35 Burst results for "Duke University"

The Hoaxes of the Left

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:30 min | 3 months ago

The Hoaxes of the Left

"So there's a new, a new hoax. There's quite a few every year. The latest was at duke university, which was home to the infamous hoax about the lacrosse team raping black woman. Also a hoax. I want to make clear why I believe there are so many race hoaxes because they're so little racism. Jews did not make up any anti semitic hoaxes in Germany in the 1930s. They didn't have to. There was too much real antisemitism. We make them up here because they're so little racism. So you have to invent them. Also, it's the hoax creator gets a lot of attention. That's fun. So we have a woman on the duke was at volleyball, the duke women's volleyball team. Duke again, another waistline duke. Another forest calling itself a university. In terms of commitment to truth and learning, prager university has a greater right to call itself a university than Yale does.

Duke University Volleyball Germany Duke Prager University Yale
72% of Top Medical Schools Use Racial Politics to Eliminate Candidates

Mark Levin

01:18 min | 3 months ago

72% of Top Medical Schools Use Racial Politics to Eliminate Candidates

"72% of America's top medical schools use racial politics to eliminate applicants Did you know this According to the review 72% of the nation's top 50 schools and 80% of the top ten as quote probing questions to elicit responses from the applicant about his or her views on diversity equity and inclusion topics What is your thought about heart disease Well I believe in equity The duke university school of medicine ranked number 6 in the country boasted it has been nationally recognized I quote for its commitment to equity diversity and inclusion In an essay prompt for applicants to the school admissions asks potential sources of health inequities include race gender education income disability geographic location and sexual orientation But what a country Moments to movement M two M is duke's collective staying against systemic racism and injustice This is in the question The name signifies going beyond passive moments of reflection and becoming more active As we build to make lasting change for our patients their loved ones and each other describe your understanding of race and its relationship to an equities in health and healthcare

Duke University School Of Medi Heart Disease America Duke
"duke university" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

The Breakdown with Shaun King

07:49 min | 3 months ago

"duke university" Discussed on The Breakdown with Shaun King

"When you're traveling with so many people and on the road, it's not easy, but I'm glad to be back home. I'm glad to be right back here with you. Of course, there's so much going on in the world as always. But I want to talk about something that I saw this weekend and this past week. And I was itching actually to get on social media to talk about it, but I tried to get myself some time off. A young black woman who is a student athlete at duke university on their volleyball team, a brilliant volleyball player, was being chanted and taunted rather with racist chants by students at Brigham young university and duke was playing Brigham young, also known as BYU. And the young woman's godmother posted what is now a super viral tweet thread about what she heard and witnessed in saw for herself. And what she described were multiple fans openly calling her goddaughter. A student at duke university, the N word. Open openly calling her the N word, in front of people. And other fans openly and repeatedly taunting her with racist taunts throughout the game. And BYU absolutely failed. And I've seen this may or may not come as a surprise to some of you, but a lot of people talk about the deep racism in Utah. And several NBA players, black NBA players that I know will say over and over again, the most racism they ever endure is when they play in Utah. The most bigotry and discrimination and ugliness they get, they get in Utah. And I saw several prominent white people in Utah, who were not at these volleyball matches, had nothing to do with this, say, hey, everybody, we really need to talk about the racism in Utah. These are white people in Utah. BYU failed tournament officials failed NCAA officials, raft staff and others who were at these volleyball matches, all failed this young woman. And it was a complete systems failure. When someone is being taunted with open racism and bigotry, you have to stop the match. You have to force that person and anybody else who is being openly racist out of the place and you need to intervene right there in that moment. And officials who could have done so didn't. And while it was primarily, I don't even know if I feel primarily. While it was certainly, the responsibility of BYU officials in NCAA officials who were there, the staff and coaches of duke university. From her own team, probably had the most power of anybody to say, hold on here. We hear racist taunts being leveled at our player and we will not continue until they stop in our acknowledged and whoever's responsible is put out. And they literally probably should have announced this over the intercom, saying, if anything like this happens, now or for the rest of the day or ever again, you will never be a part of anything here, period point blank dot com. Don't do it. Don't try it. You'll be in trouble if it happens. But duke university to my knowledge, to my understanding, also failed in that moment. And I want to use this as a teachable moment for us because yes, staff and officials from BYU should have intervened. Those who were hosting the tournament and staffing the tournament should have intervened. But when anybody around you is being discriminated against or experiencing racism or bigotry, and you are a person in power, particularly if that person is on your team or on your staff, you need to step up. And that was the moment where duke university officials and staff and coaches and others should have said, hold on, we won't play under these conditions. We won't force any of our teammates and team members to play under these conditions. We will never play here again. Under these conditions, and we will discourage anybody else from playing here again under these conditions. And it should have stopped and halted right then and there. Listen, and I'm not I'm particularly speaking to white people. But I'm speaking to anybody in power when you are supervising a scenario. Where you see or witness or hear of racism, bigotry, or we can widen the tent, massage any discrimination, whatever. You have to intervene to stop it right there. And it doesn't matter if you are the quote unquote person in charge. If you're the ones hosting it, you have to step up and say, nope. This will not happen on my watch. And while the people of Utah and the people of BYU deserve a significant amount of blame, duke university is getting off a little bit here. Because they should have intervened and that should have been a moment where this young black woman, instead of feeling abandoned, felt seen valued treasured by duke enough for duke to say, no, no, no, no, no, no. You're going to stop this? We're done playing until it stops. And if it happens again, and here's what has to happen, like your team, I'll just speak of sports. I don't care if it's anything from elementary school, through pros, your team needs to go ahead and create a plan on what you'll do if racism happens on your watch. Go ahead and work it out. Here's what we'll do if we experience or any of our players or staff experience racism during a match or game. Here's what we'll do. So that when racism happens, you're not having to think in the moment, but you've already game planned it out. That's what you need to do. And you need to do it for sports and a lot of other spaces. I'm disappointed at how this went down. I'm not surprised. Because I hear over and over again about

BYU Utah duke university volleyball NBA NCAA Brigham young duke
Mo Brooks: Our Inflation Crisis Was Caused by Self-Inflicted Wounds

The Dan Bongino Show

01:53 min | 6 months ago

Mo Brooks: Our Inflation Crisis Was Caused by Self-Inflicted Wounds

"And then when we printed all that money and spent it and we didn't have the supply chain to back it up of course the prices of the products went up Is any of this rocket science I mean this was taught to you when you went to school for economics correct Like this was very predictable By way of background I graduated with distinction and economics at duke university So I do have some education in economics And I have looked at economic issues for decades now of course you've got Jimmy Carter with the economic malaise associated with his administration and the inflation that we have today And I've been advising people that it's only a matter of time before these bad economic policies come back to bite us The difference between the economic malays and Jimmy Carter is much of that was inflicted from without with OPEC doing what they did and monopolizing all production and artificially jacking up prices What's happening now These are all self inflicted wounds When you have a $30 trillion debt you borrow $7 trillion of the last three years alone That's going to devalue the value of the U.S. dollar which in turn means you got to pay more dollars to buy whatever it is you're going to buy And then you add on to it the very bad response to COVID where we attacked our own economy we paid people not to work but what happens when you pay people not to work that interrupts the supply chain not as much as on the shell So you have to pay more in order to get it And it doesn't end with that there are other things I'll give you another example The Biden administration day one attacked energy production for energy that's going to be consumed in the United States of America That cuts down on the supply of energy particularly oil what's the net effect of that That drives that pricing So all of this is economics one O one so long as you don't go to the same university that AOC went to

