate back when Dupont made gunpowder not plastic. . There's an archivist with a bow tie a handlebar moustache named Lucas Clawson, , and he looks like someone would make cocktails. . Lucas wheeled out a cart of boxes. . Thank you. . Files that documented the discovery of a chemical marvel that changed the world, , a product that looked like glass but break a product that could also look like lightweight fluff but keep things hot called Styrofoam and incredible new film that can preserve food for days called. . Saran. . Wrap there were a couple of clues about recycling inside the boxes from the industry's most powerful lobby group at the time the Society of the plastics industry their job was to lobby for the big oil and plastic companies. . So think Exxon Chevron Dow Dupont. . And there's this one memo from one, , thousand, , nine, , hundred, , seventy, , three, , the. . Movement is just being born, , and one of the top people in the plastics industry is talking about how the cost of sorting plastic is high but it seemed like a lot of the documents were were missing I find reference to a memo a report, , but then I noticed that someone had drawn a line through it Lucas. . Can I ask you a question absolute. . Okay. . Why? ? In this section are all. . These APPS. . So many of these. . Cross out because those records are no longer. . Here anymore day or not where did they go the society of the Plastics Industry Astra them back think they really yes is an unusual. . That doesn't happen often. . Do you do know <hes> why they took them. . Did they say? ? I, do , not know. . Okay Of course, , there are all kinds of reasons why an industry lobbying group might want. . It's records back I did call society the plastic folks and ask them if I could see the records they took they said No. . So I headed to another library this time at Syracuse University and they're buried in its tax, , our boxes of files donated from an industry consultant. . Actually the industry consultant died in the why found the boxes and gave them to Syracuse and inside these boxes. . I found what I was looking for a report was sent to top oil and plastic executives in nineteen seventy three. . It says, , recycling plastic is nearly impossible. . There is no recovery from obsolete products. . It says recycling is costly sorting. . It is infeasible plus it says plastic degrades every time you try to reuse it. . So the oil in plastic industry new, , they've known for almost fifty years. . and. . Then I found more confidential memos in meetings echoed decades of this knowledge insight thousands of pages of courtroom discovery. . There's a speech from an industry insider in nineteen seventy four when it comes to recycling large quantities plastic, , it says there is quote serious doubt that it can ever be made viable on an economic basis. . Now. . Okay. . Sure. . Anyone can take something plastic melted down and make something else. . But what these documents are saying is that it's expensive, , it's time consuming it's chemically problematic and it's just cheaper and easier to make plastic out of new oil instead of plastic trash there are all kinds of names in these documents men who have never spoken publicly before and there was one name I kept seeing over and over he. . was, , giving speeches at fancy hotels, , hosting conferences and Berlin. . Phoenix, , they called him a bigwig. . He was the industry's top lobbyist. . Larry Thomas this is the man I had to find but do you know how many Larry Thomas's there are in the United? States. ? . Thousands I'd call say are you the Larry Thomas used to work in plastics? ? Are you leery Thomas who used to be president of the Society of the plastics industry? ? And then finally, , I'll prompt Merrin the plastics industry no getting around it the BIGWIG himself I'll walk. . Do that's for sure. . Yeah. . My personal views certainly didn't always job with. . US I had the quake as part of my job. . That's the way it was there. . He's retired now on the coast of Florida but I told him I've been reading all about his exploits in the world of plastic. . Where would the offices the officers were? ? What would you think they would be K. Street yes. . Twenty Five K. Street Casey was the heart of lobbying in Washington and it was in those offices at top executives in the world's most powerful oil and plastic companies met they had meeting after meeting about a little problem they were having there was just too much plastic trash consumers didn't like it. . In one of the documents I found from nineteen nine, , hundred nine Larry wrote the top oil executives at Exxon Chevron, , Amoco Dow Dupont proctor, , and gamble in a bunch of others he wrote the image of plastics is deteriorating at an alarming rate. . We are approaching a point of no return. . The classic. . I was under fire. . We gotta do. . What it takes to take the heat off. . Because we want to continue to make classic equality, , they wanted to keep making plastic but the more you make the more plastic trash you get and the obvious solution to this is to recycle it but they knew they couldn't remember it's expensive. . It's a great. . Discussion about how difficult it was to recycle. . They knew that the infrastructure wasn't there. . So really have recycling amount to a whole lot. . So they needed a different plan. . Larry Decides to call a bunch of meetings at fancy hotels. . He summons the Society of the plastics people executives Larry doesn't remember the specifics of each particular meeting but one of his deputies at the time Lou Freeman he remembers you could. . Get. . Back all the layers of my brain. . Lou, , remembers a bunch of meetings the basic question on the table was. . You guys you're our trade association in the plastics industry aren't doing enough. . We need to do more. . This one dupont executive was telling Lou. . It's your job to fix plastics imaging problem. . So what do you need? ? You said, , I think if we had five million dollars. . which seemed like a lot of money. . If we had five million dollars we could. . We could. . We could solve this problem. . And My boss said in response. If . you add five million dollars, , you would know how to spend it effectively. . Well, , they came up with a way to spend five million dollars that and a lot more I. . Remember this. . This is one of these exchanges that sticks with me thirty five years later however long it's been. . Anna was <hes>. . You know what we need to do is advertise our way out of it. . That was the idea thrown out. . The industry decided to advertise its way out of a can't recycle it problem. . The possibilities off plastics plastics. . From dense. . Touted the benefits of a product that after it was used for the most part was headed to a landfill incinerator or even ocean. . Look empty yet it's anything but trash it's full of potential. . These commercials carried an environmentalist message, , but they were paid for by the oil and plastic companies eventually leading to fifteen million dollars a year industrywide ad campaign promoting plastic. . So I asked Larry why why spend tens of millions of dollars telling people to recycle plastic when the new recycling plastic wasn't going to work? ? and. That's . when he said it. . The point of the whole thing if the public thinks so recycling is working. . Then they're not going to be concerned about the environment and if they're not concerned about the environment. . Though keep buying plastic it wasn't just Larry in lieu who said this I spoke to half a dozen top guys involved in the industry at the time who all said plan was unfolding and it went beyond at the industry funded recycling projects and local neighborhoods expensive sorting machines that didn't make any economic sense school recycling contests. . All of this was done with great fanfare. . except I decided to go track down almost a dozen of the industry's biggest projects like the one where they were going to recycle plastic and national parks or the one that was going to recycle all the plastic and school lunches in New York they all failed and disappeared quietly but there was one more part of this campaign, , the final piece that did stick around. . That recycling symbol with the numbers in the middle this symbol has. . So. . Much confusion about what is and is not recyclable in the plan to stamp it on every plastic item popped up a lot in the documents I learned of a quiet campaign to lobby almost forty states to require that every single plastic item have this symbol stamped on it. . Even if there was no way to economically recycle it, , I should note that some. . Environmental is also supported. . The symbol thinking would help, , separate and sort plastic but the industry knew the truth the symbols were causing problems. . Warm report told executives in July nineteen ninety-three that the symbol is being misused. . It's creating quote unrealistic expectations about what plastic people can recycle. . It's being used as a green marketing tool, , but the executives decided to keep the symbol anyway. . I did reach out to plastic industry folks and they said that the symbols were only meant to help sort plastic and that they were not intended to confuse people but the symbol in the ads in the projects, , all of this basically convince people Larry says the idea that the vast majority of plastic can be recycled was sinking in. . Say that. . After a while the atmosphere seems to change I. . Don't know whether it was because people thought that recycling has solved the problem. . was that they were just so in love with plastic products that they were willing to overlook the environmental concerns that were were mounting up. . It's been thirty years now since most of those plans have been put into place and the public's feelings about plastic have started to shift again, , people are reading stories about oceans choked with plastic trash and trace amounts of this stuff inside our bodies, , and once again, , people are wanting to ban plastic and the survival of the oil companies is at stake. .

