19 Episode results for "Dryest"

8 BIT CRUMBS - 02-20-2020

Double Toasted

2:48:46 hr | 1 year ago

8 BIT CRUMBS - 02-20-2020

"Ninety face is going to stay that way. We'll let me get stuck entertained for a minute. People used to and then I die. Too Much. Juice can be such a thing as too much juice. We'll see we'll see. We'll prove that one day but today is not enough juice. I don't think we can. We can always you more than God. Damnit US more juice. Rely always learn. Decided in tongue-tied early are slipping juice. At least three hours ago come on. Oh at Leeds. Least get it together. Coleman oh no the pups I gotta read it my ankles right now. She's back she's back. Here yeah pixies back. Look at the kiss terrify. She just put me down. Start dancing again. Let me go ahead and put her down people. I am dryest Coleman. This is cute as Pixie right here. And of course we had the moist at one Christopher Juicy Herman hello everyone hello everybody. I'm Christopher juicier said properly do you do you say it professionals. Christopher Juicy Herman good evening and welcome to the nightly news games now. We got a lot of stuff to talk about tonight we do. Yeah we might even have a little bit of that variety monitoring. He's on it tonight. Oh look at that juice. Juice is working Adam. You got a lot of energy. I do. I do well. It's funny because I was taking a nap before before I came over. Okay that's what was wrong with you. Why is he all like Lucy spawning like Chris? Chris Chris on heroin again. I just no not this time match the beat that we've got to look at the look around the studio for them. Well I've now just work has been super super tough this week but coming home taking quick nap before I've been starting streaming at least like an hour nap and I'm like I gotTa Start Stream I get up there and I'm ready okay. He just had a little bit of the of the of the groggy. Nece GONNA groggy us. Oh but once must I just think of like Martin's disappointment during that one point in the sun that makes me happy administrable? I remember I love that. I love at the first time we played this song from Martin. Martin hated it at the beginning. From this I give up on you. There's no there's no hopefully just exasperated loved it. Oh but we loved it. We did. We still do. We're invigorated by and there. It is a town by right there. Welcome to the show. We tell you who we are. We even have some guests bag. We you met for the first time you do yes. Oh welcome Charles. Yeah I love having audience. Yes yes. They're very good people to man to actually show you how cool they are in a little bit me why you sit there and shut up and let me tell you. Let me know please. No please speak your mind all you like but you know what I'm GonNa do is until these people the kind of variety we have here this the ask idea lot of video games stuff tonight. Yeah Video Game News Lot of game news combined with moving news. We got ill rough program coming. You know what I'm GonNa put so you can see. Eli Roth is he's GonNa be directing borderlands or is he We got a new silent hill on the way another one. Another one again combining movies with video games. They got some new skins far night out there far far. No night with these new skins right here. What else do we have here? All in non video game related news. the Spielberg's yeah taking. The kids are taking film in a different direction than their parents. That's good it's GonNa try something. It is very good to try something new different day Jonah exploring. Oh you know that is what we're going to talk about this. Yeah this is something that I will say. This genre that the Spielberg's that we know have not explored yet yet. I say yet until now until now these kids decide to take their film careers in a different direction and I know. There's you know what I put this in here on right before I left some happy stuff. That's good I mean. A lot of this stuff is happy improve my mood. Okay Yeah you know. Wake you up a little bit. Yeah Yeah exactly. What else do we have? Oh Spiderman Spiderman News for you. Oh I'm not even know anything about this all you you will. Okay Shit when I'm done with you send me all the stories like Oh here's other stories like about like two hours before. Oh good I read a minute. I'm exactly it was talking about and this one's like I have no idea what you liked that you love that you love to get those natural reactions from people. Don't you try to bring some happy news for him and look what He. I'm not unhappy. I give it to him. He looks at it and he looks at me. You put on a glove and you slap me with a try to do something for you and this is how you pay me. I want I know what it is. I'll be appreciative anyway. Anyway oh they you go check. Y'All know what I'm talking about brain dead up here. They say Yell Sour Puts Chris Pussy. Chris up in God turned against me. So when you serve God today Charles Charles Up. That's good react pro. Oh Jesse let's get a Bertinotti with pizzas and elmo. Grover would finish the job who recalled. Oh that's me isn't pushing. Oh Greg Google differ like every other time moved on the move the Yooglie. I don't know he's undecided. Keep people on their toes sister. Great and it'd be a whole shit. When is it going to movies intimately I put I put ten on Mughlan? Oh Boo vaguely odd lost everything. Oh never bet on black. Always good to see you guys here this evening. Glad to have you here look at that. Who is that Tayo audio for? Taddeo Chris he did nothing wrong. He's Avenue is completely innocent worlds against me now. They say this is right now. Grumpy cat lives on. Chris Sauer LASAGNA. And me the spirit of grumpy and his lives on grumpiness and groggy. I love that right. They hate crimes. That's a little. Yeah Yeah We talk after the show. Give these guys right. Here's hoping to do Ya. Yeah we'll talk about that worry about it. That's a little inside thing with us. You see soon enough to see the results of that. You'll see the results very soon enough. Oh Great Google Yooglie Bouli. Oh thank you. That's Josh Arch. One thousand nine hundred ninety two arch. Thank you for the subs. I'M GONNA put this out here right now off. Follow up with it again later. A just like our man Josh over there. Oh Josh boy what you can do is. He's he's subscribed I believe. I believe that. He subscribed with a twitch prime subscription. You're probably got it for free. Do you know why why because he has an Amazon prime account. It's good one unless the Goodwin and can use it to do what. Chris subscribed this channel for free again. I'm a a little slower design thinking i WanNa hit the beats house do I have to do have to hit it. Hit it hit you where it again out. That's what that's the one I got that you go into. My face hurts a little bit and but the pain will wake you up. It will reinvigorate will. Oh it's going to be a fun show tonight. Guys couldn't tell are ready. You're ready to see that we look at the bottom of the screen right. They usually the top coming up going to be to talk about so many things happened tonight. So as I say if you would like to join US regularly over here and also support is in Us At Amazon prime account get yourself twitch prime subscription absolutely. How much three exactly right? I like that that was smooth prey on top of it now lives. They've got that Elvis thing going on with. How can you get a free was going to be a fun time here on the show tonight? Chad? I want to welcome you. Go over here. Oh they got there fresh Chris up in here. That's Chris in their school pick. Yeah Yeah Man. Yeah thanks man. Every time I look at this picture don't you forget about me wrong. No Nelson do. Oh me and molly ringwald. Look at that rebel over there. That doesn't we can pick though it does look a eighty thousand covering its eyes and give them so there. You Go Chris Eerie now. I gotTA GET. Oh yeah good to see you guys in the chat. Let me say how to some of the people in here. Dan J Mark Niklas hip in the House and sailed Donald J. Luther always at Chris Ayers low Chris. Secrecy is pretty similar slime. Roy Hey Cari Hey Slam Zana all kind of people up here tonight Jaji Man. Hey Mr Juicy Chris clenwar season seven begins in a couple of hours. You'd be watching him after the show. Yes my daughter got on my street. Oh you are. Oh God hiccups. I'm sorry can I'm not Chris Areas. Excuse me I'm sorry to Berry's monk want you to know I'm more of a Geek a sexy Geek but I am knowledgeable of stuff of the nerdy variety. That's good to know ending. Always want to know more about our people up in. Homs toasties corey coming for the Slime. Always always trina juice exchange hears about NCAA before relentless venture. Oh person okay. Maybe I have seen that person guy win. Fox bringing a foxy wind up in here cory in the house. Yes yes sir. This me of course makes fun of me when I do that. Is You stick? I like it man? Thanks look at Toronto. When I was very very I I had a lot to drink. I think my skin color started to change into Orange Spray Tan going. No Ron gives me that shirt still have I. don't wear it often take juicy. That's right that's right. Yeah man that's right. That is Toronto. Who had a good time over there too? Good of a time if you ask me. Yes bullet in their follow bullet man. They grateful for the show that we did in Toronto. The club they are now beginning. People Begin to recognize how good the shows are are alive shows that we do in Toronto. I guess they expect us to do that. Well so they were happy with. The show brought a lot of money in your school bar so lot sold a lot at the bar so part you alcohol. Y'All is he really. They really really soggy toast. The bread matter fan at all the moon but man. Yeah y'All y'all y'all did very well. Everybody go Toronto L. A. About Alcohol. Drink a lun and they were very happy so they've brought us a couple of bottles to the green room and I drink bottled man man. It was a lot left but still you could look at me. I'm all for leaning on him. Man He had what he did he give you what that cartoon character got purple cow on. What the fuck. That's a good question. I don't know what I don't even know what that is is a splotch of purple with is on it that's weird. I thought I was just loose innate. Men this is this us. That's us we rab before the show was that was before the show. We did those little before parties at a bar. Oh that's right that's right. That's right I do remember that the night before. That's right. Yeah man so these shows go pretty. Well looking forward to Looking forward to New York or was supposed to give you guys some information today but they told me that now they want to have a sit down about all the details. Sit Down New York New York Dr. Yeah you need a little short. This man had that talk with twitch. Oh Yeah I heard about that. We should into the ED's you are showing a lack of appreciation densities Edwards. I know you know you good evening and wish you see you later but yeah sit down in Orlando. Oh Yeah we'RE GONNA GO TO ORLANDO is a lot of people not going to be there for platelets live during a panel there too. I'M GONNA be on in. They want to sit down and talk to the talk. All the details with the the the the agent and some other people over broadband. I don't know when I'll be able to tell you. I still keep those dates open around the end of May begin to June but a whole by the time I get back from Florida. We'll have something for you to be confirmed. Has you go have something confirmed? Be Nice and firm for the people out there. A let me see here. I'm being so rude man. How you this evening? I'm doing well how are you? I forgot to ask you know I told. You I am reading my goddamn mouth since we started. How are you sir? I'm doing very well now's groggy. I'm doing much better. Did you sleep on the couch. I did yeah at home in here. Just come home exhausted. I'm an APP now. I don't blame him as I took a little nap before I got here too early on woke up very early today. It's GonNa be fun show though as I said you can see stuff happening here chats already already lively already to go. I was going to be a lot of fun a lot of fun in as I said I want everybody to again. They've been here for a few days but again Say hello to not Charles. They'd been so good to us. It's gone this is how and when I say us all of all really now Chris. I want you to do okay. I want you to look and see what is it. I want you to look to your left on the corner of the table. Do you see something there I do. I see looks like They called the amount helping you use them for the books that key place. I've got the word of the books to marketplace book. Martin still groggy not working all that. Well foggy of this little books. Yeah I do I see some blue hedgehog's ready kidneys in Orange. Faulk all of those. But I don't know why you see the man never read and then never go to us. I shall that. I'll thank you so much. Yes some up and take the Rabanne. Yeah multiple wounds Yes sir. Oh there are different kinds of characters. All of them for us we got we have some sonic characters the classes and we got some does corey likes to say. Marielle Mary. No that's that's raw materials immemorial from love peace Yoshi Martin Luigi Lincoln's Zelda. That's really cool. We also have Some straightforward characters. Ryu Guile Chun leave very cool thank you so much now awesome. They said they needed some book. Marchetti because I'm cussing forget now as Corey pointed out. I need to know my place so there you go. Yeah if I ever lose all screwed does go hang him up on his rear view mirror and his England regional goddamn books. I'm gonNA I read Sir. You could put those at his complex over there. Nike Stop Dog in the pages of his company. Goes down now. These are very cool. So did you do these yourself? Tough tough spear creations is at the game. We'll check out her stuff guys absolutely these days. I'm representing the Chad. I'm not this is not me. I'm talking to chat chat. Says make sure that you call Chris a dummy force not reading those books man. I read the book. I those are. Nice bookmark awesome. I Love Them. Thank you so they did. All kinds of themes for all of mostly was comic books. But you being the main resident video game person it again guy the video game guy. Yeah thank you again. Oh very cool now. This is GonNa take a little bit of work. I should have done this beforehand but I need you to do something else. I cannot do this because as you can see. I have a dog on my lap. Who's very comfortable right now. But there will be a reward at the end of the trail for you own If you can get up and go to the refrigerator yes you'll find a tin foil pan in their top tinfoil. Okay going grammy. Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah it's has happened before there. You see him getting the tin foil over there all right and he's returning right now he's bringing that in all right Sir there. He is Let me see there. He is now he'll show them. Let me see. Aw Shit now the poppers I shouldn't a done is why he's dogged other cookies. I just wanted to tell you I appreciate that. I'll have a cookie right now cookie right now. I'm not gonNa tell you what these are I want. I want you to hold on sweet began in again. I got to set up. I want you to do is. I want you to taste these. I want you tell me what flavors you are. Why don't keep putting over the Iraqis. I want you to tell me where flavors okay with Labour's you are experiencing. Oh let's see we have here. We are very. They're very good. Chen Guang cooking month. Thanks good is there a? Is There Bacon in this? I thought so I need a second button now. Very good very good people. They do like a thing restaurant where near where I live like Chocolate covered bacon. Yeah that's been frozen but then they have like the chuckle gone top and everything apparently half before. So I'm guessing maybe similar to this and I know you know what I've had maple covered BACON CHOCOLATE BACON I've had A. I've had bacon all kinds of things and so yeah as you can do anything with you. Put begging like cake. Ice Cream goes with everything. He's pigs tastes good. I don't mind now is very good. Yeah no this is good. I love it. I love it so yesterday. You watching the show. The move extravagant is that must lean you. Watch it move rebukes Baganza. You saw that. We were eating cookies on the air. Lock people hate when we eat cookies or anything on the air much slobbering smacking snort important in you know. We had to eat them on the air though because they were brought by our wonderful guest over here. Nadia Charles and I hear say that they've been brought more stuff really. Yeah but but these great. These are great yesterday. They were hot off. That's the best but men you know what these are. Great still very good because like I got okay I get these the hell away much entire trying to get to any of the topics tonight. I told her yesterday as they get the hell away from me. This is the baked goods section of EPA crumbs. Now get some really big literal little and crumbs around the show with first time ever teams has an. It's appropriate. I guess it is around just a little bit more and then you. Can you put these back in the refrigerator? I can do that free. Will they're GONNA keep badgering? They want that Bacon. I thank you so much. So yeah he someone away so sorry Oh i WanNa give them to the dogs but the dogs chocolate torture for them I put David now because eating while I'm talking these interviews. It's work as he wants. That'll core what did you start double toasted. It was work. Yes Sir those crumbs out All right around my face thing is yeah. You think you're done the bacon still there it sticks with you. Even now. I'm like a little bit. Rector SNACK SENATOR IN THE STREAM. Dog a hamster olczyk little crevice cheek patches still taste good or like you could chew on this begging gum which. I hear becomes very good. I didn't even know it does not you know what I'm just making it up. I'm making it up but I bet it but put in Gum Bacon now l. Sell its primary seven. Let's type it in gun. Baking making gum off brand product is making gum local locally delegate like a national product or something like that like is available everywhere. Let me see here. We go to like a specialty shop for. Jesus there's a whole market for look at this before he got roast beef bubble gum wall. Yeah apparently You know just like the fat of meat that you pretty much fat kind of chemical way to make it last longer. Yeah the got Bacon Bay mandates. We can eat yourself later. I'll even bake embezzle which you can just look lick. You scratch sniff okay. Kids don't need this. Shit up. Themselves like you say in south cannibalism they we need a self cannibalism finger. Good Yeah muffing philosophy. The rate is the latest craze skull. Crushers the each own Bacon flavored Bangor challenged your fingers. Yes man. Can you touch me? I'm sorry girl I wish we could have given you some chocolate in and have it. Little dogs cannot eat chocolate. Specially LITTLE SMELL. My breath doing taste delicious. She's just breathing. I can eat your meat. These Ryan Watson Watson. He said what he gave me was the fragile rock it. Will I remember that? Yeah he gave me the frog or rock disk set off. That's cool man. Yeah Yeah. He gave me sonic the animated series. I'm going to watch those episodes. You put to good use man with your guy. In their oracle Oracle Jimmy white deal. That's right that's right and I think this is real voice to yeah. I decided to do sonic because while I sound like sonic I mean. Well his his Voice for more exaggerated version himself and voice. Now we're GONNA BE GETTING TO GET BACON. Roses Alice delicious. That does flowers you can eat throughout the vegetable part. Don't need just a bouquet like it put that in school. Thanks go. Excuse me so yeah. People let me see here I'm trying to think say anything I need to let you know and I don't think so. We covered. I think we've said everything we need to say. The folks out there Glad to have you guys. Hey listen you know what we've been doing? We've been reading emails on the show. Lots Minson innocent emails. GonNa tell you real quick if you want to get in touch with us Feel FREE TO SEND US IN K. Cool Man's a g mail dot COM K. C. M. E. G. Questions Koplowitz. Insult Vice. Remember check us out of social media. Twitter facebook instagram type of the goals. Facebook type in. Korva Coleman five this man over here you follow me on twitter Christianity on twitter and instagram. Mr Lewis counting the last da down here. See US studios like this love to come right here. Not In Charles. Manson DOT COM. Let us know what you planned Austin visiting moving here? Whatever you calm down Say Hello Poppy. The dough toasted goodness all of your body. Let's do it yourself in Latvia Salmon. I like the way you say the latter yourself in. Oh and pull this back over here now before we get into everything and we'll check a man over here one more time even doing okay sir. I'm doing well muscle. Goddamn good about you. Join life join life. What's good about. Oh you know talk with good friends. Great Show I think what's not to love what's not do appreciate right now entertaining. Good people presenting a good people almost as good as it sure. I know you know good friends in the conversation. It's not as good as classic the way logo. But it's almost as good as that doesn't come close. It doesn't come close at all baking compared to then man also Knesset all day. I'll chew on it all day. Like Gum and folks check out all the other things that we haven't Dt merch for you and polluting many stew pots coats for you phones. The gift of choice shirts for Tyler. They look toasted your little chrome. Dt Mercy Dot Com where happiness truly can be found again. Now you can be bought. It can't be bought. Who SAYS MONEY CAN'T buy happiness now? Dt MERCY'S BULLSHIT PRICE. Tag on their at their tag on right there. Somebody kept it that lovely moment between you and salt lake skill and we went to feed your change that voice. Now the joker now mark. Hamill is doing skeletal jokers skeletal. Yes you'll find today. I see your exercise. Thank God I'm excited. Look six no I understood mart you. It's a sucker blondes. Come on he man does kind of like a buffet chick. Yeah you don't see a guy rocket their hairstyle who are in a dead that lesbian haircut. He's he looks like a little bangs. It doesn't look good. Fuck no he was. Just like a a bodybuilding yes. I'm like a strongest soccer mom. He got that one picture to the left side right below that when reputable that one all right. Yeah you looking at you. Put that as just skill to look always been a I mean zooey seriously is like my blue master as he man of style they gotta give him a different haircut. Yeah Tom He build freak out. That's not my he man. Fuck this shit now. Change IT UP. You would banks. They got that Chiro show on Netflix and they did a whole bunch of changes that I've seen some pretty good looks like Steven Universe. Almost it does criticize that but the writings great isn't yeah. Check it out. I'll tell someone Chris wrong talking about like the alright do. What else is new? That's got you know next. We can get you dressed up as he managed star reading. He meant I could do. Oh when are we going to do that? What are we going to do the to do the show? Sonic thing shop in case. You guys don't know about this. I've been reading erotic. Sonic Fan Fiction. On my streams. And you know as as does as one does in so corey at the Great Idea. Were we would go shopping for a three. Alpha for me to wear while. I'm doing these readings. Myron on campus and chronicles. But so we gotta find a date together and do it and we haven't really picked one yet we do because we're going to stream it. Yeah because look. We've we don't do it this weekend. And we're GONNA have to do it when I get back from playlist. That's right at some point. Yeah Yeah Damn Right. It does people I will settle for like a skin tight like super tight blue leotard and like the sonic like hair like helmet thing which they want to find. This is like a physical location. So we can. Just you know it's going to be happening. Of course we can always get you engaged. Do some lizard here. We might have switched to he man very easy to find the sonic thing. You had to make an extra disturbing. Yeah like pre film. Yeah before the redesign of that little white hands actually found a rabid possibly yoga rabbit rabbit possible with jazz really doesn't have Jasmine's yes. Show that picture of Chris. Oh do that. I mean I'm eleven. Easy man is just a little too much the check he really are. Oh what is this Fabulous Austin this before? I've seen this. Let me see in print return here. This is my kitty. Mr Pads and the fabulous secret powers revealed to me a off my whole voices newcourt one change. It ended up embrace it. You know this is a new age man just embrace it. He's gay had this Emai- rate it's not a joke. Let's do this Shit Sword and saying all I love this I love. This said that you said before. Imagine right many time doing the voice says talk about what the fuck. It's a new he. Man Fuck is gone. That's the new humanity human. The human got into gotta hear about this. This is a clip that they released from. It does lead today. I love their dumped it. Yeah we're suckers cheaper. Take the old footage she's accurate. Yeah Yeah Man. I'm surprised to hear about this report. That's like the go-to on the back of these cartoons behind and just hold them and now the move card you know what I want now on the technically fun I love it. Oh Yeah I can't wait for me man man. I'm excited for now. GonNa be amazing. Simple right we're going to go ahead and get into the show but before we do. I WANNA bring up man. Charles Charles Turn Now. This is what is great about these guests that we have here today. these guys had been taken turns giving us gifts. Wow yeah that kind of couple. That is sweet sweet scope. You've ever seen men so it's Charles's turn to bring the gifts today. Oh great shirt to venture time. Thank you very nice very nice. Yeah I forgot to Lee Right. Yeah time fans forget to mention a fucking urged to but Charles. Okay this is Charles is turn my turn to Charles and I'm GonNa show you their their art work to the Great Artists Charles. What have you got us today? Okay so I bought some more prince today especially for you for Chris and for Amir. Nice thank you thank you sir. I remember saying she's usually does the crossover stuff. But I had one crossover that I really want to get into doing. And it was based on childhood stuff. So of the Nineties Justice League allies love how Joseph he was and the pokemon fan so I combine both of them anime Justice League WHOA. I have here Spf Wow that is great. Joined the Navy lucians. Typic- hot bath. Oh that's awesome. That's really cool creative. Youtube that's appropriate off. That is amazing in your your coloring on. That is they only. Let me see these talking to these people. Look closer off so people as you know even watching the shows we are joined by not only a really cute wonderful couple very generous couple over here but also very talented s and they've been giving us the gifts of that talent and Charles brought us today mashups between the Justice League and Pokemon. And we see here that we have new two Martian man right there. John Jones a motion man. You should you should man making making up our own names for them. Yes actually they make amends from marshview. Hunter Marsha I was very closely. The peachey was Pika Flash and one. The woman is as Nice. Very nice people. Look at those clues. Aren't these six in wonder woman that gun here very nice very nice? Look at them as the Lasso. I see that's clever is right village. Just give us your loved man very nice man coloring very very wonderful background for that one too. Yeah how did you do these Same thing I drew at the background or photoshop but I drew the hand colored by hand and then a fellowship very nice so the two shores the pictures his and then one right. Well deputies out there I imagine the flash thank you pick a flash flood. Thank you so much up here Mice Fernand I'll take to mito gladly display these in my office home office slash homes. Put this on my wall streaming office. Nice Nice picture. I have no family family now. Let's chat chat a San chasing great art Chattan Love that wonder woman right. There Looks Dope Dam and people are work. Thank you I appreciate it and you could see other ones on my website. I I did a document also Batman Superman Second missing girl so like the original lake nineties. Early two thousand. That's really cool man. Show to let me Let me go and pull up. Pull up your website again. What does that you remember ghosts graphics? Ghost graphic yes and she our ethics grass fed x dot. Da Da portfolio. Because I remember this now dot com to get it right. Yeah look at that right. That is yours right. No I don't recognize I got it now elaine. Look the other day changed man. Oh Oh I'm sorry. Well there you go ask bad combination. I'm deaf and he's literate Ari. Would they go there? It is right there. People Oh goes graphics you go. I'll spill it out for you so you don't mess it up. Like I did is go. See Right up here. Ghost and then graphics of F- graphics graphics is G. R. A. F. X. Dot da portfolio dot com and. You can see all of his great art prints and more you commissions yes. I do Me An email and one piece very nice very nice people so so if you like what you saw right here then please go to their site. Both of them both on the book. Great Artists. What. The other one is called Tuft Spirit. Creations correct nice very nice so go check him out folks they have very good tell you what. Ra folks what we're going to do is we're going to go and take a quick commercial break. Go do a three minute. Block of commercials won't take that long. I promise you will be right back. Was that change it up. Change it up a little bit so we're GonNa have to give you as many commercials. I want good so let me see. Are we still we still going? Thanks okay because see right now. 'cause I'm frozen on my c you talking okay all right all right. Okay question okay. My screen froze up over here. Dog is licking these crumbs. Miss Look at my chocolate linking the right Oman nipple all right everybody we will be right back after this and again. Thank you guys for tuning in tonight. Thank you for being here. Thank you Charles. Yes thank you sir. Charles loves veget. Yeah very non grab. Your friends is going end that way. Oh thank you for the subscription right there. That is blue thirty three ninety six blue. Thank you so much blue. Thank you pull here Oh let me put it back over your sock and make sure when we are done commercial break and as a SIP folks. We've got a good show coming up for you today. Why would doing commercial Anybody have anything that they want to talk to us about in the chat time to interact with do chats like Well this is Lyndon Stone. Says where's Martin Show? How are we doing this? You've been watching this show because I've seen you as up in here. Lyn Now you've been on this show like we kept. We Good Goddamn Mars not on this show. Maybe he's asking ironic. Yeah Okay Watch this. I'm going to set them off insurer. Let's go oh there's so trump's being retard again so he's bashing somebody who's bashing there every hour on the hour typically. Oh Nice so here. We go There you go. That's looking good. That's what we gotta get good mockup. Yeah that's that's how you actually in the costume. Even though you hit as about that big I love. My head is so enlarge sonics at those accurate away. Yeah Yeah like a little kid like seven year old. Big as I'm just walking around the fast mean we. Yeah we gotta get to this level man. Skin-tight settle. Yeah I I you know I like the sexy signing but we'll take this if we can. I like big ass feet right there. Really Big Mama. Is it doing so? Yeah these commercial breaks on. Take that long well most done with this. It's good thirty seconds doing these blocks. Now Yeah Yeah getting them out the way Mansell You know dead twitch. Don't get mad. We don't yeah. Let me see Chapman earlier. You know. Put your head in a vice when they go back to Florida squeeze. What DID TRUMP DO? That's what he did you. What your say trump. He's well good. Let's leave him there. Somebody say let's give five new subscribers tonight. Hey welcome back everybody yes. Let's get five new subscribers tonight if we can't ball he bashed parasite. Is that the the movie of course. I'm curious about this. You know what remind us to look? Data remind us to look at what. What's up girl? Oh he doesn't like to read as we all know too many words and understand what's going who we do Fast God's books. Rambo should've gotten Rambo. I wonder if I got more. Come new subscriber. Who was that new scrubber right there each team. Boba thank you. Thank you for joining us here. And it's wonderful community that we have and I'm GonNa tell you guys all right we're about to get onto a topics. I got girl has use the bathroom a wooden. She's crying now. I she's usually. I'll let them piss before we were done. Then do the number two did match take this ship all those crumbs is from a master. GotTa Get out fake and I'm scared. You want to hold it down. Quasi she has to be identified while I talk to the people hide chef so trump making fun of parasite because he couldn't read all the words. Onscreen I know. It's difficult for them but we can go without talking bound for now. Release the hounds. He's doing it right now. I guys Gavin questions right now for us. Please let us know can take something Chris. Bring up having a new sub notification. Please new sub notification. You want like the googly. Mobley's anymore record often switches the mountain like we can have two week period. So maybe we'll look into that Thank you guys. I appreciate it. I'm doing very well. A little tired. Works been kicking my ass lately but taking naps before I get home after I get home. Not at work. Don't WANNA do that. But the silent movie. Even I don't know anything about that. Slime Roy I said I read the stories. I didn't read the headlines. I'm like Oh talking about this. That's that's my. It sounds good so going to have to inform me about what's actually going on. I love it because what he does is he. You know he sends the stuff like before like maybe two hours before we start right. I'm on the road because it takes me about a half hour to get up here when you're in time so everything up and everything so I was like okay. Let's look at it really quick and we'll see what happens. He's got it's fine. We'll be all right and I have a new book mark exactly again. Thank you so much guys really do appreciate that. Yeah use them for my comic books now. Place I don't know I absolutely do. Yeah I mean people you know because People Gallo mad at me 'cause I've always she talking about signing. I don't despise the property or anything like that even I enjoyed the the new movie to a certain degree. You guys see the sonic fill. Okay okay. I assume you're sonic fans. Okay I as you know Korean. I said it has a lot in there for fans and honestly like the only problems I have with it. I just wish was little bit better. You know the plot wasn't so generic but there are some genuinely good stuff in there especially Jim Carey's docked robot and you guys are GonNa Love Him. I think so. Yeah no I thought it was room for improvement but certainly not bad. I think it was. It was a fine film. I don't blame you. Sonic fandom is weird as I mean. Every Phantom is a little weird to some degree you get the most passionate people I think sonic fans are very passionate and net meant big box office numbers. Because what we're going to be on the highest grossing video game villains of all time so only the highest grossing in terms of weekend box office the first week released and you're absolutely right Nichols. He could have been absolute train wreck and I think they did right by changing the design. Some people were criticizing now. They should have stuck to their guns. I think it would have been a disaster. Had they not change at design so it was smart on them to do that? He's back she better did business. That dog took a massive shift. She would explode on you. I was afraid that you just kind of being spoiled but no pushy had a massive ship hers about like this. That's Hafer Monte wasn't. She wasn't like man took an took a while to like damn usually a long as two zero two zero. Yeah people before we move on. Let me just put this up here. For Yellow Sea we can get about five subscribers tonight. You know. We're not to go. We aim begging greeting. We're not being greed. Let's say we you'll have to gift in. I WANNA get like five true subscribers entertaining enough. We appreciate subscription. Yeah we do appreciate you. Just being people are asking you sir. Particular was what will be the new sub notification. There's one on the horizon I'm thinking about it. He's thinking about you. Have discussion about after the show. Are you guys can even submit some ideas for the new notification is about how change it so I think so too so if you have any recommendations I would like to take it but I'm GonNa tell you something right here and you guys will look at? That gives us some. I'll tell you hold off. Think about it think about fucking thank about it and I'll prompt you to tell us what you think. The notification should be beg you for your money. Just let me get my head. You know. I'll show would like to have just one subscription to get something to eat tonight as all all. I'm looking for doing that. Excuse me Sir. You wouldn't be able to spit. Wants TO CUSHION. Which show would appreciate run? You're maybe get a beard. Lana cocaine heroin. Actually I know maybe some bitches but listen. Let's get subscriptions tonight because we're trying to get two thousand five hundred before the end of May are by the end of. May and you guys know about the whole Coleman cut of space jam that will watch once we reach that in the Byu imparted part of that. We'll have also The review that will have for the movie since. I've only seen it one time. Believe it or not you would think that's been fifty years working on a movie. You would actually remember you remember lot. Yeah but non man is going to traumatize traumatized by the experience thank you. I'm blocked it out now. I know they took my vision and just raped it man and so I just don't I don't think about it but we're going to move on you know. Remember we're going to go back and watch this and we're going to see what what my true vision was. Mitt for. Sounds Fun it will be and Let's see also you have that goal out there. Five thousand something I do but not there some day some day but if we get it before. May by by the end of May we'll do a twelve hour stream B. Gift five thousand subs- that'd be that would be very nice. That'd be very nice and that said so. Yeah people if you can as I mentioned to you before you can get a free subscription with your Amazon prime account of free twitch prime subscription is good. It is good all right so before. Move on Just real quick as you know the ad notification that information but the sub notification that we have is great googly. Boegli look so ugly depend on how I feel. Whatever you're in the mood for. What do you guys think should be the? What the fuck is. I don't want to do this. Billy's laugh people would go crazy. People would lose this shit. They like Billy's laugh for like the bad movie reviews. And things like that all the time you guys GonNa hate. That quick wasn't what hating it's not as what the hell is going on with. Elegant GonNa Look So. He's always doing. I know he's all love them. That's supposed to be what character? Are you supposed to be like a cracked out? Crazy Groucho Marx. Or something. I don't know I don't know I don't know what's the one below. You like those kids from that truth or dare houses truth area. That's true there. He come Lipson. Yeah they cut off your lips man any ideas from these people. Dc anything. I wasn't even looking flummoxed by Billy's laugh What about my guy suggests some stuff for US The people on the plane the plane and the plane be the last day why why. Corey people are just going to love you know. That's a long ago seventies reference. Yeah about that. Maybe you know what you want from the love boat right love boats and you WanNa try for day to day. Oh somebody said workout. The funny that's a good way to actually work ethic. You can sample his voice. Yeah we can do that. I was work. And here's a for the love of Glove Eric. B Anthony much thanks to Jesse Riley and his lovely wife Alison come into support our show. It was great having y'all in the building and sharing for the love of a glove and with you. Y'All should be like John and get you fixed now before we close the show a march eighth. Let's wearing what's Jesse Riley? Wearing a velvet blue jacket slap holes if not a little odd wearing that badge of Fidora to including the unsolvable. John Who's dressing you man. Who CARES THE WILL? Ferrell moved at this point eight year. Old Nephew could step brothers with interested in those Tuxedos for job interview. Tuxedo Paddington. Bear Marmalade. Shoot a suitcase down there. Cool Man. That's awesome now. You got those big ten celebrities checking people putting in for the love of love because we're going to go see this on March six. That's one of the things that we've got to tell you I'm going to be going to be in WanNA BE AN LA march sixth. I'm going to be there for a viewing are not showing showing thank you. Sir. A showing of for the love of love. That's the Michael Jackson story as told bothered love. Nobody ever realized they'd love has eyes and mouth so you can see all tell blood from Virgin Boys. Which is what he does. That is between you and me. We free don't tell nobody no promises. Please back me as long as you go. I won't tell US plenty of boys. Yeah man that's everybody's talking about funds show is going to be there a march six. We bought a bunch of tickets and got some people to buy them from us. Gave US money for those tickets. We're GONNA be at the show sitting together in one big row but if you get a ticket for the show you can. We're just not going to be probably sitting with you but we'll have a big get together right afterwards at a bar nearby to talk about what you just are not like circuit. Exactly what we saw should never be mentioned again. Drink it away like we do everything right. Let's go ahead and get into the show Sir these stories. It's been going on a good show games and all that and I mean they're they're here for all right. Let me come on. Stop Watch over here. What do not working for you. Not starting what stop it. Okay thank you so we have to refresh all right. Got To stop watches here. I got a couple of webpages up. Timers Snow Stabs Tab so I can actually go through and knowing his time to the ads but yeah people are young. You don't see where are we all right. Let's go on with the show here. let's see the C O. Go like this got the biggest Jubeir Roth. Yes they say that the Jubeir himself is set to direct another beginning. He more or recently eight more than bare these days as you can see. Maybe it's all the way around more Adam moving but he is set to direct a video game and are you thus becoming quite the crazies days. It's super everything. Yeah Yeah Yeah man except this one you know was a little more on the On the adult side of things which they're doing we got CASTLEBLANEY MORTAL. Kombat coming up now. We got this. This is Borderlands Borderland. I heard that he's going to be doing this. This is the next one of the one of the big video game adaptations complete with the Saxophone Solo and everything. That's not in very disappointed. Pissed off we need brick on the Sax people started petition. We don't get a we. Don't get a thick as man playing sax right here. I'm going to be very disappointed. But knowing how Ila Ross is disability humour. We'll probably get this probably get that in there but the reason why we're talking about this is because People were cautiously excited about this because today people just happened to be browsing the Internet. Yeah go on through their Daily News Stopping and say God damn has allowed in working out loves this man look at him. He's so he's so toned cartoony so jacked associated with. That's not his body. What happened right here is not him? What's going on here is? He directed the movie version of Borderlands and people saw this and the reason why the cautious about it is because this was put up by the head of Gearbox Randy Pitchford Yeah Brandon was quickly taken to how is he. He's known for doing this to jumping the gun on so many things like you know debut in New Games and everything. He's very excitable. Apparently really yeah and saw that it was already leaked and like fuck it. Yeah I'm directing borderlands guys. That's kind of what happened. Yeah because they pull the back and it was gone immediately. Yes too late now. I mean they're watching his twitter account. What's this what's this guy going to say next? Yeah a story out of how HE FUCK UP NEXT STATE. He pulled it like a few minutes later. Saw By that point all new screen captured it was spread around and not only did the video game tabloids get it but also the movie tableau is you know they. Don't you know how gasping I know they talk a Lotta Shit? A lot of rumors Including deadline that this point they just pretty much. You know fucking yeah. He's doing it. We had this whole thing. Never GonNa present production big announcement going to be a song and dance now. He didn't actually going to see any La Crosse the gym and get them. Tattoos and the marketing campaign But somebody had to mess it up so so yeah at. This point is pretty much assumed that he's going to be doing borderlands movie. Hey confirmed it. Yeah he yeah he put it out there pretty much said that. Hey Yeah I'm happy to be on board for the Borderland movie fucking. You Ain't got might as well try to hide it anymore. I think that was the headline dates at fuck it. Yeah I'm doing which I guess it'd be appropriate for borderlands. It would be it would be you got the. Iran's out there and they are all the Arado boy Ari as these guys have been known to make our. At least Avi Rod has been known to make some really bad here. I mean just for how he's able to get just his claws in the spider man for the past twenty years between that character. Yeah thirty years even now yes. That's a little bit concerning. Yeah Yeah but here. They're pretty much saying you know giving you already. Details of of WHO? Who's involved in Producers Studios LIONSGATE IS GOING TO BE DEVELOPING? This roth is already put out there. I'm so excited to dive into the world of borderlands and I can not be doing it with a better script producing team in studio. I have a long successful history with lionsgate. Yeah I feel like we have grown up together and that everything in my directing career has led to a project of this scale in ambition. Lena what Cory I mean after such wonderful films as cabin fever ring. Vernon knock knock. I'll fuck it now. Man This is this is I tried to do in the middle of the doubt but listen all the GRANO hostile. Look in why you is done of abyss you. I'll show you sir. I was like you go ahead. What I'm I'm GonNa be honest just when I when I read this. I was like no because I think they're going. They got him because he's going to focus on the things that I think. The stuff that is attributed the Borland's franchise like all the Gore and the gratuity and the violence and the swearing. Everything like that. But I think has done the saxophone phones. And you know the cut-away jokes and things but what what attracted me to the Borland series like in recent your special importance to Intel's the lands honestly is the writing and the characters and well written dialogue Hanson. Jack you gave this guy issues like who I mean. That was the big thing that was lacking the villain came in this guy. He's literally the face of the franchise because just how weird he is and how well written he is and people just want to keep seeing him in other things pop up and get new characters introduced by other developers. Berlin has when Delta was doing that. It's like Oh this is my deduction the Borland's and I really like it with Ross. Again I haven't seen all his films I'm Jay. He does that grave an actor either but this guy off. I have not seen the one family film that he directed in the clock on the wall. Yeah the House with clock for Hand House. The House with the with the clock in its walls said that's actually very good. He's like Oh stick family films but this is getting into the territory where he's going to delve into the things that I don't think he's particularly good. He loves certainly but I don't think he's very good at well. I was kind of a human because I said you know you'll get this to you. You're going to get his man. As movie you can make a snuff film. Yeah hostile or any other movies I tell you I I because I look at some stuff that he's done. I'm you know I'm right there with you man. Yeah I'll be honest no I know listen I get it. I know what you're saying because I looked at some of the stuff that he's done. I knocked up followed the career. Beulah Roth Let me see here you know like Oh let me see. Pull up the pull up the clip that I had right here because I I was like you at first man. Yeah very very much. I'm very Your first initial reaction was like yeah. Well let me see here there it is Bingo Rob Enviros torture people. Yeah there's a point that I thought that this Muffak wasn't directed movie. We actually would be torturing people you know like in real life and sometimes it's not so bad like I I like hostile. Hostile is the where the reason why house to work for me because hostile is about real people you know well not really but human beings treating other human beings it really sick ways right and like supernatural and thing. I'm like all right. You know at that worked but it got to a point where his his his his lust for like torture and Gore. It just got silly man. Almost like he people always associate like. Oh he's so hard core but honestly it's become kind of like a parody hostile. Does all these horrific things that these people I think it just comes off as unintentionally funny. It's like the one seen the ladies. I von Yeah like joke hostile the one. I know I mean. There's a lot of movies that he made them. I'm not crazy about this. Yeah Saw read it off it. Just this is just half-naked try people out there just just torching people towards your needs college two-dozen to the point where it even gets silly. Oh Yeah no god I mean some of the stuff that they deal with Gore. If that's your thing that's fine but you get to a point. I'm like all right. Now you gotTa admit this stupid right here like Cgi Zip Selamat Salam CG cartoon or not even time in like biting his crawling on such skin. Yeah AXA terrible relationship. This is silly. Medicine was like this was like you know what not immortal. And you had a point where you know what I actually thought at one point picked that dude up and came off Indiana Jones. I was thinking exactly this scene right here like Jesus but that silliness that we see right here. I mean because this is silly. Man isn't a week and field. But it's fucking do they. But were so bad about is that allow raw wants you to take. This shit series is left you know. I mean he had huma with this movie. But that's one scene where he's like a man here and look how fake this. He was in jail ashes figures. Maybe they kind of you could take that that cylinders Aaron. It'll it'll work for something like borderlands and you're right this movie. What did the House with clock clocks? Yeah House he's very old face. There's a cloth the walls we don't know what it does. Something horrible saw this and that is a family movie that he did. He knew what he wanted to have a gateway drug for kids. So that's that's what he did here in. Have you seen this? No but I've heard it's entertaining. It's bang his best film. I either gave this high rental matinee but I remember seeing thing like it's not bad at all. It's actually. It is one of the best things he's done. I saw the trailers for a guy. Let's let's Kinda charming if you look at some of the like how colorful this is in his own. Tim Burton kind of way. Spongebob too. Yeah exactly you know if you take that and if you can have him do something like like if you could if you could take something as colorful as this and apply some of the you know the goofy violence that he's done in the past and then take all that and put it into borderlands. I think do a good job at it. I I agree with with with that but the thing that bothers me is I'd evolve his films his character suck like there's no one. I care about these people on post care about like in hostile like in cabin. Fever is like no get let let the flesh virus take you. Yeah let that guide toward all miserable people. There's nothing charming about you. And the things that I've liked about the recent borderlands games Portland's three had some issues but Orleans until Borland's particular was the characters and how I found them very charming and in some cases. Well we're in special handsome. Jack you know I mean. I don't know if he could capture based on what I've seen him do before. I think that's going to be a big like that's going to be Elvis try to do that. Okay if I may have a counterpoint here sherri allow the counter. I I do agree with you that his characters suck I. I just felt when I've seen I I liked. I liked the carrot and look well let me just say this. I didn't care for the character as a whole lot in something like hostile because that was the point. You're supposed to kind of see these guys be the bunch of assholes. Yeah see and feel for them just because the horrible things that are happening happening to them but they're just fodder for violence. I get that but the thing about this clock wall movie Jack Jack Black Kid harm horror movie here. That the reason why. That's probably so good is because he didn't write it Ha me now. You're getting me. Sofi has another name names. I want to go down. Elizabeth Webb named several directors. They do very well with other people. Scripts are if somebody else's writing the material and I thank you might have something here would allow Roth that they do that. I would die prefer that long. He doesn't touch that script and I'm good films on the page. I'm alright with that but not have them right like little notes or things. This'll like no is water up your hurt his feelings. This is something you'll be gets takes a lot of credit. That's how right jokes which he certainly does not seem to be a goal down. The list made green cabin fever. Hostel made hostile to you. Made some other films are probably not not that. I didn't even see that. When the one with his terrible Kiana reeves was. I should look. I thought that was a I thought they look good to now. It's not is it not now knock knock. That's the one that I've been wanting to see everybody's been saying. Watch that as a bad movie and listen we counties is great guy. But he's not a good actor and especially when he's working with ally Roth who doesn't know how to direct actors. Dan Experience. You WanNa wait before you. Hell is a WIG right. Jeeze crazy taking no prisoners right. Now where are you going back to shoot people and John Wick Part Ford? Who Acted. Don't do that but nothing shooting day. I've been asleep up around you tonight. Longer data thank you. Take Take Yummy. We're playing kids can come to the beach with us. Stay here and do some more or yes sorry to bother you serving by phone got wet and she loved Hers House. Absurd with you want to come in and use my phone. Come in and fucked me here lifesaver. Everyone would let strangers into their house share. Could we maybe closing drives for like ten minutes? Sure how long Shula even true. They can't sell it. Man Shoot surprised nailed it. Go relooked together. Fourteen years with one person. Your whole life is going against nature will come on Evan. Buckle your seatbelts we may be encountering turbulence Supreme Astrid boobs moves. No this stop. He's done and you. Have you seen those man you nail in all the scenes all up on abilities? Yeah no stop can sell. That came in fake that sure. Wow Oh I might have to watch this for moving Yeah go on for Kiana alone. The great guy but man. You can't act Sir. No Man you sounded like my marriage. Kiani be like no stop. So you're saying you're in pain. His damage Paul Guy. Steiger's Oh new bad about Oh man. He's a good guy really sure. Sure sure yeah the even finds out good. Hubris taking too all right. Oh let's see here go ahead and move on Lewisham different. We'll come back into the video games but let's talk about something different here Let's see so the Spielberg family there the branching out to other forms of of entertainment. Your career career paths. If you will so I love the way people have been looking at things on the internet today now because everybody's been reading spill burke doing poor how what to. Click Bay like people bird does porn. Go gotta read this about times. Be Sitting at it because riot. Saving Private Ryan of Porn. Yeah Save Ryan. Let me see here. Yeah man if you've been looking at this today if you want to dumb as thought speed Steven Spielberg people like them. No porn has gone mainstream. But Fuck Spielberg's. Wow what a great day and then you can click on the article you find out. No No. It's not it's not the Spielberg doing porn. It just happens to be a spill. Burke is doing porn out there that Spielberg would be his daughter. Michaela Michaela's Spielberg. Michaela is twenty three years old and she said you know something kind of keep it in the family. I'm I'M GONNA do film to. I'm just going to be have my ass. Hang out naked on on that film. I don't know if that was all like I feel bad for like. Oh they're so cute and you're looking at it. Almost looks like Stephen is looking at that picture. Tuesday yeah get a girl. You got talent red marker and just cover that spot grab. Yeah my baby talented. And she's getting into what they say is adult entertainment and like I said man. These articles today is funny. They've been getting people all day is been spill. Berg does porn or even when they get to the point that is his daughter. They try to make it as nasty sounding as they can. There was one thank you. I love that Greg Blewett Jesus. Oh got them all out of love for you. Go right there. She has adopted daughter. I you know what I would our guest okay. I don't know unless you know unless you tap Spielberg's has some explaining to do kate Has some good on the side. He sold over one day. Just said Daddy Daddy. Hello keep it in the family. Yeah that's good would know. Spielberg has gone before but spill Lindbergh's but Let me see here if you were looking at articles today. And you're looking at headlines. You saw where a lot of people were talking about this and if you were able to get past the Bullshit Click Bait that says Spielberg does porn you. They've even trying to make. It seem like who's really nasty things at the daughter was getting into This is Drew'S LEM post. They had they must have changed it because I saw the article today says Spielberg's daughter set to star career in adult entertainment bullshit earlier. Today I saw set stark career pornography. Yes they want that keyword to get you right there. Israel's disappointed Bill Maher is one of our own. No he told you not to adopt that black. Well they have. There's a there's black Jews. No bill is a black juice. That's right yeah I'll know about her. You know I guess you what he's talking about. I not so damn Chettaba Boo but let me see here. But even when the articles are making it clear that is the daughter still try to message mind a little bit wait until the third paragraph to say it or something like that they are if you go in and you just quick reading and you just glancing they make it seem like. Steven Spielberg is saying this shit. Like read this my body my life my income my choice. Spielberg said okay. Yeah that's some nippy later journalism. There hasn't even journals sensationalism like that. That's that's so shitty that's Internet journalism. Man That's how it is. You know everybody wants to get people's is quick and they just WanNa do about stations and then they get criticized in an adventure but it's been out there for over many hours five six seven hours and