Jimmy Carter Duke University Opec Biden Administration United States Of America AOC
Rep. Jamie Raskin Fails to Report Wife's Huge Stock Payout

Mark Levin

01:35 min | 10 months ago

Rep. Jamie Raskin Fails to Report Wife's Huge Stock Payout

"Then we have Jamie Raskin Remember him the red his father was had ties to other reds He found a report huge stock payout for his wife Beautiful wife He goes around on Jamie Raskin They think that's the wife They think the wife's name Jamie No it's the congressman His wife's name is Sarah bloom Raskin And she was nominated last month by Biden to service the Federal Reserve vice chairman for supervision That's how the reward the raskins Raskin's been on the two impeachment committee I believe he's on the January 6th committee He led the second impeachment trial And of course his father was an old red and he's a chip off the old block And my humble opinion In Sarah bloom Raskin is a duke university law professor held high level positions at the department of treasury and the fed Under Barack hospital Benito Obama of course her nomination has been welcomed by radical cook leftists Radical cook left us She believes strongly in climate change And that it can endanger the federal banks independence or partisanship So of course somebody who has a climate change ideology Needs to be heading or be one of the top people at the fed We all know

Jamie Raskin Sarah Bloom Raskin FED Raskin Department Of Treasury Biden Jamie Benito Obama Duke University Barack
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"We're going to at least not do any more harm than human drivers when we start to introduce these technologies the as you look forward. Five years some education perspective from an academic perspective. What would you. What would you change. I'm thinking specifically about and applications and making it more reliable more practical. What would be from an academic perspective that you would. You would focus on if i was the grand poobah off academia i fantasize about this all the time. Well the very first thing that i would do if i could wave a magic one is that i would make all Computer science education free at the community college level across the country. Because i think we need that. I think understanding software and software code is. It's almost like another language that everyone needs to they. Don't have to be experts at it. You don't have to be a hacker. But i would like people just to be at least more familiar with these environments so i think we should have community college education free for anyone who wants to take computer science classes. I think we need to university. Need to to train all majors to have some basic coding ability. I don't care whether you're in liberal arts engineering and of course the liberal arts majors don't want to hear this but i think that that indeed than liberal arts majors you know they are digital art. Example is is huge upcoming so this would actually even help. I think you know i. I'm at a big liberal arts school duke university. I see where technology is going and it can help everyone. It's a tool in a toolbox right so why not give people the tools that they need to be successful just like learning how to read and write. Why aren't we putting coding out there for people to understand the basics and how to at least use the tools if not invented tools themselves And then the next big change our would make in and this is specifically an engineering including computer science and i would also jerk all the journals and make them start demanding this. We have got to start holding academics accountable for the claims that they make in their papers. We need to invest way more and testing and certification valuation of our technologies. So if you're going to have somebody come out and claim that their neural net is x. Percent better than somebody. somebody else's neural net. Than i think we should be. Not just these carefully. Curated data sets that you get on cagle for example but we should. We should start making people use these algorithms in the real world so that they can start characterizing the uncertainty indeed i would start an entirely kinda derivatives field which is a hybrid of statistics in engineering is an risk management. Like how do we start characterizing. The uncertainty around the systems that we design even if those systems just algorithms that makes sense. Excellent assistant great missy. Thanks so much for spending disney. I hope it's been helpful. Thank you thanks This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics and researchers on variety of topics. If you like to sponsor this sport gassed please reach out to info. At scientific sense dot com.

liberal arts school duke unive cagle missy disney
Dan Ariely on How To Win Big by Betting on Human Capital

Odd Lots

02:17 min | 1 year ago

Dan Ariely on How To Win Big by Betting on Human Capital

"We're going to be speaking with den orioli his famous behavioral economist at duke university and he is also the co founder of a firm called irrational capital. This formed five years ago. And it pursues the idea of looking at a company's human capital factor as a as something that could drive out in an investment to. I don't even know. The human capital factor is. But i'm excited to hear Dan talk about it and what he's learned in five years dan. Thank you so much for coming on odd. Lots my pleasure to be here. Well first of all. I love the name irrational. I love the name irrational capital. It's perfect but i'm curious. What is the founding story of this the funding stories. I'm a university professor. I do research on few things but among them human motivation and in my academic career. I've from time to time. I go to company and i change things around by change bonuses. I tried to increase productivity. Tried to get people to care more about work in my my experience has been. It's always been very easy to come and improve what people do in increasing evasion because most companies. Just don't think about this very carefully if you think about age ourem. Hr is usually a function that is about legal issues in. I don't know training modules. Yeah but but it's not really a function that says let's just get the best out of people just think about. How do we motivate people. How do we get people to come happy to work. So i've been doing this for a long time and it's it's easy to do and it's it's it's helpful but when i met david my partner me whether i think that we could also look at something broader the consent of one company to time whether there's some way to look at companies see how they treat their employees how the employees feel about the company. And whether this could predict stock region. And i said i don't know what the answer. I don't know this the standard answer but we can try it out so we went on the hunt for data to see whether this hypothesis would albano not and it turns out it holds very

Den Orioli Irrational Capital Duke University DAN David Albano
How Mental Floss Evolved Over Its 20-Year History

The Business of Content

01:53 min | 1 year ago

How Mental Floss Evolved Over Its 20-Year History

"Hair. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. So you're the editor in chief of mental floss. Can we start with giving listeners. A little bit of context as to what mental floss is. It started as a print magazine right. Yes it actually was founded in a duke university dorm in two thousand one by two college students and Since then it has evolved into a website for curious minds where you can basically find You know answers to life's big questions or really fun and strange facts or interesting stories that you didn't know you needed to know And since we started the website has been visited by a billion people which is wild. So tell me a little more content focus so like it's it's not. It's not a newsy type magazine. A lot of its content is very evergreen. How would you describe like from land like an elevator. Pitch have what. What kind of world view is yes. So basically we are looking as you said kind of evergreen stuff were not You know we do cover like newsy stories but there are version of newsy stories. They're quirky they're interesting So we're not part of that news rat race which is nice because i do think people kind of look at mental floss as a bit of an escape from that And you know we're focusing on like weird historical stories and You know fun facts and and things of that nature. Speaking of fun facts. I i read that Mental floss print magazine made a cameo on friends. It did. it's actually been. I think it was on friends twice And it's been on a bunch of other tv shows including the oa and the magicians so Yeah for whatever reason. We've got fans in hollywood wishes which is nice.