NPR Smith San Diego Koi
How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

Planet Money

11:28 min | 1 year ago

How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled

"How did millions of Americans come to believe that most plastic would be recycled when that's not actually true Laura Sullivan is GonNa take the story from here. Okay, it seemed like a good place to start was the plastic industry they make the stuff. Did they know the truth about recycling plastic? I headed to one of the birthplaces of plastic plastic comes from oil. But really comes from the dupont chemical company and some of the plastic industries old records are housed in the Hagley Library. It's this stone building on the grounds of the first dupont family home in Delaware. This is a place that actually used to store sodium nitrate back when Dupont made gunpowder not plastic. There's an archivist with a bow tie a handlebar moustache named Lucas Clawson, and he looks like someone would make cocktails. Lucas wheeled out a cart of boxes. Thank you. Files that documented the discovery of a chemical marvel that changed the world, a product that looked like glass but break a product that could also look like lightweight fluff but keep things hot called Styrofoam and incredible new film that can preserve food for days called. Saran. Wrap there were a couple of clues about recycling inside the boxes from the industry's most powerful lobby group at the time the Society of the plastics industry their job was to lobby for the big oil and plastic companies. So think Exxon Chevron Dow Dupont. And there's this one memo from one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, three, the. Movement is just being born, and one of the top people in the plastics industry is talking about how the cost of sorting plastic is high but it seemed like a lot of the documents were were missing I find reference to a memo a report, but then I noticed that someone had drawn a line through it Lucas. Can I ask you a question absolute. Okay. Why? In this section are all. These APPS. So many of these. Cross out because those records are no longer. Here anymore day or not where did they go the society of the Plastics Industry Astra them back think they really yes is an unusual. That doesn't happen often. Do you do know why they took them. Did they say? I, do not know. Okay Of course, there are all kinds of reasons why an industry lobbying group might want. It's records back I did call society the plastic folks and ask them if I could see the records they took they said No. So I headed to another library this time at Syracuse University and they're buried in its tax, our boxes of files donated from an industry consultant. Actually the industry consultant died in the why found the boxes and gave them to Syracuse and inside these boxes. I found what I was looking for a report was sent to top oil and plastic executives in nineteen seventy three. It says, recycling plastic is nearly impossible. There is no recovery from obsolete products. It says recycling is costly sorting. It is infeasible plus it says plastic degrades every time you try to reuse it. So the oil in plastic industry new, they've known for almost fifty years. and. Then I found more confidential memos in meetings echoed decades of this knowledge insight thousands of pages of courtroom discovery. There's a speech from an industry insider in nineteen seventy four when it comes to recycling large quantities plastic, it says there is quote serious doubt that it can ever be made viable on an economic basis. Now. Okay. Sure. Anyone can take something plastic melted down and make something else. But what these documents are saying is that it's expensive, it's time consuming it's chemically problematic and it's just cheaper and easier to make plastic out of new oil instead of plastic trash there are all kinds of names in these documents men who have never spoken publicly before and there was one name I kept seeing over and over he. was, giving speeches at fancy hotels, hosting conferences and Berlin. Phoenix, they called him a bigwig. He was the industry's top lobbyist. Larry Thomas this is the man I had to find but do you know how many Larry Thomas's there are in the United? States. Thousands I'd call say are you the Larry Thomas used to work in plastics? Are you leery Thomas who used to be president of the Society of the plastics industry? And then finally, I'll prompt Merrin the plastics industry no getting around it the BIGWIG himself I'll walk. Do that's for sure. Yeah. My personal views certainly didn't always job with. US I had the quake as part of my job. That's the way it was there. He's retired now on the coast of Florida but I told him I've been reading all about his exploits in the world of plastic. Where would the offices the officers were? What would you think they would be K. Street yes. Twenty Five K. Street Casey was the heart of lobbying in Washington and it was in those offices at top executives in the world's most powerful oil and plastic companies met they had meeting after meeting about a little problem they were having there was just too much plastic trash consumers didn't like it. In one of the documents I found from nineteen nine, hundred nine Larry wrote the top oil executives at Exxon Chevron, Amoco Dow Dupont proctor, and gamble in a bunch of others he wrote the image of plastics is deteriorating at an alarming rate. We are approaching a point of no return. The classic. I was under fire. We gotta do. What it takes to take the heat off. Because we want to continue to make classic equality, they wanted to keep making plastic but the more you make the more plastic trash you get and the obvious solution to this is to recycle it but they knew they couldn't remember it's expensive. It's a great. Discussion about how difficult it was to recycle. They knew that the infrastructure wasn't there. So really have recycling amount to a whole lot. So they needed a different plan. Larry Decides to call a bunch of meetings at fancy hotels. He summons the Society of the plastics people executives Larry doesn't remember the specifics of each particular meeting but one of his deputies at the time Lou Freeman he remembers you could. Get. Back all the layers of my brain. Lou, remembers a bunch of meetings the basic question on the table was. You guys you're our trade association in the plastics industry aren't doing enough. We need to do more. This one dupont executive was telling Lou. It's your job to fix plastics imaging problem. So what do you need? You said, I think if we had five million dollars. which seemed like a lot of money. If we had five million dollars we could. We could. We could solve this problem. And My boss said in response. If you add five million dollars, you would know how to spend it effectively. Well, they came up with a way to spend five million dollars that and a lot more I. Remember this. This is one of these exchanges that sticks with me thirty five years later however long it's been. Anna was You know what we need to do is advertise our way out of it. That was the idea thrown out. The industry decided to advertise its way out of a can't recycle it problem. The possibilities off plastics plastics. From dense. Touted the benefits of a product that after it was used for the most part was headed to a landfill incinerator or even ocean. Look empty yet it's anything but trash it's full of potential. These commercials carried an environmentalist message, but they were paid for by the oil and plastic companies eventually leading to fifteen million dollars a year industrywide ad campaign promoting plastic. So I asked Larry why why spend tens of millions of dollars telling people to recycle plastic when the new recycling plastic wasn't going to work? and. That's when he said it. The point of the whole thing if the public thinks so recycling is working. Then they're not going to be concerned about the environment and if they're not concerned about the environment. Though keep buying plastic it wasn't just Larry in lieu who said this I spoke to half a dozen top guys involved in the industry at the time who all said plan was unfolding and it went beyond at the industry funded recycling projects and local neighborhoods expensive sorting machines that didn't make any economic sense school recycling contests. All of this was done with great fanfare. except I decided to go track down almost a dozen of the industry's biggest projects like the one where they were going to recycle plastic and national parks or the one that was going to recycle all the plastic and school lunches in New York they all failed and disappeared quietly but there was one more part of this campaign, the final piece that did stick around. That recycling symbol with the numbers in the middle this symbol has. So. Much confusion about what is and is not recyclable in the plan to stamp it on every plastic item popped up a lot in the documents I learned of a quiet campaign to lobby almost forty states to require that every single plastic item have this symbol stamped on it. Even if there was no way to economically recycle it, I should note that some. Environmental is also supported. The symbol thinking would help, separate and sort plastic but the industry knew the truth the symbols were causing problems. Warm report told executives in July nineteen ninety-three that the symbol is being misused. It's creating quote unrealistic expectations about what plastic people can recycle. It's being used as a green marketing tool, but the executives decided to keep the symbol anyway. I did reach out to plastic industry folks and they said that the symbols were only meant to help sort plastic and that they were not intended to confuse people but the symbol in the ads in the projects, all of this basically convince people Larry says the idea that the vast majority of plastic can be recycled was sinking in. Say that. After a while the atmosphere seems to change I. Don't know whether it was because people thought that recycling has solved the problem. was that they were just so in love with plastic products that they were willing to overlook the environmental concerns that were were mounting up. It's been thirty years now since most of those plans have been put into place and the public's feelings about plastic have started to shift again, people are reading stories about oceans choked with plastic trash and trace amounts of this stuff inside our bodies, and once again, people are wanting to ban plastic and the survival of the oil companies is at stake.

