23 Burst results for "Duffield"

"duffield" Discussed on For Women Who Love The F-Word

For Women Who Love The F-Word

04:27 min | Last month

"duffield" Discussed on For Women Who Love The F-Word

"What would marie doing this situation early on denise you mentioned about you know until you get the number of people in clear pergram used you want to do something. Go go straight through rather than just jumping around. There's this syndrome called shiny object syndrome. Have you come across this mankind's round you guess i mean in the early stages of my business. I was trying to do everything. And if you looked at my website. Back then i didn't just talk about money and marketing I talked that. Find your soul mate. Get a pay rise at at your job Get in healthy. So i kind of opted everything that would be important to a woman. Modern woman ni- tried to everything for that woman and in a way to definitely did it in the early as i did. Different books different programs. What has really helped me to focus to focus my topic and just focus on money and business. That's it for women in business not women in corporate world's necessarily even though i do have people in in that in that world not people helping find their soulmate or yet healthy or whatever. It's i can help you with one thing. And i'll do it well and i'll i'm unfortunately it you'll have to go to someone else for everything else. And that's the problem for women. We try and be everything to everyone. And we con- it's an how to use shift a mindset from being everything to just focus on one thing. We'll i tell myself that i am off. You know it's like hey it's enough. I think a big part of my identity. When i yanga was being the go to girl for everything you know and i wanted to solve every problem. I never wanted to tell. People know that. Because i didn't want to admit that i didn't know it. So that's why i was. I was encouraging people to ask me about anything. And now it's my eager can handle saying you know what that's somebody sign of genius. You know what. I'm not so good at that. Maybe you need to find someone else without the need feeling like after solve the problem now that will hit many huts. So what is to you. A soul rich mullan. I love the word richness because even though in most societies that means well i think for women richness means something more than wealth. I think it means having every area of your life be as beautiful as juicy. Ns satisfying as possible. And not just having like one thing. Come out here. you're successful in one area. But having a holistic life we have richness in all areas of your while. Also super awesome okay. So how can my audience reach out to you. So my website is lucky. Bitch dot com. And you can also find me on instagram. My handle is denise detaille and i would love to hear any.

yanga denise marie mullan denise detaille
Per Grankvist is building a Swedish media empire around explainer journalism

The Business of Content

05:16 min | 10 months ago

Per Grankvist is building a Swedish media empire around explainer journalism

"Hair. Thanks for joining us and ohio. So i think what initially intrigued me enough to have you on. The show is that you said that the that you're basically running the nordic version of vox dot com for the uninitiated. Vox is a very public policy focused website in the us. Before we get into that. I wanted to start with talking about how you got into the news business in the first place like i think you started out as just like an independent blogger blogging during your free time right. That's right. I was blogging on the topic of sustainability and to understand and explain how companies could record sustainability and make money at same time and sustainability. Just for it's like a make sure of environmental issues how how companies can reduce their impact on the environment things like that right yup unwieldy social aspect of it so the supply chain and how you treat your people in your employees on the diversity questions. It's the full bag. And i was seeing. That company was starting duties and from a business perspective which was quite new in sweden. So i a cover that. And after a few years i got picked up a donald radar on the swedish businessweek and so they acquired the blog and asked me to head up the stain ability section. That was both online and events and in the paper unsold stock a couple of years. And what were you doing is like a day job while you were an independent blogger like was were you working in sustainability or was just the. Was this just an interest that you add. Start off as an interest. I was working as the head of sales and marketing. At wayne's coffee which is basically the is starbucks equipment in the and yeah. That was my day job. And i started the blog. Ganden started to do some. Freelance works talking about sustainability. the all new zealand Leaning into this trying to explain things so how did you. How did you find that audience for your blog. You know before you had any kind of institutional support. The audience found me. I think and so a lot of people start to reach out and asked if i wanted to come see them and i reached out the few companies. Say hey i need to understand a bit. More on those countries where i ki- and companies of that sort and they found me wealth read on the topic and we had way compensation dr turned into articles and sometimes speaking gig sensible and so you said swedish businessweek acquired you. Is that the swedish version of the american magazine businessweek. No it's it's it's a. It's a similar magazine. Exactly called business. That comes a fatter But it's basically the same but it's it's not affiliated and did they. Have you just come on and start blogging on their website. They did that and also they made me an editor and publisher. So i got to head up a new division focusing on covering these issues the emergent climate issues marching supply chain issues and so on. We did that. The nominee channel way which was kind of new and pioneering in duffield and. It sounds like swedish takes the sustainability stuff more seriously than they do in the us. Yes we do but also a bit full of ourselves so we come from a more sort of systemic point of view. Here is some research. And i've sunday's let's do this together. It's not it's not business oriented at all but more more from moral perspective or moral highground. what you could say about bitta. The greta The wasn't out approach here where we look at. How can we make business. How can we make money of this. As that was something i brought to the table and so working for that magazine. Did it raise your national profile. Like obviously sweden is a relatively small country. Compared to the us you became well relatively well known as a intellectual. Yeah you can say that. I mean i'm curious. Persons are trying to understand things and someone said Gold made the malcolm glad well of sweden of sorts. Because i was at a constantly getting interested in all kinds of new stuff. Oh here's something. Old filter bubbles. Oh here's something social media how that works on. So i tried to explain it soon as i learned something and that gave me a reputation Landed me a new job as the on the opinion pages of one of the big newspapers in sweden is a thug. Biggest national newspaper here by god gate Swedish national brokaw. Coster sat equivalent of pbs in us. Yeah so you became so not just well known in printed pap- papers but was it your voice or were you also appearing on tv i was also paying k the i do have much more of us that are radio. Appearance was forced on tv. So every friday. I come along to get with two other people on the panel discussed today. made make sense of the dole. I was basically my job. So you're a recognizable like you're walking on the street people would recognize who you're

Businessweek Ganden Sweden VOX Ohio American Magazine Bitta Starbucks United States Wayne Duffield New Zealand Malcolm Coster Brokaw Gold PBS Dole
"duffield" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

06:38 min | 1 year ago

"duffield" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Very dark relationship trauma. That we we just started sending out to places in trying to set up, but it's very does it have a title? Yes I don't think I can say. What about what about the No dialogue movie? Alan's called No one will save you Okay and that's One Hander that I was like, well, what's the most complicated character? I can make in a movie. it has no dialogue, and then we'll just you know throw everything at them kind of thing So we've cast it a couple of times with with the with their own. It's been really challenging the kind of lockdown dates and. Everything. So we're in the middle of trying to cast it. Again and trying to fairly one, we can actually shoot and then I'm producing knock on Wood a movie. With Lord and Miller universal that's an untitled. Bear horror comedy. That a buddy of mine. Buddy of mine who is mccheese assistant on the babysitter. Road and I set up at universal with and Kristen fill the bear horror movie grizzly man barely a bear yeah. As a title but universal really wants to keep the title. Okay. Okay. But. Once you hear the aisle. That's crazy. Yeah. But? Of Hoping is that that will go. Soon. We we just got a great director and we're also not going to direct it. No Yeah It was Jimmy's script, and I helped with a little and I just felt like the budget Alan's. Forty or so and I felt like I wanted to have like an intermediary step. Because I want be. I WANNA I WANNA as much as they can earn him movie money I WANNA earn like the budgets I have that I feel like, Oh, I'm responsible for fifteen million and. Build up and. What else do I like the smaller spontaneous was a bitch but I like the smaller space tour I can I can do my weird. My weird things and there's not a ton of risk Big. Things like that seems like a lot of. You know I'm not I don't care about spontaneous box. Is I'm like they'll make their money as opposed to like a a big movie. I'm like I. Don't I don't. I don't even know if there's going to be theaters in. A. Harvard, border about that. Again, I mean like we're gonNA need a a kind of government bailout on a on a lot of industries and movie downloads are no different Know Yeah, the way it works is the chains are paying rent sometimes to themselves, sometimes to other entities and. Can the people that own the spaces of the movie theaters give rent relief without having to pay their property taxes right on property with no income coming in. So it's so complicated that. Dinners are going to be. Tied 'cause you know I don't think ten works or the. We know it didn't and in America least and and so it's like I think I think we're the theater chains are going to be really tied to the vaccine. Working and making people feel confident. The doors are open and you feel safe I think they're gonNa make so much money. It's GonNa. It's GonNa take a while though because it's going to tell people could mask up and properly social distance and stuff like that. We're going to keep seeing the graph go up and down without breaks. Yeah and you know we're the only country in the world right now that that has this many cases and this many deaths and it's only because somehow masking up. A political issue rather than his commonsense safety issue like a seat belt. So it's really just on my political easy everyone in the world that washes spontaneous knows exactly how I feel politically. I. Think I think there's a direct correlation between who wins the election and when audiences go back to theaters. you know I would like the right person to win me to just iovine. Making calls Joe Biden, every single day I'm talking to voters in battleground states every single day on. I, think it's GonNa. It's GONNA take people. Theatre owners are angry. At studios and I'm just kind of like you, it's not the content it really is. When when James Bond was pulled people all mad at the movie James Bond I'm like. Are you kidding me get mad the actual fact that we don't have a national mask mandate and we don't have low numbers like. Or Japan or New Zealand because I can. Mascot. Is. As a New Zealander, his shooting the Lord of the rings show now and like I'll face time and he's just like walking around living his life. Yeah. Like like an asshole would you here but like over there, it's just like that's why can't you walk around and high five and hug and all these things I'm just like Oh this is. A move to new. Zealand. We're going to have. We'll by the way that I think there's a travel embargo on Americans coming to New Zealand. Anyhow it's a nightmare. Yeah. You'd have to quarantine for minimum two weeks just to land because of the outbreak in this country. So I mean look it's going to be a crazy couple weeks I. Loved Your I Love Your film though getting back to the film I hope I will be able to go into a movie theater together and have accused a screening one day. And never with an audience. You know what if you get through this damn pandemic and get back into theaters that'll be something that you and I hopefully will put together. It it won't be a monster two hour episode of the podcast like this but we should get up in front of in front of people and do a Q. and A. If we can't read I. Love It. Yeah. Yeah. But congrats on your first film man thanks to be generous with your time and I can't wait to see what you do next. So thanks again Brian Thank you man I have a good one youtube and that's how the. Special thanks again to writer director Brian Duffield for being so generous with his time. This was such a fun long episode to do and I really appreciated Brian being there for all of it. So thanks again for that Brian and if you have not yet seen spontaneous, I highly recommend you go rent. You could find it anywhere where you could find movies to rant and you know it's great support independent filmmakers during a time like this as well..