Duke University Mental Floss Print Magazine Hollywood
Self-Driving Cars Might Never Be Able to Drive Themselves

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

01:22 min | 1 year ago

Self-Driving Cars Might Never Be Able to Drive Themselves

"This week. The california dmv said it's reviewing whether tesla is telling people that it's cars are self driving when legally speaking they're not this follows. Fatal crashes that may have involved. It's autopilot feature tesla advertises a quote full. Self-driving upgrade option. One guy has been busted tesla's multiple times for reckless driving. He hangs out in the backseat and steers with his feet. Meanwhile no cars are actually fully. Self-driving yet missy cummings. The director of the humans autonomy lab at duke university says the so called deep learning. That cars need to see the road around them. doesn't actually learn. I can show a convolution. Neural net a million images of a stop sign and it will learn what a stop sign is from those images but if it sees a stop sign that doesn't match exactly those images then it can't recognize it and this is a huge problem because if a strand of kudzu leaves starts to grow across just the top twenty percent of a stop sign that is enough to make the algorithm be dumb and it doesn't recognize it because it's never seen a stop sign with one stranded kudzu leaves across it.

Tesla Missy Cummings California Duke University
Steve Wilson from QCode Media

New Media Show

02:43 min | 1 year ago

Steve Wilson from QCode Media

"We should do is just let steve tells about q code beginning and then we'll drag him back to premium podcasting topic. So why don't you give us the four one one on what you're doing over your code. What will share. Thanks guys So yeah i code I'm chief strategy. Officer code really specializes in immersive scripted. Fiction podcast so these are fully sound design scripted shows that often have you know amazing stories ayla celebrity talent and are produced in a really high technical level We mix master at dolby. Atmos and do some really cool things in the audio for listeners. Who haven't experienced fiction before these are shows that kind of hearkens back to the old radio days You know war. The world's is an apt analogy to what people are familiar with. But rather than using the sort of old techniques of production coconuts and wash words and those kinds of things. These are producer really high level and an amazing listening experience. Something that really is a great addition to everyone's like diverse podcast listening experience actions in trying to do something a little bit different. You know prior to joining code. I spent a long time at apple. where i did editorial partner relations and marketing on apple podcasts. Before that i actually still worked in podcasts but in apple's education group where i worked on. It jew which was a you know an educational podcasting platform with college courses and lectures and those kinds of things as well. That's all been folded into the apple. Podcasts platform now that the whole educational side. I mean how important i- i'm just curious. How important is the educational side to to apple. As far as working with the universities. I know back then. They're working pretty closely with like stanford and a lot of the big big colleges. Is that still going on you. Know yeah i mean look. I wanted to obviously be really careful and all of our conversation to make it clear like i'm not. I'm not speaking on apple behalf. And so i ask How important is it. It's it's hard for me. Sort of provide that kind of answer. But you know what. I would just say as you know what was exciting about. It you in the project that they had there it was. It was a project that really saw the opportunity and mobile learning the very early days. So this this project started back in two thousand and six. I wanna say it was not too long after podcasting itself really started and it was the result of you know apple and duke university thinking about how the ipod the original ipod could be used in mobile learning.

Apple Steve Duke University
Nonprofit newsrooms turn rivalry into revenue stream

It's All Journalism

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Nonprofit newsrooms turn rivalry into revenue stream

"Chrissy back is the managing editor of the chronicle at duke university and erica. Peril is the general manager at the daily tar heel at the university of north carolina. They're newsrooms teamed up to create the rivalry challenge around the annual duke. Unc basketball game. They were able to turn it into a revenue maker for both nonprofit newsrooms. They wrote about it for api's better news initiative and they're here today to talk about it krissy and erica. Welcome to better. News aims for happiness. We're excited to be here. Thank you so first of all. Tell me a little bit about yourselves. How did you get interested in journalism. And and how you ended up at your current roles into respective colleges chrissy. Why don't you go first. Well i actually started the daily turkey alami. Unc grad and. I worked on the job as the student. And actually erica was the student editor when i came back to be the director so i've always been on the business side and i love my experience in college so much that i took my j. school degree and i stayed in college media so eleven years at the daily tar heel a few other things in between. But i've been here duke at the chronicle for twelve years. Now how about you orca. Well as chrissy said. I was a student editor at the daily tar heel. During my undergraduate days it was a transformative experience for me in terms of journalism. In that kind of being my calling. I spent about ten years as a reporter mostly at the charlotte observer covering local news and then came back about ten years later to the daily tar heel as the newsroom adviser much like christie was saying i really wanted to give more students kind of the experience and the opportunities that i had a student. And that's what appealed to me about becoming a professional staff member in college media. I spent nine years as the newsroom adviser. Mostly focusing on newsroom. The last three and a half years. I've been the general manager which is a a more comprehensive role that oversees the nonprofit that publishes the daily tar heel.

UNC Chrissy Erica Alami Duke University Krissy Basketball Charlotte Observer Christie
Are Vaccine Passports Inevitable in the U.S.?

The Takeaway

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Are Vaccine Passports Inevitable in the U.S.?

"The world and what they could mean on everything from personal privacy to inequity Back with us is Nida Farah Hani, the professor of law and philosophy at Duke University. Nida. You started talking in the past segment a little bit about the We talked about the inequities when it comes to privacy. But what about the inequities when it comes to communities of color? Yeah, This is an area that I'm particularly concerned about. So you know, First we've seen in this country that the minority populations have been hit the hardest by the pandemic, and that's true economically as well as in terms of health consequences. On bats, you know, due to traditional inequities and access to health care and access to adequate health care, But it also, you know, suggest, uh, a difference in their ability to do things like work remotely Stay home. They've been in in the firing line of the greatest risk. So now these individuals Who could have been prioritized for access to vaccines and certainly the World Health Organization and the CDC made that recommendation. States haven't done so and so they're not getting early access to the vaccines, which means that the people who have been the hardest hit by the pandemic or not the ones who are already vaccinated or likely to get vaccinated soon. Result is if they're the ones who were excluded from being able to go to restaurants from getting jobs from being able to participate in this society. You see this widening gap. Some people say the thing I'm kind of the early theories were it was due to a significant public mistrust that there was a letter hesitancy to get the vaccination. But I actually think that that that narrative was a little overdone, frankly, right, Okay. And in fact, what we're seeing is It's more likely access to technology that kind of you know who you know and how you can get the vaccine apartments. A lot of people are figuring out through attack through who they know through gaming the system, how they could get early access. And that's not true in the population that's been the hardest hit. So I worry that this just means you're gonna see a new increase. And inequities and increase in the widening gap. Which means, you know, putting into place of vaccine passport is a way to gain access to goods and services and jobs means that we're just gonna continue to exacerbate the kinds of inequities that the pandemic already introduced. And we're also not requiring people to get vaccinated. So

Nida Farah Hani Nida Duke University World Health Organization CDC
Voting Firms Turn To Defamation Lawsuits To Counter False Claims