it was like. Oh we'll update the article because bullshit because people. They exaggerating this all exaggerating. It's yeah honestly. Yeah I mean. Is She doing adult entertainment? Yes but the way people wearing it they make it sound like she's going to be doing gang bangs and Balqis make always sound anytime you have like a prominent person from a prominent family. They go in a career path. That is you know quote unquote the expected of them. Or you know low class. Of course they're gonNA start is considered that way they put that out there. Yeah you bet that's childish but no go go to article. There's just reporting a straight up and still might be a little click beatty. But they they're going to be straight with you with what's going on with. This is exaggerated because like I say. He's not doing orgies and gang bangers and stuff like that she's going to be doing solo films. So you know. I imagine there's GonNa be some graphic sexual things happening in those situations. But what the telling you here is that she's going to be doing this solo. Because of the boundaries that she set up with her fiance Chunk Chuck Pinko. She's twenty three by the way beyond six forty seven so I have no I got no. I know nothing about the relationships. I've got no judgment on that. Just an interesting thing that people look them up. Be Prepared to see the age difference. I'm sure were highlight net in the articles. They are yeah. Why she's doing. This is quoted. Here I'm looking at this Yahoo. It says I feel like doing this kind of work. Able to W- she'd let me see here. She says Oh. I feel like with doing this kind of work. I'm able to satisfy the people but that feels good. Because it's not in a way that makes me feel. Violated is what she told the Sun. This positive empowering choice. I realized there's no shame in having a fascination with this industry and wanting to do something that is safe sane and consensual. Now also one of the reasons why she's doing this. She says it's because she wants to become more comfortable with a body right. Parents have trouble with mental problems and alcoholism and she's I guess she's not had the highest opinion of ourself low self esteem. Yeah probably so so it says here. That part of Michaela's motivation is honor her body. But the key is that this is a lucrative pursuit. My main hope is just that I get somewhere lucrative enough to where I'm not tired. I'm not tied down by Najla by things that can really start seeing people. There's nothing wrong with us. My Body in a way. That feels comfortable support myself. I can't dependent on my parents. Forever are even say. I can't stay depend on my parents or even the state for that matter. Not that there's anything wrong with that. It just doesn't feel comfortable. You re down. Talk about how she's had struggles with Childhood Sexual Abuse. Struggle with alcoholism Anorexia. So again is the wave are become comfortable with body. I mean this is what works for then. I mean you go. I'm not so forget. The twelve step program. Forget pills Duport. Apparently that's therapy enough. That's group path. She wants to go down. That makes you feel better about herself. Or just gives her the confidence he needs and doing. Well I I don't know enough about the industry you know specifically so it's like if this makes her feel better than I just watch it fulfil in the need a lot of people who are not alone people there you know. Hey it's a win win. That is she gets to do when she gets to like. Feel comfortable body. We get to fill cut. Robot shared a mutual here. I'm contributing gives long given you know the thing is is that. Spielberg has Him IN KATE. Capshaw boasted that According to her they had a facetime session and They said they're fine with it. You know they said that listen. She's twenty three. You do what you gotTa do and you can make your own choices and you do what you gotta do. Hey that's the thing man Don't have kids if you're not prepared from the Gulf Shit that you might not approve you. Ms Society might look down on exactly which I'm not looking down on this at all nine. Th career people aren't they become very successful with it. I got no hangups about sex as long as consensual as between people and people do whatever the hell they WANNA do. My only issue of the story is just how the media is explaining again. How they're saying everything that's like that's manipulative. Which you know. They're trying to slander her slander. Spielberg name and things like that that. That's that's too bad. Yeah I mean I imagine she wants to go in and they're framing it in a very negative way. It's like who cares. Let her do what she wants. That's that is the hangup man you know. I'm sorry I mean anything can be unhealthy. If you do it too much you know. I just told you my admissions on that but we have. I've said this day we have such a hang up about sex. You know we we look at People. Kill each other we can. We can watch all kinds you know we can endorse guns violence but we get so crazy when it comes to say especially United States and I think that goes back hundreds of years like even to Puritan Times where it's like you know the body. The physical body is sinful and then we've always carried that with our society specifically are carried that with us into modern day. You go over to Europe or things where it's like it's the opposite. It's the inverse where they're very comfortable their bodies you see naked people and TV shows you like the morning news and things but then the abhor mild. So it's interesting that they have that in verse Ken and it was kind of. I mean older just naked people out on the on the French Riviera. Sure sure When we we was in Spain taking a road trip and we stopped at a beach. And as I'm not lying to you met the guy that I wished Bryan Bryan Adams Road trip which we could tell you what was going on because this dude we walk on the beach any of these kids just run around naked man just laying just laying out. I thought it was a south of the sand sculpture. Run around worship forming a ritual. Or something they would just like to kiss amid a negative being like a Dude. That was out there. All the guy that was laying out the kids. Don't give a fuck. They were kids on me right there but you know we hang up to the point where we you know we. I think we were dealing with it better. And most of the people had reported straight. Nobody's had nobody what they've done is they tried to typifies people by putting in Pornography Adult entertainment spill burn you. Just you know so. They're trying to sell the news but nobody has come down on her and say you know that you're wrong. You're wrong. Tried to shame her. That's good I mean. This is the kind of kind of doing the society's though hangups about they're setting up their team they already designed to go at. It is like the third paragraph where finally mentioned her name go forward society and then they do that well they set it up to what girl doing her daddy. Daddy had a public figure and he got a career and they don't need to be doing this to him like you know what volume that's as that's life. I don't know what to say. Somebody's opposed to that. I you know Once you become an adult and like she said Hey. I'm trying to make my own money. I'm not trying to get you know my father's mind is Bob off of. He's a billionaire. So yeah exactly. But that's one of the things you gotta you gotTa be prepared for. Shouldn't I don't know maybe one day he'll direct with her movies can be the most extravagant lavish expensive porn film ever made another. Spielberg gets into adult. Hook Earth still saw my father. Okay let me see here. You know especially if you're a star man you just got to be prepared for that. I mean a lot of people still remember do you remember Laurence Fishburne his daughter Gautier to same when he got the news what she did. What is God damn it? Yeah on a y'all have heard of his daughter Montana Montana Fishburne straight up. You got that right. Yes to Montana. Montana that's eight because some people know about her other name. She started out The the great chippy. D Howard. You if you're in a new fourteen dollars. Four girls and McDonald's was a porn star so it starts out of a public place or like a faux public place in the back and fuck but is McDonald's like the new Greyhound bus station so I just got done things. We're hungry now. A workout running R Kelly over there. I mean Jesus Man AS Roma Guy called Jordan dot com on over. He's still doing videos. But that video came out longtime ago dude revealed. Brian pumper Montana chippy. Deep Chippy de Fishburne says. She's got their name to pose a pumper right there. I get one of those. I don't understand. I don't know what you'd go Montana. Montana Montana straight all right. Yeah burnt Jibbidy unless I like a road in big buck teeth or something like that. That's a point name for squirrels. Is Laurence Fishburne's gap gap chippy diesel? No no no thank you for you daddy my father. What about duty? Yeah Man? This is crazy. This is crazy. Oh Damn you at least gotTa have cheapie name. You should be like a couple of seasons but I think she changed the name going by Montana now which you have a built in porn name. Montana exactly exactly stripper name right. That is but let states choose. Welcome to the stage Texas. We HAPPEN TO BE IN UTAH. But Laurence Fishburne about this. Because like I said you gotta be prepared for this Laurence Fishburne off guard. Yeah caught up garbage. Fortunately nobody questions Laurence Fishburne about it. Mainly because I don't not where you're talking about wh- what daughter I have. A daughter met recently. Your daughter was in the news. Is that difficult? I don't know I don't know I haven't heard this that. The blinders off that I haven't heard he's yeah. You should next question next question. You can. Even his whole demeanor too. I like the way he likes shingle. Fuck of my life with no mother. No I read. I read that situation as not talking about my daughter nods like she's not my daughter but no that's not something we're going to be like the worst because you're here to talk about me. Yeah wherever the hell on promoting this about. I'm not going to snitch on myself. Room career you fucking have you noticed. No one ever talks about his daughter. His daughter's like some trouble drunk. Driving incidents domestic altercations man. But you never hear about it. Because he's like what were what would drive it. What daughter always handled the best way because I mean first of all? I don't think people should be asking about that. They should be asking them about like the films he's working on. The different projects producing array brings Donner Day. Visit THEM THAT. My daughter got into an altercation or something like that. I'm not my daughter. No so no I. I agree with you should know this. But if he adds action I would ask him. I would love to hear this. He handled it. Well no he did and no one is no whatever relates that to his career at all. Now I would. I shouldn't anyway. I think it says something about the way that we live in today. A bring up Laurence Fishburne not to ridicule. Yeah I don't know maybe him in the Steven Spielberg or therapy. You know they're not to ridicule not even bring up. The situation in half people remembered this with them. It's just I mean. We live in living in an age. Now where I don't think anybody to be honest with you besides just getting keywords like pornography in spill break to get people to Click on something. I don't think people even really care Niagara. Honestly people are just sick of it. At least a segment of the population is just like okay. That's sensationalism that gossip. It's like this okay. I just want to continue with my day. I don't give a Damn. I just want to watch his movies. Or Whatever he starring in what? I don't care what he's kids are again now. Fuck that I look at the people I look at so much porn is the button kids moving to Miranda and just nothing so much of the population watches porn beginning and like some really Kinky Shit. Go out there and start shaming people. It's like then you're GonNa go back home in fucking jerk it anyway. Yeah I you know people say call me. When she's with a horse right now we have a cover sheet about that. Be Sales Time now. Everybody no one gives a shit man no one gets. And that's why I'm saying is like anybody out there who thinks that this is going to be a stain on Spielberg's career. No one gives a fuck what she's doing. She's responsible so no one cares. She's not breaking any laws and as long as this man is like doing his thing. No one's going to give a shit by next week. It's just like with everything is Hell. We got people dying. We could give a fuck less about. We've forget disasters easy. That's true they just don't be an issue. No twenty four hours. Twenty four seven media cycle where? What's the next thing we can get outraged out or panicked mass shootings that we forget about forty eight hours later? You think anybody's GonNa remember this shit right here no illegal impression. That's my favorites on porn. Hope so no. I won't forget him. Ever forget that. Yeah and it will be available for you to see it out there. One day for GONNA start a career. So hey look. I'm not in you know I'm not. I'm not endorsing not endorsing porn. I'm not endorsing a undressing Bad Journalism I'm not. I'm not endorsing gossip. What I'm what I'm endorsing is that we will talk about. It is fun to talk about is interesting. I'M NOT GONNA like I'm above it. I'm thinking damn it's fucking interesting man. That's why I'm playing. This is what I'm talking about it but I'm also talking about in the sense that in a let's not go in here with a widow with this self righteous attitude of that's another thing with with sex man. People try to use that against people to make themselves seem like they is so much better immoral than you are always trying to hold something person and I think. That's what makes it so exhausting. Oftentimes I think most times. I think it's okay to say there is some like Kinky should've people but thinking about politicians especially thinking about politicians pre-start here moral high ground. I know right now the biggest sexual offenders out there may the frame of all kinds of all kinds of every party of every walk of life. Yeah Man Oh by Donald by Austin. Yeah should I. I'm going to be I'm going to be at. The premiere took out down. I got my tickets already Not Nothing nothing wrong with this at all. Let me see here. Let's go ahead and get into a next door. Let's bring it back into video game Chad. How do you feel about this before we move on? And I've seen some people like that's what she wants to do what she wants to do. Cares Outlook report? Later as we all wheel were playing criticizing. You'RE GONNA look her up Anyway Plan. I. I'm very familiar with the work of the Great Chippy de. I watched that movie a lot to you formerly known as Deputy Montana. I saw that. I'm sorry man you know. Let's let's not pretend I don't really. I'm just reporting and I'm not watching bliss I had to. I had to do research. Let's let's re research your history. Your search string. We'll see your favorite tabs right now Yeah I loved what the Chadha San. That's how life let her live. Yeah of course. Oh Oh gee chat seven another conversation there ahead of us on another topic in other words not going on which I have good. Dj Thing. I appreciate you. You come up with something that always gets me. Every you've ever seen some. I love go. They'd be like what the fuck is there. What are they talking about? It has nothing to do with. Let her pork live. Somebody said only criticized that is solo. Louis how many times it's been posted the gift like on the comments. Porno but whatever. The other ones are a lot a lot. Yeah I said. Fuck it literally. Now your child is don't you boom? Is Benny Spanish him? Oh move on to something a little more video game related here sad news for people in Boston Massachusetts couple of band news. Yeah man is this is GonNa hit you hard. Unfortunately if you were planning on attending a the the Sony believe it Sony Right. I Know Sonya's texts at Pax east of Sony Conquers if you if you're planning on its own attending the Sony Conference at Pax East A. You're not going to be able to go because they're not going to be there now. Here's the other bedrooms what you people in Boston. They're not going to be there because apparently all y'all got the corona virus on the kind the United States. Now dammit is that arise o no has a ride yeah slowly says we do not want to be at. Ground Zero when all those nurse start eating each other they start going out there on the ground you know you know paid enough and of course not transmit via armpit. Oh and you know what those nerves go satellite and they start getting attacked by the corona zombies actually heard that Arizona Yeah Yeah Man Yeah. They're not going to be there. Because this is from the Burj simple reason why I mean they just don't feel like it's safe. That's the option as a situation is changing daily. So they pretty much said No. We're not going. I've been following a bit of a spread of the corona virus. Are they up to like sixty seventy thousand people dead in China right now isn't it? It's eleven hundred have died Complete like overall okay over. It's like okay. Maybe that's what it is like a over eleven hundred people okay. So I'm what people have done. They've died yeah now why was sitting up. You're talking about saying two thousand. You've got some accurate numbers in this as a chat. Thank you now while we're talking about The Corona virus in over sixty thousand affected. That's what sixty thousand infected. And that's why they got that cruise ship riding right now they. They found like positive. Traces of Corona Yeah so why? Are we talking about? Corona virus resident evil. That is that is from resident evil three original original this saying no resident evil might be true story. All these new diseases are sprouting up. Like they can't identify cure. Well some people have said I'm just GONNA throw some is GonNa Freak you mind Boy I'm ready for thank about it. So anagram for raccoon is corona really. So yeah I see what you do with that city raccoon. Cynic CORONA CORONA is a raccoon. Wait a minute and then they say that I do it raccoon. What's that symbol right? There is that real that that is real that picture. There's a biotech lab with an umbrella symbol in the same city where the corona virus originated. Now this could be in that bullshit. I don't know that has to be that can't be fucking Chinese company go. Yeah we're just GONNA go ahead say you know what is Bullshit? Because there's Green. That's it was changed. Is this true chat. That's why I brought this up. Is this true now? We can't argue with that that that arrangement of letters right there we can get raccoon out of it all right fair enough but somebody said No. The Chad is saying this saying that. It's real that's real this fucking yet saying Israel. Wow yeah all right okay. Look I don't like to follow conspiracy especially ones. That's crazy about a video game that may zombies attack city virus crazy right there. That's a that's a hell of a coincident hell of coin's exactly I did not expect that all right man we go to keep that quarantine go we send our best in their Leeann. S Kennedy Chris. Redfield Genie Leon. S Kennedy. Yeah yeah and he's someone sent over there to help out those people right now. Yeah man thing to mutate. No no no. We don't not that freaked me out right there but tell you what people are saying. The founders probably a fan of resin. Neil this man I thought. Oh this is this funny. Oh Shit probably. That's where the virus escaped from all up in the club. Y'All see big mother trenchcoat and they've got a grenade launcher. You know his own. Spend all that corona. Yeah Man at your desk freaky man that I just. I'm just kinda shocked at that's real. You know the Anagram like okay. Whatever the originated in the city where the umbrella umbrellas. They're real man that evil corporations fucking real was the video game draft cap contract to warn us the people who I affecting the mansion of some kind or they brought of imagine those just destroy. That's I'm curious about this. Virtually start off animals in the Passover to humans. This is how this whole thing starts always does always start that monkeys. Yeah pigs but I mean the whole thing with Sony. I'm glad they're doing that. Because Gloria I just want to have their employees exposed to a whole bunch of people but they don't know where it's coming from shaking hands. Have that spread here now. I don't think there are any cases in the continental United States right now but you know better safe than sorry. I think that's good. Yeah well just want to say people at a pack east. Be careful be careful. Be You know. Just be prepared for anything as he is. Don't buy anybody right. Got a couple of more stories to do. But we're GONNA take a quick break block. We'll take a quick break and take that block with that break right on that commercial block on do that right now and we'll be right back where is it. We'll be right back after show at the right time. He's gotta go. I'll tell you my man. He waits for the right time he waits for these breaks to go. Take that Piss. That's good that's respectful. I appreciate it too. Thank you sir. Snag some snags. Oh you could eat them in here. Come onto him all right. Just sit out to the hallway. Bob Sell homeless person snakes. Hsa thank you guys to be here. A like a love it that eighty crumbs picking up and viewership on Thursdays. Now I'm glad people are joining. Yeah Man Sicily. Because I've been enjoying the show. Has the show been good for you? Please let us know. Give us any recommendations if you like but I hope you guys have had fun here today they say thank you are saying answer may wondering if you answered they says a good segment. I guess you're talking about the corona virus thing or maybe the porn both everything. It's it's pretty good salute corey loving the show. Thank you this was that. Oh Mac millions You guys have any questions. Yeah because some people are saying answer my question. I wish it question. Put it back up there. Yeah daypack if you have a question and answer me often answer is always it? Did it did originate in. What Oh and they're talking about like the. Oh thank you gave us that. It went by so fast pancake. No there was someone else did do donation but someone did a gun on thank you thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you really appreciate that and snakes. These people eating snakes. Jesus other that hungry how they prepare. Look I've heard of like eating snakes. Cooking them the eating them raw or something like that house. Start that that is great. And they're saying like the exotic animal trade. That's something that's eat rare extinct air exactly think Daniel and then get fucking corona virus when you. Yeah Yeah exactly when you net fucking panda in the lead up to really just make an umbrella corporation stronger coming back for revenge. Mad Me now. That's some crazy shit. So while we eat news Endangered animals will go extinct. Yeah nature correct itself. That's how it works. Thank you were getting hype guys and thank you is in Burke for the five hundred biddies. Thank you for the five hundred biddies. Always that are hype train. I feel going on this chugging along. Its gallows at chugging along years or turning. Was that the hype train. Y'All y'all getting hyped up in here gifted side repair gun take with you. Thank you so much. We really do appreciate it. I guess we got those fossils you ask for earlier then And then we got subscribing throughout the entire trump so we got welcome back everybody. Oh we're about to get on with these stories but Philo hype train coming on right here. What level are we at right now? Level one complete complete wheel level to to now. Oh Oh great. Booby Mugabe all that. Good stuff eighty-one percent. You know what? We need to have a hype rain last night and I said nothing about him. I said I said nothing about it last night. Oh but tonight just ask every chance. The League is not good him is gambling that is is team. That's my he's he's long. It's not so much pain. P Hermit Rhythm in Chad. Thank you again. High freight there. I'll look at it. And they got peewee Herman up in the chat right now doing his dance. Let me see if it works just writing. These words appeal the running dangerfield respect goal. I have none of it high bill. Thank you thank you so much I love it. I love your dog right here. I'm sorry baby. I'm sorry I'll come. You've got your chair. They want me to get on my chair. People want you to get your chair. Give them some pro. You Know Come on Wrong Waco get your ass got to tear God damn dance for you. Dance Muggy Chris Chris J Herman Brand New Day's Chris J Herman Satisfy I love it. Good glad your arms a rare fish lips news day. We're doing now off the chair. Yeah visit what I can Jason Momoa. Thank you guys. Thank you so much. For All the hype. Thank you so much for the love right. There made up yesterday. We didn't get hyped up tonight. I don't expect to get hype every night but when we do we'll show up hard we do. Yes not harder than you though I mean. I'm I'm doing what I do but that is I don't find people love you finally different songs too. I got I got a song. Got A new one coming up. Yeah perfect perfect job. Think of anything to do for the for the subscription alert. Yeah we come up with something I became. You say you had an idea away mentioned something that we were going to do in the you said. You're an idea for it. I I did. I thought I said we. We had something did we didn't mention it and he said. I'll talk to you about later. And then here we are hour and a half later. Ideas GOSSIP. Maybe they will deploy the plan for one day one day and then it'd be is. Is there a movie coming up? Thank you thank you for the success on the next big visible man. You know what this might be a good idea The next big thumbs coming out. It's visible man. The House Film. Maybe like a line from the original film. The thirties film. There's some goofy lines that Claude rains hasn't had movie on somebody says I'm just thinking off. The ethic work at all I knew was Y. Catch yes you know. I wasn't crazy St- that was a good one that will do that will be a good one. Use that all right mom. Let's get you comfortable. You gotTA hyping scared the shit out of you. I'm sorry right now. Let's you having fun. Gary you have a good time. Gary is like the figures modify take my body and just ravaging. He's like the sit of the Internet. We have some email tonight. We got some fan art. Oh Committee submitted like Fan. So let's see we got here Let me see. Let me see move on moving on people moving on we got more stories coming up Let's see what we get. Music means sidehill gardeners cheese. The cheese grater plays cheeser restaurants. All right good. Remember Your family here but yeah folks see let me see yeah people chest breadsticks but talking about Silent Hill right now silent hill. Why are we talking about Silent Hill because well for one thing why not talk about? Silent Hill is one of the greatest hard video games ever made. This is people talking about Resident Evil and how you had all these resident evil copycats and whatnot out there. This thing kind of his own and it really did where we're where a resident evil was bitten by remembers when this came out where resident evil was more of a campy. Bihar movie. This was true psychological Har- yeah didn't rely combat but not no not as much play the average guy in this mysterious town and a lot of people say you know seriously. I used to play this game. Dark scared the shit out of me. The music that the soundtrack to this game is incredible. I agree with you but even like the visual stuff to like the visuals. The Pyramid psychotic enemy some the series him just raping like like what is it. The mannequins things like that and those nurse bodies that he's found like data from that perspective of the main characters hiding in this closet. It's like what is this yeah. Nc something like that back in the day. No I'm one of the few people that that will tell you that I feel that Silent Hill. Two is a great game on the greatest horror. Games made it's my favorite of the series. My favorite is still the original. It was something about just the first time experiencing something like this and the limitations on the graphics Putting everything in fog and whatnot. It just didn't they could render it far enough smart with. They did the little babies. I was almost like the thing that scared me was that the the the graphics worse primitive at the time. And where so when you start playing a word Less detailed than what you've got later. Which for me kind of made it a scary minnows. Little babies with the knives that scared the shit out of me yes baby yes. Skinless toddlers man. Yeah that's definitely gross. Yeah this game. This game freaked me out man. It really did it. Got Into my head. Fuck my mind which leads me to say. There was so many elements that worked so well. Knick game that when they made a movie out of it the First Silent Hill movie when people say what's a good video game movie maybe not great but what's a good one. I know some people debate this but I really do think that silent hill gets a gets a bad rep. Get that movie. You've seen that movie. Yeah what do you think about it? I think it's okay. I think there's IT feels to me like silent. Hill's greatest hits. We're going to put this thing. Everyone recognizes and this thing everyone recognizes but is there reason for all these things to be here not really we just know that? These look cool It's like resin evil series. Like when Paul W S Anderson does possess the fucking random acts guy from reason. Let's like I. This is probably one of the better games. I don't think it's that good okay. It's one of the ones that kind of in the mid range for me. I think sonic in Texas pitcher way better than this. You know well the two different kinds of movies to ABC video game though. Yeah that's the thing that's going on you know. Now we're seeing that video game tapes. Adaptations are actually getting a little bit. Better now come out. And it's a great success critically and financially you know manage. Avoid that rotten on rotten tomatoes made up made a lot of money as opening weekend. Actually please the fans that they listened to redesign going on. You know where it feels like. We really aren't a new era of video game movies. He's got the game now Ashok anymore. Well the reason is that people are listening to the studios a listening to the fans. This is area where it's long overdue that you listen to the fans you know. I mean they spent five million dollars listening to fans here and it paid off you know for years the studios because one executives work completely coked out of their heads to they didn't have the the budgets to really do some things that you saw in the video games In three they just didn't give a shit you know. Just do it nuclear videogames. My Kid plays at home. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah. We'll make some quick fuck. Fuck them no matter. What exactly that mentality. That's one of the things I thought was cool about. Silent Hill Silent Hill. It did pay a lot attention to detail manners. They got a lot of things right as far as the look stuff. Yeah I'm talking guy. Greet you some things thrown together. But I guess I like it better than you but you know what you're saying you don't like it up you're saying. I think is really good and and now somebody's GonNa like boys boys boys. Hey stuff finding how about this? Let's not worry about that ocean. How about we start fresh and make something that might please everybody or as many people as we can and that is why they're going to be doing another silent hill movie. I hear I'm not sure. specially that last one man. You know where this would listen. There's a lot of people who are saying that all right you know this varies in quality for certain people. Some people say is good like me. You say okay it's it's okay. Bare Minimum Okay is right. It's still shitty but it's okay Everybody agrees said that second. One Revelation Silent Hill. Revelations was a piece of Shit where my father this is coming to be too bad because again it steadily. They got a lot of stuff right but I remember seeing this at the at the theater and I was like I saw this at midnight when they started back in the day. These midnight movies because This was when they were first introducing movies on Thursdays before. A lot of people know that movie's open on Thursdays technically now. Instead of Friday the Thursday nights Thursday nights Thursday evenings screenings earliest like five. Yeah which is our saw. Sonic but back in the day when they were tested out. You'd have to go with no matter. What movie was you'd have to go at midnight? If you're going to see something like Marmaduke or something like that you have to go at midnight to catch it on Thursday and we would do that so we we could review out on a Friday and this is what I saw this. I could have been. Sleep can't fuck this Mooney I I never. I never saw this one. I forgot the this was even real but this double down the thing. I didn't like about some of the stuff I didn't like about the original film that it was felt so over produced all the CGI them like I don't know in a world. I wish that the previous film and by this one was more practical. I think that's all I imagined. Silent Hill's like it felt like a real place surrounded and missed and I guess for me. They didn't do a good job. The one I saw who do enough job capturing that well now it said that a new silent hill is in the works Let me see there are times the Charmaine third time? We'll see we'll see. Especially if they're gonNA try to reboot this now. I don't know what they'll do because it's been a long time since lot answer. Somebody has actually made a sign and he'll game. That was exactly. What was the last one? Four three four nine people would argue. That was what the early early two thousands I mean for years. And we're going to do it with Kojima fucking up. Let me see because I got the story right here. That's right got the link. Somebody sent me the link and I want to thank. The person sent me that. That would be rebel. Samra sent me a link saying that they're going to be doing a new silent hill moving now and it says this. Vg Twenty four seven at the original directive. Two thousand six is I thought so. Silent Hill films developing new hard game to film projects for the big screen. Christophe Gans working on. You remember that Guy Thought he did brotherhood of the WOLF AND US. Good so where will of movies anyway. Instead of the upcoming film of Focus more on a cult and a small American town ravaged by puritanism. That's the same shit they didn't less. Yeah well you said. They got the same director working on this too. I mean that doesn't really make me all that happy. I'm okay with you. Liked him more than I did. I'm like all right. Listen not for Chris. Fair enough so he says you know what I got you Chris that other guy. Thanks about me doesn't like my vision to double down the CGI. You wouldn't be card. Yeah Corey Guy. Gordon Court knows me. Corey understands me that fucking Doodo. Nah Man good taste in admire that the guy wants to come back in and trust if this is true so did he drove the no. Okay no he did not know all right. Well my is. I make more practical. I don't want I don't see all the CGI subs that's green screen. Let's green skin right there. It's supposed to be a scary. It's a it's a hot town there's GONNA be some. Cgi GHOSTS SHIT bound. Ebanon make the whole thing. I'm seeing is you see I I always throws me off. I don't like that. Do you know what you're you're in men at least be at least a hide it from. Chris says you bet all rubber address. I'll wise I won't this shit. Oh Shit hold puppets. They always better time and we say no. I agree with you. I agree with you. Maybe the balance right here. But we'll see man I see and hopefully you know with in this day and age right now. Where fans away more scrutinizing now you've got to even be more careful 'cause like I said man this is a nobody's made a good silent hill game. And Wow nobody's you've made a silent hill game period. Why yes I'm kind of questionable. Yeah this Games You know the last game is over five years old so Dallas born downpl. Yes so nobody there's series and nobody's talking about I understand. Maybe if they're working on a game which here Jima wants to go and try to do this Where he you know. He can't make silent hill but he wants to go and make a hard game. Yeah the he's talked about. They want that but yeah at the same time. Kanawha has said you know. We haven't dropped the franchise so maybe this is some effort behind Konami. Where they're saying. Hey you know what? We have a new game that we're planning on doing. Let's go in tease it with the mission of a new movie. Yeah I'm honestly. I would almost be a happier about this. It'd be preferable to me if they just made this kind of like an unmade series in the same way that they just gave Netflix license for gasoline. Because that's that's a product as well and so. I think that would be a little bit better because these I trust those people over Netflix. That creative team to a real anything. No we can't no no no. I want to see real shit at town. Got Out of it. How'd you like it? I got one that I liked. That's enough like I want another one. Okay okay I think I'm probably going to be hands off of this because they don't really give a shit but this guy wants to do it again and he's going to apply like a different vision to it. I'm all for it. Okay all right Jamesy Camiel Newell Understanding now Mister Clever Ideas yes. You occasionally disagreeing opinions. This is real quick people since won't subject of movies crossing over with video games. Got Another one right here for all you people out there playing them far nights This all about the skins now. Of course all about you know. It's not it's not. It's not cool to be a banana anymore. Pretty cool though man. Googly eyed banana bananas bad as man that the slow even cooler to be John Wick anymore. John Skin Yeah when the original I know that because I got killed by that and it was an honor. Killed by Mr Wiggly's he killed me. Even I was getting kind of old so right now they say who is that new skin that we got out there. Was that new skin. That People WanNa be me bricks like Old Lady Pants and here. Why such a Douche this morning You are hard to look at. He would make that scheme. I'll drop five bucks. I would going around with the deadpool out the Mass Cam. You still look into the funny thing about it. Man Like Okay. Yellow fucked up. But it's still better looking than half the cab waymo girls and me we even with that face sexy. Frankenstein sex It's all about attitude pretty Krueger. You know what if you just go? Join A biker gang or some shit like what happened you don't hear road or appeal down the road kid. Shit ain't shit. You can't even Ryan Reynolds came. Make him ugly ugly again. The Commerce like devils looks fucking Zombie. Like his stuff is has fallen off his expose news meat. And everything so yeah. I wear that ship but I'm not going to look like that Zombie half the time the little bit of latex neck up to the neck. We're done yeah. I'll look like a handsome. Do had bad acne exactly sexiest footballer and all there was like a sexy as turtle scales. Mr Clinton bad somber chat tumble uncooked sausage sexy uncle. Somebody took hamburger meat and moulded round reynolds out of art and turbulence Hamburgers Berbie sculpture. And it's still good. Does a rankled thumb sale at all. The things we say. That sounds more on. Salt does like wrinkled thumb cutting key Jesus US BUT YEAH PEOPLE. WanNa be dead Puna fortnight. Now that's a new skin that's available out there but those who is making big news right in our whole dish the marble edition so it's accurate movie accurate so surprised. They didn't do something like this when deputy was coming out because FARC night was very popular around. That time couldn't do licensing issues now because maybe with Fox. They couldn't do anything but now that doesn't he owns the nave already. Previously done advantix gave cattle. They had the endgame event where you can play the other vendors to like black widow and Kashmir early you some of their buildings. I believe so. Yeah they're like okay deputies. Another one that he's perfect for this game shooting dimple shoots people. Yes Maine Heaven. Yeah they already had A. You're right there and had a thanos back. There was a video where I was great. I played fantasy when I played for Don. Sak when I was still playing fortnight back in day I did do that. I was famous for a brief minute. Got Killed The vendors. Defeated me Let me see here. I'm trying to find something where people are playing the footage. You get some footage of that for people. Batman event not too long ago just as Batman. See All these in Batman Yeah Yeah Grappling Hook. I believe get to get new sat around like the environment. Yeah I'm looking at all these characters. Got like they. They now the Dow that they're able to use marble care just as we saw they had Dallas Jack yet but to wash that Spielberg girl. She's fucked them. All cut to a commercial hit them that hard. You know what they can do because that DEPP. Paul makes sense like he's he. He does a lot of natural choice. Love it that's a natural choice shooting so Who Your who would be the next person to make sense for this. I've always wondered why they don't have this certain character in here dean. Take a guess how I mean. It's marvel so like a marvel character. Yeah his Mar- Disney Marvel and Disney. Punisher Yeah Punisher well. They're not promoting him right now. True that they're going to release it deadpool. Movie AS WE KNOW RYAN. Rhodes been negotiations like the netflix characters. Like they had their thing but now the like okay how do we even incorporate them back into the MCI or just do new version? They're like the put him on the ice right now. That's why they're not promote the punisher. Yes time everyone's about dental. Yeah no that's true. That is true are right. Fuck you all right. Let's go ahead and get to our last story right here last month for the night here. This is the one I tell you I was trying to bring some happiness and you shit all over. I'm sorry I don't even know if I should tell you know scoring and I should just keep it to myself. You don't appreciate it. I appreciate a lot but unlike you. Yes pity I WANNA see my my wife my man happy here. So that's why I'm happy report that you boy will continue on in the marvel. Cinematic Universe after twenty twenty one. Maybe so Thomas Spider Man. Yeah the saying that said about this. That's what I'm saying. Tried to bring you some happy spring things off. I want to save it as a surprise I forgot one to save it as you. Just throw it back at you. The one looking like this. What does it make you happy? Just wanted to pick your. Yeah so a lot of people here. Was Tom Rothman. Sony Sony allow people to hear Tom Rothman. They usually don't have good things to say the fans out there. No Tom Rothman. This is one time that a lot of people are happy to hear. It was coming out of his mouth There was an interview that he did guy would what publication was four. But I'm reading this seen it and it says here that spider-man's marvel cinematic universe. Benches may continue after twenty twenty one. They got quotes here from Mr Rothman. He acknowledges Sony can do pretty well with Spidey. Even when Marvel Studios isn't involved which worries me right. They're always but he does say here. The Fan base which is important to all of us seem to really respond to what Tom is folks have done. That's what that's what horns out ahead of Disney California didn't even he's happy with them but this what he's that was his quote. I hope so I also we WANNA see more kids spider-man's in that one. Yeah sure people know about his reputation like he's very dismissive of Superhero films. Like he was ahead. He was in charge of twenty th century Fox back in the day when they made the X. in. Yeah and he didn't give a Shit. I mean that's why you got stuff like x men origins wolverine eventually when the friend is burn out. He was ones when they tried to pitch of deadpool but back in the day when Reynolds is trying to get a movie made he was. We don't need not GonNa not gonNA work. It's like I. I don't particularly like this guy. I mean him and Sony. They've had some successes. But there are always franchise hunting the entire time when they have something good and they just managed burning away. And the fact that look this. GonNa continue on because somehow inspire man's going to be in stuff like venom to. I'm not saying that definitive factor. Anything but he's going to be a part of their universe now. I'm very glad he's going to continue. Hopefully continue on the agency. Yeah but you know. There's a point where Tom Rothman said. That was a different time. Superhero movies weren't where they were. They weren't what they are now and for him. It's all about money. Yeah always been you know. He said that being with marble and the fans liking it is been a win win win. He actually put three wins in next so when from each of yes this whole thing is like he knows it pissed off these fans with spider man. I think working with Disney to like all right. This is a relationship. We don't want to disrupt good so looks like this is going to continue off smart to realize that. I. I hope so because I wanna see this character constantly evolving the for many years to come. Yeah is he's going to be a part of that that turn it in my mind. Yeah no he's made some terrible decisions. Ask for these. Movies is terrible executive for a lot of things but I think a lot of people hold them at bay now especially when dealing Disney Disney down. He'll be but he's still ours. Yeah we'll we'll take them back when he wrote him a few of those some of those movies years just either one say hello to step. Oh excuse it's nobody's looking for what they're doing with him to would. I didn't know if you want to include this story in there. But they're shooting in chardon saw a month. Yeah Yeah. I saw that a few days ago. We have to put up with. That news was last week too and I was like. Oh Oh we're starting a month now. That was the update. Oh this update is. This came out like a couple of days ago. Maybe it was like yesterday where Tom Holland he was interviewed and he said specifically that for four on Chart Adaptation. We're taking a law firm matured fourth defend. Would you see like a young Nathan Drake? But then he also said Yeah. We're shooting for weeks. We'll see we know of David. Confirm the Director Ruben. Fleischer is rumored to be the director. You shoot if you don't have a director. That's that's getting people have been questioning that to putting the camera before the director. You know the article I read. They're almost like we got some action scenes. We're GONNA shoot so they could get like the whoever you have fill in the rest in later. Crisis is a mess. This is going to be producing it. Obviously the Yes but no. Now have you robin no Sony Sony? Sony Yeah though Sony. Yeah rods. Sony is Tom. Ross is going to be all of us after the Tom. I'll tell you what I don't know. Why but that second venom. I liked the picture that I saw from. Cleanest Cassidy Yeah. Yeah Woody Harrelson floral shirt. Yeah he doesn't look as stupid as he did. Got Rid of that. Chucky ducky wiggle child's play the haircut. Who who is this do Harry? It was it was the stooge. Larry Larry terrible shape. This is good because naturally bald anyway. Don't put Louis Harrelson a wig or a toupee just having go bald or balding. Don't care Let's see. I like the picture that they showed of him. And A KAZAA. The director that they have now have a little more faith in there. It is there it is right. He's not bald. But you don't have that. Like you said on got chucky here couldn't read though it is red that's fine. I know they got to do that but it but it but it makes this. He looks like it. Looks like Larry Larry for that boss by carrot top. It looks like a class being in Las Vegas pulling the Goddamn mallets out of his pants and shit like carrot top if he was slowing melting those fake muscles dozens body. All right Somebody that's into some some fan art. Good take a look at that. Look that right after this chat saying who's Darnold says I thought that was Logan. Paul doesn't like Logan Paul hair and everything it a little bit. Yeah Blonde Blonde hair. And then S Logan Pauling forty two. Yeah still doing pranks and shift getting arrested. For next year's old I still got it. Logan still watching anymore. Y'All do like Logan still goaded. I like me. What's the chat talking about the question for any questions here? Let us know we're saying. Oh my God doesn't like Logan Old Logan Fall. Yeah wow it does. It really does. Who said that man? Darnold I believe is never would have thought of that man till he said in. Yeah in Palm Carnage. Nothing nothing no emails. No one's asking anything. You have the opportunity right now just kind of like. Yeah right the balding man Larry would hair plugs and looks fake L. I like the way who. Who's the new the new director? Andy Circus Andy. Circus Dow surprised by honestly. Yeah I'm glad to circus came on. He's like I'm not doing stupid. Shit now you cut that here right now not doing thank you for the Subscription Akron Purple Purple. Thank you so much appreciate that. Thank you guys thank you. Avi Roger was producing uncharted. That's a good sign. Listen to me. I just know that Sony was the company whose producing opera. No I say no this well. Apparently here's my screen. Test FROM VENOM. Right there and work out apple carnage echelon and get the part so All right we're GONNA look at this email real quick before we get out of here. Thank you guys for being tonight as I said. I'm really happy that we got more people tuning in now dealers days. It's a lot of fun. Might start playing some really cool games on on Saturdays sometimes there's some we might pull out the PC man bad games. I need to be play on steam alone. There's so many like one hour games that are so horrific a lot of comedy. They got one called getting over. Have you heard of this I was recommended to play this by twitch. Although we come back from commercial break things go fast. Good thank you everybody and welcome back just talking about games to play. So there's this game that they recommended playing mainly because the pisses you off gain called getting over it I'll show you. This is a weird as game. You play a guy with like a ball for waste like you like you around and you got a sledgehammer and I've seen this game before. Yeah Yeah Yeah they. Apparently people losing shit over here. The name of it though okay. Yeah they said his game is up. People get pissed because yeah yeah people are pissed because let me see getting over trailer opening like teen comedy. Something talking over. Let me see yeah here. It is over in starring Diane keen to sound. Oh let me see here. This is the game radio and this is my first time. Seeing it was recommended. Guys are colder. Yeah okay this horrible high up an impossible mountain. I could've made something you would have liked a game. That was empowering that would save you progress in inches deadly forward. Apparently this narration goes through the game. I think really make sense successes delicious. That would have been wise instead. I must confess. This isn't nice tastes submitted. Nece it's capricious setbacks for the ambitious. Likes lenience embracing inhumane but not everyone's the same? I created this game for a certain kind of person that we're insane doing that. Yeah that's the point disappointing. We'll see that's like a half hour best people doing the keyboards. Yeah sure. Good reaction videos. Yeah so we were recommended to play. That always loved recommendations from people especially Mr Twitch. Rg Tokyo you ask for suggestions for a sudden notification of purchases. I just watched tropic thunder again today. And that's one of my let me see. What is it great movie? I'm a I'm a lead farmer motherfucker. I don't know about that. I'm a landfall armor. Okay moving along and Standard Junior. Says I'M ELEVEN PHARMA MOTHERFUCKER random people get mad at that. I love it I love it but yeah you hear that over and over. We'll try worked a little one. Mabel put this in here. Yeah maybe maybe. We'll maybe we'll bleep the motherfuckers. Yeah Yeah No. It's very good. Suggestion is a great suggestion. I'm just thinking of the people who might not like that going off the entire time quiet. Yeah Koko Silk. Wants to know. I'll let you read this Muslim about you. I'll let you oh thank you. Thank you there that I need a bucket. Thank you for the sub right there support. Read that okay. Hey Corey are there. Any plans at amounts of juicy Herman to the Gallery on twitch. Thanks and stay. Toasty knows yes. Y'All cool yes. I think I've a suggestion. I think when we get the sonic suit and we get me in the headgear. That'd be a good one. Now's go great. That'd be great one. Yeah thank rush. You were Correct Kris. Literal juice just do a bottle of juice like a gallagher said. Chris on it except that I'll be your head sticking out the juicy Capri Sun something. Let me see here. Someone said a lot to see you guys place on rock band with the rest of the D. crew. I'll tell you what twitches asked us to do. They want us to do Twitch sings yeah. Yeah they as they requested that we do twitch saying so we. We definitely doing that. In fact I don't get paid for doing it so yes I mean other than that. I was thinking maybe more community stuff the Jack Box Games. Yeah some of the tributaries as well so a lot of people have been talking about us. Doing check box games. I think we'll get to that. We'll talk about that. Let me see here orders from the top. Yep you're going to be. You will saying he's got themselves somebody. Oh that's a good one. It was work work more substantive vacation. Because they're you know they're seven you press the button. That's a good one. We did that. Who Said who say that? You see that WHO said WHO said that. Give yourself a shout right now. I like to thank people who who have very good to see it was work was td hours it defined fuck angry. Asian. I think doesn't we thank you? He said it was work. We'll take maybe he's the person center. Whoever you are thank you here. A Fan Art Eric Drapes. I think there have us let me know. GonNa Email right here. I got this big as cross-references keeps growing growing liquids inside the computers a mold. Yeah it really spreading across my screenwriter. Discoloring hungry telling me. I don't have any food. You have making cookies in the fridge eating those cookies. Otherwise charing downs. You were hurt that everybody gotta get mad at me for their juist. Yom Kippur is like expected. Better Mr Coleman what you get expecting anything out of me yes. You're where's this guy? I'm trying to find out about those cookies. Cookies says look Oh Eric draws yeah okay. Let's see here. Hello Corum huge fan of the show and I wanna make some fan art for st agreed. Life is good enough to use that for the t shirt. You said you wanted. I would give full ownership of it to double toasted. I'm not a digital artist. Do traditional mediums. But you can use my design in any kind of translate to your shirts if you're ready to have an artist s okay. I Still WanNa do the piece in the studio. Thanks for the last is got me through days. My mother's having surgery. This is Friday and any prayer from the family's appreciate it took a quick look my work instagram at air draws thank you you know what? I just I look it up right now but the surgery goes well for your mother. Yeah look it up right now but I'll probably be bad trying to find your stuff on instagram right now. But as far as the surgery for your mom we wish you well man you really do. Of course they reaching out to us about a window or anything. No Man Chad is as usual. They are Jones support of toasties out there. So they're they're like yes best of best wishes to you. Thank you for being so supportive. Let's see here anger. We're about to go. He's done Popeye's Oh I want to congratulate. Canada. I just got news. Some Big News Ryan Walter said that Popeye's has come into the chicken sandwich actually coming to Canada. Oh No yeah. It'd be as crazy as they were here for. Let's see how they behave fighting each other you know. They're always known for being nice or their said they're always nice but I don't see we'll put that to the test experiments it's social. Maybe this is Satan his way of turning him against each other. Now what is Oh Mama come on now Bore did you hear that her mom Komo News? Good come on your it. Took a few more minutes kisses. Thank you baby. All right look. Let's look at this right here. Right Papa's famous chicken sandwich coming to Canada this year. Oh this might be. That corrupts them. The thing on America's Stephen King Novels Twilight Zone Episode. Like what is so polite and love one another but then you just one element sets everybody off and start subtly tear each other apart. It'd be like needful things. Papa's need that good luck pop a candidate. We'll see what happens. You know if you kill one personal this sandwich you still doing better than us. That's true someone died over right a couple people people in Christ sad but that sandwiches delicious Aaron. We'll murder each other for the blood of my victims tastes so good all right all right. Thank you guys so much. Yeah thing about to show a lot of support from the own some good topics some good discussions. Yeah yeah thanks to and you will okay to thank you all right. I want to thank our guest will be here. Nadia and Charles. Yes absolutely coming in despoiling us. Yeah showering us with gifts. We really appreciate that guys. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. We're going to see you go because we're not gonna get coup stuff anymore. No No. Who doesn't she thought ain't done yet. Hong-dae how long are you here for? They're going to be too cool nice. Yeah and let's see here so I think that's it guys. Thank you so much. I have been dry. Escort Coleman over here. You have been Christopher juicy. Herman and you guys are still the chat. Keep doing you and keep being wonderful. We appreciate it. Both you chats out there. Thank you so much for the support tonight. Remember if you like what we do here subscribe and get a free subscription a free twitch prize subscription which Amazon prime account and help us get to twenty five hundred subscribers by the end of May with. You guys have gotten a pretty close not far to go. Good here is good to hear so. Hopefully you guys can take us. All the way should be on the front page next week. Nice that's GonNa bring what is going on with attention. You say goodbye to the to the folks at their fix featuring. She's getting antsy right now. She wants to go so people were going to get out of here. Thank you so much. People seriously couldn't ask what better community you guys have. Been a joy to stream two and we can't wait to see what more we can do it because of you. I want to thank. Chris would use Herman for helping us out over here here. Great addition to double toasted that we have here. That's very can you say yes you know. He's a little upset last week but we got through it upset at me. He was actually supporting each other now. Yes we were to be work and that is that thank you guys so much and we will see you on the next show. I guess that'd be Saturday. Yeah back almost. That's right Saturday. We will be back so people we will see you then on the eight bit crumbs until then tune in K. Cooymans G. Miller DOT COM QUESTIONS COMMENTS COUPLA. Missile input and vice won't be part of the show was to be back and forth shows. Get hold oversaw. The Social Media Twitter facebook type in double softball abodes get hold of bill phase. Two point five may crystal clear Christian Hermit on twitter and instagram on reverend seven continent classic. Dot Join US Studio Guest Kazeem. Oh Hey Jimbo dot com come on down here and see his show Carter by. That is Ed's relied good morning to evening whenever you're listening to watching this Sir Area Urine Jerry.