Brian Duffield Alan New Zealand director James Bond Joe Biden youtube Kristen Wood Lord America Jimmy A. Harvard writer Miller Japan
"duffield" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

06:55 min | 1 year ago

"duffield" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"Yeah and so eventually, those rules change that but I still talk to writers where they're being graded by the old rules of who adapted which part of the book I? Yeah. So it's it's it's a crazy process, but I wanna get to sideline sorry about that. I don't know you know. It is therapeutic for you though because you've been through multiple arbitrations and you said that like you've kind of come out and being like an advocate for other writers to call when they're an arbitration Oh, what are some of that experiences? Yeah. I mean I think what somebody advice you give to young writers of things to to watch out for when they're doing their first deals you wish you would've known. Yeah I I think part of it too because the the Jane experience was so. Crazy that I feel like it's become a thing where like someone else's going to go really crazy production experience I get, I get the call kind like US Duffield as your therapist a lot of the times it is. You know. On Jane like it would have been like. This perfect storm of everything going wrong. Possible. where I think it's like. Completely like impossible to replicate that experience To me but at thank You know and I was I was really young my second script sale and. So like I didn't have a lot of the protections that I would have now. What are some of those would advise for young riders to have I think gunning for a producer credit is super. Important, and usually is a fights until you're kind of a little older But I think that is like a bigger. Battle that you can fight and win with. You from being fired. Would you say is that? Is that one of the reasons why? Well. You can get fire, but you can't necessarily get excluded absorbed then just get can get messier. It's interesting. You say that because when I did my my podcast for rise of the planet of the Apes. Jerk Rick. Rick Jaffa Amanda Silver were the producers and one of the funniest things they said was they remember firing themselves at least twice and they brought in some other great writers but they they they realized that they had to take themselves out of the out of out of that part of the loop because of what the director in the studio wanted. But then they still were able to come back by the end of it Rehire themselves and stay involved as a producer with some of the decisions to make sure that it didn't completely go off the rails. So I think that's that's great advice. that. Be like a big one that would probably harp on I mean like you know I think in general. I mean the best experience I've had with other directors. was when I had a real say in the matter like the pilot. I made the USA. Match Ackman to directed you know olive. Olive Oliver Yeah forever. That's right. and that was a great. A great experience you know it didn't get picked up like the testing was fantastic. and. It was just like I was like Oh like I know. Who? The person is that I'm going to get along with WHO's going to do a great job all these different things, and it was like a really healthy. I remember that was the first time. I was on a set where it was just like Oh. This is what it's supposed to be like like everyone. In a good place. Everyone's happy like we're all getting. You know it just felt very like like, oh, like yeah. I. Could make this show for a couple of years because I love all the kids love all the crew. was. An expensive I mean is this something that could still get picked up that still shop. I mean because there was also a teen Sean. So everyone's kind of outgrown it. Now. But you still have the scripts you could reboot it with different cast. Yeah. I could probably but I feel like I did it i. feel like. All right fair enough. Like like Hanukkah. But but he was really. Read that was like because obviously TV you have more power by as a producer like being able to be like, no, this is the director that I really believe in really wants You know I think a lot of that can be. A. Really it just kind of start having like that. Healthy. Process. Is like if you're like, Oh, you're kind of part of building the team choosing where the movie winds up in some cases you kind of. Select, your players as it were. and. This is enjoyable experience like I. Know This director loves what I love about the movie because even I. Yeah. Olive. Was the first time. Director pitched me and like that was like you know. So I could hear what Matt was saying that I was just like Oh everything you're saying is what I wanted to here in terms of like what's important to me about this as opposed to the other things we're like other directors were hired and I had no say in that and then you kind of sometimes you show up in your like hopefully this is an awful but other times they're like this other thing you know I really love this other movie that I want this movie to become. And then you're like, oh, that's why. I know everyone needs to work but then they becomes like a frustrating experience because you're just all automatically on a different page when you're able to protect your vision if you're in the room obviously so that. I loved you know I love working with map because he added a lot. To it but I was like he's extremely talented is a nice guy. He can articulate why he thinks these changes are better and so it was not I was like other shows getting better. And my vision is expanding because I'm. Trust this guy. To do great work and honestly, Lynne Ramsay was was really similar. where she was so talented amazing. Yeah. She would have ideas that were crazy and then kind of articulate what she wanted and I was like, Oh, this is better than. What I had because as as a writer like I love taking other people's ideas because then I can just take credit for them Yeah. But like I remember like you know it's like if it's you know if his script by the writers get. blamed. Good and bad arm when someone has a good idea or like better line I'm all about. Improving myself It's It's tough..