Morning Edition

02:48 min | 1 year ago

Voting Firms Turn To Defamation Lawsuits To Counter False Claims

"And another election Cos. Smartmatic have also filed defamation lawsuits against Trump allies and pro trump media companies with more likely to come. Bill Adair runs the journalism program of Duke University and founded the fact checking website politic Fact, I think this is a completely new Way of tackling misinformation as a journalist. I am I'm a little bit nervous. The idea of using defamation lawsuits makes us a little bit concerned. In particular, he's worried defamation suits could become a weapon against journalists just doing their jobs. But in the current moment, he's come to believe they have a role to play. We need to incentivize truth and we need to de incentivize. Lying money is what matters to AH Media company. Defamation lawsuit is a big way to do that. The suits appear to be having an effect. An anchor for Newsmax walked out on a live interview with the My Pillow CEO when he started making false claims about Dominion voting machines. Can we get out of here, please? But defamation lawsuits are difficult to win. You need to show the person knew or should have known a statement was false when they made it. George Freeman spent three decades defending people against defamation lawsuits as the in house counsel for the New York Times, He says media organizations have a First Amendment right to report on what important people say, even if it may be untrue. But he says the pro trump outlets like Newsmax and away in May have crossed a legal line by amplifying and appearing to endorse obvious falsehoods. They haven't stepped back, although I don't now. Your signs that they're starting to because they're worried about liability, and I think that's a good thing. Still, Freeman thinks the strongest defamation case is against Trump's lawyer, Rudy Giuliani. He made certain accusations on TV. But then he didn't make those in court because I think he knew you would be subject to discipline and perjury if you made them an official documents, so that would seem to be pretty good evidence that he knew they were false. Yet there are reasons why defamation cases aren't filed more often. Many conspiracy theories don't target a specific person or company and the cases can take years to go through the courts, so it's likely when the next presidential election begins. These lawsuits about the 2020 election will still be grinding along.

Smartmatic Bill Adair Ah Media Newsmax George Freeman Duke University Donald Trump New York Times Rudy Giuliani Freeman
On Mexico’s Border With U.S.,Desperation as Migrant Traffic Piles Up

Rush Limbaugh

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

On Mexico’s Border With U.S.,Desperation as Migrant Traffic Piles Up

"Richard Hudson, speaking out about a surge of migrants crossing the US Mexico border illegally after President Biden's reversal of former President Trump's immigration policies. Let's in telling Fox News. We've had more migrants cross our border already this year that we had all of last year, and the reason we're having this Biden border surge is because he's reversed these policies. Democrats still point the finger at former President Trump. They say he broke the immigration system. Republicans say President Biden's policies encourage the crisis. Thousands of Duke University

President Trump Richard Hudson President Biden Fox News Mexico Biden United States Duke University
All Duke University undergrads must quarantine after recruitment parties

GardenLine with Randy Lemmon

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

All Duke University undergrads must quarantine after recruitment parties

"Lock down to Key university issuing the quarantine order Saturday night for all of its undergrads because of a Corona virus outbreak caused by students who attended recruitment parties. Over the past week. There's been more than 180 positive coronavirus cases 200. Others may have been exposed in a bin order to quarantine. Duke says the undergrads will be forced to stay in place until at least March. 21st and students who live off campus will not be allowed on campus while the mass quarantine is in place, University officials saying anyone who violates the order will face suspension or removal. So Guzman Fox News. Austin

Key University Duke Guzman Fox News Austin
Duke University undergraduates to quarantine after recruitment parties

This Weekend with Gordon Deal

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Duke University undergraduates to quarantine after recruitment parties

"Outbreak on a college campus will keep undergraduate students quarantine for at least a week. Duke University says the new infections were fueled by students who attended recruitment parties over the past week. There's been more than 180 positive coronavirus cases. 200 others may have been exposed in have been ordered to quarantine. Duke says the undergrads will be forced to stay in place until at least March. 21st Fox a Su Guzman, the school says anyone who repeatedly violates the order will face suspension or removal.

Duke University Su Guzman Duke FOX
Duke University under a mandatory schoolwide quarantine amid frat party-linked coronavirus surge

KLIF Programming

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Duke University under a mandatory schoolwide quarantine amid frat party-linked coronavirus surge

"Ah Corona virus outbreak on a college campus will keep undergraduate students quarantine for at least a week. Duke University says the new infections were fueled by students who attended recruitment parties over the past week. There's been more than 180 positive coronavirus cases. 200. Others may have been exposed in a bin order to quarantine. Duke says the undergrads will be forced to stay in place until at least March, 21st Fox says to Guzman, the school says anyone who repeatedly violates the order will face suspension or

Duke University Duke Guzman FOX
The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