Chris Chris Nadia Charles Corey US dryest Coleman Toronto Yoshi Martin Luigi Lincoln Charles Charles Amazon Jubeir Roth Twitter Tom He Florida Jonah Roy I Austin G. R. A. F. Chris Pussy cory
When and How to Prune a Rose of Sharon

Your Gardening Questions

02:29 min | 7 months ago

When and How to Prune a Rose of Sharon

"And you were talking about roads or sharing. how do you trim them to keep them kinda inbound rather than grow grow grow. And huge trim them hard. Now, I'm going to explain that, but they are one of Mother Nature's miracles high viscous. That particular one is my nemesis because they are seed bearing plant. I have dealt with them from seedling size clear up to eight and nine feet. and I actually mean you have to trim them hard. They are able to grow in some of the poorest of soils. Hottest dryest nastiest areas as a child. The ones I'm talking about playing with were screen between my parents property and the La. You practically could even muffle the noise of car going through. They were so big now to explain their blooming now on stems that grew from this spring on out set flower buds, and they're now blooming. So with the. The rule in mind that you can trim following the bloom, they will be go there trimble. Now, for that matter, you just take off the flowers, but you can trim them anytime now and I would until fall because I'm thinking in quite a brutal pruning the way you asked the question it is a plant that you. You do pretty much the same thing that you would with any other shrub. Usually they are multiple stemmed. You would take out the biggest. Stems as close to the bottom as you can get them, let the new stems come on so that you do get new growth next spring after after a fairly brutal pruning and new flowers and so on. They also can be trimmed up as a tree where you take off all the side shoots inside site growth stems and and do it in one trunk. So I, when I say brutal I would let them finish flowering and then I would go into it from the standpoint right now of just managing it size doesn't continue to grow so much bigger, then come winter. Jacket type weather fall, or very early spring. You can go into those rascals and and really thin them out.

La nine feet
NPR News: 01-06-2020 1PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 01-06-2020 1PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Lakshmi Singh Congressional. Democrats and Republicans remain at a standoff over the structure of president trump's uh-huh trial in the US Senate. He was impeached by the House for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports lawmakers returned from their holiday recess. This this weekend are expected to resume negotiations. Democrats want to question. Top trump administration officials including former national security adviser. John Bolton who has has agreed to testify if subpoenaed Tim Naphtali a professor of public service at. NYU says such testimony could shed further light on trump's dealings with Ukraine. The the public should know more about the president's role and what was in the president's mind the witnesses could help do that. I'm not sure that that will happen. But Nor am I convinced that all these witnesses would really cooperate. Republican leaders have pushed back on calling witnesses to testify but say they haven't ruled it out out Windsor Johnston. NPR News Washington. Tens of thousands of people. Fill the streets of Tehran today to follow a procession for the body of Iranian General Qasim Sulejmani late. He was killed last week by. US drone strike any rock among the generals eulogist was Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei from Tehran. NPR's Mary Louise Kelley. Ali has more starting before dawn. Street's leading to Tehran university were closed from across. The city came mourners. The women dressed in traditional head to toe black funeral. General garb many wept openly. How many prayed over the body. And the casket then made its way out the main gates of the university through Revolution Square. The funeral procession has been moving city to city across Iraq and now Iran. Iran's leaders are promising retaliation for Sulamani Death President Hassan. Honey honey has said quote the Great Nation of Iran will take revenge for this heinous crime. Mary Louise Kelley. NPR News Tehran in Kenya authorities. Authorities say they have arrested three terror suspects who they believe attempted to storm a British army training camp. The foiled plot took place a same day. al-shabaab extremists reportedly reportedly ambushed a military base in another part of Kenya killing three. US military personnel. It's still unclear if the two attacks are connected however they occurred within days as of the US announcing plans to increase security at its basis following threats from Iran the investigation continues into yesterday's deadly chain-reaction collision on the Pennsylvania turnpike which took place near Pittsburgh. Five people were killed at roughly sixty people were injured. The Associated Press reports that a nine year old girl was among the dead Ed the collision involved a tour bus passenger vehicle and three tractor trailers. The National Transportation Safety Board is taking part in the investigation. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is down nearly fifty points since the open at twenty eight thousand five hundred eighty seven this is NPR news in Australia. Bushfires it started more than four months ago or still growing to the point where so the damage is visible from space. At least twenty five people have died in these fires and thousands have evacuated their homes and Pierce Jason Bobi has reporting on the public's reaction from Sydney. This is unprecedented. That's what I'm hearing from people and they also seem to be recognizing that this seems to be the new normal people except that most of the people that I talked to you say yeah they can see that the climate it is changing. It's much hotter. Australia's in the midst of the hottest driest year. They've had on record for two thousand nineteen. It was the hottest and dryest year on record and so people are trying to scramble to cope with it. The best they can. NPR's Jason Boubyan reporting the appointment of a new top Chinese official in Hong Cong signals. Beijing's tougher approach to months of pro democracy protests. We have the latest from. NPR's Emily Fang. Low weaning was suddenly announces director of China's Liaison Office in Hong Kong over the weekend in his first remarks to the press said quote One Country Two Systems Hong Kong's greatest advantage referring to Beijing System of governance which allows Hong Kong Limited Autonomy Tawny but Hong Kong protesters say Beijing has not upheld such autonomy and are demanding political reforms such as direct election of Hong Kong's chief executive unlike his predecessor. The law has no experience in Hong Kong but has made a career as a Communist Party. Loyalist enacting often harsh anti-corruption ethnic minority policies and the regions of Shenzhen and Shanghai respectively and Li Fang pure news Beijing. The Dow is down forty seven points at twenty thousand five eighty seven. I'm Lakshmi Singh N._p._R. News.

NPR NPR Hong Kong Iran US Tehran Lakshmi Singh Tehran university Ayatollah Ali Khamenei trump Windsor Johnston Beijing Mary Louise Kelley Hong Kong Limited Autonomy Washington US Senate Australia president Qasim Sulejmani
Twenty years of climate extremes

The Science Show

06:49 min | 3 months ago

Twenty years of climate extremes

"Historian ruth morgan reflects on the big story of twenty years. The year two thousand and twenty was always going to be a tantalizing horizon for future thinkers even at symmetry conjures the clear-sightedness and precision of twenty twenty vision. Too which policymakers in resist manages. Always aspire twenty years ago. Most of southern australia was still in the group of the millenium drought. The dry conditions broke records around the nation. Perth stems where their lowest. Since the first world war and the southeast of the country was on its way to the dryest shania period since recordkeeping began as the bureau of meteorology. Put it at the time. This was the nation's first climate change drought. That observation came hot. On the heels of the third assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change which made headlines around the world with this conclusion that there is new and stronger evidence that most of the global warming observed over the last fifty years is attributable to human activities if suburban households become complacent about the household woody's than the drought was a wakeup call across the nation. Education campaigns and water saving devices joined water restrictions in an effort to ease pressure on limited urban water supplies in melbourne for instance the voluntary target. One five five campaign aimed more than half the daily water consumption of residents by encouraging shorter showers while imposing strict limits on watering gardens washing the car. Brisbane went even further aiming to reduce residential would consumption to one hundred and forty liters of water per person per day. The rain water tank in grey water. Recycling became suburban. Must haves offering the means to keep gardens green in trying conditions as the damn levels so lower and lower state governments turned desalination with perth leading the way in two thousand six a prospect that was unthinkable just a decade earlier other states took notice and before long desalination plants were on the drawing board for the gold coast sydney melbourne and adelaide. But for the most part by the time those projects were completed. The rains had returned to the east coast and the plants built. There were dismissed as wipe elephants journalist. Chris noticed this change in the weather himself as he reflected in the updated edition of his book on the murray darling basin in two thousand and ten browsing through his local bookshop. He'd realized that he's book. The river somehow migrated from the environment and ecology section where. It's just six months ago to a new place on the history shows even so this record linear rainfall that broke the millenium. Drought did not turn back the clock. A drying trend continued across the south of the continent particularly in the southwest. Where winter rains had been in decline since the nineteen seventies julian part to human induced climate change indeed while eastern australia record high levels of rainfall in late twenty ten and in twenty eleven perth and much of southwestern austrailia experienced record dry weather. This is just some of the challenges of planning for both climate variability and climate change on a continent of extremes. It's been looking ahead into the future. That's being one of the ways in which ustralian have long tried to come to terms with this continent of extreme climate variability in twenty eleven. The climate commission released its first report declaring that australia was facing the critical decade back. Then of course. The climate commission was a federal government body established under the gillard government but it was dissolved under the abbott government. Soon after its election in two thousand thirteen the decade to twenty twenty. The climate commission's report argued was critical in terms of meeting the two degrees celsius guardrail by curbing emissions of carbon dioxide in the decade to twenty twenty global emissions had to be well on track to reaching by twenty fifty to limit the planet's warming taking the temperature on the nation's progress towards this goal in twenty seventeen the climate council the independent body that rose from the ashes of the climate commission declared that australia was now known as global climate lagged already the concentration of carbon dioxide emissions had tipped over four hundred parts per million higher than at any other time for millions of us and the planet's temperature was over one degree higher than temperatures before the industrial revolution of the eighteenth century. The report warned that the window of opportunity to limit worsening climate impacts is closing and already climate events were getting worse pointing not only to bush fires and hate waves but also to drought and drying across the south of the continent. Just as the gun. I report of two thousand. Eight and countless other scientific studies had predicted two thousand and nineteen was the driest year since records began in one thousand nine hundred and it was the country's warmest year in fact all these since two thousand thirteen are among the ten warmest on record australia. The impact of climate changes lead to longer more intense fire seasons and an increase in the average number of elevated fire weather days as measured by the forest fire danger index twenty nine thousand nine so the highest cumulated index on record fires have burned before an australian but never like those we saw over the summer. It's called comfort knowing that this disaster was nice surprise after all the two thousand eight garner report warned that fire seasons will start earlier and the slightly lighter and generally be more intense. This effect increases over time but should be directly observable by twenty twenty in another ten to twenty years time 2019 white. Be so unusual. Although this use emissions might be lower thanks to the covid lockdowns and the air might be cleaner. The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere like carbon dioxide continues to rise and the period two thousand sixteen to twenty twenty looks set to be the warmest five year period on record. Unfortunately a few months of slowing down can't make up for the decades upon decades of greenhouse gas emissions that have accumulated in the atmosphere. He street is weighing heavily on the planet's climate future. Associate professor ruth morgan at the new a former. Abc top five humanities star.

ruth morgan bureau of meteorology climate commission twenty years forty liters southern australia melbourne southwestern austrailia perth intergovernmental panel on cli abbott government two degrees celsius fifty years Perth eastern australia Brisbane one degree australia adelaide gillard government
David Grann, Author

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

10:21 min | 2 years ago

David Grann, Author

"Great news. There's a quick way. You can save money. Switch to Geico. Geico could help you get great coverage at a great price. And it only takes fifteen minutes to see if you could save fifteen percent or more on car insurance. Go to Geico dot com today and see how much you could save. The sporting live on ESPN radio and the ESPN app. Here's Jeremy chef we're joined by one of the finest writers and reporters of his generation the best selling author a book such as the lost city of z and killers of the flower moon. David grand new book is titled the white darkness. And it is about Henry Worsely Ernest Shackleton and polar exploration but much more as well. David grand joins us now here in the sporting life gave it thank you for being with us. It's my pleasure. Thanks you on the program. Why this book why this subject now? Yes. So everywhere. So it was really remarkable figure. He was polymath. He was an artist. He was a sculptor. He was a decorated a British army officer who served with SAS, which is an elite commando unit. He was an amateur historian who was obsessed with. His hero Ernest Shackleton, and he longed always be polar explorer to see what he was made of and finally at the age of forty seven he embarked on his first expedition, which was to trek to south pole. And then he did a series of other expeditions as well. And each one he saw as a test of character a test of leadership, and he always wanted to get closer to his hero Ernest Shackleton rec- who David grant about his new book the white darkness. And if you could give our listeners a sense of how important the Shackleton's in the periods and the amundsen's and the Scots were at the beginning of the twentieth century, and why they inspired so many people. Yeah. So it was a period where much of the earth have been explored, but Antarctica this uninhabitable. And brutal environment still remained a place. Where not everybody had ventured into and Shackleton was particularly interesting and one who were xlii was fascinated with because he tried to reach the south pole twice to become the first person to do. So each time he'd failed. He then set out to walk across Antarctica, but his ship the endurance famously became entrapped in ice and sank so many ways Shackleton was a failure. But he became revered for his powers of endurance. And for the way, he led men on that occasion when his ship sank. He was with a party trapped on an ice floe more than a thousand miles from the nearest island with any civilization, and he had to figure out how to get his entire party back, and you need to understand the conditions in this region are just brutal. I mean, there is not human life in no life whatsoever. And parts of Antarctica temperatures can reach minus one hundred degrees Fahrenheit. It is. As the coldest confident is the windiest continent with winds reaching up to more than a hundred miles per hour. It is the highest confident in terms of elevations. It is also the dryest confident despite being covered in ice and one of Shackleton's most trusted most capable lieutenants was Worsely as well. Yes. A worst very early in life. He he had he wasn't very into his studies. But it used to go to the library and pull books on adventure. When they pulled the book that Shackleton had written in a captivated him. And he was delighted to discover that one of his own ancestors have been a member of Shackleton's, endurance, expedition that was when his ship with frozen in ice his ancestor, Frank. Where's the was actually the captain of that ship? We're speaking with David grant, his new book is the white darkness is previous bestsellers include killers of the flower moon and the lost city of z in David. We can understand the fascination with the polar explorers at beginning of the two. Twentieth century they were trying to get somewhere. No one had ever been before to explore continent. That was largely unexplored. There was no other way to get to the south pole. And once the south pole was conquered. You know, then Shackleton came up with other feats that he tried to achieve but one hundred years later, what's the point? When you when you could get on a plane in land there. Well, I think this some degree even in Shackleton's day even in the day of Scott. These were somewhat inward quest in the sense that there were external objects. But in the cut is desolate there is really nothing there. These grails were really no more than geographical data points. I think for people like Henry Worsely, they are still trying to go on those kind of inward journeys to test their endurance to test their character Worsely always looked at each of these expeditions. He had and our goal. But they were inward in the book. You make it clear that to some extent Worsely like somebody these dramas there's an edible element to it as well. And there certainly was for Henry Worsely. Yeah. His his father who was kind of a ghostly president had risen to the very highest really the pinnacle of the British army. He was knighted by the Queen. And Henry because he was often his father was often away postings, his father wasn't around a lot. But obviously he wanted to live up to his measure, but also to kind of find his own path and polar expiration became that. So he decides that he is going to pay tribute to his hero Ernest Shackleton by tempting similar feats. How does he go from this being from being SAS commando, a distinguished officer whose career, however, it stalled in the British army to a polar explorer? How does he make that transition? Yeah. Well, he had he ever since he was young. That's what he burned to do. But like as father he went into the army. He didn't quite know how to become an explorer, and he feared failure the challenges of raising the money and just the difficulties of the expedition, but in two thousand and eight at the age of forty seven. He finally decided to make an attempt this would be as I expedite and that was the centennial anniversary of Shackleton's Nimrod expedition with Shackleton had tried to reach the south pole. He had gotten to ninety seven nautical miles away from the poll and then had to retreat because of the welfare of party, and so Worsely decides he's going to reenact that journey a hundred years later, and then once it gets to the ninety seven mile Mark depress onto the poll, and what was so interesting was he teamed up with two companions who were also descendants of Shackleton's original crew when was a grand nephew of Shackleton, and the other was a great grandson of the second in command on the Nimrod expedition, and these men even though they had exploration in their genes, they had actually no exploring experience, so they begin a ruthless regimen. They pull tires across open fields. They traveled to Greenland to learn to adapt to live on the ice learning that if you get wet such circumstances you die. We're with David grant. And and we are time here is limited. And we certainly don't want to give it away. But the expedition's themselves are really only the beginning of the story. And as you've already said here, you know, this is a bad Interquest as much as an outward exploration or discovery in. What was driving someone like Henry Worsely wasn't what was driving Magellan five hundred years ago or Columbus five hundred thirty years ago? This is this is a different kind of adventure. And it's it's a test of one's own will and strength digging. Deep into Henry worse Lee's life in his story. What was it alternately that you think drove him? I think there were a few things I think one was he saw these as a as a kind of a test of endurance to push himself further than anyone ever had. He saw himself as a pioneer of the possible that any obstacle could he will himself through it. I think he also had there was a spiritual quality to Henry that. There was almost a. Buddhist quality. I mean, these journeys are absolutely, you know, just appallingly difficult. He would lose, you know, more than forty pounds fingers would be almost frost been he would have to haul supplies on a sled which weighed one of the three hundred pounds behind him. And so that's so five negation, I think also had a spiritual quality, and I also think for each on each journey. He saw them as somehow a test of his own character and his own decision making. It is remarkable story. Brilliantly told by the great David Grann, his new book, the white darkness about Henry Worsely and also about Shackleton and that age of exploration has just been published. David thank you for spending some time here with us in the sporting life. Oh, my pleasure. Thank you for having me on the program. I'm Jeremy shop, and you can listen to new editions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday morning on ESPN radio and ESPN app beginning at six AM eastern time clerk -nology truth. Brought to you. I code. Truth teenagers can communicate entirely in emojis. How why stop birthday party? Pizza slice kitten soccer ball, pineapple truth. It's so easy to switch and save on car insurance at geiko dot com. What are you talking about? Paperclips shoulder. Shrug high five wizard hat what? Geico, fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percents or more.