director producer writer Jane Rick Jaffa Lynne Ramsay Olive Oliver US Duffield Sean USA. Matt Amanda Silver
"duffield" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"duffield" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"But now without any further ado, let's get into our monster podcast with writer director Brian Duffield to talk about his latest film spontaneous. Okay. After technical difficulties, Brian Duffield going good. How are you doing? I'm doing good No more questions the center interviews over time I really appreciate it. Okay. There's there's so much to start with. Yeah. There's so much star with here we go. You went to Temple University? Yeah you got an internship. You went to oakwoods apartments in universal city with all the fresh divorcee tears still on your walls and you were out here. Right is the writers strike started in two thousand seven and what was it like for you to see what your prospects may or may not be right as the writers strike with starting. I came on Oh aid. So right? As the writer straight was ending but right as the recession started, right So. It sucked it was terrible. It was it was a tough time. I. Mean at that at that point, the WJ had tapped into their fund to actually help some writers with their mortgage payments. Something that the dues have always gone towards and you know it helps some writers. Some writers actually retired kind of your aura said into early retirement What were you doing at your internship during that time was development still going on? Yeah, there was like script. Script reading and that kind of thing. But it was you know it was pretty. Slow. You know probably not that dissimilar. From now, actually slower. Than that, it was now. We're right. 'cause writers actually right during that time. It was like a Lotta like reading scripts that were set up elsewhere a lot like kind of like a million is. The slates of. Different studios that kind of thing and. Then it ended and I saw an intern in that of take back up. A little a little bit. But it was it was. It not the The you know you do everything right and you get good results that college promises. Well. Here's the thing you were working as a script reader, and that's actually a really good fundamental task to have completed as a writer because you're looking at other people scripts, you don't want to be too judgmental. You don't want to be terrible to them but at the same time, it teaches you kind of what works and what doesn't what were some of the things that you picked up as a scriptwriter. that. A lot of them are terrible which sounds a person's Dushi but it's I found it really encouraging Terms of like having just kind of left billy. And moved out to La, and that it felt like kind of like this a you know unbreakable ceiling in terms of like you know so few people can become professional. And then you kind of read all the scripts that are selling and a lot of. Bad and not even just like bad store just like you know they'd be like full of type Bosie in all the things that you were. So Anal About not? Doing. Like Oh, the scripts. You know at the time seven figures were common. and. Then you like this mess and then you know they would get replaced or or sometimes now I remember I gave like a really scathing Review, on a stripped out Wants Him Oscars and I stand by. You WanNa. See what scripted. How about how about this without without even giving us a hint of what it was. dated. So that's you know what was it? What was it that you hated the most about? What was the the mistake we saw? I thought it was kind of like a top to bottom. Bad script didn't buy. It. was like a relationship movie and there was not. Single part where I bought the relationship And you know that's kind of the whole shirl you. Remember being like I? Think this is terrible and then my Boston like they they're making it right now and I was just like other. They change launches like, no, I don't think so. That's crazy and then you know It got. A couple Oscars I. Think And I had that I was a reader like during college and they played that as a trick on me in which they would give me a couple of bad scripts than one or two that we're like actually going into production and when I like made any criticism about the things that were going into production, they're like, well, this one's going into. Wrong. I'm like Aah my though, and like the things that I was pointing out like an coverage ended up to be laws that by the time the movie came out they hadn't fixed. So it's it's funny when they do that to you know you. You know when I even like on onset like if we have assistance I, always really wants them if they see something that they don't think is good. You know our assistant Nicole on spontaneous I. Would you have to tell me using something's not good otherwise? You're no. There's no help to be having an assistant and so I think for me, it's it's You Know I. So I I remember you know the same is true with the bosses I have. You know they were just like if you're just like if you feel bad and you're like it's A. Four out of five years the two out of five that does really serve anyone best interests and I can be wrong but it's long as I'm like able to explain why I'm wrong. It's an interesting thing for filtering notes though I mean at a certain point especially when you're on set and you're limited on time how much how much can you really changed at that point? You know it seems like you need the most important note of what's happening now and I commend you on that because being surrounded by yes. Men is a true danger for buddy. You know working in film because you know if you're not evaluating your work and your convinced that everything's perfect, that's a road disaster as well. But how how many changes could you really except when? People are pointing stuff always shooting. Kind of. Would rotate on the scene. There are definitely times when someone would be like you know we should get take like this and I would just I don't have like I would love to do that sounds great but I don't have the time to do that. and. It's Mancini's I did more. Than I would probably on another mean, we discussed it is.

writer Brian Duffield oakwoods Temple University La intern Boston Mancini billy director Nicole
"duffield" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"duffield" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"So look just really quick in case they spontaneously combust I just WanNa. Say really quick for the record that I think Brian Duffield did an amazing job with his directorial debut. I guess I'm Okay Howdy I'm Jeff Goldsmith the publisher of back in the host of the QNA. My agenda is simple each week I plan to bring you in depth insights into the creative process of storytelling folks. I am really honored today to have writer director, Brian Duffield for his feature film director Oriel debut ease had films that he's written produced but this is direct Hoyle debut on something that he wrote and is now directed and Brian did a great job. He made a movie that is just in time for Halloween. It is a lot of fun to watch 'cause there's a lot of Gore. In it, but it's comedy. It's a film that has a heck of a heart. So if you have not yet seen spontaneous, the subject of today's podcast zoom gassed 'cause we are also putting these on youtube see you could watch them. They're not just in I tunes and spotify anymore if you go to backstory magazine Youtube, you'll find it Spontaneous is what we're GONNA be talking about all day and we are going to be talking a lot about it because as it turns out as you will hear, Brian was podcast listener of Mining College and because of that, he really wanted to give back. To fans like him and to just provide the most depth interview ever, and that's what we did. We have a huge runtime today and a lot of stuff to get through. So look, we always like to amplify the voices of folks for independent cinema and I really hope you go see Brian's movies spontaneous and and support him somebody who has a podcast listener who is now doing a podcast and do very special one for you. It would be fantastic to see spontaneous you could rent it anywhere. You Rent Movies Online Brian had a lot of amazing things to say about his rectal debut so. I know you'll dig this episode and speaking of things to dig you know backstory magazine were still publishing. In fact, we're just getting ready to publish issue forty two our long delayed pandemic issue and we could use all your support as well. It's not easy running film magazine during these kind of crazy times but we are going to still do it. We're going to still keep publishing and If you want to support us by subscribing, you could use coupon code save five like the number five save five over backstory dot net and that will save you five dollars off a one year subscription. With your subscription of course, you get new issues but you also get access to our archive and currently we're on we're getting ready to publish forty two. We go back to about issue thirty in the archive and we're continuing to add new older issues as we are simultaneously building new issues. So that is our our challenge..

Brian Duffield QNA youtube Jeff Goldsmith WanNa publisher Gore director Oriel spotify Hoyle writer Mining College
Sloths Slowly Cavort By Day Now

60-Second Science

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Sloths Slowly Cavort By Day Now

"Somewhere in this forest do here there are slumps. Those slots live in Brazil's Atlantic forest. If you're a tourist watching slots isn't that exciting but if you're a scientist, well, it's also not that exciting, but there's a big upside. and. So they actually great study animal. For the wild because you can click on a daydream giles field a biologist at the university. Of Notre, Dame who studies Circadian Rhythms I mean the the ecology work that I I used to do several years back in Bolivia was was focused on bird. Conservation voted? Cola Jian. You'd see some parrots and you make some notes and then they will go on even see them again for another twenty four hours but Duffield and colleagues now collect data on the Brown throated three toed sloth in the Atlantic Forest Duffield says, the slots can stay incite or even in the same tree for nearly twenty four hours. The animals are at rest anywhere from seventy five to ninety percent of the time. But they're coping with a damaged ecosystem. The suggestion is ninety eight percents of that. Forest is being depleted a lot of human disturbance as obviously roads cutting through these areas of the forest in and it means the population of Florida Florida's depleted according to New Research published in the journal Mammalian biology by Duffield and colleagues sloths are responding to that Habitat Disturbance by altering their biological rhythms. We started to say that the the SLAW SPA try merrily day active and that's encountering chew to from some of the literature on the species that we came across before. The suggested they showed Kacem neural activity, which is kind of neither day nor night just kind of across the whole board and a few studies It was totally nocturnal behavior. So this was kind of the opposite to to what we'd expected Duffield says there are few if any studies where researchers monitored slots over a full twenty, four hour period, this study did exactly that for twenty nine days because a lot of. Literature that we reviewed that associated with slow had examined only a partial twenty, four hours, and so there was some inferences about their activity profiles. The course of the time twenty, four hour period. So there was a bit of guests would duffield believes that because predators in the Atlantic forest are extinct and Slavs don't have to compete with other species for resources, they simply taken on a daytime or diurnal schedule the the. Light Doc Sonko with primary Q. and that's Kinda surprising that an animal could be nocturnal conditions. Dino. The other organisms may come along for the slow ride from the algae that live on S- laws for to the insects that live alongside the unhurried mammals. Duffield says it's not clear if the new schedule adopted by Sloughs in the Atlantic forests also affects these creatures not something. We'd love to examine the you know the. The locally system and the Associated Wilkins Winds Sloth APPs that changes readily changed that day tonight to the teenage, the survival strategies based to on the other, and so it may will be that that change or that association daytime is supposed to nine time Casa. Morality does change some of the Yoga. Assumes that associated with it Duffield's most important piece of equipment for this research may be a comfortable chair.