Short Wave

09:10 min | 1 year ago

The Importance Of Diversifying Alzheimer's Research

"John. Let's talk about what alzheimer's disease as an how it's related to other forms of dementia right so dementia is an overarching term. That refers to thinking and memory problems from lots of causes including stroke or head injury. Alzheimer's is far and away. The most common cause of dementia at least in later life and it refers to the specific process where these toxic plaques and tangles build up in the brain and eventually start killing neurons. Those are the brain cells. We used to think and remember an for black americans. How much greater is their risk of developing alzheimer's or some other form of dementia. Some studies show that the risk is twice as high as it is for a white american though the exact amount still kind of in question and by the way there's also some evidence that lat next people also have a higher risk and asian americans appear to have a low risk than white americans. Okay and do. Scientists know why they're such huge disparities not fully. Some of the difference probably has to do with known risk factors for alzheimer's so health problems like heart disease. High blood pressure diabetes obesity. All of these increase a person's risk for alzheimer's and these factors are more common in black americans and they are in white americans. There's also at least one. Genetic risk factor. Okay people who have one or two copies of a gene called abeille. Four are more likely to develop alzheimer's and the four gene appears to be more common in people of african ancestry but scientists really don't understand alzheimer's very well in anyone. They've been testing all of these alzheimer's drugs for decades and really nothing has worked so research is still. Don't know whether all of these factors put together can fully explain why alzheimer's is so much more common in black americans. John that's really tough to hear. I mean you mentioned healthcare earlier. The you know that black americans have less access to care for loved ones with alzheimer's. What do we know about that. Just a couple of weeks ago. Alzheimer's association released a report on race ethnicity and alzheimer's and i talked with brain scientists. Maria correo who is now the chief science officer there. here's part of what. She told me about what they learned from a survey of people who were caring for a friend or family member with alzheimer's among nonwhite caregivers half say they've faced discrimination when navigating through the healthcare system with a top concern being the providers. Don't even listen to what they're saying. Perhaps because of their race color or ethnicity that's really frustrating and not surprisingly black americans. Were the most likely to report discrimination. Okay so we've talked about risk we've talked about care. Let's talk about research so as scientists are trying to find treatments. What can be done to make. Sure that black americans are included in that research. Several things they can change. The racial and ethnic composition of the people who do research black researchers are more likely to have ties within black communities and are more likely to make sure that studies are inclusive. Researchers can also change the racial and ethnic composition of the people who participate in research studies and they can focus on questions about why. Alzheimer's appears to act differently in people of different races. Yeah i mean. These are really good goals to have of course but our researchers getting any closer to achieving them. I've seen some encouraging signs especially when it comes to diversifying scientific studies so for example a couple of years ago researchers formed a group called the african ancestry neuro science research initiative. I spoke to one of the brain scientists involved. Dr cuff weeds rossa. He's a psychiatrist and a professor at duke university. He told me he joined the effort when he realized that his own ancestors who came from west africa had been excluded from genetic studies of brain disorders. It was clearly an immediately evident to me how much of a problem this was right because for me as one who does what we call basic research. In other words. I take the genes that are found in human gene studies and then i studied them in model organisms in other words things like mice or rats and understand how it changes other brain works. It meant that. I was studying genes. That were specifically related to onus in folks of european ancestry which would mean that cough fleet. Derosa was only studying the genes of a narrow segment of people. Which sounds pretty. messed up. If you're trying to figure out the genetic story of how. Alzheimer's affects all people like what is the scientific justification for this approach. Years ago the logic was that it would be easier to find genes responsible for brain disorders in people of european descent. The reason is that they tend to be very similar genetically to one another. The genes of people of african ancestry vary a lot more now. Technology has made genetic sequencing so widely available that you can easily study all kinds of people and scientifically you should because people with different ancestries can have genetic differences that affect their risk for diseases like alzheimer's absolutely and have scientists learned anything new about alzheimer's disease from studying it in black americans. Maybe you know that. Jean april four. That increases a person's risk of developing alzheimer's. Especially if you inherit two copies one from each of your parents so the gene is more common among black americans but it may be less risky for them. Some other genetic factors seems to protect people of african ancestry from the bad effects of a four. I spoke with dr daniel weinberger. He's a scientist at the lieber institute in baltimore. And he's also part of the african ancestry neuroscience research initiative. Here's what he told me about april four. If you inherit the risk form of that gene from both of your parents and your european ancestry that increases your likelihood of manifesting outside disease later in life about twenty fold if have african ancestry the risk from inheriting that gene from both your parents is about a fourth of what it is if you were of european ancestry so if scientists could figure out what the protective mechanism is they might be able to develop a drug. That would help protect all people who have at least one copy of the four gene and that is by the way tens of millions of people in the us alone now. That sounds really promising. But it's gonna take a lot more research right that also broadens who's being included in that research it will truly diversifying the groups of people in research studies is really challenging and scientists know. They can't do it on their own. So the african ancestry project for example has involved. People like reverend alvin hathaway. He's the pastor of union baptist church in baltimore. He told me one challenge facing scientists. Is that a lot of black. Americans are pretty skeptical about this kind of research. You know clearly when you begin to talk about The brain you begin to talk about the genome data set immediately within the community. That triggers all kinds of suspicions It triggers a lot of suspicions because There has been arguments that The caucasian brain is different from the brain of people of african descent and one of the amazing revelations that i found. Was that when you actually look at brain tissue. You can't discern difference right. Scientists propped up thinking for a long time. And you're saying the legacy of that lives on. Yes it does so john. How'd you researchers with the african ancestry project and other groups navigate that the alzheimer's association did a survey a few months ago. That found that one in five black americans would actually feel insulted. If a doctor even suggested a cognitive assessment to detect alzheimer's so of medicine has a lot of work to do to build trust with black americans and other minority groups. I talked about what that might take with. A scientist named lisa barnes. She's a professor and also a cognitive neuropsychologist at the old timers disease center in chicago. She told me she often. Here's the same comment. When she approaches groups that have been marginalized about doing a research study especially when that may take years to complete these researchers come in and they collect all these data than we never hear from you again so we we also give back so we who make sure that we go back to the community and update them on what we're finding we give their vice about how we're interpreting data. So we try to really make it a partnership between us and the community. And i think that that goes a long way and building trust and and and having them stay with us for the long haul.

Alzheimer's Dementia Alzheimer's Association High Blood Pressure Diabetes O Maria Correo African Ancestry Neuro Science Dr Cuff Stroke Heart Disease Dr Daniel Weinberger Lieber Institute John Duke University Derosa West Africa Alvin Hathaway Union Baptist Church Baltimore Jean
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"That's not necessarily intelligence and so the question remains to be visited. Something you know really Debate that the human brain is working which seems to be the case In the absence of any other data. But i think he would approach the fish Excitement that you talked about If i understand correctly. John me finding wrong A couple hundred thousand neurons. If we can find pakistan's in the fighting behavior of that of those neurons give us potentially some reducible. Reducible huron stakes. That would have some bad year for not for more lane but to potentially understand the green actually words. That's the hope. And i think that's the hope in some way of everybody. Who does these experiments in the hope of everyone who works on them theoretically is that we really do have and i think this is the other thing that happens when we talk about neuro science and where things are is there so little we understand and yet there are beautiful. Examples of systems are there. Maybe they're simple but we really do feel like we've learned something important. And so there's a rich vein of research from the eighties on control of movements and it reads like something out of an engineering textbook and is really elegant. Now that's mostly circuits. That don't go through the cortex that you know decades of research and i think when people look at at least i think about what success looks like i look at some of these papers and everyone has their own favorites. And you say if i could find something like that you know. That's what an answer that looks like and and so. I think people are optimistic about that. But it's very hard to tell where the breakthrough is gonna be. Kiki keeps it interesting condition john. Could you speculate. Today's looking forward five years Would you think we will be questions. Questions are busy. Get a better understanding of how the brain works the dc more practical applications emanating from that understanding in physical systems..

Today Kiki eighties John five years pakistan decades john couple hundred thousand neuron
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:35 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Yeah big city liberty so in a market a full makes is not doing. Well added competitive. Why is doing well. Full mix could have a strategy of denying flim bligh good employees by hiding them and fighting them after having. Ncaa's did you see anything happening. Well that's interesting so one. I that that's an interesting thing. So why thing that would limit firms ability to take such a pernicious strategy. You laid out in most states a knock Is only valid if the worker voluntarily leaves okay. Now this is now in florida and i think a few other states the non compete is in fact valid if if the firm fires the worker so you know maybe in florida firms could could get away with without that kind of strategy like you lay out in muskie's it's really about Voluntary separations yes. So this is this seems like this is fairly conventional now right. I don't know much about it. So none of the items have the in the low end. Fluence have as you say so. This is generally happening in employment agreement. So the best data that exists on. This was the day that i mentioned a few minutes ago by evans star. Norma shar judy prescott this. This nationally represented surveys according to their data when they ask workers are you currently bound by non compete sei about eighteen percent of workers. This is in two thousand. Fourteen said that they were currently bound by a non compete out. The problem. there is that you know. I said not compete eight employment contracts and employment contracts can be like ten pages long very fine print so there's very likely shared workers that have signed a non compete without realizing it right. If you know. I know that some would i. These very long contracts initial here initial bear right not too closely so eighteen percents almost like a lower balance. And it's probably a little bit higher than that so you know every worker but if at least one in five workers are are signing these things It's it's pretty widespread and it's it. They are more frequently. Used in high skilled occupations like the software engineers like you know our d like managers but are used surprisingly often you know at the lower end and say about the hair salons You know that that's actually a really interesting industry. Because in terms of the wage distribution hair salons are on the lowest like harris hairstyle is accepted the very high end ones. I think the Yearly compensation that industry is like forty five thousand dollars. Something like that know. Considering the fact that these workers have to go to occupy occupational licensing Cosmology school.