Larry Thomas Lucas Clawson Society Of Dupont Chemical Company Lou Freeman Dupont Laura Sullivan Sodium Nitrate Delaware Hagley Library Chevron Dow Dupont Exxon Syracuse University Phoenix Syracuse Consultant Berlin
"dupont chemical company" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

11:45 min | 2 years ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on WGN Radio

"To four AM so you're gonna do but just we start a little bit earlier we got an extra hour three one two nine eight one seven two hundred is the phone number for talking text coming up a a little bit later on comedian writer producer Josh goblins gonna join us my dad's got calling tell a joke because it's Monday to joke a joke you time tell a little bit earlier used to tell of the four forty five now we can tell at three forty five and you know we got most of coming up to best ensemble who done it movies weird inventions from this past year movies that were ruined by the RPG thirteen rating and more three one two nine eight one seven two hundred for talk text follows on Twitter at Nick the show we're stay connected on our Facebook page Facebook dot com slash Nick the show the Sunday night slash Monday morning movie reviews have kicked off earlier now for inaugural version of a of that and it's the propane Erik Childress talking about movies let's gets the back here hi Steve hello and Eric welcome back thank you Eric you're telling us about honey boy you wanna continue yeah I was pretty much done now just gonna say that you know not everyone is so lucky to have the opportunity to work out their personal demons in a big screen independent feature but I'm also big believer in second chances and hopefully that this movie and the little kind of report a resurgence he's had that special look also the peanut butter falcon this year the gifts Mr lebow back on the course that we had all anticipated form okay all right does see what you think yeah this this is good at this I've seen it a couple times then this is quickly becoming one of my favorite movies of the year the director's name is alma Haralson Israeli filmmaker that's primarily known for her documentary work and she's worked really over many years with with Shaila buff on this story and then sort of fine tuning it and there are moments where that that documentary skill really really show where we feel like we wandered into a room where an intense emotional battle is in progress at all we want to do it kind of get out of there and and and of course we can't either can they and then threw it all like this screen play makes no attempt to make excuses are explained anyone's behavior except to say that when circumstances are less than ideal we are capable of creating some remarkable ways to cope they even on healthy way sometimes and the fact that that that silent Bob it was to create this sort of this really personal screen play as a means to his own healing is is a gift to us and and then also hopefully it enabled him to like go through a healing process as well I I I will say the filmed in no way is a condemnation of parents who let their kids go into acting young here I mean if you like you mentioned before if you ever seen silent Bob acted the kid even back when he was a Disney kid you know that he had a genuine talent for performance that just got better and better especially in recent years in this no would you character who was also in fort versus four are you right now as a stand in for the above has just the set to arrive really similar screen presence that goes well beyond his age he's tough he's vulnerable he's always ready to perform any kind of it's kind of interesting to watch him adjust to his father's unstable moods and and and like I said guy a currency audience much like peanut butter falcon the origins of this movie are as interesting as the movie and I and you should seek those things out I I was looking to talk to the director recently one of the first things I did was thank her for putting warned John descending como back on the screen he's the therapists to diagnose is the older Otis with P. T. S. D. and that's what this is concerning his time with his father and I dislike inside before I even saw her face I heard her voice I knew with her off thank you for doing that it was so good to see here back on the big screen so at so basically this movie this made me realize if I ever get to meet Shaila buff again I'm gonna give the guy a big hug and thank you for making this movie because it is terrific yeah it's a terrific movie and he is unbelievable and do we know is anyone asked his his father seen this movie I think yeah his father thinks it's great okay all right it's pretty fair okay because I'll be a guy would be I was very interested to see what he was thinking who been it because how starkly honest it is and and intense at times but also really beautiful and the you know this is a major major work for for for shall above both as a writer and as an actor because obviously the very personal film he's working through some demons right in front of us and doing it genuinely and and openly and honestly our end and sometime shockingly and it's a great performance I think it's one of the best performances of the year and I I think everybody in the movie is really great looks I just know what you I think everybody does a great job and this movie works on on so many levels and says so many things and is clearly one of the most personal things I've ever seen an actor do I mean just working through this stuff he's working through right in front of us this really painful stuff without you know without you know like a sugar coating it at all that's one of the things that I really loved about and you're right the direction here I was not familiar with the director but the the direction here does feel like very raw and very real and it adds it adds immeasurably to the effectiveness of the movie but this is a movie that should be seen and and I think this is a a major major accomplishment for for Shaila buffalo I've always liked you know he's going through a period where you made some terrible movies and did some stupid things you know off screen but but I've always liked the guy I've always liked the guy and I also love that I you know it whenever I think childbirth and those weird but I think back to it a David Letterman interview he did many years ago where he was staying at the hotel across the street in the Walgreens on Michigan Avenue here in Chicago and you went out of middle of the night to get pimple cream at the Walgreens and he just tell you the story is just so funny and so well told I always think about the the the the pimple cream story whenever of childbirth is one of my favorite stories I've ever seen a the talk show in the fact that like I'm I'm familiar with that Walgreens and I've been there nine thousand times but the hotel that was across the street and so anyway that's I don't know why I brought that up as one of my favorite one of my favorite talk show stories of all time always been a fan of Shaila buff in this if you're finish I'll above you can't not see this because it's great really really great okay Steve you're the only one that has seen dark waters yeah right all right tools so we're in the late fall right now which is sort of the time known for being the place where a lot of hard hitting dramas hit right for award consideration I don't I don't know if I was quite prepared for just how much of a poignant gut punch of the film the dark waters with them to be at the latest film from Todd Haynes was Jennifer Connelly movie with the same title in the dark water okay yeah all right I think okay I'm not sure which is scarier that honestly but this is the true life story of Robert Balat who is played by mark Ruffalo either corporate defense attorney specializing in defending chemical company litigation on any decide to help out a a former friend of his grandmother's played by the fans that the farmer is played by the fantastic bill camp the the farmer's land and livestock and family have been ravaged by this pollution from a dupont chemical company that has leaked run off into the water supply and it turns out has a long history of this kind of pollution Honda tends to sort of overwhelmed by a lot with like hundreds of boxes of discovery files the thing that seen before but it it it's pretty great here and an army of attorneys though on the pop side but these roadblocks only really seem to Stoke the fires of this outrage so he risks his own career in the well being of his family including his wife Serra who's played by Anne Hathaway to uncover the truth and blocks lawsuit investigation link the company to a great number of deaths and diseases and birth defects in humans and animals in an entire community members of which are still quite loyal to depart from many of them work for the pot and not only that but he and covers of the company knew about these health issues for decades and did nothing and now we have to prove in court which is kind of with the the film really dives into the movie is based on a two thousand sixteen New York times magazine article and dark waters may seem like a David and Goliath story that we've seen in other sort of because films since like the nineteen seventies but this doesn't feel like a star vehicle for Ruffalo at all he looks like kind of a nerdy slub here he thought of it almost an anti hero instead the film always kind of does a great job of going back to the people who these countless hard working people especially bill camps character who joined the suit over the years who were the ones who are the real victims in this story does a really compelling job illustrating just how draining and all consuming assist before blocked the struggle was and it takes its toll on his health is relationships and his salary and his sanity is I mean the film takes place I think over the course of about twenty years ended the the role gives Ruffalo or a chance to really throw himself into this reminding us of the kind of acting he is capable of well before the hulk took over his life that's not a knock at the Marvel films but but this is clearly something different sort of equally chilling is the way dark water shows how powerful corporations maneuver their way into smaller towns with money and jobs and influence so completely take them over but to have them leave or cut back would destroy the community I I used to work for a newspaper in Wilmington Delaware for like three months and that's were dupont is headquartered and man every building in that city at dupont name one I remember that so well it and there's some great supporting work here from the likes of people like Victor Garber and they're winning hand bill Pullman is amazing as this is a local attorney that helps Balat C. dupont and into Robbins is here as as His sort of beyond patient boss at the firm this is Linda firm is losing money by working this case pro bono but also losing a lot of chemical company businesses because of the suit in in the the chemical companies are not exactly trusting of a a law firm that swing a chemical company when this was the defending them there are times when the film feels a little bit to detail oriented and sometimes we get lost in the endless number of names on both sides of the case but I gotta say Todd Haynes and company kind of allow the audience to get the details straight and to keep things from getting too confusing or overwhelming it's a sort of the kind of war the activists still making that feels like committed passion project which it clearly was for Ruffalo and it works on both an emotional level and one this is going to make its viewers angry beyond words and the last few title cards about.