Ernest Shackleton Henry Worsely Ernest Shackleto Henry Worsely south pole Geico Worsely David grant David grand British army ESPN Henry Jeremy chef officer Antarctica soccer David Grann Antarctica amundsen emojis David
FACT SMACK: Spider Edition

Short Wave

11:57 min | Last month

FACT SMACK: Spider Edition

"Cow hey everybody matty safai here. With shortwave reporter. Emily kwong. Hey hi mattie. What do you got for us today. Okay emily i've got an episode. That combines the two things i love most is that being efficient and the sister act movies. Very good guesses too good But no smack talk which you know. I love and critter fax. Oh of course are right into it in an episode. I'm calling animal fax mec in which we bring on a scientist to talk smack using facts to prove once and for all that their favorite animal is the best animal. I mean look this is this is going to be me laying down the reasons why spiders are the best and there are many of them. That is sebastian. Etcheverry he got his phd studying jumping spiders at the university of pittsburgh but quote. He is a fan of all spiders. Being these animals have been around for three hundred or more million years. They are older than the dinosaurs. They have survived multiple mass extinctions. They are everywhere. I cannot believe that you found someone to do this nonsense with you. Mattie oh cong- it's not scientists who study critters off didn't think there critters just they're fighting on twitter about it hashtag team fish by the way hashtag team bird or you know before the pandemic in person. I've done this informally with many scientists at conferences. And i've i've heard some cool things. I've seen some really cool animals. I've found some really cool animal research of to get the breadth of behavior diversity of habitat of of shape of like way of living that you get in spiders. That can't be beat. I have no skin in this game at all. But everyone wins when we talk about critters right especially our listeners. So today on the show. Are i ever round of animal facts mac. We'll talk about spiders. Who live in unbelievable places. Move in wild ways and are altogether amazing. This is short. Wave the daily science podcast from npr. This message comes from npr sponsor. Bank of america. You decided to upgrade your outdoor deck. So you ordered the essentials. A power washer a said a patio chairs and a shiny new grill. And you used your bank of america. Cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cashback on online shopping or up to five point two five percents as a preferred rewards member which you put towards the cost of your most essential deck edition a bird feeder apply for yours at bank of america dot com slash model rewarding copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation. Okay kwong here's how this is gonna work all right. Sebastian gets roughly ten minutes facts to prove that his critter of choice. Spiders are the coolest critters. Okay got it now. These are general spider facts. So sebastian gets to call on any spider. He wants which gives him a lot to choose from. There are like roughly forty five thousand species of spiders and to give you a sense of context. Think about an animal that we see all the time or type of animal mammals right there are only about six thousand or so species of mammals that covers literally everything from shrews to wales to rhinos compared to the forty five thousand as of spiders nest so many spy seen mammals. Like it's just where it's at. Now where's that okay. So here's the thing it's not just. How many of them there. It's also where they live. Spiders are out here. Along in here is pretty much everywhere. See this is one of my favorite things about Planet earth is basically. Wherever i go. I can find a spider because they are spiders living everywhere from the inter titles on right at the ocean's edge to forests to dryest desert's where they build sand tunnels under the sand up on mountains not as regular mountains all the way up to the slopes of mount everest and everything in between a hold on he just said there are spiders that live on mount everest. Oh yeah clung. There's a famous one up. There called the himalayan jumping spider. They live up to twenty two thousand feet or sixty seven hundred meters above sea level. They are the spider the animal that is arguably the highest permanent resident on earth. They're living in the penthouse on our planet incredible. I wouldn't have thought i wouldn't have thought spider. I would've thought something else. Yeah i know me neither. But i love this because even its species name omni superstars is kind of perfect for talking smack. The omni superstar means stands above everything because it is literally above us at all points of the day of the night of the year. Watching down a bunks. All be lower animals. Identify lower animal. You know about that spider. Maybe your soul mate. All right what else do you got supplier okay. So the one that sent me over the spider edge wong. Did you know that there are multiple types of spiders who live at least part-time underwater. Like i'm talking seawater freshwater. They're out there. I mean you must find that amazing because you can barely swim. Wow wow wow. Wow emily everyone else was getting to talk. Smack didn't turn honestly fair but her full fare but herve okay. Okay so anyways. There's this spider that lives underwater called the diving bell spider and they basically make a sifi like underwater dome of air. That's their air pocket. Go there when they need to breathe and the rest of the time they just go out and they bring a little like bubble of air around their lungs which on a spider on the bottom of the abdomen. Bring a bubble of air around with that and they're just walking around underwater. They are catching food under their catching fish catching small insects and their entire life every part of their lifespan from birth to reproduction to death. Okay even i. A person who doesn't think about spiders will admit this incredibly cool that spiders are really living all over. The place got range qualm. They got rained. I don't mean like as a group of species. Some spiders legit have ranged. in fact many spiders can fly. I mean technically it's called ballooning but they're flying get out what they'll do is they. Basically will just release silk into the wind and it goes up and basically turns into like a kite. But when you're a light enough to be a spider something that's like a kite is basically like an air balloon out of here and okay. Here's the thing though. It's not just them catching the wind. There's evidence that spiders can sense earth's electric fields and take advantage of that to shoot up into the sky do much electrostatic spider flights. Yes like how far are we talking here. How far these critters flying. I mean when the best album throughout the ones that are out there showing off. We're talking hundreds or even thousands of kilometers far that scientists like sebastian have to take spider ballooning into account when they're trying to determine where a species of all like has it always been here or did it balloon here in. It's free time like we don't know spiders out here confusing scientists. I love it. I think that's what they do most of the time honestly and scientists don't just have to worry about spiders showing up in places because they balloon there. We got other types of transportation going on like. Maybe you're tired. Maybe you don't wanna fly yourself because spiders don't just fly. They take boats and by boat. I mean they take rafts of kelp and seaweed so spiders that live by the ocean shore actually traveled around the world to new places by following clumps of seaweed out to see surviving on the open ocean and then arriving at a new part of the world. So there's one group that originally evolved in south africa and then you can follow them with the current volusia every time for go to australia and then new zealand and then from new zealand to chile and they're following that ocean current arriving in new places and then evolving into new species there as they adapt. I think we think spiders says creatures that just hang out in the corner in the attic. No spiders are open. Your mind fighters are hanging out in mountains underwater. They're flying their boat in. This is a strong first statement about which animal might be best in a strong first episode of whatever. This is animal facts. Mac were scientists use facts to talk smack accent and you were right earlier. Elderly technically everybody wins even sebastian degrees. I bet there are many scientists out there that know these things about their animals. And i want to know them and so please come on and tell me you're not going to be cooler than spiders like the that's okay but we'll all learn something really cool and that is very much worthwhile. What a beguiling invitation. Who can turn that down. I know smacktalk down to the last minute. Oh you don't even know how much smack sebastian dock. And if you try to step to spiders they have eight legs. They can dance. They will step back to you and you better be ready facts. Because honestly i don't know if you can get to this level gauntlet thrown into the critter arena. Fantastic all right. That is it for us. Thank you so much to sebastian. Who wants you all to know. That spider legs are actually attached to their heads not their abdomen. So stop drawing people. I promised him. I would say that on their qualm understood. If you're a scientist who thinks that your critter is actually the best. You can take on sebastian and his army of spiders. Give us your best shot. Email critter facts. And why you should be. On the show to shortwave at npr dot org and remember we are interested in all kinds of critters especially the ones that don't normally get any love like invertebrates. Yes yes you ain't gonna have a backbone to play this game. That's against short wave at npr dot org. This episode was produced by. Rebecca ramirez edited by viet lay. In fact check by russia aridi special. Thanks to jeff brumfield. Who actually wanted to name shortwave. This whole podcast. Fec smack sorry but This is what you get. I'm mattie so spider. And i am emily learning something every day. Thanks for listening. To shortwave from npr.

matty safai Emily kwong sebastian Etcheverry Mattie oh cong twenty twenty bank of america bank of america emily mattie herve okay university of pittsburgh kwong npr Bank of america npr Sebastian
Water and climate in the American Southwest

Climate Cast

1:01:58 hr | 2 years ago

Water and climate in the American Southwest

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing clean energy initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs Bank of America, NA, member FDIC. Chains is showing up in the water. I'm NPR teeth meteorologist ball Kutner? This is climate cast. One of the biggest measurable climate impacts is in the way, our water cycle is changing and in water, sensitive, Colorado. Water managers are already seeing those changes. Brad Udal is a senior climate researcher and scientist at Colorado state university. Brad how quickly are hydrology and water resources changing in Colorado. So since the year two thousand Colorado river, which is one of the main supplies in state is down by almost twenty percent. It's a historic drought. We have no analog for this. In records. Going back to nineteen o six this year. Twenty eighteen was probably the third worst year in the history of Colorado river flows. It was the warmest and dryest in major portions of our state. So the answer is it's changing very quickly and how much of that change is due to climate change. So last year Jonathan overpacked now at the university of Michigan, and I. Published a paper called the Colorado river hot drought and implications for the future. And in that peer reviewed paper, we suggest that about a third of this decline is due to higher temperatures. And we further went on to suggest that his temperatures warm. We could see perhaps a twenty percent flow loss in the Colorado river by twenty fifty and maybe a thirty five percent flow loss by twenty one hundred should precipitation. Stay the same. Brad. What kind of tools can we use to measure the impact of climate change on water resources in the west? So we use climate models. Of course. Right. You one can't experimentally not using a climate model. And then we use a whole another subset of models called hydrology model that takes climate model precipitation and temperatures and then convert set into run off. And then a further set of tools that maybe might not be classified as tools, but are super important are all data and observations that go into these models because without that data and those operations we can. Can't do anything scientifically. So as we see these flows. Diminish over time in Colorado. How much our water managers in Colorado tuned into the climate change impacts at work here. You know, I would say the major providers in the state are very much tuned to it. And they've been watching this for over the last fifteen years, I can remember in the early two thousands giving talks on how climate change would impact water resources to very dirty looks and within the last maybe five to eight years starting looks have turned into real interest. In fact, I heard recent manager in Utah for an entity that represents all the upper basin states in the Colorado river basin say if you don't believe in climate change right now is a water manager. You shouldn't be in the room part of the paper. You published got me curious that Colorado river basin flow has declined by sixteen point five percent since nineteen sixteen but that annual precipitation has. Actually increased slightly by a little over one percent. What explains the big drop inavailable water if precipitation has actually increased so that's a brand new paper that was released this year with that Meyer and his student moose shell. And it was a nice analog to the paper. I published last year with Jonathan over pack, and what that paper did was use a model to discover that unlike the previous paper the new paper suggests instead of a third of the decline in Colorado river flows is due to higher temperature. This new paper come up came up with another figure about half believe it or not. And so, you know as science proceeds, and and as we try and decipher what the error bars. Are we come up with different numbers? But I would tell you within the realm of a third to half as the cause of temperatures declining flows. That's one. One data point the other data point is what we have seen since nineteen sixteen is that precipitation in the car on river basin has shifted from the places where this precipitation is most efficient in terms of generating runoff, which is to say the high mountains of Colorado to desert's of Utah, which are far less efficient. So you can get the same amount of precipitation in the upper Colorado river basin, but if it falls in different places, you actually get very different results, and that shift in precipitation patterns is do or is responsible for the other half of flow loss that we found in this twenty eighteen modeling study Brad, I spent nine years in Tucson, Arizona. Reporting on weather, and we know the Colorado river water compacts were signed in a decade with the highest historical flows on the Colorado that past climate no longer exists. Can you kind of war game water in the south? Th west out for us. What does this apply look like based on your studies for cities in the south in about safe fifty years? So that is a really good question. And that's the question the base at right now is debating as it is looking at the first ever water shortage in the lower basin potentially in twenty twenty due to the these declining flows since the year two thousand in that period, the nation's two largest reservoirs likes Powell and meet have lost more than half of their supply, their total volume and that volume lost represents over a year's worth of flow in the system. We now see the writing on the wall where we're not gonna be able to meet all demands that we met in the twentieth century about eighty percent of the flow in the Colorado river, it goes to irrigated agriculture in places like Yuma and the imperial valley in Arizona, those are important places because they provide much of our winter vegetables. But in the long run as water supplies that Klein, you've got a bet that these cities are going to win the battle and that your gate agriculture is going to have to come up with some of the demand shedding that we're gonna have to do. So looking at fifty years, I would tell you the cities the economic powers the southwest are going to continue to get water supplies, although they're going to be smarter and more efficient in how they use it. And irrigated agriculture is going to have to deal with some reasonably serious declines in flows. When we talk about the concept of a rid affiliation. What is that? So a number of scientists recently. Have decided that the term drought is really a misnomer for what we're seeing drought implies a return to normality, and many of us don't think that we're going to return to a twentieth central normal here. And so we've come up with a new term called horrific -ation and a renovation which is a math full means that we're gonna see declining flows over time. We're going to see less soil moisture we're going to see the potential for even droughts last decades or many both decades called mega droughts. We're going to see a number of things that we haven't seen in the past. These things are not entirely predictable although somewhat predictable and we need a new term because drought implies predictability in price stability, it implies something that we no longer have in these water systems, and we be think differently about how to manage them. Brad. I'm told you wear a t shirt that says it's warming. It's us experts agree, it's bad, and we can fix it. Tell me about that. So that shirt comes from a number of folks hydrologist, I work with Mike Denton, you're actually made that t shirt, and I love it because you can put climate change on T shirt. Right. And I like to say that like all good scientific documents. It comes with footnotes footnotes around the back, and they tell you basically while those points are true part one. It's us. So warming is unequivocable around the colo-. It's everywhere right now. It's in the atmosphere. It's in our Lancer fus. It's melting glaciers and most importantly, it's an warming. Ocean temperatures, no one can dispute that the earth is warming in ways that are totally unusual and need to be explained part to. It's us. So for almost two hundred years. Scientists have been developing theory that greenhouse gases keep the planet warmer than it should be. And if you add greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, it's going to warm up. We now have proof of that and equally important, there's no credible. Alternative theory. That explains what we're seeing in science. You don't get to this theory and not come up with another explanation. So here we have both a theory that works and no credible alternative explanation. Part three it's serious. Well, we're talking about it right now climate change affects almost every aspect of human and natural societies. And I like to say climate change is water change climate changes water change is true because climate change, especially impacts, our water cycle point, four experts agree. So we now have many many studies. Cleaning these international studies by the intergovernmental panel on climate change five of them since one thousand nine hundred eighty eight we have multiple national climate assessments, the newest of which will come out and December. And we have almost every well, basically every academic body. Every trade group of scientists says that this is in fact, a problem and in point five, we can't fix it. So we have and know how to implement policy tools like carbon taxes or cap and trade to help move us in the right direction. And we have the technology like renewable energy at the right cost to help us fix it. But we're choosing not to do this. We don't have to be passive here. We can be active in solving this yet. We're not choosing to do. So Brad as we think about water, I'm curious. What's your message as to how much room we have on the conservation side of water is? Is that a positive opportunity? Absolutely. So our governor likes to stay that every conversation about water should start with conservation. And what we'd known that? In the past one hundred years is that we waste a lot of water. So there's a lot of opportunities to conserve water. And this has been especially true in cities in the American southwest in the last thirty years, or so many of these cities have doubled or even more in size and continue to use the same amount of water that they supplied in nineteen seventy conservation. The Ag feels a little tougher and there've been a number of opportunities that have been investigated your Colorado. We're looking at things called alternative transfer mechanisms so waste to keep adding production without taking all the water away from them can you switch crops, can you rotationally foul which is develop some fields in a year. When it's particularly dry. Can you pursue water efficiency measures? Can you do in fact deficit irrigation? So give crop less water than it would normally need. And it turns out in large parts of the Colorado river basin we go pasture grass and alfalfa and those two crops if you will or actually particularly amenable to deficit era Gatien you just stop. You're getting them at some point in the year. And they'll come back when you irrigate them again, Brad Udal senior climate researcher and scientist at Colorado state university. Thanks so much for your perspective today. Paul, my pleasure. You rent a great show there? My name is Tim Reese, and I worked for three rivers park district dance, the manager of gale woods farm, and gale winds is an educational farm that was donated by that family to the park district with the intent of teaching people about their food came from. I've been market gardening for over twenty years at both gale woods and other farms and have witnessed many changes in our growing season. For example, our first frost used to be considered reasonable around September fifteenth, but we haven't had a frost in September for thirteen years. And we have lots of new garden pests that we didn't use to have because the cold winters would kill them off. So one example is a a fruit fly that infects our raspberries before we can pick them. And so it's almost impossible to grow raspberries in Minnesota now. The high school in college students who come to gale woods to learn about in practice. Sustainable agriculture really are at the forefront of climate change both experiencing the impacts and shaping the future. I also see how in consumers who want to support farmers families want to reconnect with source of their food, and they want to support farmers who see culture is a solution to climate change. If climate change can be an issue that unites us all farmers and consumers in urban and across the political spectrum. We really do have hope for addressing this in solving it together because that's really the only way we'll make progress here. More storytellers on November seventeenth at gale woods farm. The event kicks off a series of community conversations about our changing climate. You can learn more at climate Jen dot org that's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul Hutton here.

Colorado river Brad Udal Colorado Colorado river basin thousand Colorado river Colorado state university NPR Jonathan overpacked Arizona river basin Utah Bank of America gale woods gale woods farm FDIC researcher ball Kutner scientist
537 - Are Probiotics Safe for Your Immune System?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

14:54 min | 1 year ago

537 - Are Probiotics Safe for Your Immune System?

"Hello there and welcome to the nutrition diva podcast. I'm your host monica ri- naval and today today we're talking about how probiotic bacteria affect your immune function and whether probiotic foods or supplements are safe for people with compromised immune function and then hungry girl lisa lillian is back with another kitchen hack that can help you get more vegetables into your day and also save some calories as along the way so stay tuned for that after today's main topic. Today's episode is supported by lara bar laras made with just a handful of real ingredients. It's like unsweetened fruits whole nuts spices and sometimes little delicious chocolate. There are over twenty flavors including cherry pie chocolate chip cookie dough and lemon bar so you can fight off hunger and satisfy your sweet tooth find lara bar nationwide at your local grocery store target walmart or on amazon amazon and explore all of their fun flavors at lara bar dot com lara bar. It's food made from food. Naureen recently emailed me to ask. Could you do it. Podcast on probiotic foods that one should avoid if one has a compromised immune system is commercial yogurt okay since it's pasteurized dryest and what about kombucha homemade sauerkraut pickles and hot sauces before i answer naureen's questions let's first just talk quickly about how probiotic okay attic food might affect the immune system will one of the immune systems jobs of course is to protect us from harmful bacteria and the beneficial organisms resumes that we refer to as probiotics contribute to this effort in a number of ways in the gut a robust population of beneficial bacteria can help crowd out harmful bacteria making it harder for them to thrive and in addition probiotic bacteria can influence the activity of our own immune cells regulating regulating inflammation barrier function and cell to cell signaling one way to foster that healthy intestinal bacteria is to eat more were of the foods that these bugs like to eat namely fiber increasing your intake of plant fibers from vegetables fruits leggings whole grains nuts nuts and seeds is kind of like filling a bird feeder with the kind of seeds that the beautiful songbirds that you want to attract like best if you feed them they will come and if we want to attract a lot of different types of songbirds i mean bacteria then we want to put out a variety of foods that means you don't want to just get your fiber from a single source like a fiber supplement. You wanna get fiber from lots of different kinds of vegetables fruits leggings grains nuts and seeds now another way to nurture healthy gut is to consume foods that contain those beneficial bacteria and that includes things like yogurt kefir fear and other culture dairy products kimchi sauerkraut and other fermented vegetables musso tempe nacho and other commented soy products addicts and kabukicho which is sort of fermented tea and you'll find episode all of those foods in the nutrition of archives no to be honest. It's not entirely clear how many of those bacteria actually survived their trip through the digestive tract and set up permanent housekeeping in the gut but even if they are just passing through they appear to be the ideal type of house guest the kind that leaves the place a bit better than they found it now. There's a third way to introduce beneficial bacteria to the gut and that is through a probiotic supplement but this is probably my least favorite option aside from persistent concerns about whether though supplements contain what they're supposed to contain and don't contain anything that they're not supposed to contain most supplements provide a relatively narrow selection of specific bacteria and the thing to understand is that the different strains of of beneficial bacteria have very different effects in the body one might tend to help prevent diarrhoea another might help prevent constipation russian another might have benefits for your skin or another might help reduce certain respiratory infections and frankly some of them really haven't been shown to have specific benefits at all but if a certain strain of bacteria has been shown to have a certain positive effect. That's really the only benefit benefit that you can reasonably expect from it. So if you're after a certain benefit you need to carefully match your supplement to the research that shows that benefit if on the other hand. You're just looking for overall gut health. I still think you're better off eating more prebiotic that is fiber rich foods and enjoying join a variety of cultured and fermented foods now before it turned to naureen's questions about whether probiotic foods and supplements are safe for people with low immune and function. Let me pause to thank this week sponsors. Today's episode is supported by open fit if you need some fits ration- open-pit makes getting it easier than it's ever been. This is a brand new super simple streaming service that allows you to work out from home in as little as ten minutes a day from any device and it's great for all fitness levels also affordable and accessible. I love their six hundred second series. The ten minute workouts that pack the benefits of much longer intercessions into a fraction of the time to get started on fitness journey personalized just for you just text my code diva to the number thirty thirty thirty right now. During the open pit thirty day challenge my listeners get a special extended thirty day free trial membership so just text the word diva to the number number thirty thirty thirty and you'll get full access to all of open fits workouts for free. That's the code diva to thirty thirty thirty standard message and data rates may apply. Why are you dreaming of beach vacation. This summer will start planning your escape to panama city beach florida imagine spending your days doing the things things you love all in a setting of sugar white beaches and turquoise waters discover endless family fun heart pounding thrills eco adventure and romance make it memorable memorable you can get up close to dolphins in their natural habitat on a boat tour or go paddle boarding naked exhilarating find your thrills flying on a jet ski a kayaking at sunset or snorkeling in turquoise waters. It's everything an adrenaline junkie lives for make it incredible mike along the beach taken air boat tour or explore the secluded beauty of two state parks and make it special with a romantic getaway relax and reconnect with dining on the beach breathtaking sunsets and enough live music to dance the night away so make it yours make it panama city beach your real fun beach plan your escape now at visit panama city leap beach dot com and now let's talk about the safety of probiotics for various populations although their benefits may be limited did probiotic supplements are generally safe for healthy people occasionally a probiotic supplement might produce side effects such as gas or diarrhea or or in rare cases skin itching or rashes. These are generally not serious and they are reversed when you stop taking the supplement but there are some situations where beneficial bacteria either from foods or supplements can pose a threat to the host. That's us acute illnesses. Such as pancreatitis increase titus or a flare up of crohn's colitis or ceac disease can lead to increased intestinal permeability as we've discussed in the podcast recently. This doesn't mean that bacteria or toxins leak out of the got into the bloodstream but it may mean that bacteria including probiotic bacteria penetrate the lining of the gut far enough to kick up a big inflammatory reaction from the immune cells that are standing century there and if your gut is already inflamed. That's the last thing you need. People with compromised immunity either from severe illness or sometimes due to medical treatment for a disease are also frequently advised to avoid probiotic foods and supplements studies have found that using probiotics and severely ill oh or immuno compromised individuals can increase the risk of adverse side effects including infections and now we're finally ready to tackle naureen's questions. She asked which foods you might need to avoid if you have a compromised immune system in particular. She wondered whether commercial yogurt would be okay since it says on the label that it's pasteurized now this is a common misunderstanding pasteurization which kills all bacteria would also kill kill beneficial bacteria and that's why the milk that's used in commercial yogurt is pasteurized before the bacteria are added to make the yogurt. Oh gert so commercial yogurt does contain live bacteria as does kefir kombucha and any other probiotic food that indicates that it contains live and active cultures as to whether these are safe to eat. It's really hard to make a blanket statement about quote unquote people with compromised immune munin systems as this can encompass it a wide range of situations it would really depend on the degree of immune suppression and the nature of the illness order the treatment or therapy. The national institutes of health says that the people who are most risk of severe side effects include critically. Ill patients those who have had surgery very sick infants and people with weakened immune systems. The situation with probiotic supplements as opposed to foods is even a little little more complex patients receiving certain kinds of cancer therapies for example often suffer from diarrhea and that's one of the conditions that often responds well to specific probiotic supplements however researchers at m._d. Anderson cancer center in houston recently reported that in a small group of patients receiving immunotherapy a specific type of cancer treatment those who were taking probiotic supplements were less likely to respond to the treatment so if if you are receiving cancer treatment be sure to discuss your use of probiotics or really any supplements at all with your healthcare team noreen also asked about the homemade sauerkraut and other fermented foods and indeed there's been a veritable explosion of home from tation in recent years and given the the fact that the yeast and some of these fermented foods gives off carbon dioxide there have been more than a few literal explosions as well home for meditation can be a fun way to introduce introduce more probiotic foods into your diet but whether you're brewing your own kabukicho or from entering your own pickles or culturing your own yogurt. It's a lot lot harder to control exactly which bacteria you're cultivating home-produced products are likely to contain a much wider variety of strains than a commercial product and some of those will be beneficial some may simply add flavor and that can be either good or bad but there is also so a risk of incubating a pathogenic bacteria or two along with those good guys in a healthy person that might lead to an uncomfortable night in the john <music> but for someone with a compromised immune system it could be more dangerous so even if your doctor gives the okay to consume commercial yogurt it might be best to to steer clear of those homemade products if you're not in good health and even if you are in excellent health home for mentors are well advised to be very scrupulous fearless about sanitation and safe food handling thanks to narine for her question. If you have a topic or a question that you think would make a good topic for podcast episode. You can call the nutrition diva listener line and leave me a message. The phone number is four four three nine six one six two zero six six. I'd love to hear from you and now hungry. Girl is here to share another of her kitchen hacks but before we turn it over to lisa. I'll let you know that you'll find a complete transcript up today's discussion of probiotic foods and supplements along with links to some of the research that i mentioned and several related podcasts that's all on our website at nutrition and diva dot quick and dirty tips dot com and if you'd like to find out more about my nutrition coaching programs in groups head on over to nutrition over easy dot com where you can sign up to get updates invitations and special offers and now let's hear what hungry girl lisa lillian has cooked for us today. Take it away lisa. Hey nutrition nutrition diva listeners. Have you fallen in love with cauliflower yet. It is so great it's such a fun delicious low calorie substitute for starchy carbs things like potatoes and of course rice now cauliflower rice only has twenty five calories a cup. That's a fraction of the calories and regularize so it's it's really easy to write your own cauliflower to the biggest mistake that people make is to start with pieces of cauliflower that are too big so chop your cauliflower nicely and added to the blender under and then pulse it until you have rice size pieces. It's easy now. You may need to stop and stir occasionally in order to finish the job but it really is very simple and end. If you're feeling super lazy you can just pick up small ready rice cauliflower at your local market. It'll be in the freezer section or the produce section so you can get it fresh or frozen frozen and once you have your cauliflower rice you probably want to know what to do with it right so check out my website hungry dash girl dot com and my new book hungry girl simply six there are so many cauliflower rice recipes in there be sure to check out lisa's podcast choose the right thing where i also stop by occasionally to answer nutrition questions from lisa the and her crew. That's true the right thing. Wherever you get your podcasts our show is written and researched by me. Monica reindel edited by karen hertzberg produced benny than and sam's and our team at macmillan audio also includes michelle margulis morgan ratner emily miller and mikaela prowl. Thanks so much for listening. I'll be back next week back to talk about what to look for in a protein bar. Subscribe to the nutrition diva podcast so that your sure not to miss that one have a great week.

lisa lillian Naureen diarrhea walmart amazon panama city macmillan audio panama city leap mike Anderson cancer center Monica reindel narine michelle margulis noreen tation houston
The Conspiracy Farm Ep. 86 Randall Carlson