forty five thousand dollars ten pages florida Fourteen two thousand harris Norma shar judy prescott eighteen percents five workers eight evans star about eighteen percent few minutes ago one least one muskie
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Decision making and then we try to understand the mechanisms of the behavior even without looking at the brain so in this study we actually were looking at how people make choices. We looked at their. I position how they looked over the foods what we're looking at which food in which order and we run computer simulations to try to link these different parts of behavior into a story but that tells us something about behavior. But it doesn't tell us something about the brand and so a next step for us will be to try to understand what is actually changing in the brain. When people see these indulgent foods so a wooded the brain response to a food change. And and there's a little bit of work on other labs where people have foundries analogous to that that gives us some some targets to look for in the brain. But we don't have that answer yet and so that's one of the really cool things about doing. The science here is that there's just so much to look at that we can find all kinds of interesting ways than in the world where people's choices don't line up and we can study that at all different levels from what they choose where they look at how they talk to other people about it. And even with the brains do and that gives us sort of an overall story for the process of decision-making yes as in motion scarred as he look forward in this emerging asian noodle economics. Where do you think it's going to be sort of the most exciting Research at least from your perspective rebellious focused on yes. I think two areas so one a topic so the topic that many of us care about deeply now is social decision. Making how my choices depend upon what the choices say about me to others or based upon what other people tell me and so forth and we all now realize that so many of our decisions have social component. Even if i'm the only one making the choice. I'm an benefiting and i still think about what others how they might perceive me if i make the choice. Obviously with things like political decisions really matters so that's one topic that's incredibly important and we're going to spend a lotta time to research on that. The other is trying to understand how to get an integrative perspective. This goes all about back to some things. You and i talked about the beginning. We take information about the brain and connect it to traditional economics or to marketing. And that's a really exciting area but it's really hard in the so we wanna have. We want to do the research in the lab that matters but not just matters only for sites which is important but also so that it can have influenced to help marketers present information more effectively consumers so we can have consumers develop rules that help to make better choices and so forth. but it's really exciting eighty Would love to follow you. Research as you go forward Excellent yeah thanks so much for spending kind of. You're most welcome thank you. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics and researchers on variety of topics. If you like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to info. At scientific sense dot com..

two areas one one topic eighty scientific sense dot com asian
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"And the reason why is because they look at the number of calories and saw they could get in effect more food for the same price if they bought the unhealthy option. If you're seeking calories per dollar the unhealthy foods are actually better even though there are obviously worse for you and many other ways and so the the the producers may want us to purchase as much as possible and often the lowest cost for them to produce in that may not be fresh food which has been more helpful you had so could be there could be some regulatory aspects here But you know given the these a real problem Maybe this is something definitely later. Think about potential. Absolutely one of the things that we showed in this study in in other studies. Is that the your choices depend upon where you're looking what information you acquire during the decision process and so one thing that's really striking is that even though regulators can't always influence exactly what's offered to consumers they can often influence what information is presented house presented house marketed and so forth and that may be one avenue by which we can help us behavioral science to get people to make better choices. We can't tell a company that they can't sell sufferings that are horrible for you They can only sell water like that. That is better. We consumers want to have pleasurable indulgent shoots It's one of the great joys of living but the way in which is presented to people might be something that regulators and policymakers can look at making applications garden. Even the school meal design right Because this antiquated that fulfillment. I think they still use This could be an interesting thing about You know how to construct. The the meal plans their potential absolutely. I mean one of the things. I was surprised to see how big is affects. Our is is is by the realization that you know we probably don't want to just simply think about limiting all indulgent foods. What better way to think about. It might be to allow people to indulge to sort of fulfill those goals to have some healthy foods but to moderate the calories or the the degree of process of processed foods. They come in those indulgence. That is the core idea. Might be we don't want to just try to get people to make better food choices by training their self control but by giving them the opportunity to indulge in ways that are gonna have to lease negative effect. And that's obviously for things like food choice in schools. The what the options you give kids. You're not going to tell. Kids can't have any tasty foods but you may be able to present the indulgent foods them in a way that encourage them to eat more of the health helpful to what's happening in the brain in the instance Scott it is sort of a guilt complex of the of the stuff that you are going to consume and dan get compensated for it but it was wonderful question. So that's one. We don't know yet so often in the laboratory. We want to like identify a behavioral phenomenon..

Scott one one thing one of things
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Yeah absolutely we we one of my co authors in this gavin fitzsimmons. Susan marketer at duke. And he's been very interested in these sort of affects because you can see them on menus so for example often on a miniature food paired with it being like fries paired with with this and there's a weird We don't want people eating too much fries for obvious reasons but there. There's a weird Parallel here if you could people a an automatic indulgent that is not as bad for them as fries so for example you have a choice between a healthy and a more tasty option in you. Pair those with something like a mint which is relatively low calorie but still tasty the we would predict the presence of mint. That will you present for both would push people toward the more discipline. And so we've we've basically just begun somewhat interrupted by By pandemic limitations trying to think through howard how we can actually test interventions so that we can give people Minor nudges that would actually change their real choice behavior. In these cases so for example. Mcdonald's are a let's say megaza or any other fast food place might be able. They wanted to push people toward healthy choices. Hair foods with again. Very simple low calorie indulgent options to increase discipline choices. Have you looked at you. Know if you would Bring the economics dimension to it the price dimension to it do use. Is that a threshold price at this table. Debut fail You mean in the sense of like would would. They're willing willing to take indulgent or food. Fail it costs more than the logic because it cost me slightly more. Yes so we haven't. We haven't done that experiment with food Wh- we always try to keep a cost constant so we can get a relative trade offs between a taste and health you cleanly some other cases. We tried to look at cost and budgeting some other work and in. That's more on like impulse purchases and so we do think that changing costs and how you perceive costs can help with self control in like impulse purchasing and so matlab is doing some work related to that but with food. We haven't done that yet. Um okay there's one worry many cases that often the healthful foods because they're less process and have more natural. Greens are a little more expensive and he has been that that that does interact but we haven't. We haven't tested interaction. Yeah i mean. Yeah if is sort of a threshold value right thing about proctor and gamble at other marketers. Disa- restaurant if if economics for the producer is not significantly different and they can actually extract a better behavior in the consumer. You know ready for for them. They might go for it. Otherwise it becomes more complicated. I think part of the problem is a mini cases the producers interests are not aligned with the consumer. So this is a little bit anecdotal but Whenever some fast food restaurants had to put calorie information and new york city on on The ended up with young males tended to buy more unhealthy options..