producer Josh writer three months twenty years
"dupont chemical company" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

09:20 min | 2 years ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Here with knives out you gave three stars too dark what dark waters will remain a lot of people of Erin Brockovich another one of those stories about a crusader who's representing a lot of people gets a very powerful organization and in this case all based on a true story as Erin Brockovich of course was mark Ruffalo plays an attorney from West Virginia and a lot of farmers are say they have a lot of problems in the land the cattle are dying their children are having all kinds of illnesses they think it's because the dupont the giants dupont chemical company is dumping barrels of unknown substances in the river and they may have toxic levels that could be very poisonous mark Leff lighting is great play these earnest characters who really just car clinic quietly determined we have seen here we talked to one of the West Virginia farmers but also explain it this is gonna be an up hill battle the battle will be up hill it will be an up hill battle classic technical difficult I you'll face in an appeal battle nine of them right I had a bunch of we'll get to I'll give it three stars to this it's not a record which was very audience pleasing with Julia Roberts winning the Academy Awards it was very well done but you know they had a show chrome music it was a little almost like even though it has a lot of serious stuff because she you know the way Julie Roberts plays a role this is much more intense but it is a true story and this attorney spent more than twelve years representing these people who at deal suffered sometimes great injury some had died first the fax all came to a he actually eventually one one of the largest settlements in the U. S. courtroom history against upon because a little substance called teflon when it first came into the world there was maybe some dangerous level that's now but you know things change is off at the late nineteen nineties in the two thousand well the kind of change some of that there's been a roll back yes in the last two months there's actually an astonishing scene in this movie when the mark Ruffalo character comes home and halfway places wife they've got three young boys and he starts tearing up the entire house because it's not just the Pam cooking spray or not whatever the brand is but it's everything the route the carpets everything you could think of any look at our entire house let alone drinking water and worried about it because it is going to affect his family so mark Ruffalo gain weight for this role right he's doing that method thing a lot I mean he won't play the character ages and actually in real life his character realized that he was within it he was with the farm that usually defended the big chemical companies in environmental law type of thing and it goes away any and and actually courage and they said let's look into this this might be a case we can take on so it's that's originally games we he ages because the ages fifteen years of them yeah and also ages even more than that because he almost kills himself he works so hard he literally suffers a stroke one day because he's working so hard on this case it's him against five hundred attorneys on the other side wow three stars all right wrong work all right queen in slim queens lives we get a lot of publicity Daniel kalua people known from get out he was a Black Panther one of our best young actors this is the story that is fictional but feels like it could have happened there there's a young black couple on a first date the driving home in Cleveland Ohio a white police officer pulls them over things escalate and get quickly out of hand shots are fired you end up with a cop dead on the street and now queen insulin got to decide that they're going to call nine one one or wait for the back up this way what happened which probably not gonna go their way so what they do then is hit the road now the interesting thing here is to think about this they're going to get to Louisiana the maybe eventually Florida which means they're going to go through Kentucky and Tennessee in other words you have a young black couple on the run going through the Deep South and as their on the run the camera footage from the shooting is being played on national tat TV a lot of people are saying those are thugs who deserve to be brought to justice others are saying they're heroes that was a racist cop of a deadly shooting on his record already that was racially motivated Bristol headlines ripped from the headlines a lot of people going as the black Bonnie Clyde I think it's a lot more kid to Thelma and Louise his body clad were hardcore criminals from the start Thelma Louise in a fictional story they were good people who got put into a situation that's the case here these these two young people they've never been in trouble with the law before fact one of them is a criminal defense attorney but they realize it looks bad and they think their only way of surviving is to escape along the way they meet friends and foes shall we say some who want to help them out and keep them on the run who believe their folk heroes are putting their graffiti up on bill buildings and things like that songs being written about others who say if I see a mom turn the men fascinating film really intense on one of the great bass sound tracks you'll ever hear of the script is from the awaits was done a million great TV shows a shot and yeah in the end the size television series it's academy award level filmmaking and it's one of those movies that I think it's gonna resonate with a lot of people I'm giving it four stars it doesn't just give you one point of view and paint every single cop or every single fugitive forever single criminal in the same white it's much more intelligence and nuanced than that hi I don't think we deserve that here anymore hello mark smart movies also took but also is it it's way like it got a little bit of easy rider in it you know you got these people on the road the character they run into in the way their lives change and they kind of changed involved over the course of the journey as well wow four stars so this will you believe again Oscar nomination I don't know if we'll get an Oscar nomination the is of the some of the music probably will you know it's a really crowded field this year it appears to be interest more to come on that would be interesting to see how this film place all right wow okay so if you're gonna stay home with the family yes and you're gonna and you want to you want to start downloading stuff or streaming Jennings Disney plus Jeff went online two weeks ago to great fanfare and a little bit a heck up but it's it's up and working I bet you downloaded it myself regulations thank you I figured out how to do it I still can't figure out how we can get a little and the other things I want ESPN plus it allows you to Peyton place but it is a separate issue it's not about me so let's let's talk about the Mandalorian which was that's their big first effort right yet large to join in on this as well because she is seen these the Mandalorian as a standalone series from John Fabbro in the Star Wars universe and takes place just after the events of return of the Jedi correct I believe you said five years by either way ray mentioned multiple times that you know the empire's phone the entire song so it's it's pretty clear not to mention the storm troopers are kind of what's what's the word for them the kind of beating up the hill they're on their own mercenaries hired mercenaries and body guards because yeah the umpires are and the Mandalorian that's a bounty hunter so he's alone bounty hunter it's very much like a spaghetti western in space fees it's greedy I think and it's got a lot of the dark comedy you get to see all these blue your different interesting creatures and he has been tasked with tracking down the character everybody's calling baby yoga yes yes it's so obviously bounty hunter so he's going to find things to collect the bounty for breaking him back in a you can tell that there's the connection with the bombing under the helmets are very similar to that for the fat from the original series actually and baby your there's always speculation a what role be be to put that actually iota as a baby but it's the of the same species regularly iota is not spoiler baby in this time frame but a video to his captors internet oracle does he have the force or does he not we'll find out won't we I think a lot of you I I agree well it looks like it looks as good as the Star Wars yes every adult so it is vee's visually there's no cheap there's no discount is here it has that look and feel it has all these great and we're we're we're meeting some new supporting characters Carl weathers Apollo creed myself shows up it is great interesting human characters and great droids as well yes there's some interesting droids just when you think you've met all the droid you've ever would know in a Star Wars universe even as a minimal fan there's more to life and what they're doing what does the plus is doing it it is interesting with the series actually the some of the other streamers are doing this as well they're not dumping it all on you a one time write your what's the crown you know over the next sixteen hours you could do that but they're gonna drop three episodes which are about thirty minutes apiece forty minutes apiece they're gonna drop those yep three a week right is that how they're doing it no I think a new episode comes out every Friday I was yeah that was three and then now over the fence on the show but something like this they want to be a good old fashioned episodic TV has interesting how they're they're they're making that makes now because one of the things that they're realizing the streamers realizing is when they drop this stuff the way they've been driving it all once the you you can't you can't engage in a conversation about it because some people seem to hold out to people have seen all that and this now creates that social buzz that everybody's looking for all right percent good yeah really very exciting all right how many stars do you rate a half star for the Mandalorian yeah and I'm Disney plus only three episodes into and if you want to watch fantasia hundred thousand times I do that I'm just as well all right yeah that does it for this edition of the roe Conn show will be back with you out that they're selling full compilation we back with you on Monday tomorrow even very is filling in for us I thank him for doing that and we got Chicago Blackhawks hockey coming your way next it's.