The Conspiracy Farm

1:03:22 hr | 2 years ago

The Conspiracy Farm Ep. 86 Randall Carlson

"Ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to the conspiracy far where we don't start to conspiracies. We just had the lauter in. Now, your hopes of the most state of the yard multi in four five cast on the inter-web. I present to you. That. Free will sit ladies and gentlemen. What is up, ladies and gentlemen, greetings inside you -tations for another episode for the archives of the conspiracy farm Jeffrey Wilson rolling shot down as always with you have see hall of Famer eater of worlds master of the Tango lover of ice cream that militant what's up jam? I can only do left Cartwheel's though. Can go to the right. I can only go to the left on the master of everything. But today man, I'm really stoked because this guy is literally been our most viewed episode. He's just I listened to him for hours. Everybody's probably heard him in Graham handcock for hours on the Joe Rogan experience. He's an architect. Geological theorist anthropological theorist master-builder architectural designer teacher. Attrition. Geel mythologised geological explore in renegade scholar. I love Mr. Randall Carlson joining us once again, what's up Randall? Randall Jeff stock do you can hear him. Hey, not your. Yeah. You disappeared for a moment there. Oh, well, how are we doing buddy? I'm doing great. But. You sound like here in the bottom of the will over the very well Darren for help. Darren for help getting you back on check those guys out at grime, merica dot CA. If you want to check out their volumes and volumes of very, very interesting and thought-provoking podcast. And you guys haven't event coming up. Don't you guys? You want to shout out there Randall? Yeah, I do. Yeah. It's in may may seventeenth or going to be sort of gathering. The America boys have rented a lodge there in southern Colorado just north of pagosa springs, and we're going to get together and do some good eating and some exploring, and we'll have some lectures and multimedia shows and who knows what? So it's going to be from the seventeenth. There's going to be. I think the way they've set it up is there's going to be three I guess, they're calling them trimesters where you come in for three days and. And we're going to do three of them back to back. So the best bet would be to go to the grind Erica website. Where they've got the details. Sounds like a great time in love to love to check that out. Yeah. If you ever spent any time in southern Colorado and the Durango area or northern New Mexico round Towse. I've never been there. I've been all over the country, but I've never been there at a wonderful place. It is so we're going to be exploring Jimmy kind of a combination of archaeology and geology in our field trips. We're going to be learning about the chock. Oh, and culture that occupied the San Juan basin of New Mexico and then extended up into southern Colorado and into Utah. And it's one of those mysterious lost cultures. That did a lot of built a lot of really cool infrastructure. That's still out there in the desert's. You know, it's f- archea astronomy is the term because this is the science that looks at how these ancient peoples were building their sacred centers. They're urban centers their temples and their complexes, according to the after an article patterns into sky. So that's a big part of. We'll be doing is learning about that. And then exploring some of that. And then we'll be looking at some of the regional geology that has evidence for some major transitional events in earth history. Some of them quite recent as a matter of fact, so will be kind of a it'd be kind of an eclectic mix, but mostly focused on the archaeology and the geology of the area by any of that as far as those structures, go go Randall, I was wondering have mathematicians been put onto these locations to to measure them and figure out exactly you know, how how how precisely they built these buildings to match the astronaut Michael the heavens above. Yes. Yes. You know, mostly it's been a strong numbers. You know, archea astronomy is being ten of a subset of the whole. It's an interdisciplinary approach where you you're looking at the archaeology, you're looking at the infrastructure and two buildings the roadways. The the causeways plazas and all of this. And what it requires is kind of an overlap between understanding geometry architecture and distraught me, so it's you know, it's a field that didn't exist, you know, in the fifties and sixties other than totally out on the fringes. But in the last two or three decades, it's kind of coming to its own. So once it became, you know, that I it became accepted that yeah. These people were doing that these people were obsessively interested in the sky, and for whatever motive, whatever was motivating them. They attempted to duplicate the patterns of the sky down here below it's kind of the Al chemical dictum as above so below it in the literal, most literal sense, and what time period was were these structures builder. This society built they do they have they figure that it's I'm guessing, well, it's probably more than a gas. But based upon the evidence I've seen it probably began about a thousand BC and came in several waves and the final wave which perhaps eight hundred years ago that recent up to that recent okay. Up up to that recent assuming that the dating is is correct. And at this point, I don't have any reason to to doubt, the dating it appears like some of the sites were occupied then abandoned then occupied again and somewhere around seven eight hundred years ago. Apparently there was a very severe drought in the south western US area. And this might have been the death knell for the Choctaw and culture. So they just simply simply moved out of the area. Or did they die off or oh, that's part of the mystery. I'm I'm gonna lean towards they moved out of the area. But there was probably starvation as well because when the rains disappeared the crops failed, and you know, when the crops fail you don't eat. And then the next thing that happens is famine. So and then once people get week from not having eaten their immune systems, get compromised, and then that's when pestilence and disease comes in. You can see that quite frequently throughout history where there have been periods of famine, and that's been followed by you know, the plaque the black Pat plag- the just Indian plague all of those came in the wake of periods where people didn't have food and mostly that was brought about by cold, you know, the little ice age caused were net came on and nearly thirteen hundreds it caused crop failures all over Europe. Into thirteen forties. And then as a result of that, you know, the great cause Europe had been quite prosperous for three or four centuries during the medieval warm period, and it was during this time when they had an abundance of food, and they could organize these armies of craftsman to build these magnificent cathedrals that they built all over Europe. But when the climate shifted nearly thirteen hundred there was a whole series of crop failures that led to famine, and then you had the bubonic plague that wiped out in some places as much as half the population in some places. Almost the entire population. And so suddenly there was no workforce, you know, and people were thrown back, you know, into the survival mode. So that was the end of, you know, the gothic building enterprise that had gone on for almost two hundred years to destroy society that way, and you know, how quickly did the ice ages. Come on at that time in the early thirteenth hundreds. Oh, pretty quick within about a decade or two at the most. I think there was a it was a cold spell. I think it was in the year thirteen hundred and fourteen and then you know, it didn't come on all at once. What happened was you sort of saw this progressive deterioration of the climate over a period of several decades. 'cause there was would have been some some extremely cold winters, then some chilly. Wet damp summers. Then some warmth came back again. And then it succumbed to the cold. So then you had about a century of what I call the first wave of the little ice age. And this is when glaciers begin to grow again. And by the sixteen hundreds and seventeen hundreds the glacier had grown like if pro most of the world to a larger extent than they had been in over ten thousand years since the end of the great ice age. And so a lot of in Europe, particularly. A lot of farms were destroyed as the glaciers increased in size. The and they came down out of the mountain valleys into the into the what they've called the inter Montaigne or inter mountain valleys where the farms were and wiped out the farms. That's incredible. Now, we hear scientists talking about a current ice age that's potentially coming. Now. What what how much truth is behind that what's going on with the climate change? And all the other talk that we've we've heard about for decades, not we don't want to be controversial necessarily about this. But what you know, you're running in circles of people who are very intelligent who are very educated about this stuff. What's what's actually going on? Do you? Do you believe? Well, you know for about three years now we have been in a what's called the solar minimum in a solar minimum is definitely correlated with climate change. And without you know, getting into the controversial stuff. I guess, you know, there's there's a great deal of evidence out there correlating climate change was solar change solar variability, and it's regrettable that that tends to be downplayed or Nord in most of the you know scenarios that are coming out of the IPCC. C which basically was an organization it was founded to make the case that humans are the dominant cause of climate change. So given that I mean, anybody who doubts that can actually read that in the industry Carter of the organization, it stated right there. So reading that you realize okay, they're not going to be looking at the sun. They're not going to be looking at changes. Did you make Natick field or not going to be looking at it changes in the amount of cosmic dust created to the earth? They're not going to be looking at Vulcan ISM. They're not gonna really be looking at changes in atmosphere can oceanic circulation as much as they're going to be looking at carbon dioxide because of the fact that carbon dioxide is directly a function of you know, modern civilization, right? Well, that's well. You can't you can't tax the sun. You can't charge extra extra money per gallon of gasoline either. Yeah. I actually right. That is exactly. Right. And you know, I don't know if you remember this, but you know in the seventies. The concern was about an. Nice age not global warming. The concern was about global cooling, and the reason for that is because you see nor whole models of like climate change, particularly with reference to the glacial and interglacial ages that were you know, had been well established by the by the late eighteen hundreds. But the timeframes were always considered to be extremely long. You know? In other words, we might have a hundred or hundred and fifty thousand years to get into an ice age and just as long to get out of an ice age. Right. Right. So what changed that was in one nineteen? Fifties was the development of radiocarbon dating as a method of dating organic material that's less than say forty or fifty thousand years old, and what had happened was that the the the method of radiocarbon dating was developed nearly fifties. But it took a decade or two to to build up a. Database of dates where one could look and go. Okay. So we were assuming that the great ice sheets over North America were pretty much intact consistently for maybe a hundred thousand years or longer problem was is that they'd be into do radiocarbon dating and discovered that well right in the middle of where the big ice sheet was where it might have been a mile and a half thick there were forest growing and those forests were growing their thirty five forty thousand years ago. So clearly if there were forest growing there there couldn't have been a mile thick ice sheet. So the question becomes as well, what was the extent of the ice sheet during this this period? And and it must have shrunk considerably from its its most massive extent. So what? And then the other thing was is that realizing that most of the ice was still there at fourteen or fifteen thousand years ago and the assumption was. Up to this time is that the ice disappeared because there were changes in earth's orbital geometry and the connection with the son right so earth, you know, sometimes there's a little farther away from the sun. Sometimes it's a little closer. You know, the earth is tilted sometimes the northern hemisphere is tilted more towards the son sometimes the southern hemisphere is and of course, the northern hemisphere is mostly land in the southern hemisphere is mostly ocean. So you have the potential of of of this great ice accumulation in the northern hemisphere more so than the southern hemisphere. But in any case, these these forces of geometric change between the earth and the sun are called Milankovitch forces or Milankovitch cycles after Milutin Milankovitch who was a mathematician. I think he was Serbian that did the calculations. But within that model? It's a long gradual process to get. Out of an ice age problem is now is we know that it was not even remotely close to a long gradual process. It was a it was a episode process. There was talking to strike a strike from a something that came out of the heavens so to speak. Well, you know, what I would consider that to be one of the prime contenders for explaining the what we now know is that you see when we for example, when the ice melts, obviously that ISIS melting, and it's going back into the oceans as as it goes into the oceans, the oceans level rise is so it's the opposite process when the ice is growing ocean levels are shrinking so at the at the late glacial maximum as it's called which was sixteen to twenty thousand years ago sea levels were as much as four hundred feet lower than they are now. Wow. So but so the assumption. The earlier something was is that there was a relatively smooth process. The ice melted. Away and sea levels came up in a very gradual very uniform manner. But that's not how it happened. The sea levels came up in pulses of huge pulses of Meltwater introduce suddenly into the ocean, for example, Meltwater pulse. One as it's called is now dated around fourteen thousand six hundred years ago, and there was another great pulse of Meltwater dated to eleven thousand six hundred years ago. And there's evidence that there may be a third pulse around twelve thousand eight hundred years ago, which corresponds to the onset of the younger dryest. So what it appears is that there had to been sudden energy inputs into the system because it takes energy to melt ice, right? So. We're talking about an ice mass over North America that was bigger than the one. That's now over the south pole Antarctica. Now, if you if you were going to try to come up with a scenario. Hey, let's let's melt all the ice in Antarctica. And if you years, how would you do it? Well, the problem with that is is that there's not enough energy available to accomplish that in in a few thousand years because it requires a significant input of heat to to accomplish that melting. So what was the source of that heat? That's the mystery. Now, Robert Schalk believes it was the sun. And I and I tend to agree with them. But I also believe that we were dealing with some what the what you just brought up with some impacts of objects from space, which certainly could introduce an enormous amount of energy into the system and. Extreme melting and the argument about you know, they've they still are searching for major craters. I mean, they've found some obviously. But the the fact that there was a couple miles of ice over the top of everything and a crater being formed wouldn't necessarily happen as easily. I guess if that were the case, right? That's exactly right because the crater I mean, the ice is going to absorb a lot of the energy of the impact. Now, of course, there's so many variables there, it's a complex thing to think about, but you know, you're talking about obviously, first and foremost would be of the impact or the second thing would be the velocity of the impact or the third thing would be the density of the impact or in its composition. The fourth thing would be the angle of approach all of these things are going to affect what happens in terms of the post immediate post impact phenomena and the resultant cratering effect. So if you had a mile. L and a half or more of ice. And the object was say only half a mile or less than diameter. You're probably not going to have a typical crater bowl like crater form under the ice. If it's a little bigger. So then it can penetrate the ice it most likely will blast a crater out. But the problem is is now in the process of that impact, you generated enough heat to melt an enormous amount of ice sentiment sentiment and everything else flows back in probably flows back, and that's exactly right, and in effect to Dr very few analogues for impacts into ice sheet of the things I have looked at primarily to try to get an understanding would be an impact into the ocean, right. Which is very distinct from an impacting the lamp now an in the ocean, dude, aloft, huge amounts of water, vapor into the atmosphere, and that water vapor water, vapor is a greenhouse gas. So it's going to form a canopy that causes temporary. Short. Live runaway global warming until until the water vapor precipitates out an impact onto land is going to loft enormous amounts of dust into the atmosphere, and it's also going to trigger a lots of wildfires. As a secondary effect in those wildfires will put more soot and carbon into the atmosphere that will increase the opacity of the atmosphere reflecting a lot more son back into space and therefore caused global cooling. So there are those two different effects. Now what happens though, if you have a multiple impact event, and you have impact into Oche both ocean and land. Well, now, you're gonna get such a complex set of of offense that it's going to be difficult to to sort them out. But that I think is the challenge in front of us because the evidence is there that there was some kind of an impact from something from space, the radium is there, the platinum is there. Manno diamonds, the the micro Speros. The magnetic grains, all of these things taken together really point pretty much directly to an impact of some kind right now in Australia. There's if correct me if I'm wrong, but is there a debris field of meteoric of meteor material where there is not necessarily a crater. Yes. In fact. Which was hitting the mass of layer of ice. Right. Yeah. Now, that's probably from low density objects entering the atmosphere and exploding in. Okay. Okay. See which is which is essentially what happened in nineteen. Oh, eight with the tin goose go cosmic event over Siberia, which you're probably familiar with. Right. That's the big the big explosion near that level. Trees for hundreds of miles. Yeah. Yeah. Level trees over eight hundred and some square miles incinerated about one hundred one hundred fifty square miles right under the epicenter of the blast. That just turned it into nothing. How far above the earth? Did it detonate about five miles eight comet or so roughly so yeah. And that was based on the size and density of the object was probably I think the prime candidate for its identity was a member of the torrid meteor stream. Which the earth crosses twice each year once right around Halloween and once in and again in late June early, July, you know, it's a stream of meteoroid debris that is circling. I it it is handed off between Jupiter and the sun. So it's a big elliptical orbit that takes it out to Jupiter and then back in where goes around the sun. So it earth crosses that stream as it's coming in towards the sun in late October early November. Okay. It crosses the stream again when it's coming from around the sun in late June early July. So now the from from the detailed analysis of the eyewitness accounts, the astronomers and others who have been looking at this able to determine the point in the sky from which the object actually emanated and one of the things that was repeatedly said by people with things like. Well, it looked like it was shot out of the sun. It looked like it was born from the sun things like that. Which you know, puts it coming into the atmosphere from the direction of the sun, and it was early in the morning about maybe seven seven thirty on June thirtieth by the Gregorian calendar that that thing came in and exploded. But you know, it came in essentially without warning. They couldn't see it again because it was coming from the direction of the sun, which exactly where a torrid meteor would be coming from. So this is amazing though that so if it was if it was born of the sun, it would be a solar flare of epic proportions. Then if it was born, but see what what I think that was the allusion it because it came from came directly from that direction. Okay. I'm saying. Yeah. So if you were looking into sky where the thing was. Coming from. It was coming from the direction of the sun. All right. This is why we don't see toward meteors, really. We don't see the summertime tour. It's because of that fact that in order to see him you have to look directly towards the sun, essentially, whereas the fall time Torridge, you're looking out towards the constellation of Taurus the bull. That's why they're called the torrents. And so if to see the torrents, you know, go out and late October early November. And and and actually the radiant point which is the point at which meteor stream appears to emanate from space, which is an luge in because it's not really coming from. Taurus, right. It's just that we look into direction of Taurus to see those meteors coming back in from from out in the Jupiter's orbit. Right. But the the radiant point, which is like the bullseye. Imagine this that you're that you're walking you walk down railroad tracks. As a kid, right? And you remember how the parallel tracks converged to a point in the distance? Yes, sir. Now picture instead of two dimensional railroad tracks you've got like a tunnel. And and that's the best way to visualize. A meteor stream is that you've got this stream of debris. It's coming in a tunnel. And so if you're looking up the tunnel if it's going to give the the allusion of perspective, it's gonna it's gonna look like everything is converging on a point. It's not really because these these objects are all flying in parallel past. They're all orbiting also, correct? Or are they? Yes, in the thing is though the orbit is big enough that by the time, it intersects, the earth's orbit for all practical purposes, those pieces are flying in parallel lines. Okay. See? Yeah. I know if you've ever had a calculus course at any time in your life. But the idea of hit a lot since then though. That's true. I guess so so all that calculus stuff kinda got left there in the ring two plus two now, buddy. Okay. Hey, that's better than some people. Right. Right. So let let me ask you. I mean, if we were to have one of these events now with seven eight billion people on this planet one that caused massive flooding. I mean, what are we looking at as as far as cost to human lives or just human existence? Well, it depends on the magnitude of the event now. Sure, but one that say one that's happened before. So I for instance, let's start with the tin goose command event the energy released was about a quivalent to a fifteen megaton hydrogen bomb. Now, a fifteen megaton hydrogen bomb is generally considered to be a city BUSTER, it it could one hydrogen bomb of fifteen megatons could wipe out any urban area on earth has gone. Elliott has gone. Yes. LA is gone. So fifteen megatons is fifteen million tons of TNT equivalent, right? So the hero Shema object was ten thousand tons. So a fifteen hundred megaton bomb had Houston bomb would be the equivalent of one thousand five hundred here Shema sized atomic bombs. So that's pretty damn devastating. Now when we're talking about a ten Guca object. We're looking at an object. It's estimated to be somewhere between one hundred and two hundred feet in diameter tiny in the in the really in the spectrum of things. Yes. In the cosmic spectrum. It's it's a piece of cosmic dust. Basically. Now, if you get up to something much much bigger than that, say six miles in diameter, which is the estimated diameter of the dinosaur killing asteroid. We would be lucky to survive as a species. Right. We probably could if we had enough lead time, especially if we had like a lunar base that we could relocate to for a few years on her base while. Yeah, that's my. That's mind-blowing. Yeah. But that's not likely. What's more likely is something along the the scale of ten goosey object? But that in itself would be pretty dramatic event. Because we're talking about imagine. Oh, I mean like Hurricane Katrina hitting New Orleans that was that was a big deal. Right. But now take that multiply that times. Ten say raised by an order of magnitude. That's kind of the scale we'd be looking at with a ten goose ca scale event, if if it happened over a fairly densely populated part of the earth like the eastern seaboard. Europe or any place like that or f-? So are you still there? Oh, yeah. I'm here. I was just looking at all in weird noises came across just then anyways. So you would have but see here, here's the here's where it gets interesting. And kind of scary. There's a number of astronomers and Astra fist and stuff who are studying the various kinds of impacts and encounters that the earth can have and one of the things that they concluded was there may be episodes where there are multiple ten gluco events and not just a single object coming in, but perhaps dozens or maybe even hundreds which is certainly believable considering all the debris out there. Yes. And here and here, here's the thing. You have a few dozen those that's going to be a may. Major game changer. You have a few hundred of them that you're talking about something. And it's going to be on the scale of an all out thermonuclear war in terms of its devastation. It's an extinction level of that at that point. I it's well, it may not I wouldn't call it extinction. Locally. Yes. It would certainly cause extinction of species locally. It would definitely cause the extinction of civilisation not necessarily extinction of the human species. But essentially, we would find ourselves living back a stone-age existence starting all over again. No, no, more I pads for junior. No, no, more I pads for junior. No, well, I I'd like to shift gear with the a little bit. Because I mean, I'd love to stay on this path. But there's so much stuff that you know, that I wanna hit on I want to talk a little bit about. And I'm this is me trying to give you props when you were on Rogan show with with Graham handcock, and Michael Shurmur Graham, handcock, obviously, and you, you know, your beliefs coincide, your your research coincides for the most part, obviously, but Shurmur is a mainstream guy that just it seemed like. He was very uncomfortable. During that show. He was trying to stick up for for mainstream the old school. You know, what we learned in elementary junior high and high school and college the old the old books the old ways of thinking and a lot of old science, and and he and Graham Hancock had pretty pretty heated. I don't think they liked each other a whole lot. Let's put it that way. And you seem to be the one you didn't talk that much. But when you did you set a lot and you brought it you circled it all back in and made it understandable for the layman to to really be able to decipher a lot of this and Rogan was on your side quite a bit. Also. Yeah. I think you know, he she saw what was going on. And and you know, Shurmur listen Shurmur plays a role in its a valuable role there needs to be skeptics on all levels. But basically Michael Shurmur his job. He's a gatekeeper. So his job is to undermine anything. That would question the prevailing paradigm. You see? So so that's what he's doing. And you know, I came away from it with the conviction that yeah, he didn't know what he was talking about. And came he came on prepared. I, you know, afterwards, we hung out a bit, you know, and it was very congenial. There was no, you know, Graham, and and and Michael Shurmur were got on fame asleep for about an hour while we hung out. And then we parted company and said, hey, we should do this again. But I don't think Michael really wants to. And you know, the thing was is I tell you. That I went there prepared unleash the big guns. And I never really did. I was sitting there with, you know, hundreds of slides ready to jump in there. And you know, and I don't think you need it to. I think just just the little bits that you needed to insert yourself in the conversation was more than enough more than ample to really take his legs out from underneath him on on a lot of the stuff that he was trying to say. Yeah. And I think you know, again, I listen to me. It's like I'm skeptical. I'm skeptical of a lot of things that I hear. And I think there's a lot of nonsense out there. And you know, I I try to dot my is and cross my TS and do my homework. So that I'm not coming in and just coming with something half baked, but if something that I've actually thought about and done to research and done the background on it. So I can actually speak knowledgeably site the resources, you know, no, the references. Oh, who's doing to work and what it is? And no in and I try to look at both sides of it too. You know, so like in terms of the younger driest impact ideas, I've gone through not only the proponents, but the the opponents of the idea line by line, you know, to try to see what are the the criticisms of this and the the critics of the theory do have some legitimate arguments. Right. But when it comes down to it. They don't have an alternate explanation. They've got some legitimate criticisms that of the of the impact scenario at the end of the last ice age. But then they don't have an explanation for how you could trigger such an extreme change in the global environment. Over such a short period of time that criticize certain politics don't offer up a solution. It's the same mentality just people complaining, basically, and and so. You know, when we I this is something that's been really sticking with me a lot because of all the kind of changing gears a little bit as far as ancient civilizations. A lot of the pyramids globally that have been found all over our are being discovered constantly in the jungles down in South America. And I wanted to ask you what your thoughts are on term in terms of the burial grounds. The Indian mounds here in say the midwest in the United States, just for instance, are those are those pyramid structures are those are those structures that are similar to what, you know, have been found in the ancient Mayan civilizations things like that. Or they I mean is are they similar are. They the same thing. Very similar. Okay. Lot of the differences. You know, of course, has to do with what's available to build with in. You know in the Mississippi and Ohio valleys, you had earth and timber in Central America, you had limestone primarily, right? So, but when you look at the. General form of the structures. Very similar because you have truncated pyramids in both places. The difference being that say in Mesoamerica, the pyramids, the flattop here mids are built of stone. Whereas in North America, they're built a birth. But in in the North American pyramids that they all held wouldn't timber framed structures on top of were undoubtedly temples that are forced because they were timber there. Now, gone, okay? But in some of the some of them, if you're look here for you can see that depressions in the ground that were where the post hole where the holes were that held the post. Who were the builders of these? I mean, we're I mean, we're how far back to these date the oldest ones, and and who were the builders of them. Well, the oldest one's and now Graham is getting into this in his new book that's going to be coming out in April. The oldest ones are, you know, five thousand years old there are there are earth monumental earthworks structures in Louisiana that are actually older than five thousand years poverty point Watson, break are two. Let's see what poverty point I think has been dated at forty seven hundred years and watch and break has been dated a round maybe fifty five hundred years. So and you know, basically, what you see is when you start looking at these structures, and whether it's South America, and in in Graham's book, it's into great detail about the earth work architecture in the Amazon basin. And the interesting thing there is is that that stuff in the. Vast extent of this infrastructure has been hidden by the rainforests for centuries, and with all the clearcutting that's been going on which you know, is is not a good thing. Because of course, it's releasing huge amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. But what it's doing though, it's exposing the land below and there's this gigantic extensive infrastructure of monumental earthworks architecture, and it's for all practical purposes, it's almost identical to what we find in the Ohio and Mississippi River, valleys and type. And what type I mean, what type of numbers are we talking in terms of population of these of these cities, oh tens of thousands of people. So the whole population had been at least several million. That's incredible it isn't credible. And and and I would highly recommend, you know, when it comes out in April two to get Graham's book and read it because it's it's it's gonna be a paradigm change. I'm I'm about two thirds of it right now, I'm doing a review for him. He sent me a pre publication copy. And I've been like I said about two thirds of the way through it. And it's yeah, it's it's gonna it's gonna change in terms of the argument. You know, he addresses a lot of things people brought up the critics that don't like the idea that history may be a lot more complicated than the standard textbook versions. The information that we got that we grew up reading, you know, all the history books and everything else was this by designer was this just simply by accident of just people just didn't know, they didn't have the technology. We hadn't found the pyramids. All this all this other stuff. That's you know, that I could theorize on. But what do you think really is is the cause of of the misinformation we were fed? I mean Klein towards the second I would be less inclined to think that it was conspiracy in the old days. I just think it was part of the model, you know, sort of Judeo Christian model of of earth change, and then how that how that transition into sort of the modern concepts of of global change and prehistory, you know, for one thing there was an objection. You know, there was sort of a what we say type of AB cultural chauvinism going on not to give credit to various indigenous peoples around the planet that may have. Had a much more sophisticated understanding of of strana me and geometry and mathematics and engineering than they've been given credit for. But it certainly does seem now like there is sort of a conspiratorial element to it. Because what seems to be emerging out of the, you know, the evidence of history and prehistory is that. Yeah, there probably been multiple civilizations. That have arisen and become lost in the vagaries of time and have left almost no trace, you know, because the human presence on earth keeps getting pushed further and further back. I mean, we're finding now evidence of modern humans going back two hundred fifty to two hundred thousand years, that's the and that's the thing that is blowing everybody's minds and a lot of the people that are protecting. You know, the the old textbook way of thinking are freaking out about that. Well, yeah. And they don't because it's gonna require basically. Here's what we're looking at the the models of of historical, change and geological change and so forth. Have heavy fall over one hundred two hundred and fifty years, right? Most of the twentieth century was the the development of the academic models of prehistory. The ideas of long slow gradual change, you have the uniform a- -tarian concept in geology, which is one grain of sand. One drop of water at a time. If you've got millions and millions of years that's gonna -ccomplish, you know, and be able to shape the world into what we see today, and alongside of that came Darwinian evolution which is kind of the the biological counterpart to uniform geological uniformity which says, you know, that species of all one small incremental change at a time over long periods of time. These changes accumulate and eventually once. She's becomes a new species. But you know, we're still back to the problem that you know, when we look at species, we're looking at the end members of continuum, but where the hell is the continuum? You see where is it? But then and this is why in the early eighties. It was such resistance to the idea that the dinosaurs were exterminated by an asteroid impact. Because suddenly you've got a mass extinction event. You've got a mass mortality events that wipes out a majority of the species existence at the time. Right. And then that's followed by a hiatus the fossil record where there is a an extreme impoverishment of of diversity in the species. And then suddenly. All these new species appear, they call it the the the the zoologist and paleontologist and things looking at this. We'll call it a rapid specie Asian event, but what causes that no one really knows at this point. But so now the models of of you know, evolutionary change are gonna have to take account of these rapid extinctions in these rapid species Asian events and figure out how how do those going? How do those get worked into the model? I think part of it is this. I think part of it is that when you haven't mass extinction event, it's triggered by some type of a cosmic encounter. I an asteroid or a comet delivers all kinds of very exotic materials into earth's biosphere during an impact event, and a lot of the research that I'm really interested in right now has to do with how those materials such as the platinum group metals in particular might act as catalysts. Trigger rapid evolutionary change over very short period of time. It's it's very possible path at the same event that wipes out a whole bunch of species on one end is then stimulating or catalyzing. The emergence of a bunch of new species, in fact, since the cosmic Noah's ark, pardon me, a cosmic. Noah's ark a cosmic Noah's ark. And and you know, is is you know, as cliche as it might sound. I don't rule out the possibility that people's back during the last mass extinction episode, which was the younger dry as extinction episode may. How many years ago was that thirty thirty thousand knows younger dryest was about twelve between one thousand eight hundred twelve thousand. And you know, this is the thing that Graham has been arguing that we now know like from places like an today and go back lead Tepi. And and probably the stinks on almost certainly think there was a much higher level of cultural activity going on back, then and has been realized and. So the civilized nations weren't only wiped out with the intelligence went along with them. And it was like a a starting over completely for race. Like like, a computer crash and in a rebooting. It's it's bizarre to think about an, you know, for me, I sit there, and I ponder all of these megalithic structures that were built all over the planet. They they coincide. The the old star maps that are carved in the snow and everywhere with the same the same carvings all over the entire globe. With all of the civilizations that that existed, and I have to sit there and think is it possible that we had some sort of. I mean, I alien assistance in in building these make structures or the knowledge that came with it. Well, that's you know, question been raised in debated and discussed for decades now, and I'll give you a little insight into what I think. Okay. You know, I I'm wide open onto question of aliens. I don't necessarily believe it. I don't necessarily disbelieve it day that you know, the foes. You know sets down in an alien gets out of it. And I get to ask him if you questions that probably a lot of questions, I've got I'm I'm gonna you know, I'm I'm holding back my opinion onto manner. But right. I think what we need to do is. We just like use the analogy of modern times. Like remember when shoemaker Levy nine in nineteen ninety four struck Jupiter. The right, okay. So we were able to predict that fifteen months in advance or I'll well twelve months in a dance. It was discovered in March of ninety three and after three months about survey shin. The strana is able to predict that it was going to that the these Twenty-one pieces of what had headband a single cometary nucleus until it got ripped apart. But Jupiter's intense gravity field for me it into twenty one separate pieces. They were able to predict that, you know, in around the second week of July the following year in these pieces, we're going to collide with Jupiter now, let's suppose bad then we discover an object. And we realized we. We in, you know, whether how we fair in the aftermath of an impact totally depends on how much time we have to prepare now. So the thing is what you make relieving nine. It had undoubtedly been circulating the sun for centuries. We had just never discovered it. Right. But it was out there. You know, going like ping pong back and forth between the sun and Jupiter right now suppose, we discover something it's Ron are looking out there, and they discover there's an asteroid, and they start charging its orbital elements, and they conclude that you know, what in a decade or five years or twenty or whatever it might be that darn thing is going to collide with the earth. What would we do? Well, there's a number of things we could do but for but every one of them would be oriented around maximizing the probabilities of our survival and maximizing our ability to preserve as much of our civilization and our. Science and our knowledge and learning as possible. See? So then what we would do is. We would begin to devise strategies for perpetuating such a thing. No. I think that if we look back in this is I'm going to just put this out as hypothetical model if we look back at it ancient history. We almost see that there almost like to cultural trends running parallel on the one hand, you see people that are living very broody stone-age existence. What we might think of as barbarian existence right hunter-gatherers subsistence architecture, but then superimposed on that. It's just all of those things you were just talking about, you know, these this. These this world wide phenomenon of make Olympic architecture and monumental earthworks architecture, this archea, astronomy, SEIs craftmanship, precise craftsmanship that would have required an enormous amount of organizational f. Math skills and math. Yes. Exactly. Cartography mathematics, engineering astronomy, even geology there somewhere. There seems to be a source of knowledge that's out of context with with the conventional models of prehistory. So think about this suppose, we got faced with the devastating catastrophe. Then basically pull the plug on civilization. And in the aftermath of that. There might be two categories of survivors. Those who knew it was coming and took great went to great lengths to preserve to prepare to preserve as much as they could they survived because the intended to survive they planned to survive, they prepared to survive. Then you have other survivors who just essentially survive because they happen to be in the right place at the right time. They. The luck of the draw they survived they wherever they were. They didn't get wiped away by floods. They didn't get wiped out by the fires the explosive events. Those people now are going to be thrown back into the stone age existence, and there's evidence now that in the aftermath of the younger dryest. There was a pretty extreme population collapse worldwide. That probably was the counterpart to the mass extinction of the great megaphone. In other words, you know, we lost the woolly mammoth we lost the sabertooth cats. We lost the giant ground flaws the Irish elk the the cave bear, the you know on and on and on right over one hundred species. Well, those animals died in a catastrophe to me, there's no doubt the way when we examined the fossilized evidence. It's not consistent with human hunting. It's consistent with being wiped out in catastrophic events. So it's also now becoming more acceptable consider that well, maybe the human population went through a precipitous decline as well. Right. So the survivors who survived because of the luck of the draw their whole preoccupation is going to be just the day to day existence. Where are we going to get food to survive tomorrow right now if you had somebody else? That actually went to great lengths to prepare in survive. Just like, well, we see an analog here. You know, particularly would go back to the Cold War. We had you know, what they call the continuity of government, which the idea was in the aftermath of a Cold War. Everything would be basically, I mean in the aftermath of a nuclear war. You know, we'd be civilization my succumb, but they had their strongholds. You know, the Cheyenne Mountain in Wyoming where they were going to take refuge to survive. That's the thing. That's the thing that I think. Talk about you know, there was a certain sector of society who prepared for this sort of stuff they were educated enough, they prepared and they survived. I look at it. It's the exact same thing. Now. I mean, if there's a massive meteor or any kind of anything headed towards earth. I very much doubt that they're going to announce it on the nightly news that next Wednesday earth is going to get destroyed. You know, they're just not going to say it. I just don't see him saying it because the government and the people that run everything are going to be underneath underneath those mountains because we know that we have those facilities. So it's it's the same thing today, in my mind, I think. Yeah. I think you're right. The thing is though it it may not work. So well because of the fact that there's too many amateur astronomers out there and a lot of the professional. Astronomers they're focused on, you know, other galaxies deep space objects and stuff to discover an earth impacting asteroid or comet you've got to be looking in near earth space, and you don't need, you know, a five hundred million dollar telescope to do that, you know, you can just do that from your backyard, and so just like well like shoemaker Levy nine it's called shoemaker Levy because it was actually discovered by David Levy who was an amateur. Astronomers say so. I think the we're we're would leak out that way. But, but you know, and again, it depends on the lead time if you've got five years. Hey, a lot of people could get ready. If you've got five months, not so much. Right. Right. So the the the people that I'm gonna go back to the builders of the structures here in North America. And we don't we don't have here for much longer. So I'm going to get get to this. You know? At fifty five hundred years, you know, dating the oldest one that they've found so far who who built those are we talking who who we would envision as the native Americans who are, you know, in our history books or was it another another, you know, civilization. Okay. I didn't think that it was the native Americans. Okay. I think there was the indigenous peoples I think they let me put it this way. I think they provided the labor pool, but not necessarily the architectural design, very interesting. Okay. So so and there's all these mysteries. And and, you know, talk of giants that roam the earth and all this sort of stuff is there any proof of that. Well, you know, I can't say proof. But there is a very strong circumstantial case, you know. In in a lot of the mound excavations of North America. There were particularly in the nineteenth century. There were numerous giants. I'm saying giants. I'm talking about seventy eight feet tall. Right. And you know that tended to get lost. Now, I have in my collection. I have you know, I have access to Emery university here where I live, and they have an extraordinary collection of of documents historical documents and all of that been going through phone. I just was this has been years ago now, but going through a lot of the old stuff from the nineteenth century, you know, like archives of the various states and stuff, and there will be accounts of the excavation of various mound. Structures and so forth. And there are frequently accounts. You know, you know, Reverend so and so and his people out there excavating and they discover an eight foot skeleton. So, you know, this was in today's there, you know, no internet for people to post things to go viral. There wasn't any. There was nothing really to be gained by coming out and proclaiming that you've found. What timeframe would these people have been dated these giants? Well, I'm thinking we've got to go back several thousand years for that. Yeah. I would I would think so. So they were so they were would you say that they were a subset or part of the native Americans or they were just a different group altogether. I think they would have been a different group altogether. Okay. Okay. Yeah. And they probably met their demise at the hands of the native Americans. Maybe. Or the flood. Maybe maybe although I'm inclined to think that they probably die under as a result of natural catastrophes. Okay. Okay. That's what I was wondering. I mean that that that makes sense to me, you know, the the, you know, a great flood, and well, there's nowhere to go like here here. I'm just pulling something up here here is now this is from the annual report to the Smithsonian Institution entitled antiquities of Kansas City, Missouri dated eighteen seventy seven we have lately made a discovery here, but number of Indian mounds, which are evidently of great antiquity. They're situated on the north side of the Missouri. River in the angle of the great band upon the high bluffs commanding view of the country about the mouth of the Kansas river directly opposite. We've not yet made any extended investigations these mounts, but examined partially one group of five in the center of number one at a depth of about five feet. We found a human skeleton the bones were so fragile that we could only get. Out in fragments. We did not notice any very marked. But Yulia layer p q Leah ready to these bones, except their great size and thickness, and you know, there's many. Yes. Let's see here. They in another case. This was the twelfth annual report of the bureau of ethanol Aji from eighteen ninety they excavated amount. And they found a sepulcher, and it was eight feet long. And this discussion was in it pretty much filled up the whole seppuku sepulcher that they found and excavated from this mound. So is this do you think this is the reason that because there was s commission going on in the eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds is this the reason the laws were passed the stop digging the stuff up because it brought up potentially a differently history than we were taught. Maybe maybe you know, I puzzled over that. Clearly, you know, the idea that there may have been seven and eight foot people wandering, but you know, hey, here's the thing. We know we we talked about mega fun, right? Huge or larger great fun. And when we look at some of those, you know, you talk about the Irish L it had a ambler span of up to twelve feet. You look at the the giant short faced bear Toda's Seimas, Matthew here was a creature who that that stood six to seven feet tall at its shoulder was twice the size of a modern grizzly bear, right? Right. And you could go on and on with this, you know, the mammoth this imperative or imperial mammoth stood up to sixteen feet high. It's shoulder was place as big as a modern elephant. And so you think you know, the the way it was put to me by a person, you know, that runs in your circles is well, yeah. Animals were a lot bigger. Then why wouldn't the people have been bigger? Why? I couldn't there have been right athlete. So it does make perfect. It does make perfect sense. Yeah. It does. Here's another Quayle. Just historical collections of Ohio in two volumes and encyclopedia of the state with published in eighteen eighty eight. But it was a collection of things that went back to the seventeen hundreds. So when the settlers first arrived in this one particular sediment along Yojairo river there were twenty or thirty Indian cabins there were amount situated in eastern part of the village and then extensive burying ground near the Presbyterian church, which appeared have had no connection with the bearing places of the Indian. So when they excavated among the human 'bout bones found in amounts were some belonging to men of gigantic stature, some of the skulls were of sufficient capacity to admit the head of an ordinary man job owns that might have been faded on over the face with equal facility. The other bones were proportionately LA. Large. Now, imagine a skull. That's big enough that you can put it on like a helmet. That's a big person that that's probably somebody who's nine feet tall. You know? So I mean, and so the the archives are full of this kind of stuff bat. And so what are you gonna make it willing for anybody that anybody that doubts? It also you have to do and spend some time around some Samoans and you'll realize it's not that unthinkable. Samoan's? Okay. Right. Why does Samoans now? I don't I don't know how to say it because they're massive. If you've ever if you've ever stood in a group of giant Samoan men care. Their heads are literally as big as my torso, their massive human beings. And these people were even much bigger than them. Yeah. Apparently. So it's it's mind blowing. But well, sir, we have to let you go here. Pretty soon. You have been a treat to have on in. It's I mean, it's always an education just to read just to listen to you. I listen to you on a lot of different shows. And do you have any social media that people can follow you on get more educated on some books, and please. I'm ninety thousand words into my book. I'm going to try to have it finished. By this summer. I'm gonna touch on a lot of this stuff. We're talking about all with all the references and sources so people can, you know, follow this stuff stuff up for themselves if they're so fine. But yeah, GIO cosmic. Wrecks dot com. Just like it. Sounds geo mix wrecks dot com and sacred geometry international dot com. And he'd be out there listening and also any social media that people can follow you answer. I haven't been too active on social media lately. I I'm trying to get back to that. But I I've been so busy with my my design work in my research work. I find that. I, you know, I'm one of those I tend to get on social media. And and then two hours later, I'm going wait a second. I don't have time for this. I perfectly understand. I do understand, sir. Well, we want to thank you again Reynolds Carlson for coming on. And we've got to have you on again here. We apologize some technical difficulties. Jeffrey is furious. He wasn't able to ask you some questions. Somehow he got dropped from the call and we tried getting him back, but we're not able to. But we look forward to seeing your van again may seventeenth. Yeah. May seventeenth in southern Colorado and go to the grind merica website to find out. More. Those guys are awesome. Awesome. So yeah. Check out the grind merica site. And hopefully, everybody can join Randall in the posse down there around Durango. It would be it would be an amazing experience. I'm hoping I don't have to do a broadcast at that time, sir. There might be a possibility that you'd come hang with us for a day or two or three or whatever I certainly am hoping. So I know that I'm in Colorado at the beginning of may for a broadcast. I haven't seen my schedule any further out than that. So I don't know if I'm doing a broadcast on that weekend. But if I am not, you know, where I'll be. Well, it'd be great to hang out within, you know, meet you, and and get to know you better. And maybe that'll happen one day anyway. Well, thank you, sir. Ronald Carlson, ladies and gentlemen. This has been another episode of the conspiracy farm.

Michael Shurmur Graham Europe North America Randall Jeff stock shoemaker Levy Joe Rogan Michael Shurmur United States Colorado Michael North America Graham handcock Darren New Mexico Jeffrey Wilson Noah Geel mythologised geological
 Disaster in the Australian outback