Susan marketer new york both one gavin fitzsimmons duke co matlab megaza Mcdonald
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"It's completely flipped over the tub cup Coming decades whereas urban people often more concerned about the environment than rural people which is not what it was decades ago and things like free trade in the last elections free trade a switch between the parties which is so. I think that's a scary part. The positive parts are if we know. This is what's happening then. There may be ways of of dampening its effects in my own. My own hope is that that the way to solve the polls aviation is going to be by a recognition by sorry by insertion of some people who are non identity focused so Crowd of people. Hafer bugs have democrats. They don't get anywhere but if there at third republicans third and a third people who care about policy but don't really give a damn about republican or democratic labels that third group of of sort of unaffiliated people actually can help lead the group to a better overall consensus ness what we have to do as a society somehow figure a way to make it. Okay the not part of either try but the care about the policies is it. Is it less of a problem. In market body systems Pop systems except france. Or something like that or look you sort of had to party Yeah that's a wonderful question. I i have to get a disclaimer. That i am not a political scientist. I made neuroscientists psychologists who works on some of these issues so all. I haven't done that. I haven't done those studies. My understanding is yes. That is the case that as you allow people sort of more granular expressions their identities then in those sorts of systems you could bay for example primarily affiliated with a party. That's pro environment. That part is part of a coalition. That's navy generally left-of-centre and so in those cases it's gonna be less likely you're less likely to think of the other as just evil as it is modern american policies in more likely to think of it as an Is your party is expression of your.

decades ago democrats republican third people republicans third group third american france democratic decades
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"This makes a lot of sense given the the sort of political environment the last few years it. Also it also connects to things like brexit. Where if you look at the in england for example people who said their identity with english ten incredibly pro brexit. Where's people who said their identity was british. Even though the demographics are similar tend to be. Yeah it's I don't think a lot of people will doubt the so if If you have some sort of a prioritization policy positions against against identity What we're finding is that Scarred but we're finding is that identity has a higher bad. You been to make the decision. Well actually we find that. It's it's almost like a dial you could turn from. One extreme to the other there are people. We have a had samples of roughly thousand people that we collected the online Basically and makes immediately like the twenty four hours before these elections and within the samples there are people who are fully policy in people fully identity. But what's what's striking is that. It's not your demographics per se that causes you to be Care about identity. It's the degree to you. See the vote as reinforcing of an identity. So if i e my vote for this particular candidate reinforces my identity. As say a military veteran then that identity change tends to dominate some people to the extent that policy similarity with candidate is utterly irrelevant. Has no bearing on how much you like. the candidate. Though striking in the most extreme identity people policy had no effect right sort of problematic for democracy. Isn't it a big stream. One could argue have least state. Maybe half the population could wear blue shirts and had the population where richards at did never change. it doesn't really matter In fact they can make decisions without without any policy position. Inflammation of affect your thomas. It in the in the current system document the us politics specifically And so let me ask you that. Advocating closer to sort of autonomous only identity enforcing Taking voting therapeutic process or do we still have some policy. Policy-based folks out there so so we we do still have policy folks and i think that there's There's supposed to bad and good at this so the bad is of course what you're hitting at. Which is that the. If if our voting becomes detached from our policy preferences then that means that it's just a social signal. It doesn't actually help them. The elections and our democracy doesn't help us get to the greatest good. And i think that's that's a real concerning things so that if for example i don't know these data but let's suppose something like seventy percent of americans would support raising the minimum wage. I should say. I don't know those data. I would be surprised if the true support for rape mate for raising. The minimum wage matched the people's expression in their political parties was almost every issue of that sort. Tends to be favored by one party. In this by definition rejected by the other in a two party system i think is pretty problematic. It also means that identity changes policy positions. So we've seen this in like old time environmental issues. I mean environmental issues used to be rural issues. It used to be perhaps even the seventies more republican than democrat..

england seventy percent one party two party thousand people british republican brexit One extreme democrat seventies Scarred last few half the population twenty four hours ten english pro americans
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"This is only a political scientist recognized for decades And so i do not want to remotely imply that my lab. My colleagues and i have been like the ones identified that as a problem that that's something that problems out there yet but we a few years back tried to think about solutions or ways of thinking about the problem and previously. We had done some work. Traditional neuro economic research looking at how the brain plays games under non-social context and we found this sort of weird phenomenon. Actually examining people behaviorally playing poker game all things some brain regions that were seemed very very selective social contexts. Come on just when you're trying to identify let's say social actors A social actors behavior and but they weren't there when you're watching face similar identically. Played computer actor and this led align research were trying to understand sort of under what cases to the brain sort of adopt a social context where economic considerations get pushed back and social considerations. Come to the fore so that idea. We thought this could apply to politics so in two thousand six we actually created a model A pretty simple. But a mathematically specified model that would talk about the trade offs between policy identity and so we took the traditional models from public science that would be the policy part but we basically said this is how identity could identify into the process. Such that if a vote reinforces some of your identities. Then it may actually diminish the effects of policy upon your preferences but we argued. This was something that was narrowly nearly plausible because based on this earlier neuroscience in gave an explanation for why identity might be relevant. Four voting came out in october. Two thousand sixteen and so did some interviews with my colleague libby. He's a political scientist at interviews and we talked to people about this impure very curious of how to apply to that election. Oh no we. We'd better get collect data. We've been at this like an a theoretical model snow immediately. Before the twenty sixteen election and immediately before the eighteen election's we collected data on people's identities and their voting programs. And so this last year we could. We publish the follow up which is a little strange to say. It's we published the theory before he proposed the data. The data reinforced are justified in In these us elections both the twenty sixteen presidential in two thousand eighteen senatorial elections the degree. To which you saw your vote as as reinforcing an identity like military woman hispanic etc caused your your consideration of policy to diminish and the people most influenced by identity policy was irrelevant So we thought this..

october last year two thousand Two thousand both two thousand eighteen Four twenty sixteen few years back twenty sixteen election six eighteen election sixteen
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Take a quick break got the knee. Comeback will talk about a couple of recent papers including the cognitive foundations of the choice. Talk about basically. So this is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations with leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. If you'd like to sponsor this podcast please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back as you were talking about neuro economics How the brain actually makes decisions Bear activities might be hubbard teams with uncertainty risk. What mean by uncertainty dignity and saw that a lot of people potentially different definitions for op but a lot of fields thinking about this or looking at this and casually interested this up you have a more recent paper entitled issues or identity foundations of water choice and this fairly topic of papers. You say voted choice as one of the most important problems in political signs. The most common models assume that voting is a rational choice based on policy positions Suggests key issues and non-policy inflammation so identity or personality Though such a modest explains macroscopic features elections they also reveal important nominees. That having assistant explanation so what are the anomalies that you're talking about. Yeah one of the key things. We all have observed the last but Four years you could say the last decades is that people people don't always vote in ways that at least superficially look like they support their self interest. And what i mean by that is is we can imagine that that on their segments population who would benefit from different policies immigration restrictions immigration liberality A higher minimum wage health care whether healthcare is provided to more people or remains sort of the province of employers. So there's a whole host of issues all the issues that people care about and it been striking too many people that how people vote doesn't always line up with of interest. I mean there are many people who vote for high of people who've for higher taxes and so other things must be influencing the voter voters decision..