Erin Brockovich attorney West Virginia giants mark Ruffalo thirty minutes fifteen years forty minutes sixteen hours twelve years five years two months two weeks one day
"dupont chemical company" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:10 min | 2 years ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Colitis a new film tells the story behind that discovery dark waters follows Cincinnati attorney rob a lot one day a West Virginia dairy farmer shows up at his law firm the farmer says all this cow is are dying and he thinks it's because the dupont chemical company is contaminating the water Sir I am a corporate defense attorney so I defend chemical companies well now you can defend make mark Ruffalo plays rob a lot both men recently came into our studios and ask them to describe the experience of filming and some of the places where this story played out in real life this is Rama I mean I I really think that was incredibly powerful to have the filming actually occur in the offices were a lot of the story took place and with the families that were involved there were several of the the folks there in the community in West Virginia that participated we wanted to center is much of it as we could on the actual community a lot of filmmakers would be afraid to do that even afraid to have rob around as much as we did why because those people would try to exert control of the story yeah I think it's comes out of a fear that maybe people won't feel comfortable the way the story is being told or even there's an ego dimension to it to just have heating you know the guy you're playing standing over your shoulder telling you and I I that didn't happen like that are you know I would have done that differently or but for me it was really freeing to have him there and poor rob by a deposition and I was gonna say the flip side of having somebody micromanage your performance who who you are playing is that you can turn to that person and say how would you do this does this seem realistic to the same actor can you give me an example of of when you did that on set yeah there is an actual deposition scene or rob a lot is deposing holiday the C. E. O. of dupont that's two ponds pregnancy study from nineteen eighty one does it look I could depart document it looks to be and I as an actor you wanted to go in and use that deposition to literally tear into dupont and all of their abuse and deception and you know you get the chance to find lead like me your address yeah and I asked rob and he said what I was really doing there was trying to lay out to him the things that they had done and who they affected so that he would do the right thing and it changes that seeing and it makes that seems so much more compelling seven pregnant women all dupont employees all from the tough online you see this here quote child form once one nostril I defect end quote yes two of the seven women nearly thirty percent gave birth to babies that have the exact facial deformities that your company already knew or done here part of what sets this story apart from other kind of legal David and Goliath type thrillers is that Bob you work corporate events attorney and your corporate defense attorney when you took this case so how risky did that feel at the time you know at the time we thought this was going to be a fairly straightforward project just representing one farmer right we had no idea at the time we were taking the son that we would discover this was a completely unregulated chemical and one that was not just there you know the farmer's property but in the water of the whole community and ends up in the water all over the world and everybody's blood when I started digging in and seeing those facts I just realized I've got to get this information out to people and hopefully once people see what's really happening here people understand this is a public health crisis DU Pont denies wrongdoing in the company has pushed back on the film saying the facts are not all accurate the current dupont CEO says he never witnessed a kind of behavior that we see in the movie rob they said that this is inspired by your life not based on what actually happened how do you respond to that this is rob I'll jump in first you know this is something I've been dealing with for a couple of decades now you know the company has its version of the facts and the you know I think folks can see the film and you know I've recently done a book so people have those resources and yet they can draw their own conclusions about who's got the actual version of reality here in the film it's clear that your actions really kind of divided the community and your colleagues as you were filming this in Cincinnati now having kind of litigated the whole arc of this case did it feel like everybody was on your side or did it feel like some people still looked at the project you know cross wise you know we're still talking about a community out in West Virginia that is you know it's a company town and there are still high I think hard feelings in that community between the folks that took on the company and the supporters of the company and hopefully people when they see what really happened and what this community went through hopefully those attitudes will start to change I I just want to add to that if you have what you know where did we come to an America where we have a choice between having a job and being healthy but you're talking about the fossil fuel industry or you're talking about farming and the pesticides that we're using people are choosing Hey listen yeah I'm like a cancer from this but at least I got a job and like that is such a sad state of affairs for American workers it is not a spoiler to say that you leave viewers with some really sobering information at the end about the pervasiveness of harmful chemicals around the world why not leave people feeling good like you got a court victory you got justice for these sick people why why why and on the note that you do because the store is not done it's still out there it's in our blood it's in the blood of nearly every living creature on the planet it you're talking about is PFOA that the chemical that was at the center of the litigation yeah that's in polar bears they found it in eagles it accumulates in us over time we can't get it out of our systems and in the end part of what the debate I think about this film should be and I think it's a debate that we're having nationally is do these systems that are made to protect us are they actually in service of us or are they in service of a corporate political system and that's why we can't and this movie with our hero driving away an S. U. V. and a happy ending mark Ruffalo and rob a lot thank you so much for talking with us today thank you thank.