Duffield Atlantic Forest Atlantic Forest Duffield Brazil Scientist Brown Throated Doc Sonko Florida Florida Bolivia Journal Mammalian Biology New Research
Travel to Devon and Cornwall, England

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:57 min | 1 year ago

Travel to Devon and Cornwall, England

"Welcome to amateur traveler I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about Devon and Cornwall. I'd like to welcome to the show. Ryan Duffield from Devon who has come to talk to us about the city of Plymouth in southern England and also the surrounding area, including Devon and Cornwall. Ryan welcome to the show. Thank you very much. Thank you for having me Howie. Good well, you know and it's funny because we just talked about the English coast, but we've moved a little further to the West and talk. Talk about a different region of the coast than we did on the show recently when we talked about Suffolk and the the downs. Why should someone go to Plymouth Plymouth? Actually it's a fantastic city. It's a city that goes amazing maritime history and tradition that dates right back to the medieval times, but actress quite often overloaded when people think of cities in England. They think oh of Lunden Bama again. Manchester Liverpool perhaps. I think Plymouth is just as much. Interest is end if those cities, but it's just north of us so much, and I think particular twenty American. Listeners interested is also the city where the pilgrim father set sail on the mayflower. Sixteen twenty associated with the traditional thanksgiving. S Pre interesting point. Is also surrounded by beautiful coastline. It's right on the border of the county's of Devon and Cornwall these are two of the most popular tourist destinations in the UK down in the South West of England, said Scott lost offer. Willing we're looking for dividend cornwall if we go down to the English map and you go far bottom left. That's where we are, and if you go further bottom further left from there, you end up in the ocean. So we're. Right on the south coast of Devon Oklahoma so are literally facing out to the Atlantic okay well and facing out towards the south. Yes, excellent well, what? Are. You GonNa. Recommend Fourth Festival is obviously starting in the city centre, so the city is actually pretty much based around the coast and its large harbours, so I would say starting day Sutton Haba, which is the main harbor in the city and that so where the city spreads out from I'm from around the. You've all sorts of things to say side. You've got things like the mayflower steps. Steps, which is where there's the pilgrim fathers actually set sail from and this museum dedicated to that you've also got what's the Barbican? which is this old coupled street state specs, medieval periods, which is full of these is correct, slim pubs and bars, restaurants shops things like that, and it's one of the few passes cities. The city was actually bombed June. Sacramento War by the Nazis and the. The city was destroyed, and this is one of the well preserved areas of that city out, also recommend site just basically following the coastline of the city's known as Britain's Ocean City for good reason, because it will revolve around that and overlooking the area. What looks like is huge, fool trust, but what actually is actively operating? Royal Marines and Royal Navy base. That's right in the heart of. Of the city and they still have people that you can save people, training and things, and they actually do tours of that interestingly and I'm not sure how many military basis you can know many Abitur tour during the middle of the day. You can't do that well and it seems like one of the reasons they do that, too. Is You mentioned? This is not a new military base. Quite historical, so this is where the ships sailed out to fight the Spanish Armada for absolutely, and the city is very synonymous with Francis Drake. Who is the man who led the defeating of the Spanish the? He was from Plymouth. Things like the main shopping center in the city named optimus could drake circus, and you'll find lots of other places around the city named after him. You also have along. Along the Bob sell them this coupled medieval street. You have the Plymouth Gin distillery, which is actually the oldest gin distillery in the country, and of course you can go in then you can have tools that you can find out how the GIN is made. You can find out the botanic WHO's they use? Jin's at the end of that. So if you're GIN, Fan Pathak place to go we'll. Get into more detail on all these things. So in terms of the BARBICAN. For instance you mentioned the Plymouth Gin distillery. There are different pubs and things. Do you have a favorite pub? Is there someplace that we ought to check out? There is a place I feel bad commending it, but there's a web spins now Weber spins is a national chain across the country. If you live in the UK, you know about web of Spain's. They've actually got really nice bar that down on the Babacan. Babacan, which is right by the Plymouth Gin Distiller Selfish Nickel Jin from that, but they've got huge selection of our genes of a drinks there, but all the buildings there because they're all medieval style buildings that is then become ingrained within the actual itself garnered sovereignty. Highly recommend that this is places down the thyroid record. Think of any off the top of my head. Okay mix over a new kind of places and very traditional old pubs as well which great.

Plymouth Plymouth Gin Cornwall Plymouth Plymouth Plymouth Gin Distiller Devon England Ryan Duffield Ocean City Chris Christensen Devon Oklahoma Howie Royal Navy Babacan Francis Drake Sutton Haba Manchester
Join Forces to Create Unique Hair Education, with Katrina Kelly and Conor Doyle

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

09:48 min | 1 year ago

Join Forces to Create Unique Hair Education, with Katrina Kelly and Conor Doyle

"Between of being lockdown. I've had all of the emotions like every kind of emotion I've had from the week before the business had to close to decide what what we were going to do before the government do told was and then the first week I was kind of lazy and then the second week I was just enjoying the moment of quiet now having to do and then like this week. Now I've been busy busy busy organizing dance almost so we'd have emotions. I'd say about you you adopted into this okay and you find implanted to go out and slowly think and this is what. I've been talking to a lot of people in the industry where I think like because we've been so busy. There's nearly as like dealing of guilt. Almost you know what I mean because like everything's cancelled We can't really plan too far ahead so we've gone from having like the whole year plan to sudenly sitting down and thinking what to do next so for me. The hardest part is actually just like taking a breath. Getting there definitely gotten their Katrina. I mean say you both as education. You really you have yourselves but how you coat with this current restrictions that we've been given in isolation lockdown everything that was planned has that created a meltdown for you and have you that with it. Yeah so I think for me what happened was I could see at Komen. I good Sense of like you know. I had it educated Portugal. That trip was cancelled. I was in Italy in that Wisconsin. I supposed to go. Easy that Wisconsin everything. Kinda start counseling down and then you know the shutdown of the Ceylon was. It would lay Again how the safety is most important and but now I'm kind of if I'm honest John. I'm enjoying having time with my family. And they're not annoying me to think he's been. We've all got a heads around. We're all in this or the same. We're all in it together. So initially was a shock. Wasn't it because again? You had some bookings going on different things we would do in it but now. I'm Kinda waking up each morning. She in kin and I feel a bit guilty for Sinus. Almost umbrella over enjoy myself. Not exactly a name isn't it? You're like you're like you're not entitled to that because you don't have all this works to actually it's a whole world is on pause. You do guilty about it because you know there's so many people suffering obviously the medical profession epidemic of wonderful thing but from a selfish industry. Point of view is quite nice to have a little bit of time down and I think the thing about it is creative. Energy is to really let that go. Wouldn't you agree? Trina yeah like in the sense as well. I think that as hairdressers we do tend to dot to you know new things that are happening. I think as a creative especially when the night stops. That's when your brain starts to walk more so I think it's good to it's nearly its forces into this space that we stop and think in a different way put lives or instagram lives. Connor Katrina deserve. What's your take on this? I've just kind of doing one of them at the minute. An quite well because they came more from like not being able to stop so he's a great. How can they possibly deliver to work? Get the industry involved also just like make a little bit of money for charity and civic and going Dot Tumb quake good so I think everyone is kinda reach now on developing a bit into that now Daphne I think showed how much potential is in Duffield of inscribed on facebook live. Maybe we weren't using as much before. Well we certainly on that. Well we treat. I mean he's gone. It's called mental hasn't it? Everybody is just a lot you know what? Let me. Just get on their lives yet. Like is for millions. I wear deal on M. There was one thing that we want to do on its launch an educational so are not held back on a couple of the lines because this week possibly tonight. I actually this weekend and we're launching a new website. This is all a home. Diy like has your hair at home but not color. Joist 'em how to do. Different styles are actually due to watch this instead of the on the lines. Were doing like to watch the live at the tutorials on the website you have to donate so for the source few weeks or actually 'em raise money for lots of phones for Amer Hospitals Arend and sore the World Health Organization as well and so another kind of held back on some of the light on instagram. For that reason because we are site is going to go live so but we're delighted that we are going to be doing everything like for donations for the floor. He weeks all that launched as mega wilder view is doing. I think for a great cause but yeah I have a lot of fun watching these lives and people getting used to beeping good to watch now. Certainly. Yeah we'll be watching what you do in. Yeah sounds great Wednesday night but we want to learn a little bit more of the guys and I know you are massive. I mean you both huge in Ireland. I know that and certainly across European giving listeners. A little bit of a heads up less work at how you came together. I in you know as a bit of a collaborative force would not be. Right in saying the purview. You you definitely got so. Let's start off with yourself. Khanna gives a bit a heads upon who you are the hairdresser and where you are right now so I suppose I'm Harris in eight years at this stage and I. I was inclined of a really big company for a long time. And they're quite good. I got quite actually started to feel like the same thing over and over again. I started to feel like I didn't actually like hair anymore. It's actually like I didn't like industry. I DOT COM to panic. Decided why didn't realize actually that I was just talking to roll and I think sometimes you don't realize until you're on the outside of it and so what happened was I think I think Katrina. Just start shot and over instagram. And WHO's just like? Who says MoD one? Who'S IN WAY MASSACHU- requests headier? Then we got gotten on. Education is always something that. Kinda I wanted to get into a bit more Fulltime Amway's doing a bit of a time never under my own name was always under the company's name or through a brand or something like that on my stock trainer kind of thing and I think Katrina just Matt The exact point where we both kind of a bit of a real realized that we could actually Jewish collaborate and fuel each other's trae tippety android without overpower each other and that was about maybe two years ago. We did some projects together from them. Brunch did our own things again but we always bounce back to each other and to check in and see. How can we build your auto home? We create something together. You know advised that way on so since then. I've left and bigger company. I now work with wildflower crate. Shudo which is kind of crazy flow bespoke kind of area in Dublin on Bhai Danica Garner Ideal Cooper. Dare I have my own Education Connor James Education and I still. I know what a couple of bronze on my own terms and Katrina now are starting to poke. That's kind of where I'm at the independent iconic. Oh you lucky. The indecent of freelance work with lots of different various brands educational. You kind of in a free place to as you want when you want. Yeah exactly am I think that's a really? I don't think you can actually put a value on that radio and I think that's you know I think that's the way businesses need to be if they want to retain stuff. I think that's like more business. Owners are seeing that those that aren't are probably finding harder to retain staff Co. I kind what about you Katrina and so I guess is well like that a stage where are my education. I had my own education for three or four years on against was educate brand online education. was like going radio. I was trailed with it. Got to a stage where I was ready to kind of you know. I wanted to collaborate. I of felt like education again. Like being bossed at times can become very lonely. When it's you up there all the time. Educating says sometimes it's nice to collaborate with somebody so am I had an idea for this 'em Harrison's course and I had spotted connor how isolated. Dm So we sit back idea for the science education connected together then Katrina yet like we had. We had been told on instagram on. Just when I came up with the idea of the Harry signs and we wanted it to be created when I got into it. You can't just knew he was the one I just knew I was like it. Has He was the? And when we did chemistry experiments like ideas for future on Salva chemistry experiment than just critic creative