Today in Focus

26:55 min | 2 years ago

Disaster in the Australian outback

"Today. We discuss a disaster in the Australian outback where searing heat severe drought and terrible mismanagement has allowed rivers to run dry and in opinion, the guardians Williams asked for all to hysterical about screen time. Southern Australia is in the middle of an extraordinary heat wave. With temperatures soaring to up to forty seven degrees swiping rod across central and south eastern tonight. Temperature records waste and the mercury was only headed one way. It's happening when the country is already one of the worst droughts in its recorded history drawing up landscape, really large parts of the Murray, darling basin a huge swathe of land the size of Egypt. Little rain is expected for months. It's like the main artery in a stray area. So people are starting to really worry about what the future holds. The areas drying rivers that run from Queensland through New South Wales. Victoria, and into South Australia are increasingly the site of fish kills mass fish deaths being reported all over the Murray darling basis morning. We're just getting reports coming through the fishkill down at like Hyun. The latest this week. So the water carpeted with hundreds of thousands of bony bream, golden perch and Murray cod is an absolute catastrophe. These magnificent animal generations out her now is dead. Let residents fair being forced to abandon their homes in search of clean water animals animal Abbott, no water to swim cook wash with anymore from the guardian. I'm initially Astana today in focus, I disaster in the Australian outback. So we flew about three and a half hours to mill Jura, which is near the junction of the Murray and darling rivers down on the border of South, Australia, and Victoria and New South Wales. And Davies he reports the guardian stray Leah traveled to them in Indy. Lakes long with the photographers we drove about three to four hours up a dirt road. But it's really quite Ramoche and take yearly at this time of year because the temperature was forty seven degrees celsius feel what it feels like you're in an oven you walk out, and as the wind blows it feels like it's just scorching your legs. I've never felt anything like it's it's almost a claustrophobic eight the closes on you when you're around it. And and getting back into the start getting little DC tired. He start sweating. Forty seven degrees. Jeez. I mean, that's not. Yes. Normally look around that part of the world, you can have forty seven degrees want one or two days a year. But people are getting really really worried that they we're getting like two weeks of this temperature in a row. So we drove up to Menendez which is used to be quite a big tourist spot. There is some agriculture including grape growing and citrus. But now, it's all the grapes of being abandoned. And so there's just this collegial grape vines everywhere in fields and then further up. It'll just be a dry river bid. Why did you go to this area? So the reason why we went to Mindy was on January seven there was a a major fish kill. And by that. I mean, all these fish just suddenly died and floated to the surface, there was a copy of these little fish and in amongst them were larger quite endangered fish, the golden perch, and the silver perch and also some very large Murray card, which are native fish that can grow up to a major long and be sixty seventy years old. We've had Fudd hers coming back from an indie of the river, literally carpeted with these tiny little what silvery fish. It's really disturbing. We went down to the age of the darling river, most people tell me, you would never see him my record in your life. But they they were they were just gasping for breath. And it was was quite horrified to see we saw one just turn over flip a few times and it died right in front of us. How many Fisher died so we've had three kill fish kills. In Manila, d all of them are being I wanna tens of thousands and into that people say I in the hundreds of thousands. I think we're going to end up with a figure that's probably a million fish died in the river in the last month. People say that the bony bream the ones that are dying in the hundreds of thousands, the really important in the food chain in the river and without them. We're gonna see impacts all the way through right down to South Australia and some of the Fisher talking about our enor-. Thomas Murray card. I mean the way sixty two kilograms it's the weight of a person and in pitchers people have their arms stretched out wide to hold onto them, the huge only. Yes, they really large and the papal Menini have this relationship with the fish, you know, they love them, and it's been part of the tourism industry. It's part of the, you know, the mythology of the old timers about the fish. They've caught and I've seen grown men weeping over these did fish. Any words toward it's very very sad. Very sad. This is a man might disaster. These animals. That's Mexican feel chronic dying. Well, the preliminary investigation has suggested it's caused by high temperatures and then low temperatures that follow. And because there's no flow in the river. The water has been becoming slowly Deok sedated by blue-green algae, which is a poisonous algae. And then when the temperature falls the algae dies and uses up more auction leaving the fish without any dissolved oxygen in the water. Why is there a lack of water is all because of the drought? So the issue for strata with this river system is that it's been historically farming has just been able to take water out of the river system and gradually. It's become unsustainable. Now, the government realized this in in the two thousands when we had another drought and they've been endeavoring to come up with a plan to manage the water better. But. This is exposed is that, you know, this just way too much water being taken out still and the government has peps bowed to Bagram culture at the expense of the environment. And just because what what kind of agriculture we talking about. So in some of the dryest parts of stralia. We now grow caution almonds citrus. And these crops all require huge amounts of water as the government has tried to regulate how much water is used by agriculture. The result has been that big aggressor has bought up a lot of the water rights strandings often say why are we growing cotton in such dry climate and the answer is well it makes money. This was saying that customers have said they feel they've been unfairly blamed for what's happening. You've had some of the forms who did you meet? So we visited one of these thumbs in what's called the Loa, darling. It's a massive property of half a million heck diz. It's one of the bees sheep stations in New South Wales. But Lauren who's the wife of the manager is absolutely struggling to know, whether she can stay there. But even before the hey came sort of been struggling to cope with the lack of water. So for a long time. Now, we've we always knew the she's got a little baby who seven months old called will. They would usually just drink the river water use it for this stock when it has blue-green algae unit. That's no more. The snow is unbelievable is unbearable. What does it smell line? Smells like. Smells, like, rotten eggs. It's just you can't fill up a sink to do the dishes because it's just awful. We usually brush tape in this water easily by cont actually bath her child in the river water. The river ward is being declared. It's got a red alert for blue green algae. And the the medical advice is don't touch it. Don't drink it swim in it. She save him wondering whether she can wash her flaws with it because the baby will be on the floor. The last time it went dry. Some of the kids imprint Carey in other stations got very very seek that had like bedsores on them just from playing sprinklers e cetera. And then we're on like antibiotics months afterwards. So instead they bothering the baby in a tiny little amount of Brian water. The net that now run acid rain water. So they're gonna get water trucked in from somewhere else. It's not fair. It makes you angry. Thanks you side. And it just feels like nobody cares about. When you were watching. How did you feel just so hot I felt for her? You know, I could see how worried she was about the baby every day. We think about leaving like is it worth at being in like, this is our home. We love it so much. But is it worth it? What if will does get from the water? Rena? Where's your family from with you wanna right people? So we're river people from the far northwest of New South Wales. My grandmother was born on the Narran river, which is on the northwest age of the Murray darling base. Llerena alum is the guardians. Indigenous affairs, editor she spent a lot of her childhood on the banks of the river visiting her family who have lived there for decades. Recently, she traveled back to the region to see the impact of the drought. For you will arrive people to river is very important culturally. We shed that water with all the other nations of the basins. There's about forty six different nations in the Mary dining bison. They all believe I have a strong responsibility to look after not just the country, but the the water other communities that live by the river, predominantly indigenous communities. Yes. Absolutely. So most of the little towns along the Murray darling majority indigenous population because that's where people were herded onto reserves at the turn of the situation after they were sort of brought in from their traditional lands, but they have lived on these rivers since before Europeans arrived. Tell me about that trip because I hadn't been home so to speak for a long time. But the rivers are just always there. So it was a shock to me to see how degraded the country was to see these big rivers empty and the enormous old gum. Is on the river banks that really give you shelter in pace. When you sit by the river to see those big old trays sort of fully into the river bid was quite confronting. Do you have memories of visiting your family as a child and in those memories? What did the river mean? The rivers sustained us culturally physically spiritually for centuries. That's where we ate that's way, we had ceremonies. That's where babies were born. That's where funeral practices were carried out and whatever lying on the water for their livelihoods in those mission times people call them win every people during the protection era in the last century were herded onto reserves and lived on rations flour sugar and tea a lot of people were hungry and a lot of people were poor. So the rivers even then provided sustenance. So you could always going catch a fish or Yogi. Do you know what he sees? No. It's a it's a freshwater crayfish, which tastes like lobster list salty. Do do you remember seeing people catching bees when you were a kid? Absolutely. You got into the river. Start a little fire and Paulo can of water, and you could cook fish and. Yeah bees. And there were it was a rich life on the river. And you returned recently on the river was gone. How do people feel about what's happening? Not just one river all of them. So we traveled a four hour. One might drive. They were no revisit all. The by one is driving. Nemo is dry the great Narran lakes, which heritage protected. Wetlands dry. And and the elders at they were crying and telling us these eighty year old people who have gone through all sorts of deprivations in their long lives who've never seen the river this bed. Virginia Robinson, one of eldest said this to me, the ultimate destruction of our culture. All people think about now is no water in the river because they were in harmony with nature. That's all unbalanced all destroyed now. And do you believe that when the government is thinking about this crisis? It's thinking about those communities. No the bow river at welded. And the darling river will Kenya. The two towns in the system that have the biggest original populations the number of times the river. Stop flowing was in the last decade was phenomenal. It's obvious that these towns of being abandoned in why the being neglected. The government's strong view as the Water Minister said to me the other day is that this is caused by drought. The saying that it's it's unavoidable. And when it rains, everything will be fine. But I know that people don't buy that for a minute. They see cotton firms upstream that have plenty of water for irrigation. And they start to wonder why it is that they have to subsist on ball water. And there's no running water coming down every triple whammy drought, curing trees change. No water. But what role do upcoming elections play? So climate change is being an issue industry for quite a while now, but we have a federal government that is absolutely opposed to admitting that it exists. Current prime minister bottle up of coal into parliament previous prime minister was famously quoted as saying climate change is crap. But the side of dead fish the side of you know, little children bathing in Brown, muddy water. That's coming from the tip. I hope is going to galvanize people in a way that we haven't before. And there are enough people in the constituencies of those impace whose seats in L looking very shaky indeed because they've voter heartland attorney against them because of what they're saying happening to the beloved rivers, and I think this the current government is on borrowed time. This week the state politician who's responsible for water in New South, Wales travelled to the lower darling. River to witness the third mass fish Depp this month, speaking on the banks of the river. Now Blair admitted we've seen nothing like this. And acknowledged it was about more than the drought. And that's why I'm here. Okay. So I'm not on not implying, these this is this is something that warrants the prompt attention. I'm Davies has been reporting on a plan for the area which has been in place since two thousand and seven but many say it's not enough. The Mary jolly basin plan is probably the best attempt at trying to resolve the conflicts between the environment, and farmers and irrigation and climate change. So the plan is the government put thirteen billion dollars. That's about seven billion pounds aside to buy buyback water for the environment. The trouble ease. It's not going to be enough to turn the river back into a sustainable system. Do you think the government hose taken the side of big business over the side of local communities since twenty thirteen we've had a conservative government in ustralia, including the national party, which is a coalition partner. Now, they're the party of the Bush of farmers with the result that I think pharma's have had a fun loud voice than environmental. Groups, and certainly the science has been ignored and a foam is starting to change their mind. Yes. I think that's what's happening. So this certainly a group of farmers who are now realizing that unless the plan is revisited they could be a an environmental disaster in the future. You went to meet one of these farmers who'd already become famous speaking up about this. What did he do? So rob McBride and one of his mates Wade into the river, peaked up to large cod and film themselves say how horrified they were. And look at conic fish. Australia thing trade. This is Lottie disgusted with yourself. It's absolutely gone viral. And I think single handedly put the problems of the river onto the world stage nothing to do with. Disaster. We went down to rub mcbride's property and his family in the forties. And they head have one of the biggest sheep stations in New South Wales. But they don't be water uses and they're in a part of the river, which is just becoming more dry. This is the most amazing rivers can see his face just desparation about what's going to happen to his property. Clearly, the big boys view is destroy the mini likes. We just sacrafice loans out here to justify a lot of it. Feels like maybe this is teetering on the edge of an ecological disaster. And the this part of Austrailia is on the kind of front line of climate change. Well, the Murray darling basin plan, I know this will come as a surprise does not actually take into account. Ouch climate change. So when they devised it. They used Ola numbers that were based on the last hundred years, even though they had worked done by elating scientists which said you can't rely on the same sort of water flows. You have to look forward into the future. Where it's luckily, we'll see hotter. Drier climates in the south you need to adjust the plan accordingly. Now that hasn't been done. If it sounds like urgent action is needed. What needs to be done? So we've recently had an inquiry, and we had a parade of scientists who came to give evidence, and they said you need to allocate more water to the environment or this plan will fail. Llerena what might happen? People going to survive in this area. Well, it's a good question. Book for example, in west New South Wales has just had its twenty first day of above forty degree temperatures with severe water restrictions and no water in the river. So we dealing with communities that are, you know, quite precarious. Now, the people of weld told us black and white alike said we've got six months if we don't get some water. That was Llerena alum and and Davies do read all of their reporting on the Murray darling crisis and have a look at some of the astonishing photographs at the guardian dot com. Coming up is it time for parents to calm down about the amount of time that children's spend staring at screens. In today's don't stop. Making quality time feel self is more important than ever when he by subscription to the guardian and the observer, you can look forward to sitting back and leafing through every page at your own pace from the latest ground-breaking investigations to recipes reviews. Award-winning sports coverage are more subscribe before the third February and you'll save up to fifty two percent on newspaper subscription for a year. Just search guardian. Subscriptions. Now guardian columnist Zoe Williams on the screen time debate. So my son who's eleven watch is people playing games that he also plays and often you'll have to screens going. So he'll be playing fortnight on one screen and then have an ipad in front of him on which like a seventeen year old from Utah is also paying fortnight, but they don't playing the same game. What she's these horrible horrible? Crude unim-, Asians of you know, girls with Bobby figures saying mean things to each other my other daughter watches kind of craft crofters and people making slime people melting stuff watching her watch. It is kind of this is really pointless and boring, but it's actually made her much more crafty and into melting things. Now, there will be people. Listen to this is absolutely horrible stope you childhood because they're not reading all doing brodry or helping me cook, none of them can cook. I could I could use to be stricture. But I suppose I'm willing to interrupt too much what they actually want to do this huge amount of childhood, which is not what you want to do. Don't want to go to school, you generally, don't wanna go swimming. So, you know, I've got to be honest. I probably do let them do whatever they like in the in the time that they've caught vegetable. They were all things about the internet, which which Paris do worry about and they worry about with reasons so ease anxiety about online bullying is it does seem to be more pernicious and bit more savage. There is that element where you know, your Instagram self. It comes your entire self and then of social anxiety touches to that. Because a simple thumbs down from stranger can ruin your day. Don't know any of my children's pin numbers. And I wouldn't ask them. The orthodoxy is so fixed, you should have the pin numbers to children's devices, and you should feel free to go through them. Because otherwise how to know what they're up to that talking to that. They're not communicating with a paedophile that they're not bullying someone else that nobody's bullying them. And I just would not be willing to do that. Because I think it kind of fosters an atmosphere of mistrust and dishonest e I think a kid moderately intelligent child of eleven can outwit you if they want to. So there's no point looming over them because they'll find a way to have prove see if you even if you don't give it to them. And really if you want to protect them from the dangerous things that the world can throw at them. The kind of number one thing in that is that they feel like they taught you which they won't feel like if you've sets up this dynamic, but you know, I've said that in front of parenting panels and stuff people look at me, like I'm out swiftly crazy. On the one hand, you this kind of culture of perfection around parenthood. And then on the other hand, you got this culture productivity and childhood so children to be always doing something productive always improving themselves. Always maximizing their time. I really don't like it. I think it makes them very anxious. I think there were kind of lived realities of human life, which cannot be measured and cannot be maximized. And I'm really uncomfortable with the eye of with like packing every second of their days with yet more stuff. Elements the internet that made me anxious, but I certainly would take the anxiety over something more profound about controlling their every waking moment. That's all for today. My thanks to an Davies, Llerena alum and Zoe Williams. This episode was produced by India Rakkason, Amer Collier, and Elizabeth Casson sound design was by axel Kakuta. The executives on Jackson, and Phil may not we'll see you next week.

Thomas Murray government darling river Davies Zoe Williams New South Wales Austrailia South Wales South Australia Narran river darling basin Victoria Murray darling basin Water Minister Egypt Hyun Leah Astana Indy
Episode 059 - The Best Prime Minister in Canada's History?

Poutine Politics

19:40 min | 7 months ago

Episode 059 - The Best Prime Minister in Canada's History?

"You pick your premise. I okay. Is that way I know what to do next? As I have a winning be. Okay. I did pick my a I'm just like I I can't argue that. Okay. But you pick and we also I'M GONNA destroy. You. Okay Wow Welcome back to Putin politics. Canadian issues served with cheese skirts, my name's Adam. My is back and today we are going to talk about who we think. Is the best prime minister ever of present or former and not future? 'cause we don't know expert minister is. It's going to be Derek Sloane. Come on. Ready. Not The person I thought you're going to say. Out of Mrs Wheeler on, we can come up with a brilliant idea of we pick our own grades prime ministers like, yeah. That's great. So I've come up with a narrowest and I'm GonNa let former sort. I. So I could either say that that's the greatest voice ever or that he is an upsurge schmuck go ahead at. All right. So the first the first thing I'm GonNa do here to kind of give you the idea of why I'm like this is what this is what I wanNA talk about okay. And it has nothing to do with anything that's going on right now. But I was I I was seeing I was to see a client and I. Guess we're talking about obviously all the different things going on with the you know the Cova programs and Blah Blah Blah that and this guy is like a he's he's Trudeau hater basically he's not like he's not like vitriolic about it or anything like that. But he just like it he just doesn't like Trudeau he really explain it. He just doesn't like him he groped. Older than that guy, he's in his late set, he's in his late sixties. Okay, so he was around for seven. Yeah. Yeah. Probably. Exactly. You're certain demographic e you hatred. Yes. But it was the follow up comment that really made me want to do this topic and the follow up comment from him was that he believes that Stephen Harper was the best prime minister that this country has ever had. Why, because he would he do exactly I don't mean. mean or angry or anything like that I mean. It's like comparing Harper to crush it. What did they do? Rightly. Would groundbreaking legislation, they bring in what do they do? That was so spectacular in the other like I've I. Harp Christian almost the same like two thousand like opposite. Have Liberal takes on things in one concern and takes on things but really, they didn't do anything significant. Exactly and not, and I'm like I'm like I can't think of a prime minister since I've been born let's say that really would fall into that category, right? Like I mean okay. Did Brian. Mulroney win the largest majority ever yes. In Nineteen eighty-four. So obviously, I was like not even one year old when that happened. So I'm not going to remember that but that wasn't the point of this that wasn't the point of this conversation either right like and that's why I. Said look at all of the prime minister's that have been around since confederation and pick the one that you think I did the best basically. But yeah, this is this is where this conversation comes from his when his when this client said that he think Steven Harper's been or has been the best prime minister that we've ever had just you know I because it's because it's a client and things I'm like I can't absorb. Okay. Yeah. That's interesting. Anything, coming from PODCAST number three weeks. Perfect. So when I was when I was going through the list of prime ministers. So I I. I did essentially eliminate the majority of the prime minister's before the Second World War. Okay. Now, this from you know from things that we know about them and have learned about them and the things that they did. You know whether it was you know the the segregation and the and the elimination essentially of indigenous people and people of other minority rate, minorities, racists on and so forth and and the reason why I'm like well, I don't feel like any of them can really fall into a position of being the best prime minister that we've ever had is because those were those were government choices. It wasn't necessarily like the person themselves was like well, I don't. Like them, but I'm going to do things as as a parliamentarian as a as a politician that supports them because they deserve to be supported Kinda thing. Right? It was like, no, this is this is government policy right? You think about things like the like creation of the RCMP and the residential schools and the North West rebellion and things like that I, kind of look at all of the all of those kinds of things happening through the late eighteen hundreds and early nineteen hundreds and basically say that the majority of those prime ministers should be disqualified for their roles in those in those. which got me to essentially from Mackenzie King forward unlike okay. Those are the people that I should probably the prime minister. I should probably look at it from my point of view and say it's someone from this group that I think is probably the best. So. Who Do you think I picked? Slack. You'RE NOT GONNA. Tell me what? Okay. All right. We should affect. Conversation. Okay. So so you told me that you have you have to that. You looked at one a and one. B One and the reason I won't be is because if you pick one a while I'm like, yeah okay. We have nothing topic. Okay. Fair. Enough I think I think in the end result I have one in one be as well and I think a lot of it has to do with their their work in creating the. Beginnings of the stronger social safety net in the country. So I would say that my one a is Louis Laurel. And my one be Lester Pearson Blow wrong really. Yeah. It's Pearson it has to be Pierce. It has ninety wells. Okay. Not even club. Why is it not even close? Essentially. All of the main social programs that we use he created. Okay. He was not a politician because he wanted to be. All right I think that's a key indicator like if you want to be a politician because he wanted to be politician usually Mike. Well, you have alternatives you want people. So are you doing the widsom best interest country with special interests a you and there's a law of prime minister that you could say. I know what you're doing you. WanNa be a prime minister. You don't ask who is right for the country and I can think of the last two ministers and go. Both of you call them, fi yeah yeah. Easily qualify for that right right and what he did it you can even. Say Well he didn't do that. Well, I mean he won the Nobel Peace Prize for his he created the blue berets, right? Okay. So Now and. That was that was that was one of the things where I'm like I think Pearson could be could be above law in my eyes but the reason why I chose long over. Pearson. was. Okay. So I the Nobel Peace Prize big thing. It did technically happen before he became prime minister or as a result of things he did before he was prime minister set. So I was like. Okay do I count that as as as part of being Prime Minister? I probably shouldn't just because it occurred beforehand Brian. So the reason why and and you're right that Pearson Pearson's prime ministership led to you know like account a pension plan and and and Health Canada Act and you know those different social safety nets and things like that. The reason why I picked the wrong though is that during while he was prime minister, some of those programs got their start and Pearson was part of his cabinet while he was prime minister. So in a way I kind of look at it as Pearson. Almost continued on with some of the things that Louis Laura started, and that was that was kind of the thing to me that. Barely barely puts Laura over the edge. In my point of view, that's how close I feel they are. but I feel like because you know whether it was all they'd old age pensions the start of the federal government supporting the provinces in regards to healthcare costs the start of of the equalization payments and transfer payments systems happened under under the wrong guy for me. You know he was he was there with the formation of NATO in the United Nations depending on how you feel about the those organizations and kind of helping with the beginnings of peacekeeping forces with the United Nations. So it was it was those kinds of things I was looking at and saying. You know again it's just barely. But because those things happened while he was prime minister and he was he was. He was an important part in influential in those decisions that that was why I put him slightly of Pearson. Close, you don't think it should be close. Okay. All right. Pearson put through. All those reforms like those finished reforms? Yes. Laura may have started it, but he put them through any put them through with a minority government. Well and I mean, yes you're right and he's so I have to I have to admit okay, I was I was thinking about pulling a fast one on this one. And saying Okay and saying that the best prime minister. although he was never the prime minister was Tommy Douglas. Can make me. Tommy Douglas Ones but Tommy Douglas was the the father of of those things but he didn't do every like no pearson was a better peacemaker. Weeding to be numb ripe. To Korea yes. Long was was part of Korea. He would've been. Yeah actually it was wondering if you're GonNa pick king, let no no no no. I mean, he's our longest serving prime minister but I don't I definitely would not have said that he was he was with the best now Pearson I still say Pearson the best, Mike There's no question my mind about that. I thought simply because of what he did and our flag the. vespers. That's precisely. There's so many things that you can be like Okay Pearson to that that that that and. Allow if you look at list and this is what drives me nuts because I looked at mcleans list have you seen the McCain's list of top Prime Minister? I decided to avoid it I don't really have to look at it. Have you ever WanNa see on dryest liberal coverage just look at that. But who did they put a number one? King. They did put him at number one I thought I read somewhere I thought I read on that they didn't put him as number one one one of the three times it done it they. Okay. Franken the best and worst prime ministers. This one's from two thousand sixteen. Yet. But look how many liberal people there are. A. Yeah. Well. Liberal Liberal. But like Johnny, McDonald because he was the first, Mike, I don't think John was like A. No gotTA gotTa admit the score was close though because it well. I. Guess It was out of Fife, but you're right I mean. The liberal. Liberal liberal conservative liberal liberal liberal liberal conservative conservative conservative conservative lift way. The Heck Down There Pearson is. Fifth Yeah. What you guys know what you're doing? Well, maybe it has to do with fact that he was it was a minority. was always under a minority for him cares matters either I mean he won both of the elections that he that he was part of. Yeah here's the thing Kinglasik. Sorry to sorry 'cause Pearson was in Pearson was in the elections with even Baker. So No Pearson did not win the election he didn't win. He would do in his first election lost it, and then he won a second lesson. Yeah that's. The guy had a lisp. So it wasn't like he was a great or her, but you see what saying like this is just like why is this so skewed to liberal like if this was an accurate affectionate, it looks like as Conservative Party was just the worst for Canada and it's like it's not the worst mom Ariel. Maybe, that's part of the problem. Is this vote? This vote happened in twenty sixteen and maybe people's thoughts on conservatives were down at that point naturally evening go back to Sing Oh, like older lists. Okay. Yeah. In the nineteen, ninety nine once like. It is interesting at on this. So this was so this particular list was. A year posted a year after Justin Trudeau was elected and they had him down as the best short term Prime Minister? Now with the great score reminds you because it was out of five in his score was three point two seven. And then followed by Paul Martin at two point three, three out of five. Again. And and Kim Campbell she came in last. Them? I always want to give him a little bit more credit than than Yet, she got ostlund mask. All. No. It wasn't her fault of course nights. Oh, here you go. By the way we made all these bad decisions and now you're the leader what? Like. We're GONNA make sure that we upset both the East and west at the exact same time. Yeah. That's impressively bet. Yes. Okay well, I mean like I and again I guess this is where I'm I'm so close between my two choices that I feel like maybe I could. I could flip or or whatever. But I again I mean I like I said I, I think in the end result I picked. Because he's not bad he and I feel like he started the he started the he started the conversation in regards to the social pro social safety net Hey, he brought. Newfoundland into confederation to. Madman. Newfoundland. Yet, whatever you be from Newfoundland what? I find that offensive and I'm not even Newfoundland. Laurent the irrigate. Laurent's KNOB BY MR like I'm not saying that okay. You not hear me say that. Laura is great. Came to say he started conversation. Okay and greatly lots of people started competition like Doug like Saint Brian Rooney start the conversation about making sure that all the promises agree you had any failed. Failed Core. Yeah. He failed at that. I wouldn't. I wouldn't necessarily say that Laura failed at what he was doing. But he didn't see lay well, I think he's sixty I. Think he succeeded on parts of it, and then like I said I think I think Pearson followed through on the rest of it. Pearson put it through. The person actually put it through bright I. Don't count the person that Kinda did it I the person that did it okay. I'm telling you. He did some of it because like I said, he introduced he. Old Age pensions. He introduced he introduced the federal. Health. Transfers, he introduced the equalization system He introduced he introduced It was about it was something about not not like an old age security thing exactly. But almost like a pension payment or or or a a disability payment as it were for for people who were blind. So, again, like he yeah. There's a introduction. Yeah. So so so instruction of old age assistance for Canadians aged sixty five and older and above universalism ation of old age pensions for all Canadians aged seventy and above introduce introduced. Introduction of allowances for the blind and the disabled amendments to the national. Housing Act which provided Federal Government Financing to nonprofit organizations as well as the province's And unemployment assistance for unemployed employable on welfare who had exhausted their are I at the time benefits so and L. Former this way Maybe putting him at one twenty, I'm putting him four five. Okay. That's all upset. Okay. Amount we're standing here. Right I mean you could go pearson law wrong borden. I think I'm not. I was like wait who has no? No, he's terrible. I mean king comes second tier it's hard to even John McDonnell because his the founder young put in the second tier whatever it's hard. It's hard to even do like a top five right The you get some people that. Love Trudeau and they get some people hatred. Oh but there's just too many things atro- did that might That I just can't ignore, right How many times has the warranty Mac Bennett Act the time as. I think. I think it's an at once three his sure. Owen? Oh. Sorry. Yeah. Yes and nineteen seventy. Yes the October crisis yeah. I'm sorry we were at war nine, hundred, seventy. Well, there was a war going on somewhere. Trudeau. So like I said journals not necessarily I. Don't think he's was like the worst, but he wasn't angry but look claims and then to all agree yeah because he's flamboyant he liked to look at him look at what all of his. Grand Spectacle but we would he do another one that I think it's slide away too frequently Joe Clark Right 'cause Joe Clark was in a No win scenario right and. He did the right things. So he should be higher up on the short-term list. He's one of the ones think should be like one or two on short term. I don't think he was that creative prime minister overall because. He he wasn't even a year right but he had to make tough decisions and he made those tough decisions, right? So I, just a one of the interesting things that I reading at with Trudeau let's say with with with pet I I was reading about just doing the research that I was doing for this and Kinda like okay I. Know There's a lot that I know there's a whole bunch of people I can cut out and be like, yeah they're not GONNA make my list no matter what Yeah of course. ACT A lot of people. Yeah. But it was it was it was Kinda reading about the whole thought of how much people complain about how much he added to the debt while he was prime minister how much he added to the national debt and not not even thinking about it because of because of a good chunk of the time that he was prime minister but the fact that during during a good chunk of time when he was prime minister there were a lot of financial issues around the world and again, just kind of like now and two thousand, eight. Canada. Wasn't the only country that was suffering financially right. And so much so much gets put on him for adding so much money to that. But you know like there was the two, the two oil crises in the in the seventies, and that caused a lot of issues in the united, states as well and in Europe and. Like. I understand why we have such a limited view when we complain about things that we don't like but. You almost need that that wider view of the world especially when you're talking about world leaders to say, Oh, well, I mean okay. Yeah things looked bad here but things look bad everywhere. Right you WanNa you WANNA use the error of measuring stick yeah. So your choice was Pearson My choice was Laurel Years Pearson by a mile mine was Laura by like an inch. Well. That is a look at our favorite prime minister well, best prime minister, not favorite prime minister because I. I again I think even those two terms have different meanings so Let's hear. It means that you let the most yes. Exactly. The best. All right anyways. So who we believe the best prime ministers in history of Canada. From Putin politics. My Name's Adam is by we'll talk to you soon.

prime minister Pearson Pearson Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Louis Laura Lester Pearson Brian Rooney Laurel Years Pearson Putin Canada Mike There Derek Sloane Mrs Wheeler Steven Harper Stephen Harper Europe John McDonnell RCMP Korea Mackenzie King
Ep012 Interview with Christianity Exploreds Alan Avera

Grace and Peace Radio

18:05 min | 1 year ago

Ep012 Interview with Christianity Exploreds Alan Avera

"Welcome to Greece piece Grayson piece. Radio is a Christian living blog and podcast dedicated to engage in conversations about applying God's word to everyday life. Thanks for joining us for today's episode on your host Anthony Russo and. It's my hope that you will be encouraged and God will be glorified with that. Let's start the show joining me today. Very special guests. And this is my first interview ee. I'm sitting with Mr Allen. A Vera gas close one more time. Avery Avery okay. All Right Allen is the executive director with Christianity explored. Usa Live you're in the Greenville area. So I thought it would be a great opportunity to get together as I'm learning more about. Christianity explored marches looking forward to doing the program. I thought I'd meet and find out more about both the program and also Allen Allen. Thanks for being with me today. Appreciate it okay. Thank you first of all tell me. What is Christianity explored Christianity explored as a church equipping ministry in the area of evangelism and discipleship? And we are trying to help. Local churches be equipped every day Christians. That is those that wouldn't say. Hey I've got the gift of evangelism or I may church elder or Or Minister our pastor but the people who the Everyday Christians. We WANT TO HELP. The church equip those people to be able to love live and then tell the gospel of our warnings. Savior. Jesus Christ crowned partnering along with the Pastors in equipping the saints for the work of the ministry that's correct excellent and that's done through small groups through the gospel of Mark Correct. Yes correct the the namesake resource that Christianity explored has is the Christianity explored course which is now known as third edition in its seven weeks thirty through the Gospel. According to mark that helps people discover the answer. I three big questions. Who is Jesus? Why did he come? And what does it mean to follow him? Or what does that mean to me? What does he want me to do? Spots and those are really three huge questions that our culture. If they're not asking they need to be asking. And those who are asking or are looking for answers yet. That's correct and there's a actually. We have an interview with three pastors a church out in the Denver area and one of the guy says you know those three questions really upon them hang most of the questions that the unbelieving world ask who is Jesus. Why did he come to follow him? Almost everybody's questions fall under one of those three big headings nate. You said that the materials in its third edition. How long has Christianity explored been around Christianity explored was developed in the late nineteen ninety s? And then I guess it currently it's want somewhere in the early two thousands. It comes out of all souls church Langham place in central London and in England and probably named people would be familiar from that. Church is the late Dr John Stock so develop under the tutelage of the late. Dr John Stott. And one of the primary development developers was Rico. Thais who has been the minister of evangelism adapt sheriffs since nineteen ninety four. Wow I didn't realize it was that long. And it's in over one hundred fifty countries now. It's not just the US and yes. Correct I'm not sure somewhere between one hundred twenty five one hundred fifty countries. It's been translated the sixty languages It is being used all over the world just recently. There have been trips to the Far East that the team at London is made to equip people. There you know. Spend an Africa. You know from the United States we help do training in in South America Most of the languages in the Tin Forty Window has Christianity explored translated into their languages. Oh excellent and then the small group structure. What some of the feedback. You've gotten from from those who've gone through the program. What ain't that understands. Since we use one of the four gospels. The Gospel according to mark would really getting people into the word in helping them meet Jesus there but as we do that. Three things are happening simultaneously When somebody when a church is using Christianity explored to the things happening among the Christians that are helping lead. It one is each time. They go through their reviewing the Gospel and following more deeply in love with Jesus in the Gospel as they As they go through mark yet again another thing is helping them know how to use the word of God itself as the primary evangelistic tool and then for unbelievers. They're hearing a clear presentation of the Gospel but an dialogical way in a way they can ask their questions and where we can take the time to really help people in the places where they're struggling. I think a lot of times we think of evangelism or as a one way communication. We've got something we want to communicate to the unbelievers but we might be totally missing. What their real hangup is but Christianity explored In the format of a small group discussion where we're looking at the word of God together and people are having a chance to ask their questions that we can really help diagnose where people are in terms of their journey with those three questions who is Jesus. Why did he come? And what's it made the follow him and then of course those people who who don't know the Lord who aren't Christians. They have an opportunity then to see really from right there from the source material. Correct this this man was more than a man. Yeah Rick Thais Says I mean our goal is really for Jesus to walk off the page of the gospel of Mark and in the People's hearts. I love that a long. Walk off the page at Jeffrey. Yes and so now. How long have you been associated with? Christianity explored wealth in terms of actually working for the ministry since twenty thirteen. But I've known about Christianity explore from before Christianity explored because prior to this. I was a pastor in the Maryland. Suburbs of Washington. Dc and I had a couple in my church The husband had a three year job assignment at the American Embassy in London and before he went the only church that he knew of in London was all so the writings of John Stock so he decided before he ever left home that he was going to go to all souls. He came to all souls in Nineteen Ninety Five Rico. He come to be minister. Evangelism in nineteen ninety four and was already developing what was going to become Christianity explored. So this couple from my church was in London from around. Nineteen Ninety five to nineteen ninety eight. They came home in the husband. Chuck's at Allen. You have got to find out what they're doing and London. That's very briefly in the early days of Christianity explored. That's the way that it spread spread by word of mouth people that had come across it and London through visiting also came back and reported exactly the way. Jut reported to me saying pastor. You gotta find out what they're doing in London so the Gospel that spread word of mouth Now the Gospel program that I got spurred mouths. Yes yeah that's funny. Yes so that's the way I heard about it. I heard about it through word of mouth recommendation so the first hand actually ran a Christianity explored course or at that time was a pre Christianity explored. Course it was before any of the material actually been published so chuck brought home an old cassette tape of Rico leading the sessions. So I just listened to those over and over again so I had the gist of it so that I could run a group myself right right now. You had mentioned too that you were a pastor of a Presbyterian church correct right but Christina. The explorer is not denominational my correct. That's correct it comes out of an Anglican Church in central London but here in the US the biggest group of users are Baptist Churches of various kinds the second biggest user the United States or Presbyterian churches of different is the third-biggest larger are the Independent. The Bible Churches The nondenominational churches. The fourth largest group is Anglican and then there is a good mixture of evangelical free and various other kinds of churches. I am now. I Love Hearing Christians and Churches Working Together for the Gospel crossing those denominational lines and then just n resources that are available to the whole body of at as great. Tell me if you can about someone You know a story of someone who's WHO's life has been changed by. Christianity explored. Okay I can tell you a couple of I tell you three stories one. I can't use the name and he can tell why but there was a young lady who was going to college here in the. Us come from a Muslim background. And while she was studying at college he was invited to Christianity explored course that a local church near that college was running and Had her life totally transformed by. The Gospel made a profession of faith but because of the background. She's from and when she really doesn't want her name used in the stories. Sure but that's the case of the student who came here to study and somebody invited her to a Christianity explored course another one is guiding will who is An executive in healthcare industry and his boss is actually one of the people who came. Christianity explored from job assignment in London. So Billy Went to London thinking that it was going to be the best job he ever had in the spiritually dryest experience. He ever had said you know. It's actually the opposite. The worst job ever had pets book through coming across Christianity explored. It was absolutely amazing for me. So then Billy's now on our board but he's always sharing the Gospel with people using Christianity. Exports he was inviting. This guy who worked with him will To go to Chris bored with it will kind of resisted that invitation for five years allow But finally after five years with billy continually inviting him and praying that the Lord would provide opportunity then the board had will in such a case that he Said Yes yes. I'll do the Christianity's for course with you. And then he had his his life changed as a result of the gospels. He committed his life to Jesus Christ. And then there's another one in. Colorado named the shelter and she was at a church did runs. Christianity's or twice a year and People kept inviting her to come. She kept coming. It took her going through the course seven times before she finally got it and A accepted the salvation through Jesus Christ She said I've gone through so much and understood marks while accurate. Probably talk the course far. I actually made the profession of faith but now she is so excited about it that she and her husband just gave a gift to help us more stories like Hers People Coming to Christ through Christianity explore. I it sounds to me. Those are those are really cool stories. It sounds to me like at the end of the harvest when all of a sudden dawn. And we'RE ALL IN HIM I. It sounds like there's going to be a lot more stories like than because of what Christianity explorers done yet. Hopefully they'll be story had all kinds of resources not just pray that Christianity four right here lots of I will. It sounds like you will. If if in fact I was talking to someone before the interview. He said look now that you know we just finished doing that with With with with their kids kids are smaller or whatever it was and they said that they loved it that was another example of how how user friendly I guess you could say of. Course is as well yet. Chris as four is very flexible. Anthony Churches Hughes it in large groups as long. She break the large group up in the small discussion. Groups is this signed. Be a Scott. A discussion oriented exploration together of the gospel of Mark. But it also can be done one. What This Guy Billy? I was talking about shared. Will he often does it all online? He'll do a skype or something like that. And they'll go over it with people in various geographies. Oh that's You know it can be done That I say one it can be done at. Various locations is done in churches and homes in public places like YMCA in business offices. I know one who's done in a retail store so IOS flexible. You can be used a lot of different places that well. That sounds fantastic. Wou A great flexible resource to meet people where they are. Yes just like Jesus yes and to bring them to him now for those who are listening if they wanted to know more about. Christianity explored what? What's the website? Where were they go? Okay Adler give you two websites. One is the ministry website in the others. Yes website so. The ministry website is Christianity explored that U. S. so as just Christianity explored all written together. That us that we also have a guest website. That if you've got somebody that you've been talking to who is not yet a Christian and you WANNA point them to a good website. That's going to have answers to tough questions is going to have. Testimonies and also introduction to Christianity explored. That website is Christianity explored dot Org Christianity explored dot Org and then There is a ministry that uses our course online. That if you know somebody who's struggling the understand Christianity but not in a place that they're able to come to an annual group. The Billy Graham answerless Dick Association has a website called search for Jesus Dot Net and on search for Jesus Dot Net. You can go to a cab and says courses three follow courses. One of those three is Christianity explored as of mid for online of Angela's and course wonderful and I will definitely include those in the show notes and Allen. Thank you so much. This was fascinating. I'm so glad to hear that. The Lord is usually Christianity explored. And that everything is going going so well for the ministry as well. That's fantastic. Okay now throw the ball back Hue unexpectedly. I know that you go to a church. This use Christianity Ward. So have you heard any You know good feedback from the church as I have. Actually I've been talking to the fellow. I mentioned earlier. Yes goes to goes to my church. Okay Oh that would be one example. I don't know if I can ask you three examples but I'll try actually I think I can. I have a couple other people come heavy whereas as we were talking about Christianity explored in the last few weeks at Church as I'm actually heading up bringing Christianity explored to our church again and look into these small groups and stuff I've had a couple of people come meet a yellow before before I was at the church. They said you know we did. Christianity explored here and it was great so Feedback is was really positive and they were very urged to hear that archer. Who's bringing yes? That's good wow again thank you so much. I really appreciate it. Thank you God. Bless thank you well. That's our show all hope you'll join us next time we spend time in God's word looking at how we can grow knowledge of our love for service to if you've enjoyed visit US grace and peace radio DOT COM on facebook at facebook dot com forward slash recent peace radio until next time. I'm your host Anthony Russo and Jesus changed my life.

London United States Mark Correct Allen Allen Anthony Russo Billy Greenville Chuck Mr Allen Greece Dr John Stock Avery Avery Chris Dr John Stott Africa Grayson executive director Maryland facebook Jesus
Does Australia have a Murdoch problem?

The Signal

19:48 min | 3 months ago

Does Australia have a Murdoch problem?