Cincinnati attorney West Virginia thirty percent one day
"dupont chemical company" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on WDRC

"Today in seventeen eighty five one of many items dreamt up by this founding father Bank, robbers, Bonnie, and CLYDE died on this date in nineteen thirty four gunned down in a police ambush near sales, Louisiana, and that same day in nineteen thirty four the DuPont chemical company invented nylon. It's I use wasn't toothbrush bristles born on this day. Bandleader Artie Shaw, bought, sir marvelous, Marvin Hagler TV host drew Carey, and. The singer jewel I Mitch Davis. And that's your on this date update. You say we believe in God guns and good old glory. Believe that children should be taught to respect our great American flag, and we believe in freedom and liberty and the right to keep and bear arms. From three three. Three three. W DRC talk of Connecticut, celebrating one hundred years with a little bit of. Welcome back to LARs Larson show. Pleasure to be with you. Glad to get your calls to and on first amendment Friday.

Mitch Davis Marvin Hagler Artie Shaw LARs Larson DuPont chemical company father Bank CLYDE Louisiana Bonnie Carey Connecticut one hundred years
"dupont chemical company" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

09:09 min | 3 years ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Joyous. Happy easter. And we're in a very festive mood today because we're in fact, going to give away three different books cleaning out the old health libraries are books that have never been used. We often will get books sent to us from publishers asking and requesting that we interview people on the show that our author's books, and sometimes they send a couple of books. We don't need to just one for our health library. So sometimes we get some duplicates. And we have three books to give away today. And we're going to start taking phone calls into the show. Everybody who gets on the air asks health question or make say health comet we'll be entered into the pool to win one of these incredible books. We're giving away today. Very valuable, and if you're wondering what the books are let me give you the titles of the books. The first one is in titled the top twenty life-changing neutral. Reinforced by Dr ward bond, that's an opportunity for you to win. Should you? Call into the show ask a question about healthy to riveting or lame. It doesn't matter. The only bad question about health is the one you're not asking the second book is entitled the five factor diet. This is a diet that will help people lose weight. It's the diet. That's changing Hollywood. According to US weekly. And the third book is entitled one thousand ways to be a slightly better woman. How to be thinner how to be richer to be sexier to be kind or how to be saner and outta be happier. That's the third book, and you'll have the opportunity to win one of those three books, should you? Choose to call it in the program today and simply ask a health question or make a health comment, you'll be entered into the pool. The panel of judges will draw the names out at the end of each hour for the winter beach book ad we'll let you know about it. Get into the show eight eight five five three seven two six two one. Triple eight fifty five Dr Bob, that's D R B O B on your touchtone phone one triple eight five five three seven two six two. Now, if you're new to the program. Welcome. And welcome back to a regular listeners. But for those people who are new to the show, and they may not realize or understand what kind of questions are fair game or what they can actually call it to the show and ask about let me get your quick rundown here just to a broad brush of what we can discuss from ginger Vitus to gall bladder problems from pain to pimples ringing in the year, two ringworm anxiety to arthritis or maybe you have allergies. Maybe it's heartburn. You wanna lower your blood pressure or lower your cholesterol, free any one of those or any other health question that you have I'll do my very best to try to answer your phone. Call. The only question is when you're not asking so call in right now. And till Dr Bob where it hurts. And also have the opportunity to win a free health book that has never been used one of three books that I just mentioned all right now, let's get to the business of and again our phone number into the show nationwide. You're invited in with a health question or health comet eight eight eight five five three seven two six two. That's one triple eight fifty five Dr Bob or eight eight eight five five three seven two six two. L let me back up just a bit. And talk about last week's health poll question, we had a hell poll question last week. And if you were around, you know, we asked the question related to would you as an adult consume a nutritional supplement that contained breast milk because apparently, and I just found this out. That's the hottest thing going right now companies are racing to produce. A formula for adults not children, not babies. But for adults that contains breast milk. A new report says companies. Are looking at these supplements. For adults contained breast milk. They're trying to raise into the market. And we're talking about big companies like DuPont. Chemical company and glide com are just two of the big brands developing what they call H M O. That's human milk, only go Sakarai, they hope to earn billions of dollars in doing. So they believe a growing swell of studies is showing that breast milk could boost gut health it everybody, not just babies but adults as well. And based on that data that information that science they're going to make an attempt concerted attempt to educate adults that breast milk in supplementation form, not sure how it's going to be delivered. Whether it's you know, you put it in your smoothie as a powder, you take it as a pill potion about or whatever it may be. That's what they're doing. So we asked the following question of our listeners last weekend on the show. And the question was would you take a food supplement containing breastmilk? Yes, or no, we've got our information and our data and here the results of those people who went over to my personal website at Dr Bob dot com. That's DO C T O R, Bob dot com and voted on the question, would you take a food supplement containing breast milk? Here are the results. Seventy one percent of you said, yes, you're down on that. You're you're all for it. You would you take a breast supplement breast food supplement as an adult. Whereas twenty nine percent of you who voted on the question said, no. So guess what the as habit, and I'm gonna turn to my co pilot of the show here in just bounce set off him one time here. I don't know if I've asked you or not yet Darren you're on the other side of the glass here running the show co-pilot of the program doing all the heavy lifting. How would you answer that question, sir? Would you take a food supplement? Let's say, well, what are your friends, or what are your co workers there and says to you? Hey, look Darren. There's this incredible food supplement you should be taking it. I'm taking it. I'm feeling a lot better. And you say, well, let's it what's it all about. Well, it's it's breast milk in a pill or capsule. Would you take that there knowing that's breast milk? Have no problems long as I know it's in a pill. I couldn't drink it. But if it's in a pill on we're not asking, you know, swallow it, but it'd be impaled potion her powder, some four, okay. You're on the side. And that you're with the majority of people seventy one percent of people said, yeah, they do it. Now. Let's see I was surprised at the number. I did not expect that high in number going down on the breast milk supplementation. Because most people go, you know, it's only for babies and children. I wouldn't do that know what's going on these big companies are now thinking that's the next biggest, you know, the next biggest -ociety or or go gee berry. It's going to be milk. I'm not sure who's going to be providing the breast milk. Not sure we'll find out. Anyway, thank you. Once again for participating in that poll, ladies and gentlemen, we're gonna be talking about our Facebook posts one of them was highly. Controversial this last week. I think you're gonna Choi this then we'll get to your phone calls and questions Dan by it's the doctor Bob Martin show. Got into gestion gas bloating your symptoms could be caused by an imbalance of the good versus bad bacteria in your intestinal track. Stress. Fast food xrays antibiotics, they are all part of modern life. They can decrease your good intestinal bacteria leading to a rise of bad bacteria.