Connor Katrina Instagram Wisconsin Katrina Portugal Connor James Education Connor Ceylon Facebook Amer Hospitals Arend Italy Amway Daphne DIY Harry World Health Organization Khanna
Our Dream Routines with BEAUTY BAY

Birthday Skin

10:55 min | 2 years ago

Our Dream Routines with BEAUTY BAY

"You have a lot of knowledge as a consumer as well as somebody it's kind of working in the beaten so which is very different to me names because we are consumers that just kind of do the research and help the consumers or at least try to every single week but we saw a really nice way to kind of get the ball rolling with you being Pov eh a skin would be talk about a dream routines so obviously you have all of kind of like a background is care and we also we after a few things now and again and we obviously still have to spend all of our expendable income in skincare shops so we thought we'd run through our dreams routines I think it helps nice as well in this'll studio hurts quite a variety like a wide range of skincare concerns as well so yes sign it gives tiffany toe in everything really nice well Ames shall we get through yours I don't want spotlight all right so I have like quiet combination oily dry skin I don't you know I don't know what is anymore you know I don't know is complete is just skin it's just it's just on my face I don't want any more attention to it but no it's it's a very weather dependent it's very very oily an extremely dry in the winter or overall say it's combination or the dry because yes and sensitive your massive cow even forget though I have no idea hugely since I can't forget it so we're going to start off with kind of like a little well if structure in a routine haven't waste off with McLennan's it see elements pro collagen cleansing bom It's odd just lover Grace this was also yours then we we like have you ever so much in the name of light the two people and like just connected with like a wave uh-huh me included but yeah I just love it a lot of the consistency of it the texture is so nice I love the it feels on his skin it smells and say fail it literally it just it will it's it's yellow as well so it looks and reminds me butter but yet oh blustery it's just so smooth on my cows come on pitch it to me sell it to me like it just melts it's like a balm isn't it and it turns into an oil around yeah it's just insane it's just I have to admit I have smells it does smell lovely I must say Schnell I don't use it like all the time because I'm scared of it now because it's not mega mega folks but it's also like a Kinda just want to say if you're like I want to put it in a little glass box and just keep it I'm talking like a million quid Israeli not I think it's like forty five pounds eighty five but it's like it's like a treat for me when I use it as like when I'm feeling like I'm right get your shit together misprint mom get your elements like butter out an obey Gloria like sparring ajar Mike God Christ stay day sparring absolutely they'll just beautiful the only way describe on it's quite a big job you don't use that much you do quiet in it this is where we announced amy is in a relationship I'm pregnant with a recount amazing so I mean you've you've summed the prices of cleansing bomb I have sung the praises but right I kind let's be realistic with you guys as well so you know I've got quite a lot cleanses am born in terms of cleansing and I don't think I've ever met this chair I am it's no anyway I'm quite lazy yeah no very so a lot of the time I will use and I can never pronounce this the Masella missile how do you pronounce I say my I don't know how I say Messiah say also that I think I say Mr Mussa I think even if you don't I'm so confused that conflict I just loved like I use that every single day dots my go-to cleanser if we're talking about absolute dream routines yeah because it's just a couple of we are will yeah Yeah so onto Tony I've gone for the heels colangelo toner now a lot of loyalism all know how much I rave about the Clinton Sheila Yeah Range I just love I absolutely love it it's just so soothing and Carmen and I think that's the whole Colangelo I'm not yeah I'm GonNa say tails once I mean I've been a few times and I was just thought that because Boorda thought give me a attain I might because of my skin type they literally gave me so much of the Colangelo Rain just really good for like sensitive and drive it's just so soothing I think that's the only way I can really describe quite pricey for tone though which is sought talk about dream routines yeah so the is my dream cleanser toner Gio we have got like ceremony as SPF Mossbacher. Listen to my voice much now so I want to hear from you guys and go around in the Circle Okay Fab grace you all go to cleanser is the also the animists pro collagen cleansing ball Yeah I I love the cleansing bomb I think it's like the nicest way to me you can make up because you're not just stripping riffing off your skin you feel like you put something better than I do actually use Masala water as well Oh my God almost I room John Doe Paul with the same and yes well I normally use uh-huh just get everything off my face then go in with the cleansing ball yeah and I like to spend a lifetime massaging in 'cause I feel like it Scott the right kind of consent but in a chore you're just you're enjoying your cells enjoying washing you Faye Dream Tony Grace Dream toner would be the FRAC Kochta's also actually lactic acidosis so it's a explanation kind of alternative to a scrub and that yeah I just Soak compared and he's it maybe two or three times a week yeah I was going to say without being locked cuss it how often do Jeez it. PM and the piano I wouldn't anything like vitamin C. on them after it kind of just let it sit and do it seeing me put my moisturizer on but yeah it's very gentle so like I think it'd be a nice one fee to try tasty because it doesn't stain his whole it's not like a really strong guide call it in the market for an exfoliating it just can't find one that works well for me yes such a SOB story I care about all of your dream routines I just want to know what's good for me I'm Gonna I'm GonNA listen to this it's dangerous avenue her because I felt the law danger us well I am not the person that doesn't have elements as their favorite cleanse so I my favorite cleanse it is the Kim Ledge Capri Clinton's bomb the step one oh she's a boo boo she go and the reason I like it so much is because it's kind of like the consistency I can imagine your LMS Clinton Baez obviously it's a bomb but they give you this kind of really gentle little rubber finger like appropriate type thing so that you can message in a little bit more than that feels really nice like you said you like semi Sarge Duffield's amazing and it's very much like would not use all the time but if so if I'm going out and if one heavy makeup I will use that to make sure everything's off and then I will go in with the kneeled low-viscous t semester I think it's literally just called LV C. plus the full name friend and it's kind it reminds me of a missile awards because it you literally just put it on rubber around a bit and then give you couldn't just wipe off right this one you can do that with but then also has this really love negative reviews because when you use hi oily and then when you wash it off it's like water on a dog's bark just dislike slides off its a bit like that but then as soon as you like pie drive the towel it leave your skin dead soft and like Supposin plumpy Nice yeah sucker film after Lewis People may see why a were a fan of that yeah yeah yeah I think as a Ah Dry Gal I'm absolutely love it and it's an can take scarf at the same time and in terms of tone I have gone for your hated product teams I don't hate it you know I did use Minoza an offer the glossy solution I honestly we did I did four weeks not makeup did not ex- journey yeah we did it before and after officer wasn't wearing make anyway so that was an improvement in my skin but then I was using the solution and kind of carried on with that and then run out of it and didn't really hi it for whatever reason and then as I got maybe I'll just try again and then as soon as I re boy within like a month Motzkin had completely played up and then when I went to couldn't take it with me 'cause it was too big for hand luggage on my skin just was a bit kind of out of touch with the weather being so cold and I was really high up amount Tinson stuff but then it just didn't react very well at all to play as soon as I came started using atom bomb again like a few other little spots that only