"This is an abc podcast. You see the truth is murdoch has become a cancer. An arrogant cancer on our democracy monarch in fact has lost making newspapers but he keeps them and buys more of them with a single purpose in mind which is to maximize his political power in the country. Kevin rudd has really changed his tune about rupert murdoch since the heady days of kevin or seven campaign when he was vying to run the country back then he was courting the media mogul freeze approval. Like almost every other ambitious politician but now he wants a royal commission into news corp the australian of murdoch's media business. So does he have a case. Maj up and i'm steven smiley. And today on the ignore half a million. Australians agree with kevin rod on this spun including another former prime minister from the other side of politics malcolm turnbull. So could it happen and if it did what would it broke mission actually achieve. It really feels like for as long as i've been paying attention to the australian media there has been someone complaining bitterly. About the extent of rupert murdoch's influence via news corp traditionally from the left but having former prime ministers take up the cause. is anyone. Yeah so this is the petition that kevin rudd setup calling for a royal commission into news corp's impact on democracy in australia. It's attracted more than half million signatures. Which got us wondering. How seriously should we be taking this idea. I think the two answers to that firstly. I think we should take the issue very seriously. I think that a royal commission into the influence of rupert murdoch would be a very valuable thing to do but the second is because the likelihood of its thing approach zero. We shouldn't be taking it seriously as a serious possibility. Dr malla is a senior research fellow at the center for advancing journalism at the university of melbourne. I think so. Many people look on at kevin rudd particularly making this coal and think. Oh this is you know sour grapes. This is someone who essentially lost brawl with news corp and that's what's motivating it does that kind of factor in terms of how seriously you take this now doesn't he did get a rough deal from murdoch over the iraqi prime ministership think. He's fairly clear. and through. one. Of these editors the other day that doesn't really like us and like to give us the heave ho and and get he's might mr abidine among the highlights in the last week kevin's chaos does lp's heading lists more out harebrained. A fly tags are lacking to kevin rudd's head yesterday. I think there's a lot more to it than just an ambitious politician trying to wreck revenge on murdoch. I think the issues that that kevin rod rices The issue of murdoch influence on the way a democracy works and his his effect on politicians very real issues and and would benefit from a royal commission. Stott exploration so. I would give it a lot more credence than just revenge so given that you think that having a royal commission into into the murdoch empire news corporation isn't such a bad even though it's unlikely that he's said before zero possibility of actually happening. What is the case for holding an inquiry. The case is made out by the fact that we've got three mature western democracies the united states kingdom and australia in all of which we've got a particularly polarized and toxic political culture in everyone of those democracies the murdoch oganization is dominant Dominant here with control of two-thirds all the daily newspaper circulation plus the sky news pay channel. Courage quibble quit credible for a is most feel. Strike tokens leaders ruinous. And to the to stop. And i think the struggle to sign anywhere. It's extremely influential. Newspapers in the united kingdom and of course the united sites scott the new york post mass-circulation daily newspaper and fox news which has got the highest household penetration of any cable news service. In america. we're a nation founded on principles on freedom leaders have changed the course of human civilization when we take part in democracy. We control our destiny fox news. America is watching. So i think the fact that murdoch is the common factor in each of those democracies with is particularly toxic political culture it provides the main ground for world commissions desirable and perhaps looking at other sort of comparable western democracies places like canada new zealand. Dart have quite that same concentration of ownership by a murdoch earned media business. They don't seem to have those problems you just described. I think we saw that. Very vividly displayed in the recent new zealand elections. Now those elections were conducted with a level of civility. That we just don't see or haven't seen for a long time in australia in politics. So i think there has been a very strong contrast so whether or not you agree that it is fair to pin the scourge of polarization on rupert murdoch's media empire news corp definitely does earn a very large slice of the media in australia. But it wasn't always that way. Originally news corporation was very slow coming. It sat off of course in adelaide with the adelaide died us which was afternoon tabloid pipe and then murdoch started the australian in the late nineteen sixties. He started as a rather revolutionary broadsheet. It was a very fresh looking newspaper. It didn't sacked was a small l liberal newspaper initially the australian and had some very good journalists editor maximum Team people like that and it did have a quite a distinct and more progressive flavor than for instance the sydney morning heralded. The major turning point was nineteen ninety-seven when paul keating altered the media ownership rules in a way that allowed rupert murdoch to purchase the heraldo. Miki time times group. Which newspapers and television stations at the time in all the capital cities except the northern territory so brisbane sydney melbourne hobart at leiden perth in one fell swoop. Murdoch got a lot now. He doesn't try that anymore back. It gave him all of a sudden. This tremendous grip on about two thirds of the dating newspaper sedation. That at a stroke transformed the whole landscape and pull keating's stated all the reason for it was that he saw rubel represented new money and consequently would be more progressive and more inclined to favour labor than the old money of the fifth axis. Booby hated and wished to do down. And and keating has been quite. I put now that turned out well. Patty and so estrella found itself with newscorp running two thirds of the print media at a time when print media was a great deal more important than it is now and dennis says the company has wielded that power to influence a few key areas of public life. The issues that it affects in particular of course climate change And and what we've started talk about as About a long as the culture wars so issues concerning The issues of aboriginal reconciliation of the teaching of a truthful history of australia. Those sorts of issues that will come under the rubric of culture wars. I think those are the issues that murdoch's press must particularly influence. And the why do it is in fact if you look at our code of conduct their internal code of conduct sites okay for the journalists to present the news in such a way as leaves no doubt in the reader's mind about the newspapers position on issues. Now that's mixing up commentary and news coverage that's a fundamental feature which is most unhealthy. Now one of the defenses mounted against these claims is that news corp is really just taking an editorial line that happens to match with existing views within the community right so basically. It didn't create an ideological rift. Just happens to animate the views of one side of it. The side it would most likely described as the mainstream but if dennis is right about news corp's power to move the needle like that on big issues then you can see why so. Many political leaders have tried to cultivate a good relationship with rupert murdoch. We've seen a for example when tiny bled in the united kingdom was leader of the opposition. Live coty and was trying to become elected to the prime ministership in nineteen ninety-seven. He traveled from london to an island. Where murdoch was at at the time holding court in order to win his blessing for and support for the upcoming election. Any of these big media groups you fall out with them and if you watch out because it's it is literally relentless and unremitting. Once that happens. I took the strategic decision to manage this not confronted. He obtained that support and he won the election and in australia. We've seen succession of prime ministers from from bob hogan woods guiding sometimes in convoy to murdoch's gruden pham for the same reasons. That's the case for a royal commission into news corp. But i think it's a separate question about what we would actually get out of a royal commission what we would learn. Well a royal commission has great pows to require people to turn up to them on and then to examine them in public. And so if you could imagine a royal commission like this for instance you would subpoena poll catering who As treasurer in nineteen ninety seven bicycling handed murder control of the heroic times newspaper group which is the basis of his power here. And you've asked him. Why did he do this. What did you think of the consequences. At what would he do about them. You could get a succession of prime ministers a succession of senior public. Servants and policymakers put them in the witness box. Ask them what effect murdoch has had people like kim williams Who was for a time in charge of the metal operational John haagen also. For a time in charge you can put these people in the witness box and you can put them on a. It's which means that perjuring themselves if they live you. And i said some very difficult questions and i think that would yield to us would be a real insight into the dynamics between the modal hogan is asian and at politicians and policymakers what are a royal commission like that might finish up recommending would be laws requiring a divestiture by murdoch of at least some of his newspapers a royal commission like this might recommend recommend ways in which diversity of meteorology ship could be improved now. Of course that would main running against the grain of media initial policy. That's been going on since nineteen eighty seven and was reinforced and twenty seventeen when malcolm turnbull. Scotland removed the cross ownership laws. That it's it's now possible for an organization like channel nine to owned both the nine television network and the all fairfax newspapers to three senate committee. Hearings the coalition proposing holy holistic media reform that includes scrapping laws that prevent companies controlling tv print and radio in a major market. So you will be running against the grain of thirty years of policy but nonetheless it would stimulate. I think a very lively debate about the state of the pressure stride yet and it might also be an occasion to raise public awareness about the state of the press and press freedom in australia which is extremely limited. When you think about it interesting that you mentioned just now that malcolm turnbull government was one that made it even easier for rupert murdoch to consolidate. He's share of the media in australia. Grow at even and yet malcolm. Turnbull is one of the names on this petition. That kevin rod is dotted. How do you square that. I think it's a very different matter when you're out of politics and you don't any longer feel that you'll site might be in the hands of rupert murdoch. I doubt if malcolm kimberlin was still prime minister that he would have signed that petition in a fit. And i say that because you only had had the look at the reaction of scott morrison anthony albanesi when the proposition for this royal commission was put to them. They reached for the forty foot badge. Polling pushed it away. We'll kevin dryest legitimate issues and a. He's within his rights full of prime minister to-do side but it's not a broad focus on on murdoch on unused colt. Worry about concentrating on the report the reporting of what we do To bit locked complaining about the referee in a in a fully guy. I suspect that's exactly. What malcolm symbol would have done. Had he still been in office. So it's one thing to feel enthralled when you're office and fight another the feel empowered against him when you're not in fact. Malcolm turnbull has gone further than signing the petition on monday night on the abc q. And program he had a huge conversation with paul kelly. The editor at large of news corp's national news piper the strategy i you believe or disbelieve in global warming is like saying you believe disbelieve in gravity turned something that should be question of engineering and economics into amdahl uted ideology and idiocy and we are paying the price or thank you exaggerate the impact that we have. That's what rupert. Os's decided say all we don't have a very big audience when not that influential news corp and murdoch have done enormous damage to western democracy and in particular to the united states australia and in particular on the subject of global warming. Okay so clearly. Malcolm turnbull much like kevin rudd has had a massive change of hot and as dennis sees it. It's no coincidence that they both former prime ministers because he says as a working politician. It's traditionally been very risky to go against news corp let alone support a royal commission into it right although we should say here that royal commissions are not the only mechanism we have in australia for these kinds of investigations for example just yesterday. The greens managed to get the numbers for a senate committee to look into australia's media and democracy and that inquiry will report back in march right. But it's not going to have anything blocked the power of a royal commission. Yeah which dennis says is never going to come off anyway and in either case he thinks there's a very clear lesson from history that inquiries into the media rarely translate into actual change in australia. We had an inquiry by a supreme court judge retain judging viktoria john norris in the nineteen ninety s and. He proposed the statutory authority to scrutinize newspaper. Acquisitions that win. I wear and there was a report in ninety ninety two by the house of rip select committee on the print media which looked much much the same issues and they report. I'm sure has not been remembered by anybody except lunatics like me. You tend to leak mattis okay. So there's that and a big part of the explanation as to why that is at least according to dennis. Is that people. Just don't get excited about this topic very easily since nine eleven. They've been about eight hundred. Three pieces of law passed in australia on national security grounds. Many which had nothing to do with national security that which criminalized journalism. There's been from time to time and outcry about this and there have been true inquiries into press freedom in australia. None of this seems like the slightest difference than i think. It is because When it comes to matters of press freedom and press ownership the public uninterested. Australians have not had to fight for their civil rights in the way that people in other countries have and they are content to think that the the the prisoners to has enough freedom and is secure nothing. Nice freedom's not to have to worry about changing and given that dennis. What do you think is the future four news corporation in australia. Well i think. Probably i almost i want to go on doing what they're doing that they they will be very much. Come down to the business decisions now with a win reuben goes and as things stand. Lacson takes over his elder son. Lachlan might take the view that the business case for newspapers is not as strong as report thinks it is and as a result of that they may be changes but i think any change will be based on business considerations entirely and we have nothing to do with the public good. That's the thing today. We'll be back with you tomorrow by. You've seen listening to an abc podcast. Discover more great. Abc podcasts live radio and exclusives on the abc listen app.

news corp murdoch rupert murdoch australia kevin rudd Malcolm turnbull kevin rod steven smiley kevin via news corp Dr malla center for advancing journalis mr abidine kevin rod rices murdoch empire news corporatio united states kingdom media empire news corp murdoch keating dennis
SAVAGE KINGDOM w/ Alex Cooke *Special Episode*

Bad Science

20:28 min | 6 months ago

SAVAGE KINGDOM w/ Alex Cooke *Special Episode*

"I. Did the movie, Right Or will we have to fight? Hi everybody. Welcome to bad science eight bonus episode. Today I am talking to Alex Cook he is the director of photography the new season of savage kingdom, which is narrated by Charles Dance who played Taiwan Lancaster and game of thrones, and it premiers on Friday August fourteenth on national. Geographic welcome to this bonus episode Alex I n. thanks for having me. Thanks for being here. Live from. Your Dad's car Thank you very much. Excited to be here. Toyota what kind of Toyota Sequoia, fresh hot lively, Toyota Sequoia Beautiful Beautiful Car I wanted to ask you about this show, which is fantastic by the way somebody over there. Sent me the episodes I watched the first one. It was so great. It looks great. It's suspenseful and I just wrote down a bunch of different stuff I'm GonNa ask you about if that's all right with you. That's great. I'm excited to hear questions. Okay. So first of all, this was shot in the Okavango Delta am I saying that right? Yeah. The OKAVANGO Delta kids correct in northern Torna. Yes. Okay. So can. You tell me about that. I mean obviously, we all know that the area was once part of Lake, Ma, GACA Gundy, and ancient lake that mostly got dried up by the early Holocene. But what else can you tell us about it? So the Okavango Delta is the in the delta systems in the world and the water comes mainly rain water comes down from Angola and so every year in the Delta will get a seasonal flood which provides the life of the Delta, and so the rains come down from Angola and flow all the way down into the Okavango does which is. A series of sand islands that were created by termites interestingly enough of thousands of years, and now is one of the main wildlife destinations in southern Africa and didn't WanNa. So yeah, you have like this area where there's just tons of different types of animals all kind of interacting. Attempting to survive according to the series? Yes. Yeah, exactly. So the series savage kingdom was shot in Moremi National Park. In a place called. And Numbers One island in the on the northern tip of an island court chief silent in the northern part of the Mermaid, which is typically surrounded year round by water. But what happens in this season is due to the drought and the lack of rain what's in Angola and the lack of flood waters coming down it creates this. Passage onto the island. So in this season, we have new characters mainly three male lions that wondering to this sort of already established environment, and so it's got the existing characters from savage kingdom three, and then we've got new characters that have now come in and joined the island because of the lack of floodwaters they've been able to come in because it's been dry than in past years. Yeah. That's what I was going to ask you about actually is that a new phenomenon or is that like a predictable seasonal thing? Does it usually have a drought or is this like unprecedented? Twenty years ago the Delta was went through massive droughts where the whole system was dry. But in the we've had very high floods the loss. I think about five years ago. So within the last few years, the dryest it's been, but it it historically does go through drought systems and They're filming this Yes The we filmed the season four of savage kingdom. It was over about one year filming and it carried on directly from savage kingdom three. So for the savage kingdom series itself, we spent two years in Mumbai following all of these animals almost every day. Wow. So you're a resident over there. You know the local spot yeah. Yeah. But each we worked in a team of three cameramen and we went worked on rotating scheduled for about two weeks but. We each spent about two hundred and fifty days Yohe in Mumbai filming for the series, my God, and when you're not on those two weeks or you just at the local pubs and diners. As the director of photography for this year this season what we would do is we take all the footage that we filmed over that two week period and we have a base in mound. What's one which is the closest town in south of Angle Delta and they we with the natural history film has office, and so we'd bring over footage together downloaded all because we'd come back with two three, four terabytes of footage each week. So we download all of that, and then my job was to look through it and start creating in seeing where the stories regarding seeing who who is doing, what I'm trying to figure out the story line for these animals. That got to be a fulltime job of just watching footage, right? Yeah. This thousands and thousands of hours of footage. Oh, the bloopers though probably. Lots and lots of videos are sleeping lions. Great. Okay. So right at the beginning of this first episode, I'm not giving away spoilers here, but there's some pretty I mean it's pretty typical actually of like animal documentary stuff where you see animals eating each other and I was just curious after a while like does it still affect you? I guess the way that it affects us as viewers watching that because. I feel like you've probably seen countless infinite hours of animals tearing each other apart and for me, it's still like so nerve racking you know That's one of the things about savage kingdom, which is it's kind of the role untamed reality of what happens out there and yes being out there and living it and seeing you do see a lot of gruesome. Cooperation, but it is just natural animal behavior and you you definitely do get desensitized to it because you do you get used to it but at the same time. If you think about we we sit with lions for hundreds and hundreds of hours of them doing nothing, and then within one hour, you have maybe the most important sequence, the film for the whole series. So you don't really have much time to think about what's happening or the animal that's being killed because you're so busy thinking about what shots you need to get and. How to best tell the story and be able to capture the story that you're witnessing unfold in front of you. It's kind of like what they say about cover agents I guess where it's mostly sitting there and kind of boring, and then it's like all of a sudden you're in the movies and it's like you go you go this person here I need this now. Exactly I've sat with lions full fifteen hours one day and they moved one hundred feet. Lazy Definitely Lotta to saying wow. Okay. I just have so many questions for it's unbelievable. But okay what is it like because I assume at least from the footage it looks like it's really hot and really dry out there, and so if you're out there like you just said for fifteen hours, our you surviving the elements sweating a lot. I said we we live fulltime in the film vehicles that we phone from and the open film vehicles with no sides no windows. So you get a lot of fresh air flow but sure you definitely definitely get taught and one of the funniest things working out there is you spend so much time with these animals is that they get quite used to you and you spend thousands and thousands of hours with. The most period of a few years and but often happens is you'll be sitting in the sun and they'll be moving in the morning and then come to mid day and getting hotter, and you'll be the only shade around. So we've had lions coming fall asleep under the called method sleeping underneath the caw, and then that's when it gets a bit tricky because then you move and you're stuck in the sun. Suchet shade is definitely a commodity out there at times not a great shot either right of like check out line sleeps under the car. With the Lions it's a bit easier because you can usually see a tail sticking out. So you know they're still there but when the Leopard comes and sleeps under the call, you have no idea if she's still on, there's no way of checking my Gary You have to keep your head on three sixty spin waiting to sneak out the other side. Okay. Well, that obviously leads me to ask you if you've ever been attacked by any of these animals or if anybody's been injured. Which I guess I can just skip over my stupid question which was. About you're sweating I was GONNA ask if you add like ice vest or like slushy in one of those like guzzler hats. We expecting we. Lots of water and often as a an African Sarong to Koi, which will wet and draped over ourselves, which helps keep school but no, no one's been attached. We hope and. Rice safer we work in the animals the very habituated work in. A game drive area with Mambo Wilderness Safaris instead, these animals that around game drive vehicles in around us and you spend time with you and they don't see you as a threat. It's more of a big moving rock. I like to think that annoyingly follows them around and provide shade at times I mean I would still be scared all the time these things but you know fair enough I guess you guys are very brave and also just tempering the environment there must be so impossible I'm in Texas right now and I played tennis for an hour and a half yesterday I felt like I was dying. Okay. So you also track the animals I was reading. You have some expertise in that area. So is that like what I'm thinking like in the movies where you're like looking at footprints and smelling droppings no smelling droppings but unfortunately. Lots of list looking at footprints in there's different ways to track the different animals in. It's definitely an acquired skill that we've all had will US cameraman of had to learn over the years of experience in years of being there and the hardest to find his definitely leopards and with leopards taker you not only have to look at tracks but the so thick and dense in the areas they liked to live and operate that. One of the best ways is just switch the car off and sit and listen and you wait for the other animals to find them. So you wait for bird to allow. Impala to. Along. And you learn all these different sounds that the vervet monkeys in the boons- making you really utilize all of the different. Animals, to be able to find the. Unbelievable okay. So you guys are working together. You have your, you have a partnership with the Animal Kingdom out there yet, but it is I mean it is a lot of searching. We wake up every morning about an hour before sunrise and I've spent every day for weeks searching for leopards and only on day seven, find them Jesus it's probably the Demonstra awarding thing being able to track something from start to finish finding the tracks in the morning, following them all day, and then being able to find them and not only find them and then be able to film them and witnessed sort of what they're doing. Yeah I mean it definitely has that much. Quality know just watching this footage feels like I'm seeing something that you know nobody seen before people are just like not many see somehow you know and I mean you must have like a maybe a deeper calling into this like when I watch this stuff. I I start to even just think philosophically about what is our role in the Animal Kingdom and how? Are we helping or hurting their quality of life? So does that have a have a role in this show? Do you think people should take away some sort of message on how to live their lives or or just appreciation for these animals? Maybe? Yeah. I think I have a huge appreciation for them and I'm so lucky to be able to spend so much time. Seeing animals do what they do and I think that's the beautiful thing about savage kingdom is it is raw unedited real life behavior. So you see the animals doing exactly what they're doing and sometimes that's really really sad and sometimes it's really funny and the brings in all these different emotions and I think if there's one thing that people could take away is just To be able to have a love for wildlife and appreciation to see kind of wildlife at its best whether that's the brutality of it'll the beauty of it and to be able to go on and protect it and be able to allow these animals to live the lives that they do have. You ever been need to intervene during some of these sequences. Well, that's. That's a tough one. I asked the hard hitting questions here, Alex. yeah. Yeah definitely I would say, no. Because like I said earlier so wrapped up in the filming of it sort of takes. The emotional side away from things it soften the next day or two days later that the emotions early start to hidden and as well don't give away anything. But in previous previous seasons that's been we've filmed deaths of death of lying cubs, deaths of leopard cubs, fan things really hard that that's. In season three though is the death of Hula Hoop. CD One of the main characters for this season film tired I'm and her sort of downward demise not which would be hard to. witness because it was so slow took so much time, but it's usually a few days later that the emotion style kicking. Yeah man that sounds so tough good on you. Okay. So you're a DP let's dip our toes into that pool of for a second. So are you strapped into a steady cam? Is it all like a camera mounted on a car? Do you bill gigantic tracks through Botswana to car cameras on what's the deal there? Yes. So we we operate like I said earlier, we operate a to cruise system each reach to film vehicles which are outfitted with camera mounts on the side of the cost. So it's it's a moving home and sort of camera setup so. The camera sits in between the passenger in the driver's seat ready to be built because it's a lot of you don't know when anything's going to happen with filming wild dogs she needs to be able to chase them for kilometers at a time through thick Bush and say needs to be able to grab the camera out, put it on the car and shoot straight away, and so we have a main setup. So those running gun filming, and then for this season, we also use the shot over which is mounted at said stabilized Jimbo system mounted on the front of the vehicle, and that gives you those really beautiful steady cinematic shots really poll entitle the dramatic sequences together with the beauty in. Kind of what's special about? Okay. So you're not out there by yourself with a camera on you just. We're operating from the vehicle, but we do spend the night sleeping out in the Bush just us on the call, and that allows us to he everything that's going on in that really helps with were saying earlier about the tracking is if you can hear lying coaling nighttime, you can you can know the movement to the pride and he spent so much time out that you really understand these animals you understand how they move and why that going where they do in the territories in. So if I'm asleep and I, I have three male lions roaring in the north, I know that the pride of females in the south. A not going to be going to the north when I'm trying to find them tomorrow because I know that they can hear them and they're going to be shifting them. All of that helps with us finding finding and tracking the animals that just sounds so terrifying for me. Once, I spent one night camping hated it couldn't do it. Did you did you grow up like being an outdoorsy kate or you just used to the wilderness like it just doesn't affect you as much? I. I grew up outdoors grout came up camping but I, I can't say I was immune to it I. Definitely you have to get used to I remember I'd been in Botswana working for natural for about six months before I was left alone. In a vehicle by myself and made the mistake was really dry and I made the mistake of sleeping up one of the watering holes with elephants coming to, and I had screaming elephants running through postal card full moon and I I think I slept about twenty minutes that night and kept driving around trying to find a place with no sleep. But you do learn with the experience out that you do learn the best places to sleep and you and. Say and way not going to be interfering with the animals. They never sleep on an elephant path because natural highways in animal corridors they'll use and we like to try and sleep next to big tree because we think we sort of blend into it but I have woken up before with the leopard sitting in the tree. While we were asleep up. Off of ninety percent of you are not killed doing get it also not sleeping in the elephants path seems like a good just universal rule. Yeah. Definitely a good way to learn. Yeah. Yeah and why did they send you out there alone is that common protocol or you like a rookie? Were they trying to my Boston to go back to town and so I was left out there but we work operate by ourselves side live Oh. That's normal. We selves with the shots over we needed we have a team of two people because someone needs to drive while the cameramen operates the kimball system films they are typically. One person in the car sometimes we'll have to we'll shoot two cameramen in the car to be able to better cover sequences but is a lot of times out there sleeping alone by yourself. Wow, that is unbelievable. Are you I mean? Do you bring books? Do you have a Nintendo switch yet? Not Intend to switch of books and lots of sitting mentally encouraging lines to move. Yet the the thing about being out there is you often need to be more aware than the lines because they'll be fast asleep and you'll sit fifty one hundred feet back to be able to. Everything unfold, and that was one of the things you have to be able to give with these animals so much space to be able to let the natural course of action, take place, and so often you'll be sitting back if the shade under shade waiting for something to happen and you got to be, you have to be ready for war the impala to walk in because cameras take about a minute to turn on which was the bane of our existence because yesterday no minute before anything's going to happen to turn your camera on because. We're always watching and listening with these camera developers. They don't have camera that just booed on. Yeah they they have very, very good cameras, but they do take a while kind of cameras are they let's shout them out really stood for this is serious. We show exclusively on red shoot on regular cameras. Shooting in six K, which allows us to deliver the product in very high quality. Okay. Read cameras from me and most from Alex Cook speed up your on time. Doing these people are out here. He's sleeping with lions over here. Read how hard is it my own turns on I'm not going to get do it. Okay this is all fascinating I can't thank you for joining me. What was it? Oh, I was just curious on the books that you're reading. Are you reading novels? Are you reading? What are you reading out there anything anything and everything that gets given to me just you don't even care. There's too many list I think read about one time I recorded read about forty books in three months. So you go through the it's a lot of sitting. So you go through each anything, get the hands on while any recommendations homogeneous. Homo. SAPIENS by no. Yuval Harari. Okay. Fantastic. I feel like if it makes the top of your list and you're reading, you know with the lion near you forty books and three months then I got it, it's worth it for me to check it out definitely. Okay. Mr Cooke. Thank you so much for joining me. I hope everybody watches the show please it's my pleasure. It's savage kingdom comes out on Friday it sure does. Okay. Thank you so much. Thank you very much. Enjoy your dad's car. Out But that science has hosted and produced by me heath. Edinburgh are associated producers. Emily Feld. Our editor is Lucas Bolinger. Our social media is managed by blue whale media. Shout out to Jane Kate I. Love. You don't tell my girlfriend, the executive powerful Punching Shrimp Doozer is Brett. Kushner. Oh, falls on Instagram at signed pot. If there's movie legacy discussing the podcast feel free to email at bats signs at secret combats bad signs at secret dot com and please leave an I tunes review give us five stars GonNa Guber driver but it does help make sure people know about the podcast which we really appreciate Nice visiting by.

Lions Alex Cook Okavango Delta Botswana director Angola Toyota Sequoia OKAVANGO Delta Toyota Animal Kingdom Charles Dance Mumbai Okavango Torna Angle Delta US Moremi National Park Taiwan Bush
It's All Politics

The Sustainable Futures Report

21:50 min | 3 months ago

It's All Politics

"This is the sustainable futures report for friday. The twenty seventh of november. And i'm anthony j. You can listen to me on this podcast as always but this week you can also hear me being interviewed on mama. Earth talk with morris canal. Like good podcasts. Including these sustainable. If you're just report you can find it on apple podcasts and all your favorite podcast hosts the even a link at the end of this article. If you're listening to this you can find the episode taxed on the website together with all my sources at sustainable futures dot report sustainable futures. Don't report. I decided to call this episode. It's all politics. There are certainly lots of politics around in the uk at the moment but my main thing is that we need to rely on politicians in both opposition and government to make real changes to protect us against the climate challenge. Politicians have the power so far as we empower them although there's a world of difference between letting them do something and making them do something. Only governments really have the power to make significant. Change the question in. The media is whether boris johnson's ten point and published last week will make that needed difference. So that's what. I'll start as a lot of other news as well as us. Politics chinese politics in australian politics. There's more on hurricane iota and other extreme weather we round off with electric vehicles. Carbon capture storage and weather. Sustainability is sexy. Well fashionable Tation with you from book. Which i've been reading. It's cold capital and ideology by thomas. Pickety and i've mentioned that i've been reading it for some time. It's very big book with profound detail. Meticulously researched. thomas. Pickety is a french economist. Who is professor of economics at the school for advanced studies in the social sciences. Associate cia at the power. School of economics and centennial professor of economics in the international inequalities institute at the london school of economics. He has what he says along with global warming the rise of inequality is one of the principal challenges confronting the world today whereas the twentieth century witnessed a historic decline in inequality it's revival since the nineteen eighties has posed a profound challenge to the very idea of progress. What is more. The challenge of inequality is closely related to the climate challenge. And it is clear that global warming county stalked or at least attenuated without substantial changes in the way people live for such changes to be acceptable to the majority the f. mounted must be apportioned as equitably possible. The need for fat portion of the f. is all the more obvious because the rich are responsible for disproportionate of greenhouse gas emissions. While the pull will suffer the worst consequences of climate change so will always johnson ten point. Plan these issues. The daily mail covered the plant extensively. It claimed that the twenty twenty three for the end of gas boy does to be installed new properties was tightly unattainable in fact the government change this within house to twenty twenty-eight and blamed a misunderstanding the paper itself seemed to be a little confused about the difference and the fact that there is a difference between a heat pump and hydrogen-powered boya having said that as i commented last week that does seem to be some incongruity the government's plan for these two different energy. Sources we do already have a national electricity grid and we may have to upgrade it to cope with extra demands from home heating and electric vehicles. We have a national gas great but it is certainly not as extensive as the tragedy and it is largely unsuitable for the transport of hydrogen while hydrogen may well have a future as transport fuel or for storage of Renewable will energy during darkness. Ola wind from my layman's point of view. It looks like a very expensive project to rise out to homes across the nation. The mail newspaper also reports that the prime minister and business secretary alex chama elder private meeting with more than twenty powerful british on multinational corporations. Just hours off. The government published its green industrial strategy loss wednesday to lobby them to invest forty billion pounds in a clean power revolution. The prime minister's office at number ten put out a video to promote the prime minister's ten points the male gleefully pointed out that the closing shot of a revolving world british isles on it. They did miss that. The illustration from for carbon capture and storage pictured industrial chimneys belching black smoke down to earth. A website base in india. Asked will boris johnson's green industrial revolution enough for net zero uk. It's not helpful to meet. The uk's kaban budgets co two emissions would need to full by another thirty one percent by twenty thirty whereas government projections expect just a ten percent count based on current policies. But that has been a historical policy. Gap between the uk is heading us is where it needs to be on climate. Due to a lack of credible attempt a plan for years this can be attributed they say to the brexit referendum and consequent policy kale's this does not reflect well as of next year's twenty-six climate conference the odds of the will are upon us in green world's the john lewis green party. Molly scott cato says random and acted policies. Don't hold up to the climate emergency. She continues far from providing reassurance the plan reinforces the fear that the government simply does not understand the climate crisis. We have facing while biden is promising to spend two trillion dollars on his climate plan. Johnson's plan amounts to only sound full billion pounds and his government is investing more than four times as much in the energy-intensive road building program. She says full billion pounds because it's widely reported that most of the twelve billion in the plan. I'd already been announced the whole ten point foam at she says comes across as a random shopping list of nice to haves. But what we need is a clear plan to reach defined targets. The paris agreement sets out the reductions. co two emissions. We need to achieve to stay within a one point. Five degree warming limit. The government has set a target of net zero by two thousand fifty and has its own committee on climate. Change to keep it on track to reach that target. This planet knows those very real limits and throws out a number of random and unconnected policies the very epitome of government policy. Not being joined up event organizers. Ed asks is boris johnson. Ten point plan enough to reach net zero. They say a new thirty page document has been released by the government going into more detail about ten point plan despite a more in depth. Look at the low com- transition. The documents somehow manages to raise more questions. They don't to simon evans of carbon brief whose analysis demonstrates that the planned measures are not enough to achieve net zero. The fact that co two is down one third in decades tilles the off track against few jakob targets. He shows uk government projections getting further from dogs. And he two points out that this is not a good place to be for. The nation hosting next is twenty-six conference. You'll find a link to simon evans detail analysis of the plan of the end of this episode. All the sustainable futures wrote website. You makes the point that this is a strategy and there is much more detail to come out with this week. Spending review the final decision on the sizewell nuclear station and the revised nbc. The paris agreement target expected on the twelfth of december further education news says the plan will require major investment in trade skills apprenticeship right now if the uk is to deliver it. Maybe they'll be something about that in the spending review und- in cumbria the deputy leader of copeland council welcomes to clean energy announcements in the ten point plan. That's the same cumbria where the council has given permission for the development of a new deep coal mine and in other news well from the usa. President elect joe biden has appointed john kerry as his climate envoy. It was john. Kerry who represented the united states in paris in two thousand fifteen at the signing of the paris agreement is first task will be to reverse the exit from the agreement implemented by the trump administration in september in a speech to the united nations president z. of china announced that the nation would reach peak carbon emissions before twenty thirty a neutral by twenty sixty an important message from the world's biggest emitter. It seems that the announcement took many by surprise including many emissions experts within china itself. Austral for many years. China has argued that emerging economies should not face restrictions on emissions. And they didn't kyoto. If i remember correctly restrictions should apply instead to the industrialized nations which have produced unconstrained emissions for decades if not for centuries the straits times attributes the change of policy to professor z. When how all of sync University as china's top climate diplomat and of the communist party central committee he also led research demonstrating how the twenty six targets will be achieved. Twenty sixty is a soft target targeted. Most nations have set themselves with is a change of policy in the right direction and there is no doubt that there is resistance within the nation is not climate skepticism. That drives resistance chinese schoolchildren. Children are taught. The signs of global warming from a young age and citizens are eager for the government to clean up the polluted air water. The main issue is the coal industry on the very same day president z. The un a commentary in the people's daily a com- a communist party mouthpiece argued for the future of coal as long as coal is utilized in a clean efficient way. It should be cold clean energy across the world in australia to former prime ministers on going head to head with media mogul rupert murdoch. The concern is partly of media concentration in australia. Which means that model controls. The majority of news outlets in the country kevin rudd and mouth tumble are seeking a royal commission into murdoch's newscorp sparking a wave of negative comment against the to across the new coal titles that concerned about climate denial in the modal papers. Rupert murdoch himself says that on climate denies. Here there are many outright denies writing regularly for his papers. Some james modal resigned from the boulder news cole earlier this year. Citing disagreements over editorial content widely believed to being disagreement about presentation of climate science. Let's not forget extreme weather. Many consequences of the climate crisis occur in far off countries of which we know. Little last week's news was hurricane iota as it made its way through nicaragua and other countries in central america. Last week's news for most of us but very present crisis for those living in those countries iras wind and heavy rains killed around forty people across central america and colombia including at least two in the island of providencia most of the infrastructure was damaged or destroyed. According to cnn iota is the thirteenth hurricane of the historic twenty twenty atlantic hurricane season. So far there have been thirty named storms the most ever recorded the combined devastation. From iota eta and the coronavirus pandemic will likely play the area already suffering from a pool of public health system for years to come. There's no just central. America suffering extreme weather the washington post reports that cycling hits a malia as the country's strongest storm on record offshore an explosive intensification abroad fulda eight inches of rainfall accompanied the system through northern somalia. The dryest positive. The country drenching desert regions with a euro twos with of rainfall in just a matter of hours or a couple of days reigns also swept through the gulf of aden and brushed up against yemen and there are other extremes in july twenty sixteen the temperature in mitzvah northwest q. Wait reached fifty. Three point nine degrees centigrade. Which is a hundred and twenty nine degrees. Fahrenheit high temperatures although not syndicated have since been claimed jainism and california at the other extreme this week the guardian reports that the russian city of level stock in the extreme east was overwhelmed by an ice dome which left a hundred and fifty thousand people without power or water qasr encased in ice and trees collapsed bringing the region to a standstill as transport links and energy infrastructure destroyed probably because his near the coast temperatures in the region. Rarely full been minus. Six degrees centigrade announced weekend down to minus ten and finally a few more stories around off. This week's episode first carbon capture and storage writing in briefings full brinson katherine mcbride suggest a number of natural ways to sequester carbon. Not cutting down trees to make way for a railway that nobody will use is one of our ideas. Farmers could be paid to plant cover crops in empty fields a winter. These plants absorb cobb and are absorbed back into the soil prior to replanting in the spring. She estimates this trap some three point. Three billion tons of co two each year with benefits for the facility of the soil known a great deal in the context of the uk's annual emissions of around three hundred fifty million tons but probably was doing on the less however a controversial aspect of this is the glyphosate. Weedkiller monsanto's roundup would be used in the spring to kill the pilots. Said that reprinting could be done on. A no telesystem is direct planting without plowing. Another suggestion is to plant hedges along the nation's roads and motorways to absorb both co two and noise every little helps. It almost certainly won't be enough to solve the problem. But that's not a reason for not doing it in manchester. In nova's england sent all the dole than pow house at least in name leaders are calling for government investment including into eden project north. The original eason project was built in an abandoned. Clay pits in komal. It consists of a group of bio-bombs enormous glass domes which contain plants from all parts of the world as a tourist destination. It has brought some two billion pounds to the region. Aiden project north is projected to attract around one million visitors a year and directly employ multiple people the business case estimates a visit to spend of more than two hundred million per year in the region not including money spent at eden project north self which would support an additional fifteen hundred jobs. Nothing specific in the chancellor's review about the seventy million pounds. That the project needs sage sage scientific advice group for emergencies as being regularly in the news over the last few months as it provides advice to the government to deal with the covid pandemic until recently there was criticism that the committee's deliberations and advice were kept secret at a group of equally prominent scientists setup. How little independent sage now. They have decided that their expertise could be used to address not just the pandemic but other emergencies as well. This week announced that they were turning their attention to the climate crisis and will hold the government to. I should watch developments with interest in a revolt this week. Contract has a shift to electric vehicles. In emerging markets will end the oil era. They say china is leading a switch to electric vehicles in emerging markets which will save governments two hundred and fifty billion dollars per year in oil imports. Uncut expected growth in global oil demaim by seventy percent by twenty. Thirty countries can finance the shift to electric vehicles from the huge savings. They will make on oil imports. Common trucco calculates the custody importing oil for the average call is ten times higher than the cost of soda equipment needed to power on equivalent electric vehicle controversy. And then you woke. Times is sustainability fashionable apparently watch companies claim that younger consumers expect sustainability to be built into every product as a measure of course luxury watches should follow this trend on the other hand of the said claims of sustainability. Were a how is a recycled sanity. Produced watch strap on a production run of five hundred watches and to impact the environment. In any way. I started with politics and the ten point plan. This is not a political podcast on. Just say that the day after the ten point twelve billion pound climate plan. The prime minister announced an extra sixty billion pounds for the defense of the realm military spending in other words. Is there an increase in the threat. Level other threats more serious than the climate crisis let us not fund our defense by impoverishing the realm. We seek to defend. Let us be sure that we are defending ourselves from the right threats. I'm not saying this week. i'm as day. That was the sustainable futures report. And thank you as always full listening. There'll be three more episodes before christmas. Then i think i might take january off for research you understand to ensure that the sustainable futures revolt in twenty twenty one will be better than ever not be able to go anywhere anyway. Of course i aim to produce things of interest to you my audience so please do continue to come back with ideas and suggestions that i can develop topics would interest you mile at anthony dash dot com or contact me via the website as i say three more episodes before christmas so there will be another next week wonderfully it'll be about. Don't forget to listen to mama. Earth talk imagining day about walls. These sustainable futures report.

billion pounds boris johnson uk morris canal Pickety School of economics international inequalities ins simon evans paris alex chama forty billion pounds thirty one percent john lewis green party Molly scott cato two trillion dollars anthony j Five degree china thomas sizewell nuclear station
Trumps Plan to Politicize the Fed