Four years one last decades many people key
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"And those curious dates the flight and ask this properly. Is this sort of societal. Humoristic that share or is is you know every clewiston is developing those killer six. I think there's there's a lot of commonality and so one of the features of a human behavior is in general does more commonalities than there is difference in. So you and i and everybody else. Listening will have a similar tool kit. A few ristic's so for example One of the most powerful ones in many simple real world choices familiarity that we tend to prefer things with which we're familiar and that could be political candidates restaurants or anything else if it's miller. It's more likely to be good or popular better. That's your everyone shows and the degree to which we rely on it or the circumstances in which realized it will differ from person to person but everyone shows that you're listed. It's there's a left like that where it's it's there's a general rule we all use but you might use million For example for restaurants but not when investing or somebody else might use it investing but then do a lot of analysis while shopping right. Yes so so you know as you know. Intelligence making big strides We had this deep neural networks. Have lots of data. We can clean it to you. Know to make some types of decisions and Oftentimes you need large amounts of data to do so as you know But often human skin do this or learn these type security six with very little data and that sort of put. The damper on our progress would understanding the rain from a computer perspective. What is what is your your thoughts. I think that's that's a court challenge for Exactly right that there are many things that we can identify with with complex analysis tool. So i often. It's thought if you want to try to optimize decision problem. You can train machine learning algorithm on a large data set..

one six One million security six of
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Yeah so we often will run. Experiments in which people are faced with choices that have different properties so as the simplest case we give people choices that might have all the information available to them or missing information so in our first study. We did this. We left out probability information so you might know what you could win. But you don't know your chances and it turns out that we give people's in big use cases there specific regions the prefrontal cortex that come online and specifically for ambiguity and not for cases like risk. Now the reason that's important is because we can then link the brain Other things we know about those regions it's based on clinical studies or based on other experiments to get an idea of their functions so at the decision earth science really allows us to do is take a situation like that and by looking at the brain gives a better sense of specific crosses like an ambiguous. It seems there regions that are actually constructing the choice in real time that they're trying to identify or learn the probabilities. based upon past experience in those regions. Come out of preferentially for embedding but not in cases with information is already there risk. Different regions of the brain seemed to be involved. When there's information is already in front of you who didn't realize that approach to other to other types of paradigm as well and basically try to build up sort of the core blocks that we use when our core tools we use when making decisions this fascinating start. So you know in business conduct One type of decision That the makers sort of seek winchell decisions and so you make a decision today and you read for a period of time and you have an album From from that That some pregnancy expectation of happening and then based on that you will make another position. And so you have you know Some uncertainty boarding so Someone setting these showing up. Listen and become by all of this Innovated that that provides us an economic value of different options that get looking at now. We can do this. Mathematically really well now the question has always been managed fulham do they actually do this systematic or or is really just you know seat of the pants decision making that's what we can actually see But but the Movies see anything from your experiments that be are making efficient To wonderful a wonderful question. i think you're hitting it. One a core challenges for the research that that in some ways the types of optimal models that economists and then manage management people management of firms have come.

first study today One type One earth
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"The value But often we don't actually used that bad you at all in business decision making it is sort of a feel good process That billions of dollars spent in consulting investment banking and everything else Our our our decision making but never actually used. And so. It'll be interesting from your perspective. Venue in you. Think of how the brain does sort of the brain makes a decision on around certain day what we see with activities might be and so on. That might give us some insights. Yeah that's right. So mile lab actually was one of the first now fifteen years ago that tried to break apart different elements of uncertainty. So if you take. The tha the the term uncertainty of that. At least i think of that is sort of a subjective sense that we all feel that we. We don't know what the outcome of our choice will be but economists and psychologists over decades of actually broken it apart so there's lots of different levels but the most common distinction is between something called risk. Which would be something like known probabilities. Imagine in gambling in ambiguity so called median uncertainty which is a case where you don't know probabilities. And or you don't know the distribution of outcomes and these in theory can be treated the same as you note economists something. Many economists have decided and said that you could optimize over and over ambiguity impede on no the probabilities. You sort of assume something about their distribution of the move on and so we showed in my lab that actually risking beauty or tracked at least in part by different brain mechanisms and so over the succeeding decade of neuroscientists. Have been trying to understand. What does it mean for something. A subjective uncertainty to be sort of broken apart in the brain such depending on. What the uncertainty is. You have. Different brain mechanisms. That help you deal with. It should have some sort of evolutionary analog to it i would imagine homo sapiens trying to cling to start why they would type of uncertainty perhaps history Maybe walker holes Where the line might he Historical observations by the given some expectation that that distribution but then they often encounter And that that has notice prior distribution so so so Do we know the What you see in the brain is actually a function of the the evolutionary aspects of well. That's a hard question to answer. I mean these sorts of stories are always difficult at least on the scale that we can look at it in human behavior There's a couple of things that g- you think are relevant for your argument. One is that most what we see is actually conserved across humans and other species Let's we when neat feature of decision neuro science. Is that many things we can do. We we do both humans and in other species so people risking ambiguity in non human primates and even in rats and the rat in the radin. Brains are don't have all them. I mean they have less himal edgy. But you can look at a monkey..

billions of dollars fifteen years ago both One one walker first mile lab
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike as scott. He'll tell who's professor of psychology neuroscience light duke university listened in his lab investigates the brain mechanisms some leg economic and social decision-making but scott..

Mike scott
"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"duke university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Duke women call it quits on basketball season because of Covid

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:13 sec | 2 years ago

Duke women call it quits on basketball season because of Covid

"The women's basketball team at duke university is calling it a season because of safety concerns earlier this month to members of the team tested positive. The coronavirus the men's basketball team at duke plans to keep playing

Duke University Basketball Duke
Major drug ring busted that fed pot, cocaine to 3 North Carolina colleges

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Major drug ring busted that fed pot, cocaine to 3 North Carolina colleges

"Instigators have broken up a drug ring on multiple college campuses in North Carolina. Timberg has the story from the USA Radio News. The next bureau federal authorities they're charging 21 individuals in connection to a distribution ring that funnel drugs onto the campuses of prominent North Carolina universities. The D, a found drug activity at frat houses on campuses of UNC Chapel Hill. Duke University and Appalachian State University. U. S attorney Matt Martin, calling on university administrators to do something they were sales going on inside these houses. Dealers set up inside these houses, poisoning fellow members of their fraternity fueling Culture. The feds estimate more than £1000 of marijuana. Several 100 kg of cocaine and other drugs were funneled onto the campus is from the USA Radio News Phoenix Bureau I'm

Timberg Usa Radio News North Carolina Unc Chapel Hill Matt Martin Appalachian State University Duke University Usa Radio News Phoenix Bureau