Lactic Acidosis Frac Kochta John Doe Paul Scott Forty Five Pounds Four Weeks
"duffield" Discussed on Behind the Steel Curtain

Behind the Steel Curtain

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"duffield" Discussed on Behind the Steel Curtain

"The letter S. I didn't know that. That's an F. Yeah. Go look at the logo, that's a letter s and I just found that out about a year ago. But that's meant to be enough. I don't think anybody knew that. I heard it now I just found that. No. When you take a look at it, you're just gonna go. Yes. It's the same thing when you look at a FedEx logo. There's a wing of a plane in an arrow going forward in a FedEx logo. It's. So the first thing you're gonna you're gonna do f- stuff. I'll cans and FedEx and you'll just be amazed. I'm going to be looking at that little things like that from now, on and everything every little product. Look at now. On. It's a smiley face. Stuff like that. I mean, in fact, found out a lot of that on the internet. But I learned the FedEx thing years ago. My dad worked for FedEx, but I learned it in a class in college. They were talking about it, and in a public relations class, and I thought that was really cool. But with that we're going to go ahead and wrap up the show. We're going to think everybody for listening as, as always, thank you behind the curtain, who, who puts us on the air here and gives gives us the chance to connect with you. The fan, Tony Duffield. Thank you for another great show. Yeah. Thanks, a lot of fun. I really enjoyed tonight's topic's. It's. And I can't wait to talk to you again. Well, thank you very much. Tony floor Tony deaf. Yo four behind the curtain dot com. Money was Brian Anthony Davis. We appreciate all of you and you my friends have just been hung over. We're talking week.

FedEx Tony Duffield Brian Anthony Davis
"duffield" Discussed on X96

X96

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"duffield" Discussed on X96

"Six dot com slash live is where you can see this. And I'm also going to tweet it right in a minute. When I find the Twitter. Well, that's blue to put it on Blu bet. But this is a follow up. Cautious cautioned before us look. Well, so it's a follow up to the story yesterday about I'm not even gonna put a comment or I'm just going to tweet it there. We go. At our of each Bill. So yesterday, I talked about my son collecting, the dead raccoons from the street, and that he was going to he wanted to skin it and save the bones and save the skeleton and everything like that. And you heard that your heart is his mother, and I said, no, you're not going to do this in the yard. No, no, get it out of here. So he did take it to his friend David's house. But the way people who are listening yesterday, you were not helpful in this thing, by the way. How so listeners of the program. You guys were not helpful. So we start getting a reports of dead animals everywhere that he can go which when I told him about that he said, well, that's really good. You know? So this didn't satisfy his curiosity. He's no, no. And then and then I got Email from people. So he was he was thinking of ways to clean, the bone clean, the flesh off the bones of this dead Ragu. So we can have the skeleton and people said we know you can buy these beetles online that do. And I said I guarantee you when I go home and mentioned that to him he'll say, oh, I already know about those Beatles. I ordered someone there. No. He has friends who has he has a friend who has. Source. There are people out, and we got this Email Bill. Hi, my name is Mike Duffield free to use my name. If necessary I wanted to give you some input on what may or may not be interesting to you and the listeners regarding little bill's latest exploit with the raccoon. He's interested in collecting the bones is far more common than you would expect. I run a thriving business cleaning bones, professionally and live a completely normal life outside of that. What what you might find? Even more surprising is that many of my most of my business is cleaning and retake rearticulating, the skeletons of people's pets pets die. I know many people cross the country of had similar businesses. In fact, were many of them. It's their sole source of income. I've worked with locals and had people ship their pets across the country for me to memorialize him. It's fascinating processing really isn't as grosses people may except except in the case of roadkill is little Bill. Just learn I've cleaned animals a small as mice as big as a horse and everything in between the things you learn about these animals when you process them is fascinating. I often find physical deformities the owners didn't even know the animals had or past injuries that had healed. Anyway. No wanna go on too long. But I want to say your son is perfectly normal at least by my standards, and I see myself as a regular guy. Thanks,.

David Mike Duffield Blu Twitter
"duffield" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"duffield" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"I'm not quite as quick to mute people on Twitter because maybe someone just had a bad morning or something. But I think it's very important to be extremely cautious. Because there's so much noise out there that honing in on the signal be very cautious about who you actually let into your mind to influence it. That's a very important thing, you need to guard your mind as well as you guard, your private keys, in my opinion. What projects are you looking at right now that you think are game changers. Coming into two thousand nineteen. Of course, bitcoin is always there. It's hanging out is the king is the dead. It's JoAnne schilling. It's not going anywhere. But what are some other things on traces radar with BIC? When of course, there's things like lightning network and member Wimbledon grin and stuff. But I got some Cemex in an air drop. You know, it has like a one and a half million dollar market cap. I mean this things on nobody's radar. I think it's kind of interesting, you know, that looks kind of fun dash interviewed Evan Duffield on bitcoin knowledge when dash was like three dollars. You know, I mean way back in the day. So dash has always been interesting to me. Of course, like understanding how to properly and securely like claim airdrops is all an and forks is is always on my radar because that's like free money. Right. But then once you get the forks or whatever it's like, oh, well, maybe you don't want to sell all of it. So that's why I've stayed around with Cemex because I've been looking at some of the stuff they've been doing, and I'm like, oh that looks like there's some interesting things happening there. So, you know, you don't wanna get chasing off in the weeds and spend all your time like out in the weeds and unproductive stuff. But I do think it's good to keep your eyes out and be looking at different projects. So I'd say those are the ones I'm kind of looking at and just really listeners dash is no at sixty four dollars at the time of this recording. So long way from three dollars. Yeah. Well, it went all the way to like fifteen hundred. So I mean, dashes totally totally imploded since the the big bubble 2017. But hey, that's kind of what happens, but I like I like the master node aspect because that's. An innovation when it comes to the cash flow statement with these crypto currencies. So I kind of I think that's an interesting. Interesting innovation, you know, which is because to me the cash flow statement in accounting is like the most important one and dash innovated on that. So when I go to look at like, these different projects, I want to look at projects where there's actually been innovation made. And then I want to see how plays out in a real world environment with money at risk, you know, and game theory, and all of this stuff and dashes stayed around. You know, so it looks like an interesting innovation and is proving itself and for the listeners to win a one if you want to know more about master knows we do have a master knows went to one. We have Ryan Taylor. Also, doing a one to one and dash and Ricardo spongy of minero also has a marijuana one on the podcast. So we'll check those out in our backlog. Trip to a one one has the SEO to be the first place. Somebody might be coming to when they're getting into the space. They might go. Crypto win a one. This isn't a this podcast and figure out the space figure out these different ideas, these ideologies, these terms, these people in the space investments or coins, what have you? If this was the first podcast. Somebody new getting into the space was listening to what would trace say to them figure out what private keys are and how to secure them. That's where the rubber meets the road in this industry. Like everybody wants your money. And so you got to figure out a way to protect those Toshi's..