Dr Bob Dr ward bond Dr Bob dot Darren US weekly Bob dot Facebook DuPont bloating ginger Vitus Bob Martin Hollywood D R B O Sakarai Choi Dan
"dupont chemical company" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"This nice. The answer. Mostly clear thirty eight degrees. What's going on? We of the answer. The head of the House Judiciary committee says attorney general Bill bars agreed to testify about the final report on Russian interference in the twenty sixteen election brilliant reports democratic chairman Jerry Nadler didn't say win VAR would go before the committee Nadler said bar wouldn't commit to making the full report public. But reiterated that public version of the report would be available in a matter of weeks, not months Nadler and other top Democrats in the house wanted the report by April second, but bar said he wouldn't have it ready by then bar released a summary of special counsel, Robert Mueller's final reports Sunday, Brian shook NBC News Radio. The state attorney general is announcing New Jersey, assuming the DuPont. Chemical company for polluting the soil and water around one of its former plant some Pompton lakes, attorney general Gerber. Greenwald says DuPont knew that a procedure carried out at its condition factory. Could contaminate the water, but the chemical P F A S, which is classified as a likely human carcinogen and that can cause kidney liver into. Particular cancer as well as auto immune disorders and adults gray. Wolf says the lawsuit filed force DuPont to pay for the cleanup and sports and the NHL the Rangers lost a Boston six to three checking the traffic on the George Washington Bridge, the outbound lower level with a left lane closure under the apartments till five AM for construction left lane construction on the cross Bronx west between the Degan and the Alexander Hamilton bridge and New Jersey bound on the outer bridge crossing the construction blocking the right lane. There is construction in the right lane in the Long Island expressway westbound between junction, and queens boulevards you now.

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"dupont chemical company" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Are included in the band that's in effect for at least a month. New Jersey is filing a lawsuit against one of the world's largest chemical producers. New Jersey is suing DuPont. Chemical company for polluting the soil and water around one of its former plants in Pompton lakes. Attorney general Kabeer gray will are sending a strong message to polluters that no matter how big you are. Or how powerful you are. Or how long you've been getting away with contaminating our state's natural resources. We are going to hold you accountable. Says DuPont new procedure carried out at its amunition factory. Could contaminate the water with a toxic chemical known as pizzas which can cause kidney liver and testicular cancer as well as autoimmune disorder in adults. I'm Bob Brown for seventy seven w ABC news. President Trump says his administration's latest court challenge to the Affordable Care Act opens the door for even better healthcare options. But New York democratic Senator and minority leader Chuck Schumer says striking down Macaire would harm millions who benefit from it. The president wants to go back to repeal and replace again make our day the Republicans here in the Senate tried over and over and over again. To deal with repeal and replace they couldn't because they have no replacement. The president says Republicans will be the party of healthcare. He's also putting pressure on Venezuela. Undisputed leader nNcholas Maduro Russia's to get out. President Trump sitting next to Fabriano rule. Solace. Wife of one Guido the man the US recognizes as legitimate leader of Venezuela. Russia is building a small military presence there to support the regime of nNcholas Maduro the US and other nations have sanctions on Venezuela, including it's nationalized oil company. They've got a lot of pressure right now. They have no money. They have no oil. They have no nothing. They got plenty of pressure right now. So we'll see they have no electricity other than military. You can't get any more pressure than they have military, meaning a US invasion, which the president won't take off the table. But seems very unlikely neighboring countries are trying to push out as well. Bob Costantini, the White House. The Dow down fifty three points, the NASDAQ down forty four the SAP down twelve and now your forecaster in the Ramsey Subaru.

president President Trump Venezuela nNcholas Maduro Russia US DuPont New Jersey Pompton lakes testicular cancer Chuck Schumer Bob Brown Bob Costantini Senate ABC New York Kabeer gray Attorney White House Russia
"dupont chemical company" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Jersey is suing the DuPont. Chemical company for polluting the soil and water around one of its former plants in Pompton lakes, attorney general Gerber gray wall says DuPont knew that a procedure carried out at its Pompton lakes ammunition factory. Could contaminate the water with a chemical that can cause kidney liver and testicular cancer. But kept on polluting anyway, or sending a strong message to polluters that no matter how big you are. We are going to hold you accountable. Many neighbors in Pompton lakes have come down with cancer. They say it's all related to what went on at the now closed DuPont plant. The attorney general says the lawsuit filed will force DuPont to pay for soil and water cleanup in Pompton lakes, no-one Laden for seven ten w o war mayor de Blasio says the city is filing a lawsuit against ballyhoo media because he says the advertising companies floating East River billboards are distracting drivers. And bicyclists lawsuit accuses ballyhoo of repeatedly violating cities owning laws that restrict water base ads that are visible from highways. The Powerball jackpot for tonight is sitting at seven hundred fifty million dollars. Well, this jackpots the fourth largest in US history. And if you one you have about as much money as Bryce Harper and Mike trout will make combined with their new record, setting baseball contracts. So what would you do with it all give some to charity? Some to family move out of New York. Probably by house, our give a large chunk of it to the poor people. The odds of winning one in nearly three hundred million chance getting hit by lightning than winning this stuff. I you don't win in New York. Everybody usually wins in another state in lower Manhattan. I'm Scott Pringle for seven ten WR. But they do win. A New York Brooklyn truck driver, hit a two hundred ninety eight million dollar Powerball jackpot back in December and Ohio man has the last perfect NC double A tournament bracket. NCWA officials say Greg Nigel of Columbus is the only person who's correct? Picked all forty eight games. So far in the men's basketball tournament next up. We check out the forecast.

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"dupont chemical company" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

09:16 min | 3 years ago

"dupont chemical company" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"This segment is Dave Phipps, Indiana normal. They've been pushing to reform the state's marijuana laws. Pick comes to medicinal marijuana up. Something David mentioned laughs up segment of circle back on is the fact that so many states around Indiana. Whether it's my home state of Illinois, Michigan Ohio have have legalized marijuana to one degree or another. I'll looks like he's going the industrial hemp route. What does that tell you that Indiana seems to be surrounded by place that are going green so to speak? Well, that tells me that not only are we way behind as we are on many other issues. I mean, this is a great state, and we're doing great things in so many areas, but you know, that we are behind and other areas, and this is one of them, and you know, we have an ever growing fast number of citizens in our neighboring states that are becoming medical canvas patients or consumers in these are people that are fully aware that if they bring their. There medicine, for example to this day, they will go to prison or they risk that and they're going to avoid this state. So this is an ever growing number of people in our neighboring states that once came to visit us now, avoiding our state not paying gas tax not paying hotel tax not paying all of this taxes. They're even if they're just passing through there. Now going around to save the risk of jail time. You know, that's worth if I'm in Ohio, and I know a medical campus patient, and I know I can go up through Michigan and then down through end Illinois to get to my family members in Illinois and stuff crossing through this island called Indiana. Then I'm going to do that to void Jill time. And there are a lot of people avoiding us now. Because of that issue are also on the flip side of that too. Are you hearing seen hearing stories about people literally say me live near the Kentucky, Ohio, Michigan or Illinois border? Literally driving ten fifteen miles. Ten fifteen minutes now to go get whatever they may need, and then come back almost sort of almost draw parallels. The old thing about Sunday alcohol sales. You couldn't buy it on Sunday in Indiana. So we just basically went across the border to go get whatever you wanted or needed. That's absolutely, right. As you know, right now, Michigan. They are recreational. They don't have any dispensaries opened selling recreational right now, but citizens in Michigan concurrently grow legally, they can grow their own recreational cannabis in they can give this cannabis as gift for as a gift, for example. There's legal ways to make transactions with this. And it's happening right now. And there are a lot of people, including our veterans going up there to seek medicine that way because they can't get here the right way. And you know, this is not only going to grow. This is not only going to increase the number of hoosiers that are being arrested and separated from their families. But this is also going to increase the number of hoosiers that decide to just stay there. They go there to get this. And they they see how good is how good they. They're doing with this medication. And or just if they're doing it recreationally, even they're not risking jail time, and they want to choose that over Oklahoma for recreation per possession their prerogative they're not that doesn't make them a bad person or criminal. But they're seeing the this is a good thing. And they're moving on up there and staying put, and we're just, you know, we're losing hoosiers every year, and I can't help. But think the cannabis law is part of that problem and contributing to it one things that my friends with prosecutorial community will say as rumors of no great times would legalize marijuana gross exaggerated. They talk about known trees accidents, workplace, injuries employers, have an drug tests, etc. Do they have a point? We'll you know as far as. Driving under the influence of cannabis. You cannot compare cannabis to alcohol with driving under the influence or two different beasts now, I'm not saying people should go driving under the influence. Absolutely not. It can definitely affect your driving ability and hinder your driving ability and people should act responsibly when they're using cannabis, but you know, that reasoning that the prosecutors want to use that is a concern that we can deal with in legislation as we're passing it. But then you know, if they're really concerned about this. Why are they not lobbying to outlaw alcohol? You know, there are a lot of people dying from alcohol alcohol is technically one of the deadliest if not the deadliest one of the deadliest drugs in the country, you know, overall when you look at how many people are actually dying from alcohol abuse, whether it's from liver damage longtime abuse or if they want to quit drinking. They could die from that. You know, why are prosecutor friends not lobbying to make that illegal and put people in prison for that. They're not doing that. Because it wouldn't make sense. And for the same reason that doesn't make sense they shouldn't be lobbying to Keith cannabis. Illegal and be putting are innocent hoosiers in prison for this is just the same logic just apply here. That's all. And if this also has medicinal value to help hoosiers. Hey, use it for that. But in the meantime, while you're figuring this out on the medicinal value. Stop arresting people in separating family, stop taking fathers and mothers from their children over this. It's not good our guest, David Pepsi is with Indiana normal who's been pushing for reform of the state's medical marijuana admitted states marijuana laws for that matter David is this basically for lack of better term. I'm trying to say this a generational issue. When it comes to legalize marijuana. Yeah. I think so. And as we see more of the earlier generation, leaving our state house and more of the younger generation moving on in. We are gaining more and more support in the state house. And yes, it is a generational thing. But it's not totally. I mean, we do have some of you legislators in the state house that are supportive of us. But yeah, it does seem like it's more. You know, our age group and younger that supportive of it. Because for whatever reason they see the reasoning and the logic that are older generation is not seeing probably because of the propaganda that was put out there in earlier days. You mean like Reefer madness? Oh, man. The worst movie ever that was awful to think if I've never known anyone to smoke pot to play the piano that fast. Never never. I have a theater background. I did theater by younger days. I never knew anybody who smoked pot to ever play the piano that fast. It was it was just not humanly possible more like a slow waltz best. If that is what cannabis did I think maybe it would already be legal because. Everyone loves a good piano. But I'll tell you. I just want to make sure that everyone is aware of what's really happening in Indiana on this issue and make sure that the that they're aware that this is only going to change in the state of Indiana. If we all get together at events and on social media and internet all get together contacting our legislators and make sure they don't believe this stuff in the Reefer madness. That Abdul just mentioned if you haven't seen Reefer madness, you should watch. It just for the laugh alone to think that lawmakers actually believed the rhetoric that was in that movie. It's it it boggles my mind and guarantee, it'll it'll confuse you as well. And to think that is why is main reason it was made a legal the same people who funded Reefer madness. The people who ran DuPont chemical company back in the day that is who lobbied against industrial. Camp and cannabis they wanted to tide altogether. And that's what made it illegal in the first place. And when you look at the history behind it like that boy, this is what our legislators are supporting the thinking of those lawmakers in the thirties. He's a joke. I tell people if ever watch Reefer madness, you're gonna need refer because you won't be believe what you're watching. Because just so it's it's ridiculous. My friend. Obviously does look like a medical marijuana is going to go anywhere this session. So what are you folks? Do. What's what's next in your fight? Okay. Next in our fight. Is you know, recently in the news if you haven't seen you should Google check it out. We have we recently lost a who's your child to epilepsy? Little Charlie Curtis and her parents has been have been on the news recently discussing how they lost their child and to epilepsy and how they believe medical cannabis could have helped because they gave this child THC and they saw firsthand the reduction in seizures for this child. But sadly, it was too little too late and they lost their child. We're we're dedicating our four twenty event at the governor's mansion this year too little Charlie Curtis, and we want everyone there, we want a huge crowd there to show our governor that there are real people being affected by this law. This is not a money issue. We're talking about this is not a law enforcement being concerned with with. Things they shouldn't be concerned about on the cannabis issue. This is about real patients and real people and real lives that are being affected, and we need a huge crowd out there to show our governor that this had really does have the support that we're saying has you have the opportunity to join us on four twenty in front of the governor's mansion to help us save Hoosier lives and reduce suffering. All right. Well, I guess they has been David David as an advocate for marijuana decriminalization as well as medicinal David normal. They've hips. Thank you very much stopped by debut. Appreciate it, my friend. Thank you. Do. Appreciate your heavens. You're listening to the weekend edition of the large here. The invitation to Lexus is not sent like other invitations. It is.

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