Cemex Twitter JoAnne schilling Evan Duffield BIC Ricardo spongy Ryan Taylor marijuana three dollars sixty four dollars million dollar
"duffield" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"duffield" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"This is the worst fields fill hundred show, which right, Margaret, Thank thank you. you. Listening up a little bit. Gav loosen it up. Talking about my own. The fuck. Did you senior source? Hey, what are you clowns doing? You're referring to me as a clown. Wait, a minute loosen it up, and I can't look weird. What is it with you? You're talking about my anus. What is he doing? Giving me the weird. I. Kind of go about the defense. Now, I'm not going off the deep end. What was the problem? I said I was used said I sat a good, I'm loosening any goes, loosen. All I was trying to say. Okay. Uh-huh. You're gonna meet for what were you trying to say I was should differentiate between the vocal cord. That's right. Go ahead. Well, she's going to beat me up. So what are you? What are you saying I demand that you say it she's going to beat me up bell? Make sure she doesn't listen homeboy at Margaret just what e- tween vocal court. Yes. And the butthole well, you a hold on hold on his ass. But you know, what you and I need to have a talk after the show got fire me. No, I'm not gonna I'm not gonna fire you, but you know, we really have to give you gotta have a conversation with you after the show because you're just you're weird man, you're taking all kinds of stuff. He's more than weird. This kid is he's gone. We'll put up with something like that. I was trying to differentiate between the vocal cord and the butthole fills laughing. Let has got a funny. Oh, it's funny. You know what Phil as well? Get up and throw myself in front of a truck out of the highway out here. Everybody sit down and put banking garbage the copy. Hey, but I'm serious coulda. Tell me your bowl way of thinking man is Wade jacked up. Okay. Well, you know, you better differentiate between the vocal cords and the butthole. What do you think they were talking about? I don't ever talking about the voice. All right. Then what did you have to say? Well, you got to differentiate because somebody may be tuning in. And all they heard was MS grey saying I need to loosen it up. And so naturally that. Oh, man weekly. Wait, wait a minute. I wanna talk to my husband on the air. Come on. I demand to have my husband out. Ahead. Look at Phil. Go ahead. If you gotta make Frank I need some legal advice right Duffield because this is getting very this is getting to the edge. Nobody sue Phil. I'm not suing Phil. But I think I need to do my rights my workplace rights as they pertain to don't say it, bud. As they pertain to what as they pertain to whether when I say loose. Yeah. See you're going to get mad at the kid for saying that by husband Dr. Frank Robert Lennon until hundred so it's Leonard at the Phil Hendrie show, Robert Leonard what you come on tell his he home home. Bart wasn't. Oh, okay. Yeah. He is put it on the air. If you don't wanna put you on because we need to ask you a question. I mean. A franken. Phil hendrie. Can you hear me? Rice has going where Margaret I love your friend. They said that you need to talk with me about some Frank. I wanna know my legal rights in a situation here on the film reprogram now. But Dickman that you need to know your legal rights, but I by on the Phil Hendrie show. What the Christ thing? What do you mean, it what what do you think? Frank Margaret got into a dispute with. But I'll do it. I got into a dispute with bud. But I said I was loosening up my throat, and he claimed that I needed to to to specify I'm burning daylight bargain for Christ's sake. All right. All right. He's he claims I needed to specify that. It was my vocal chords. Not my anus. All right..

Phil hendrie sue Phil Frank Margaret Dr. Frank Robert Lennon Robert Leonard Bart MS grey Wade Duffield franken Margaret I Dickman Rice
Pompeo testifies on Trump-Putin summit

Tony and Dwight

03:45 min | 3 years ago

Pompeo testifies on Trump-Putin summit

"Afternoon more of, the same partly cloudy, with highs around ninety degree weather forecast I'm meteorologist Tiffany savant it's up to eighty eight at NewsRadio. Eight forty w.. H. a. s. our top story the thirteenth triple crown winner will race no more Paul miles reports Winstar farm. Announced that justified has. Been retired from racing trainer Bob Baffert says justified is not responding quick enough from an ankle injury and there's no time to train for his, scheduled career finale in the Breeders Cup Classic at Churchill Downs. Justify raced just six times all as a three year old and he won every race. Becoming the first undefeated triple crown winner since Seattle slew the Colt will return to Kentucky next month with a possible sale to coolmore stud farm that. Is home to two thousand fifteen triple crown winner American pharaoh Paul miles NewsRadio, eight forty w. h. a. s. secretary, of state Mike Pompeo was on the hot seat that the capital today. Opening a Senate hearing Senator Bob. Menendez a New Jersey says it's hard to get. Pompeo to tell. What. Went on during the Trump Putin summit. But seems to have taken a three ring circus, of a debacle of. A meeting with President Putin. And a reality TV summit that was, little more than a photo op with a brutal dictator one hearing with the secretary of state Pompeo says Trump briefed him about what. Was said in his private to our meeting with Putin. At the Helsinki, summit he did not reveal what was discussed Pompeo defended, the president's right to hold private meetings there was no. One else in the Trump, Putin meeting other than to translators a new report from the Kentucky office of drug control policy shows how lethal the drug problem is the new report shows that over. Fifteen hundred Kentuckians died as a result of a drug overdose last year that's an eleven and a half percent increase compared to two thousand sixteen. When one, thousand four hundred sixty eight people died fat Neal was a factor, and approximately fifty two percent of the toxicology cases up from roughly forty seven percent in two thousand. Sixteen the report says, the top five counties four deaths per capita are Kenton Campbell Boyd Mason and gentlemen, county Haley Hanson NewsRadio eight forty w. h. a. s. eighteen year old Tyler Giral went to have a day of Fun before she was off to serve his country in the marines he was killed on. A ride called the fireball at the Ohio State fair last year when it broke apart mid, air amber Duffield Tyler's mom says safety has not improved since the deadly. Accident now she spends her time pressuring state officials, to pass Tyler's law a state law that would require extensive right inspections at fairs I don't want anybody else to have that Because that, was terrible amusements of America who handles the state fair rides has. Brought in a third party. To examine the, rides in addition to their workers for this year's, fair they say, they are no longer doing business, with the makers of the fireball a restaurant, south of Seattle has been a victim. Of what could be turning. Into a, disturbing trend scammers trying to extort money by leaving bad reviews. The one-star reviews of Napoli, Italian restaurants and it's Speakeasy lounge called the food garbage and ripped the staff the reviews are horrible manager Jason Fulton, says, business, plummeted when. People read those things on yelp Google and. Facebook then he got a letter demanding nine hundred dollars to take down the reviews which he said were traced to Romania. The sheriff in Pierce county Washington says we are seeing extortion cases on a daily basis right now and in, this particular, case there. Wasn't much to do besides flag the bad reviews and count. On the public to get the star rating backup Scott Goldberg ABC, news your next news update is at six thirty I'm Suzanne. NewsRadio eight forty w. h. a. s. Kentucky His breaking news weather and traffic station Trainer Bob Baffert says justified is not responding quick.

Mike Pompeo Trump Putin Summit President Putin Bob Baffert Kentucky Tyler Giral Donald Trump Seattle Paul Miles Newsradio Jason Fulton Drug Overdose Tiffany Savant Paul Miles Kenton Campbell Boyd Mason Winstar Farm Ohio State Churchill Downs Putin Senate
"duffield" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"duffield" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"I'm robert short i was the makeup effects supervisor designer for beetlejuice i'm tom duffield i was the art director on beetlejuice i was given the script i read it and i was amazed at the amount of creative elements that were in the script and of course the scale of some of the things such as the sand worms when i first read the script i'm fat i've never anything like this before this wildest movie i've ever read what is this about i don't this is crazy i was brought in on on meeting that completely turned the entire project on its ear for me all of a sudden the sand worm that i had pictured as the horrible big brown things we're suddenly black and white stripes with big blue lips and big yellow eyes and ahead within a head and at that point all of a sudden realised oh this is unlike anything that i would have expected ville nervous because i never done anything i've never seen anything like this so it was like it was really a first time effort here and the fact that tim was going to be overlaying this kind of style in this kind of look onto a story like this really felt it was going to be a unique experience one of the things that sets beetlejuice apart from a lot of films even of that era is that we decided early on that we try and do everything or as much as we could in camera by doing things live on set like a magician's tricks light of hand for some reason that plays emotionally better with people it also gives the the film a very handcrafted feeling and look.

tom duffield director tim beetlejuice supervisor overlaying
"duffield" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"duffield" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"I'm robert short i was the makeup effects supervisor designer for beetlejuice i'm tom duffield i was the art director on beetlejuice i was given the script i read it and i was amazed at the amount of creative elements that were in the script and of course the scale of some of the things such as the sand worms when i first read the script i'm fat i've never anything like this before this wildest movie i've ever read what is this about i don't this is crazy i was brought in on on meeting that completely turned the entire project on its ear for me all of a sudden the sand worm that i had pictured as the horrible big brown things we're suddenly black and white stripes with big blue lips and big yellow eyes and ahead within a head and at that point all of a sudden realised oh this is unlike anything that i would have expected ville nervous because i never done anything i've never seen anything like this so it was like it was really a first time effort here and the fact that tim was going to be overlaying this kind of style in this kind of look onto a story like this really felt it was going to be a unique experience one of the things that sets beetlejuice apart from a lot of films even of that era is that we decided early on that we try and do everything or as much as we could in camera by doing things live on set like a magician's tricks light of hand for some reason that plays emotionally better with people it also gives the the film a very handcrafted feeling and look.

tom duffield director tim beetlejuice supervisor overlaying
"duffield" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"duffield" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"I'm robert short i was the makeup effects supervisor designer for beetlejuice i'm tom duffield i was the art director on beetlejuice i was given the script i read it and i was amazed at the amount of creative elements that were in the script and of course the scale of some of the things such as the sand worms when i first read the script i'm fat i've never anything like this before this wildest movie i've ever read what is this about i don't this is crazy i was brought in on on meeting that completely turned the entire project on its ear for me all of a sudden the sand worm that i had pictured as the horrible big brown things we're suddenly black and white stripes with big blue lips and big yellow eyes and ahead within a head and at that point all of a sudden realised oh this is unlike anything that i would have expected ville nervous because i never done anything i've never seen anything like this so it was like it was really a first time effort here and the fact that tim was going to be overlaying this kind of style in this kind of look onto a story like this really felt it was going to be a unique experience one of the things that sets beetlejuice apart from a lot of films even of that era is that we decided early on that we try and do everything or as much as we could in camera by doing things live on set like a magician's tricks light of hand for some reason that plays emotionally better with people it also gives the the film a very handcrafted feeling and look.

tom duffield director tim beetlejuice supervisor overlaying
"duffield" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"duffield" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"I'm robert short i was the makeup effects supervisor designer for beetlejuice i'm tom duffield i was the art director on beetlejuice i was given the script i read it and i was amazed at the amount of creative elements that were in the script and of course the scale of some of the things such as the sand worms when i first read the script i'm i've never anything like this before this wildest movie i've ever read what is this about i don't this is crazy i was brought in on on meeting that completely turned the entire project on its ear for me all of a sudden the sand worm that i had pictured as the horrible big brown things we're suddenly black and white stripes with big blue lips and big yellow eyes and ahead within a head and at that point all of a sudden realised oh this is unlike anything that i would have expected ville nervous because i never done anything i've never seen anything like this so it was like it was really a first time effort here and the fact that tim was going to be overlaying this kind of style in this kind of look onto a story like this really felt it was going to be a unique experience one of the things that sets beetlejuice apart from a lot of films even of that era is that we decided early on that we try and do everything or as much as we could in camera by doing things live on set like a magician's tricks light of hand for some reason that plays emotionally better with people it also gives the the film a very handcrafted feeling and look.

tom duffield director tim beetlejuice supervisor overlaying
"duffield" Discussed on The Crypto Street Podcast

The Crypto Street Podcast

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"duffield" Discussed on The Crypto Street Podcast

"They they never rather they almost never mentioned dash and these articles and so like i don't know if that's a failure of branding on the part of dash or maybe it was like a happy failure i don't know but it's just funny to me do you think in terms of like ultimate privacy there any disadvantages to having it be optional on the chain i think in terms of ultimate privacy using a blockchain at all is is not really what you want which actually reminds me so i interviewed the founder of dash evan duffield last year and it's like a i actually just listen to it again last week if may encourage you to do so it's on youtube it's called something like evan duffield working on skunk works to future proof dash and this guy he's like he's like a a wizard a mystic who has a crystal he has a proverbial crystal ball that i am quite convinced allows him to see a future in in some ways and one of the things that she talked about as a longer term vision for dash essentially becoming essentially replacing the banking system is this is this concept he has which i actually dubbed like a bank in a box which is weird like a sort of kiosk would offer all services that a bank branch currently offers the kiosk of course running like a full dash node and one of the things that he mentioned in that interview that i surprised me but now actually kind of makes sense was that perhaps this bank in a box allows you either the bank in the box or like the cashier when you go in like pay dash or something basically in his sort of vision when people spend dash they have you know like the common sort of cultural thing that they do like a cashback of like actual paper money and i an when he said that i was thinking like i've not heard this anywhere in cripple land what's this guy.

founder evan duffield
"duffield" Discussed on Launch Life with Jeff Walker

Launch Life with Jeff Walker

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"duffield" Discussed on Launch Life with Jeff Walker

"And they are still cranking inuit or death and oh by the way it at the end of a long launch a long fight the open cart in a and a threeweek launch process they've been at it this entire time working like crazy in now for some of it was midnight one pm two am and they just completely rocked it so i'm just so proud of my team they are rockstars' they are rockstarts i'll tell you what that live chat was just it was for the win right there live chat really helped us for all those people were have a hard time ordering was absolutely amazing and then we came down to our clothes and in in our partners just crushed it sort of interesting because in every one of these launches there's this there's gv leader puerto up our affiliate partner we have a leaderboard for them and we trick which parners since the most sense and there's prizes are big prizes for the top partners and there's a lot of competition and they're competing for the prizes put their also competing for bragging rights they are competitive group and wages head amazing support and and our winner denise duffield thomas just crushed and so is notable in that she's of was the first time we've had an australian win first time i think first i'm probably the yet and he's actually took fifth last year and she was prior top of all time top osce finisher but this year she won it she took a wiretowire absolutely crushed it and notably denise inner osmond mark their their business partners and mark was behind the scenes denise started the front of the business marks behind the scenes palm the lovers and in in the marketing but.

partner denise duffield gv osce threeweek
"duffield" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"duffield" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

"The core team it's notches dash like i worked for tass but not for core rate in fact i sometimes you can even criticise but adds with each other but although that would be very counterproductive for both trying to fix dash but others too and uh evan duffield founder he left the court team he gave a ball i control and then he now he started the third subbed hour delay should called dash labs which is going to be very future focused it's a now you have not we have uh three independent teams working under this this same a decentralised opponents organization umbrella they're not accountable to each other but they're all accountable to these split say fortyfive hunter so independent investors the master notes who get to vote them the their proposals them so that's a that's a pretty strong message of decentralisation there it is not just decentralisation but division of labour which i think is important in the darfur guy the threat we had an on just what last week to discuss the road bat forever lucien than just as importantly the wbu as part of it even uh that uh for further decentralisation that further a dow proliferation if you will where like you said he is now the head of dow arm sorry of dash thumb what was healthy is knobs that's labs op he the dust logos would lower was the lowest rate network is named in order found leka that sounds cool to it does little to no doubt but that's a laugh zone for tasks of authority might end up cutting the name oh right maybe i'll be head of dash logos the new dashed del yes my own little fiefdom in the dash of community already planning taking over the world but it's it's a it's a a i think it's a really smart move on the part of the evan and you guys in the community in general again for further decentralisation but he also reap the dividends of the division of labour in having even some like you said you don't wanna silly but heads by.

tass founder evan duffield fortyfive darfur
"duffield" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"duffield" Discussed on Let's Talk Bitcoin!

"I obscure obscure a what's his name um uh evan ever duffield's living was the right now going that is brilliant uh we need to make this happen right away is on it sending him off the whole devin discontent so the epa what's the uttered odors commercial some big cash america usa man of the do the trumpster you know what i'm talking about i literally a on a student at gajah insurance commercial well we could make our own little dash commercial with the dust men the know after the cash you say things they'll be kinda cool i like my idea agassi tito india back we should start a i want to get into pushing dash to a local businesses in the end even go she's got a two gun shops around town in trying to make that happen i'm sure you were thought of that but a definite look forward to that in speaking of what you're trying to break here in a minute um i need to get in touch with my buddy again but i won announced that a friend of mine in colorado who runs a canada's specific business um well technically too but the the primary one that is his the sort of uh you know public face in his very special a product line is the we'll just that he came up with a very unique the product line for the industry that uh his starting to really take off noone else has but him and a pretty ingenious thing uh that he devised on his own and when he he's gotten large orders for a or even when he's just to give it to major growers of for publicity they've loved the raved about it but he is going to start accepting dashing bitcoin nor him on the show pretty soon i just need to make that happen he's excited so it's done deal they will very bad with armand stay tuned.

evan duffield epa colorado canada agassi armand