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

20:54 min | 2 years ago

Trumps Plan to Politicize the Fed

"White next is supported by Charles Schwab sting informed is all about asking the right questions. Which is why Schwab encourages you to ask questions about the way, your wealth is being managed do, you know, how much you're paying and you get your fees back? If you're not happy at Schwab. You get low costs and satisfaction guarantee. If you're not happy for any reason, though, refunder fear commission sa- go ahead. Ask your broker some questions you don't like their answers. Ask again at Schwab. To find out more. Visit Schwab dot com forward slash comparis-. If there's one thing President Trump wants, you to know like really wants you to know it's that the economy is wrong. Since our election win. The stock market is up almost fifty percent. You look like geniuses at America is now booming. Like never before the countries doing very poorly. We've created by five point five million new jobs. Nobody would have believed that was awesome. But there is just one tiny little problem. The Federal Reserve has started to haunt Trump's enthusiasm. It's as if he's getting a scapegoat ready. Just in case the American economy hits the skids, if the fed had done its job, the stock market would be up five thousand ten thousand additional points. Trump tweeted this weekend. The fed is one of those topics that I feel like I should know about. And I do not us kind of part of what I wanna talk about Jordan. Weisman writes about the fed for slate. How Donald Trump is actually one of the best things ever happened to fed writers. For a long time. The Federal Reserve has been the most important economic institution possibly in the world, and nobody gives a damn typically people do not care about the fed. But Donald Trump has this way of just, you know, taking the dryest topics and turning them into a reality television style feud. And he's done that with the Federal Reserve Trump is mostly pissed off that the fed raised interest rates last year that could slow economic growth just as he begins to run for reelection. But for Jordan, the thing about this viewed is that Trump may have a point today on the show Jordan's going to take us inside the battle over the Federal Reserve and ask will Trump to reshape this institution in his own image. I'm Mary Harris. You're listening to what next stay with us. These two words that can change your life. You're hired especially if you're someone who's got a criminal background, by the way that is one in four Americans. It's huge, but if a conviction history, and you go in for a job interview, you are fifty percent less likely to get a callback for that job. Then someone went in without a conviction history. Dave's killer bread wants to change that their employee's aren't just employee's their employees partners and one in three of them has a criminal background. They hold positions ranging from entry level jobs to management roles. A job today is helping them buy groceries and support their families pay their bills just by buying loaf of bread. You can join millions of fans who support Dave's killer breads commitment to second chance employment. Visit WWW dot Dave's killer bread dot com slash what. Next for a special offer. From Dave's killer. Brad. And you can learn more about the people behind the bread. Can we answer? This one question for people who will be asking it feeling dumb for asking it. Yes. Her take me to reserve. What happens there who is there? And like, I think of them as like the man behind the curtain controlling the economy looks sort of changing these indicators they can print the money for all right? So the Federal Reserve does a bunch of their, but in the most important role that they have as far as most of us concerned is the control interest rates. They don't control every interest rate, but they control key interest rate. You know, the the federal funds rate the interest rate were banks lend to each other overnight. Yeah, it controls short-term interest rates and short-term interest rates have an impact on long term interest rates, and you know, if you push interest rates up that's gonna probably slow the economy down because becomes more expensive to borrow. And if you cut interest rates that's going to give the economy boost because becomes cheaper to borrow and all this gets much more complicated the deeper you get into it. But it's about a my low rates. Juices the economy high rates slow it down way down and the people were usually they're typically are very dull, but competent intelligent, economists, not all lawyers sometimes they're finance guys drunk house finance guy in a lawyer. They have degrees wear ties they were ties. I mean, that's that's the fed typically until Donald Trump show south so in two thousand eighteen points skied Jerome Powell. Yeah. In charge of the fed who's Jerome Powell dropout while he was on the board of governors, right? Is a so he's been there little while he was already there. And you know, he's a finance guy. He was actually a veteran of the George W Bush administration. But you know, the thing Trump how was mostly known as sort of an acolyte of Janet Yellen. Right. Janet Yellen was the fed chair before him before him and drummer Jala was sort of always agreed with Jan he just took his orders from her. He he was away the Donald Trump could appoint someone with Janet Yellen views on monetary policy. But with a slightly. Looser approach to regulation, he'd be more likely deregulate some of the financial industry, which is important because the fed is also involved in regulating, finance or you surprised when he was going to know. 'cause I mean, he was definitely one of the front runners and Trump seemed very torn about yelling. He actually kinda liked her cousin thought of her as a low interest rate person. Even though he's not a lot of campaign like, you know, the spreading conspiracy theories about how she was keeping rates low to boost Obama. But in the end, he actually kind of liked him respected her which was strange because she's a diminutive powerful woman, which is like the kind of thing that, but it was clear he had some action for and he he thought about reappointing her. But in the end didn't instead he took one of her right hand men and his tenure hasn't been smooth. No, it hasn't been and actually yellow was not a low rates person. She was a hike rates vary slowly in order to kind of gradually increase of make sure they got ahead of inflation before it broke out type person and drum pal kind of continued in that tradition. And he he was okay the slow. Let's let's do this low and slow, right? That would is like if you wanna use barbecue terms loan slut was what he wanted to do. And and so he's hiking interest rates, and for someone like Donald Trump is a real estate investor and used to kind of seeing how when when the fed sets interest rates up, then all the sudden, it costs more money for you to borrow money and buy things he gets that intuitively. He understands this is like one thing about the economy gets on like a gut level that like high rates are bad for the business. And he gets that one of the things he has going for him is a relatively hot economy. And so he's freaking out about this. What happened in December? Because in December. It seemed like there was a breaking point the sort of so economic data's if year writers and some questions about how strong the, you know, this expansion really is going to continue the fed hydrates again and markets kind of freaked out immediate, right? Yeah. Because they don't do this stop the market was like Jerome Powell is utterly the middle of a press conference leaves the press conference. What happened? Well, what really showed that they had second thoughts was then the next quarterly meeting they paused their rate hikes. They said we're not going to hike again in fat. We might not again for the rest of the year. We're going to totally rethink this. They even left open the possibility of cutting of things got worse. So it was kind of like the fed had a bunch of cold ice water thrown on its face. Like is they woke up like, oh, maybe we've been overdoing it. But that that happened too late to switch Donald Trump who's already pissed off. I still remember looking at like, my 4._0._1._K and realizing it kinda gone off a little mini cliff in December and never look at your 4._0._1._K. No. But yes, so Trump was angry. And I mean, I think he took it as some indication that the that the the feds stopped hiking. But now he wants them to go further and he wants them to cut. He implied. He might fired Rome Powell, right? Yeah. It's not clear he can do that. Well, he absolutely cannot fire drone pal from the Federal Reserve what he might be able to do according to some legal experts is. Demotes him from being chair to just being a regular governor. And appoint someone else chair. This would if that were to happen. It would be a nuclear bomb in the world of monetary policy. Like, it would re and once you start gaming out. What would then happen? It gets kind of crazy because the powers of the Federal Reserve chair actually largely informal the chair. The Federal Reserve doesn't even have to be the one who leads the interest rate committee. The other governors got pissed off enough. Could maybe pick someone else to lead that call very strange, Jerry. It is kind of like it's a grocery co op except for the most cursory caught that also controls the world Konomi. But like, you could get totally crazy if you did that he probably won't though because everyone is talked down. And instead he's decided to go this other out, which is try to nominate sycophants to the fed board who will just do it. He says, which frankly is actually a more productive way of going about it. I think than throwing a grenade at the fed. But it worries it's worrisome because it has this creeping impact where it's like. If you start stocking the board with your allies than if we've comes much more insidious, although I was surprised by how much power Jerome Powell had because after he made that decision to hike rates in December, and then kind of rethought. It came back and changed everything sounds like he didn't even consult anyone. He was just like listen, I'm gonna make a decision here. Bad on me. We're going to change it. Well, so the thing is the the fed has traditionally operated by consensus. So he has to convince the other people on the committee that that sets rates, you know, you have twelve members there, and they all get one vote and the Cheryl gets one vote, and it's majority rules, technically. But typically they try to present a unified front, so they try to work it out together. The chair himself has a lot of power and there's traditionally law deference given to the chair he's he's not a dictator. But he's definitely the first among equals is sort of the the way it works. So he definitely had to convince everyone else to go along with his plan. So. In the last few weeks. We've seen these names floated of possible people to join the board Herman Cain. Stephen Moore told me more about who these guys are. And what their monetary theory. It's. He laughs. All right. Stars Herman Cain. Who's actually it? Looks like he's he's done. He's already shot. Like so is so alarming. But it sounds like, you know, people just said, no, well, it's also interesting that he's more alarming. We'll get to that. So we all know how McCain, you know, her McCain, I know Herman Cain. He's failed presidential candidate. You know? The former Godfather's pizza executive is ran a lobbying group for awhile Shuki Duckie, nine tax plan, etc. Etc. I don't know what Chucky Ducky is oh truck. That was like it's a shaggy Duckie kinda day. It's this weird turn I don't know where it comes from. But like it was just like those like he's always a great day here to Donald Trump has Schalke Duckie kinda candidate, ROY. Stephen Moore is the Zelic of the conservative economic world when he got cable news guy right now, he is. Yeah. So when I wrote about him getting nominated my phrase was he is the embodiment of the sucking void at the heart of conservative economics. Use this old supply side guy, you know, from sort of art Laffer, he's friends with art Laffer. He's spent most of his career either trying to elect Republican candidates who will cut taxes or convincing Republicans in power to cut taxes or working for the Wall Street Journal editorial page writing about how people should cut taxes or consistent. Yeah. Exactly. Like, this is all he has spent I mean, and he is famously wrong about everything probably the one of the funniest things that ever happened with him is that I think it was a paper in Kansas decided to never ever run one of his Cindy. Gated at Dory's again, because they found like just really horrible fact errors in it became a thing that like you've been banned from the pages of this Kansas paper. Like just like that's just sad. Right. Like, Paul Krugman disagrees. A lot of Republicans, but he just like refers to openly as a clown. I mean, Stephen Moore is he's he's very flexible that that's the thing. He he for a long time was a sort of regular supply side, Republican free trade free markets, whatever he actually wrote him, and Larry cudlow editor wrote a piece I believe in the national review just hammering Trump for his positions before Trump was a nominee first positions on trade and immigration. And then as soon as he was the nominee. They're like, oh, well, we're on the Trump train tariff. Sound like a great idea. Well, yeah, exactly. They just they're like well cut taxes, which is really the thing. They care most about and so, you know, Steve Moore converted, you know. Trumpism there's this. He apparently sat down with a group of Republicans one point and told them in private that we are no longer in the party of Reagan. We're in Trump's party now. And he now spends his time on the live time on CNN is a talking head defending the administration, and you know, he was never a monetary policy guy. He admitted many times I am not a monetary policy expert, but because he got great person for the fed. Well, here's the thing. Because Trump was so obsessed with the fed Stephen Moore became obsessed with the fed he is willing to the Trump line. And that's what's important. So and Herman Cain. Similarly, so both of these guys. Yeah. Who Trump is floated out there as maybe they should be joining the fad. They talk about cutting interest rates by maybe half a percent. Do you actually think that's a bad idea? So what here's what makes data? I don't think that their their views about monetary policy are like what should be done in the near term are what makes them problematic. They would be two votes on the Federal Reserve Board. I one thing that commute people. There's the Federal Reserve Board of governors. That's. Seven people. But the committee that sets interest rates is called the FOMC that's twelve people. So they'd be to twelve and frankly, they would probably get inordinate beatings. The other ten guys are like Trump just going to look like. Okay, steve. Yeah. Keep talking keep talking yet. Now. Now now, there's no no there's no deflation what you talking about. Steve, Steve, what are you talking? That's how I imagine this this meeting would go. So it's not about like their influence on the short term. Why there are kind of scary is that the Federal Reserve is one of those few institutions that there's been sort of a bipartisan truce on for many years. Now, there's been this idea that we're not going to make this a political football. We're not gonna try and put partisan hack on it to, you know, get the policies we want. Instead, you know, those been the tradition of presidents re-nominating fed chair that the prior administration had picked to kinda show some continuity and reassure markets and the idea that well, that's all out the window. Instead, we're going to stack the fed with people who will do our partisan bidding is very destabilizing frightening to people it's almost like the supreme court. That's what the little frightening to people. And which is the problem because so many people internationally or sort of setting their currency my ours, right? Let's part of it. It just. Yeah. I mean, the interest rate on US treasury bonds, and what happens the dollar facts, everyone, right? Like the whole world economy is. Yeah. Some in some countries, it's because they said their currency, they peg their currency to the dollar another country is it's just that, you know, if interest rates go up in the US money flows out of their Konomi and flows here. I mean, there's all sorts of reasons why the fed is the most arguably the most powerful single economic institution in the world if that were to become basically just another dysfunctional site of partisan warfare. A lot of people are scared of what the outcome would be. That's not to say the fed has done its job perfectly in the past. Yeah. I was gonna say like, I mean, this sort of idea of nonpartisan fed. Head is that really just a dream of the last two or three decades. I think the way you described the fed of the past two decades is ideological but nonpartisan, and that is a a important distinction the fed ever since the Paul Volcker error has been very very that's Reagan years. The Reagan years ever since Paul Volcker Slade inflation in the eighties. Right. Finally, brought down stagflation. It's been very very, very careful, and hyper vigilant about inflation and keeping that low. That's Pulgar had to make really tough decisions to do that. Right. He created a extremely deep recession. People forget how deep recession was. But that was sort of mythology of the fed was that they are willing to make the hard decisions and plunge the economy into recession if it meant bringing down inflation, and this was this hard-won battle, the problem is that over time, you know, people who kind of came of age in that era sort of had this inflation phobia, right? That was that they were a little too mom Nike focused on it. And as a result. You know, there's a sense that. They've probably sacrificed some job growth over time and some economic growth overtime in order to keep down inflation. And right now, the Federal Reserve is actually sort of they are quietly doing this review of all their policies and how they're like. Wow. This whole fight with Trump is going on kind of this TV few. They actually are kind of rethinking the way they operate or trying to because they have some recognition that maybe we have messed up in the past. The thing is the best way to fix the fed is not to put Herman Cain or more on it, the sway fix. It is either to come up with some sort of legislative rule that says, okay, we want we want to change the feds mandate and here is specifically what we want to accomplish. Or you have sort of cultural change at the fed like what we're started being to begin to see where they say, okay. We have to pay more attention to employment and be a little less afraid of inflation. That's a way can change. You pick personnel who will do that. But just making it a more partisan institution because that's really frightening thing like a partisan fed where you have the central Bank run. By Republicans or Democrats, and you have the opposite party in the White House that they would try to kneecap the economy, that's really frightening over the next week or two I'm wondering what you think we should keep our eyes on because you've you've said some really interesting stuff about how you know. We obviously all watch the interest rate decision that happens. Is there something else? We should be looking at though, I think that if came does withdraw it'll be interesting to see who Trump nominates. Instead, there are people in the economics world who are sort of respectable ish who are still shown their willingness to kind of toed the party line and be partisans, and you know, adjust their views to match the president's and whatnot. You know is better or worse in some ways. I think it's worse because you get the same effect. But instead you have sort of like Petit. Overspent ability. And if Trump finally figures nominate one of those guys he's finally gonna hit that his personal sweet spot, which is having a yes man on the board without the sort of backlash. He's gotten from his own party. Even at this point. Jordan, Weisman, you make monetary policy phone do do not as good as making love and fun. I'll say I'll take it. Thank you. Jordan. Weisman is slate senior business economics correspondent. All right. That's the show. What next is hosted by Mary Harris and produced by Mary Wilson, Jason de Leon and Anna Martin if you haven't done it already tell us what you think about the show hop over to apple podcasts. Leave us a rating leave us a review were reading them. And we are super psyched ac- them, especially because it helps other people find us. Thanks for listening. I'll talk to you tomorrow.

Donald Trump Federal Reserve Trump Herman Cain Jerome Powell Jordan Schwab Stephen Moore president Weisman Charles Schwab Schwab dot America Mary Harris Steve Moore Federal Reserve Board of gover Janet Yellen Federal Reserve Board
Maryrose Cuskelly

Published...Or Not

28:23 min | 2 years ago

Maryrose Cuskelly

"Thanks for downloading the podcast. Three CR is an independent community radio station based in Melbourne, Australia. We need your financial support to keep going, go to WWW dot three Seon dot org, Dora you for more information and to donate online. Now, stay tuned for your three CR podcast. Now, murder is closer to home than you think today's book Wedderburn looks at the murders in the small rural Victorian town of the sign, nine Whitman, and the author is Mary rose, Kaz, Kelly. Did I get that? So I'm curric- Kaz, Kelly, cuss Riley, interesting name think it's kind of anglicized Arshi was what. Sure. So maybe rush, welcome to three CI as the subtitle suggests of this book. This is a true tile of blood and dust. So this mur- or these murders because there's more than one actually happen. What was the scenario when it was first reported? It was that in Jemison had killed his three neighbors. One night in October, two thousand fourteen at the basis of their disagreement, apparently was the use of a dirt road and the dust that raised Ian 's property and his house was quite close to the Sturt road that even that was what's called a paper road. So it's a, it's a survey, but unpaved right away. And it was essentially for all intents and purposes, it was on his neighbor, Greg homes, property, Greg Holmes stepfather. He lived across the road. He would use that road to excess a damn. Mm-hmm. Behind Greg's house because it was very dry and he would take water from the dam us throw it to get back again for and the water would be used to water. The gardens in head asked paid not to use the ROY. That would been very dry. It was the dryest spring ever I think. And because he said it raised dust it contaminants my water, it dirties my washing. You can use another access point that will take you maybe another ten minutes stop using the road. But Peter refused and now the main had patron in that was kind of where the main conflict was and they had been friends at one stage they'd worked together. They in was a builder paid had earthmoving equipment in would often get Peter to do the groundwork for whenever he was building a shed when in house had burnt down at one stage, Peter had done the earthworks for all of that. So. So, but something had happened over the intervening years and it had come to this point where in walked out of his house one, not with a hunting knife, walked over to Greg's place and literally a few minutes later, Greg was dead. And then Ian walked home, took down to guns from his gun safe and walked across the road and killed Mary in Petah. So it was this devastating, crime and quite savage crime and over something seemingly very trivial, something very trivial indeed. So what was the appeal of writing on a subject like this? Because it's not like you're writing a novel where a crime fiction who done it, and we're, we're sort of leading towards discovering who the perpetrator is. It's open shut case in many ways. So what was the fascination for a subject like this. My fence nation really developed over time. I was actually, I had been researching the story that come to a dead end and put a lot of time into that. And so I was looking for something else to write about. And my friend windy reminded me that her father he lived in whitbourne was a good friend of ends. In fact, in had cold Wally after the mood is while he waited for police and said, can you have killed Peter and Marion, Greg? Would you come and look off to Genesee? Was his wife. And so I didn't really know what always getting into. I just thought we'll all have a chat to Wally, and but this makes it a more personal connection if it's a friend of yours and and this association. Yes. And because I heard the story, I threw Wally. He was a friend of Indians thought very highly of him and. You know, while he was an elderly man, he was in his mid eighties in was almost twenty years younger and Ian kind of looked out for Wally while he was, you know, an was a good friend Wally. So Wally was very much in ends Kona. And so when I saw when I began to research the story, that was the perspective I had that Ian was a good man who had been pushed beyond what any normal person could bear. And I suppose that was my first. So it was my first perspective and so I was interested in well, what makes good man to a bad thing, but and then what made in what was it on about that day that made this man do something so terrible. That was my beginning put. It also makes us vulnerable. If you know people who are involved in this situation, if you start writing and then sort of changed their opinions and such like it places you as a writer in a very vulnerable position. Yes. And I was aware too that it could place Wally in vulnerable position because as you can imagine an event like this is very divisive in a community. Well, especially in a small rural community where everybody knows each other. Yes, but this is the interesting thing that the nature of the people you say the protagonists were not archetypes, but complex and flawed human. Beings whose motivations were planted and who state of mind was contested by those who knew them. So you go in, we get a perception when a murder is reported and climate case close, we know who done it, et cetera. And we don't see any of the other elements associated with it by going into that rural town and investigating you're starting to see the implications, the background, you're breaking down the stereotypes, and I'm reminded of trim into parties in cold blood and NFL Anders stars eland where these individuals, these authors went into the environment and all of a sudden they started where Capote was concerned, almost found an excuse on it. That might be a bit extreme for the murders in as much as the murderers were victims of society. An Anna funder. Talk to those who were. In the Stasi, but they simply wanted to belong in some ways, though there was a justification in in some ways or a rationalization for actions. Were you expecting to find anything other or what were you looking for? I didn't expect to find. A justification for in did. I mean, I don't think you can ever justify killing three people that way. So I wasn't expecting to exonerate in or anything like that. I just was curious and about what could have driven him to these. And also it became clear that you pay to himself was quite a divisive figure in the community. You know he was, you know, he was his neighbors who I spoke to loved him, you know, but they would still describe him as a store, you know, paid a like two. He loved an argument wouldn't back down from a confrontation, but you know, he was loyal. He was intelligent will. This is the interesting thing about the profiles of these individuals that you've got. You've already started mentioning about in Jemison, and he was a stickler for detail in many. He weighs so that could have been affect in his Mike up plead a locker is fascinating because they were. Well, there's a background story was Peter and Mary. Would you care to highlight some of that? It was. It was by this second. Marriages and pita was came from, what is known in would have been is a pioneer. Family luck family had been something like seven generations. And so you know, a local, a local local, and but he had when he had begun his relationship with Mary Ann ended his first marriage that was seen by his own family as kind of disgraceful. And in fact, he wasn't in touch with any of his. Now he, there was a a lot of estrangement in that family. And I think that you know people who I spoke to said that was a source of great and continuing sadness for him. But Mary had five children and he lavished, you know, he and I became a substitute fan. We'll. Were a substitute family for him his so. They accepted him as part of their family. As far as I will concerned pita was part of it was innuendo in in some of what was. Going on there? Yes. And I think. I say later in the book that was to me, it seemed like pita had become this kind of scapegoat in the community that nothing was too terrible to ascribe to his character and. We'll let that speaks. Yeah, and impede I think because of the sort of person he was, he was not going to try and improve that impression of him. He was just going to carry on doing what he was doing and how he did it, and he would not try and grey shade himself with anybody that speaks thin also, too small communities and the attitudes and perceptions and stories they tell each other, it's almost incestuous in that regard that that the nature of the stories that are made up about people rumors that go round within a close community. And I think it also I think it will can also happen within. You know with the, you know, look, I live in Melbourne, very big city, but I have a particular community that I live in and. You know this, there are tensions and rumors and flare ups that happened, you know, in inner city Melvin as well. I mean, nothing that I witnessed as terrible as this, but you know, I think that we all have that capacity for doc nece and to what extent and that that's the fascination, because are we all capable of such a degree of darkness to to guide to such extent, to such an extent. I suspect we are. I suspect all of us are, which makes one of the reasons why we keep wanting to read this book or. Maintain and find out and work towards the end, not a, not a who done it, but we're still looking in some ways for our own psychology with a we are capable of such things, but but back to the characters, you got Gregory homes as well. These Mary son, return veteran petey instead. So and once the ensues, one of the things that also knighted me there was these these to these conflicting reports, people would would you know conflicting reports of other characters of these people like to Greg's family, his partner, he was, yes, you know, he was struggling with the aftermath of being in Afghanistan. That's terrible situations, but you know, gentle, loving, trying to get on with his life. You know, very like his partner lien said he was the most Optimus gentle caring person in her life and his family to he's rather than sisters were saying, you know, for the he was there little brother and that's how they saw him while other people in the community. Those these stories about, you know that. Great. Was a bit of a heart, not, you know he was a bit difficult to handle, but. You know, other Sidni that wasn't the case at all. So you get these very conflicting reports of people, and it's in part of the trying to reconcile those is very difficult. Like with, you know, in, you know, he was really generous to Wally. His friends entering Gordon, you know, he was generous would do anything for you. Wonderful man, a beautiful French. So what drives somebody? And we can never answer that. You've also got Mary Lockhart in there. Loves glass yet Mary a great collector, keen gardener, avid bird watcher. It's so simple. It's so mundane in many ways that then somebody with such. Simple interests could be then the victim of such an horrendous crime. It's it's extraordinarily, but then the repercussions then extend beyond the murder. And this is what happens when you go in and explore because you have that Wedderburn community. There are a few eccentric people in. Exception is one what we're describing it, but I just, you know, what I I'm continually reminded of is when you start talking to people, they. That they become either they just people and they have their in Petit diversity of interest. I mean, there's one couple nighboring coupled Jackie and poll, and Jackie's a sort of, well, what, which yoga a bit of everything? Yeah. So Jackie has you know she practices Reich, she has kind of the realm of the spiritual is very important to her. And her partner and had partner is a ex outlaw biker who adores his wife and tells a great story, but they and they, and that was very close to Peter and Mary and would just. Just devastated by what happened to them. And that was the other pita had this reputation as being kind of conservative this redneck, but yet perfectly happy to to be friends with the so-called what which, and one of the things. One of the first things you do with this book is the interview of Anna and Gordon McMahon, and the comment is he's not this man as in. They were friends within and the having great difficulty reconciling the man. They knew with the person who committed such an Arinda crime. And that speaks to many of us are there's a fear fears in as much as are we to actually truly recognize no, somebody is our judgment in question. Well, is this notion. Which entering Gordon speak of Ian snapped, and that's quite a common. You know, people use that expression a lot. You know, I just snapped. And I guess, do we all have that point where suddenly. We lose control of ourselves or is it that we lose control of ourselves or are we pushed to find this notion of? Can we be pushed beyond that? But and I guess that's what I was. That's what I struggled with as well as idea. Like Ian wasn't. You know, he had never been in trouble with the law before this wasn't. You know he wasn't someone who you know had been had been committed, you know, had been charged with violent crimes in the past. So this notion that we can be pushed to a breaking point. And I was this. I was doing. I did a little bit of research into, you know, murder and masculinity in violence and that sort of thing. And there is this notion, I think murder is masculinity is affecting in lots of murders. In this notion, this is kind of confrontational. I want to go into that the because that's very interesting because you in and. Peter, a very strong characters amidst the alpha mile type syndrome. But this notion of conquest, this notion of dominance of getting your y in such like, can we? Can we escape nature in in that regard? Because or are they victims of their makeup? Yeah, I don't know this. It's that term toxic. Masculinity, like it's almost becoming a cliche, but I and I don't know whether. I think they was something in that that there's something about this about an a medical notion of honor and respect. And some of the reading I was doing around mid was saying, you know, the most effective way. To make to push someone to violence is to insult them is to, you know, kind of low of themselves to lower themselves in their own eyes and in yours. And so I think and the more I kind of thought about, I think they might have been an element of Ian trying to regain some notion of status that that he had lost power and that he was trying to regain that somehow status in control resigned situation. But in many ways, it's an artificial perception of I've lost control of the situation will were you ever in control in the first place? It's a norm, an artificial concept for a lot of these people as well. But you also go into the notion of homicide homicide is a dynamic relationship between two or more persons caught up in a life drama where they operate in a direct interactional relationship wrote Marvin Wolfgang in his seminal nineteen fifty eight work patterns in criminal homicide. Wolfgang at criminal criminologist argued that examining the relationship between a murder murderer and his or her victim was crucial to understanding the event. So it's it's not just the psychology of the individual. It's that interaction that is toxic. If we used that word again, yes, where is if they were in another situation or if a safety valve had been released, it would have been a totally different at gum. Yeah, so it's it's quite extraordinary that that the psychological notion again, trying to look for an answer to all of this. So is this what compels the story or this book in terms of us wanting to find a rationalization because they're the members of the community are trying to rationalize. Is it about dust? What is it about. We keep constantly wanting to sort of tie the end up of the circle to Mike. All right. Is there an all right in in that outlook? Look, I don't know that we can ever say, okay, said this is this is what happened? This is what happened. If we just do this, it'll never happen again. I don't think that's possible. And in some ways I didn't. I didn't really expect it to be this easy answer because I think all of us are complex people and. On that night. That night, you know, Pete ahead in the afternoon before that night. Peter had driven up and down that that road, but there'd be no interaction between in him. Why did end up to Greg's place? I when it was Peter, he was so furious able to overcome Greg who Greg, trying competent, knifed cetera. And I think we'll let the listener read that the the description of the injuries for themselves, but Greg was younger, how was he. I have a parent and Riddick nature of of the gunshots extraordinary. I'm hell. He's another question because we've got this ripple effect a murder, but it goes beyond into the community. People reconciling trying to work out. How do you reconcile the new writer's voice in all of this. Because you never were able to interview Ian and your knowledge of the players in many ways is in direct, but also then writing a book adds to that ripple effect. It does, yes. So how do you reconcile the writer and the writer's role in taking on such ties it? It is tricky and it's something that has been. A lot of my mind as I wrote it, but more specifically once. Publication was, you know, on the horizon and I did I did and continue a little bit to struggle with it. I mean, I think. My publisher at one point. I was like, oh, what have I done in writing this book? And she was saying, these stories are important because compelling narratives, they help us to empathize. You know people, I think it is useful to remind people how live up ended by violence and tragedy, and to know that those people who are you'll get caught up, they're not Justice statistics. They are neighbors, friends, family, legitimate for a rider to enter that discourse in some ways because it's not it's real now because there was a controversy about the cover. I didn't see anything. Controversial in, but I'm an outsider, but the blue Wren, for example, on the cover and the knife and the gun and such, like what happened the well, the blue ran is a symbol of Mary. He was one of the victims in fact, and so I didn't have input into the design of the Kaaba, but I saw the cover before it went out and like you. I didn't see the potential for the distress that it might cause. But for Mary's family who. This the, the Ren with a simple for their mother. It was very jarring what was more than jarring was very distressing. And that was so. When something does go out in the public realm like that, and suddenly. You. You know, discover something that you hadn't considered. So yes. So that was I knowledge that there was a real hurt their so. It's almost out of your control because the design by the publish it's taken over. The story is now owned by somebody else. That's right. Yes. So. You get nuts. It's difficult, but at the same time, like I'm a people who have people would probably read the book would probably say that I, you know, I'm a big fan of Helen Ghana's work as well. And she often delves into this dock territory and you know she has written, you know, if if every rod ahead to I'm gonna I'm paraphrasing here obviously. But you know if every rod ahead to defend their writing, the nothing would ever get written. So I think that is a certain amount of that you can't. You know, rod is will right, and and also I think a book like this can contribute to the conversations that we are already having Inada society about toxic masculinity, which we touched on before about this kind of source of what's the source of rage that we see on our roads on social media, Renou homes. You know, how do we help people recover from trauma. So I think books like this can contribute that way. There's another element and we're gonna go to short time left, and that in many ways is the ongoing psychology of Ian, and because there's the trial that takes place in has confessed. I did it. I snapped. He is organized. Rings friends says, tie care of my wife and, and that is a fractious relationship anyway with these water broken one at cetera. But it's almost like another psychological episode because in the trial where he sort of is almost resigned, but then fights the charge and such like, how do you into that? Yes, it was actually one of the one-sided attending the court proceedings that I was completely intrigued by that question. Because when Ian I committed the mood as he called police, he said, you have done, it ought to be locked up. But then once it came to. The corporate seatings he seemed to termined to disrupt and derail it. So he changed teams of lawyers. He changed his plea appealed. He did this, try to introduce new evidence, and I. Because I can't seem to ends mind. All I could do was observe him in, and I'm trying think about what my reoccupied did something so terrible. How would I continue to live with myself? How would I continue to think of myself as you go to justify to just in order to be able to continue living admit to it, then you destroyed? Yes. And two sets just my own feeling on it that the in to accept what he had done and responsibility was in some way to destroy his own ideas himself. The book is where to burn a true tale of blood and dust. The author, Mary rose Kelly, and it's an Allen and Unwin publication, some areas. Thank you for coming in today. Thanks very much. David.

Ian kind Peter murder Greg Holmes Mary Wally Mary rose Kelly Melbourne Jemison writer partner Anna funder Gordon McMahon Mike Australia pita Jackie Mary Ann Mary rose Genesee
Episode 06 - Ohh Bourbon!

Mute Button Podcast

24:46 min | 9 months ago

Episode 06 - Ohh Bourbon!

"Hello this is Kelly Spears your host for the mute, button August. If you haven't heard about anchor, it's the easiest way to make a podcast is let me explain first, and foremost it is free. There's creation twos that allow you to record in. Edit your podcast. Right from your phone or computer into. That's not good enough. Anchor will distribute podcasts for you, so it can be heard on spotify apple podcast in others. And you can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything that you need to make a podcast in one place. Download the FREE ANCHOR TO ANCHOR DOT FM to get started today. Known big this. Following. Contained language. percent former presidents. Welcome back to the button podcast. I'm your host Lee Spears. Today's episode I think is going to be a a refreshing change from a ones of recent where we've been talking about all the things that are going on in this world. Really I want to talk about a subject that. Is Near and dear to me and that's burden. I think that for many of US Bourbon is the Clintons in essential? Drink for the American male. There's just something about. A Bourbon weather's neater on the rocks. It says N. screams America. And, when you think about it, Bourbon drinkers are some of the most brand loyal drinkers out there. Because he loved Bourbon, or if you don't, you're always going to be attached to brandon sort. Bourbon drinkers, you're either a bullet guy or four roses gal one of the many others. In Your Bourbon Choice says a lot about who you are. Probably more so than just the fact that You might be a little afraid to branch out and try something in for myself. I you know I can attest to that as For years I was given Williams black, label drinker that was my bourbon choice, and then branched out and. Found four roses a small batch which you know I like I, we'll talk about both of those momentarily of but. To the same effect now. I'm also finding that. I like to try different bourbons because each has its own particular player, its own particular flavor. and you know when it comes down to it. Bourbon is not typically the drink that you're just going to get drunk. It's a sipping drink. Which means you know it's? It's made for nine caps and things like that something that's going to be easy on the pallet something that's going to allow you to have some deep conversations with friends and loved ones. For that very reason Bourbon, drinkers are a defined yet eccentric Compassionate Group of people. Some site that we were dreamers. Believers and free thinkers. But Bourbon drinkers also tend to be traditionalist their trailblazers in the bold. they tend to be people who love to. Lead to drink burden that is unique and has no grasp on. Particular social norms, classes, or status quo so. You can find a drinker in. A Rural Kentucky. And in in in modern metropolitan. Hatton. Bourbon drinkers are people's people in their group is fiery as they are loyal in their odd estate, our special especially when you start looking at some of the brands that are out, there would be bullet, or whether it be larceny. or any of these particular drinks that have come about you know in the last several years. Falling in love with a bourbon drinkers fate tempting. World Jarring. It's a world jarring decision to make, but trust me rewards to do at least one time in his or her life. Because I'm GonNa tell you. A falling in love with a Bourbon drinker is. One of the greatest things that you'll ever did because. If you have a love, you can have a conversation in that. World's going to change for you. So when we talk about Bourbon drinkers, who are we talking about? If. We were just a judge about marketing for most whiskies safe. Yes would be to be a white man of middle age or southern by birth or At least aspiration in could be a blonde woman in Full Kentucky Derby. Pass tails out in the mid JULEP. In yet while white people make up about three quarters of all Bourbon consumers in the United States according a survey. By gravity, a media company the details are more complicated. Did. You know that African Americans, the most likely most likely demographic group prefers spirits whiskey or Cognac. Beer or wine, according to Nielsen Research, but yet they only constitute about thirteen percent of the total population. Either map percent of Bourbon drinkers. But I could care less about the demographics burger drinker. I want to know what Bourbon taste good. That's was can be hard considering how many bourbons out there in this day and age. Recently went into. Wine and spirits store and there was an entire I'll I guess it was thirty feet long by maybe with shares may be four foot. Tall. Of Different Bourbons and it just amazed me and and I know that that was just the tip of the barrel so to speak. when it comes to Bourbon. The. Let's talk about Bourbon exactly. What is Burbot? Did you know that Bourbon isn't is a tab of American whiskey. That's what makes it so much. So American. That's last earlier when we think about burn within about that American man. That's this drinking it. It's barrel aged. It's a barrel aged distilled spirit made primarily from corn. And Its name ultimately derived from the French Bourbon Dynasty. Although, the precise inspiration, the whiskey's name is uncertain. Contenders include Bourbon County in Kentucky and Bourbon Street New Orleans. Both which were named the dynasty. Bourbon has been detailed in Eighteenth Century yet. The name urban was not applied until the eighteen fifties. The Kentucky analogy was not advanced to the eighteen seventies, but bourbon may be made anywhere in the United States for that matter. It is strongly associated with the American south in Kentucky in particular. And I will say. that. You know I'm not from the State of Kentucky, but I tend to to like Kentucky bourbons more so than any other. Barbara because there is a there is something special about that association with the State of Kentucky. and has a two thousand fourteen two steelers. Host. Market revenue for Berta within the US about two point seven billion dollars. Amber about two-thirds of the one point six billion dollars of US export. Of distilled spirits. Now, according to the steeled spirits council the United States in two thousand eighteen us. steelers derive free point six billion in revenue from Bourbon and Tennessee Whiskey, a closely related spirit produced in the state to the C. Sold in the United States we'll talk about Tennessee. Whiskey a little bit lighter because it has a particular process in which it is made, which makes it distinctly different than say a Kentucky Bourbon. Bourbon was recognized in nineteen, sixty, four by the United States Congress distinctive product of the United States. Bourbon sold in the United. States must be produced in the United States from at least fifty one percent corn and stored in new container of charred Oak. Now Even though it has to be produced in new container of Charter Oak. That's fine These Bourbon distillers typically wind up selling those barrels to Irish whiskey makers. Other spirit makers will reuse those barrel, so it tells you something right there. You have good barbas. Are The folks won't there there used barrels? So in this episode. We're GONNA talk about four burdens on my list of favorites. Start with first one. In this one, believe it or not is a cheap version and his. This recently became one of my favorites in its very own barn. verio Barton has been carefully distilled in age for generations in Bardstown Kentucky. This classic Bourbon Whiskey has a bold and rich tastes. It goes down smooth just as it has for decades. America's first cocktail before there was a company, there was a drink. Antone peach out essay correctly crow immigrant. Operate a pharmacy owned the French quarters Royal Street. In eighteen, thirty eight with his background. As an opera Kerry, he was a natural mixologist. His friends would gather for late night revelry at his pharmacy, according to. A history. He would mix brandy. After north and a dash of his secret bidders for his. Yes, later, this quad would come to be known as Sadak. And the drinkers bar. Cocktail immediately spread in popularity of the city's on his coffee houses. From that, there was a term for drinking establishments during the mid eighteen hundreds. Of the cocktail is most. Strongly associated with a wildly popular, says right coffeehouse located in exchange alley now I just want to stop you for a moment. It's amazing. How many great drake's have been derived? From pharmacies. Dr, pepper. Coca Cola. All these dreams had a purpose. and you know. Making a person feel better. Increasing their health or in. Helping Limb to heal from certain conditions. Biting fifty owner seal Taylor had institutionalize drink at his coffee house by using only says right before it feels brandy, which important sodas exclusively this adds wreck cocktail received his name from a coffeehouse, which where it was most often Found the company from the Bar Com accompany was born by eighteen sixty nine Thomas Hardy purchases right coffeehouse get into flyer and market brands and lick. Out The rides feud bidders in eighteen seventy three. By eighteen ninety, his company began to bottle market this as red cocktail now made with whiskey instead of brandy. In addition, the company operated the size wreck borrowed Royal Street later Hardee's former Secretary C. J. O. Raleigh Charter. This is red company and ever since. Except for. as delicatessen Grocery Vendor during the prohibition. The rat company has distilled in ever increasing line of spirits. Today, they're still an independent American owned company proud owners of many of America's most. Venerable still in companies include Buffalo Trace a Smith Bowman glenmore still rebe. Arden, Fleischmann Mentally Mr Boston. We talk about very old Barton. The! For about twenty bucks. This particular Bourbon has astonished following fans who rely. Ovarian bargains, their house or table Burbot at and rightly so. Thorough bargain especially. When bottled in bond, version, one hundred Peru, his imminently smooth. And enjoyable. In terms of its value tired as he had can do. What are the very? Can't be when the very top Bergen picks at his press writes in fact. The only reason that purchased it is because. Twenty Bucks there was quite a bit of it. I like the bottle. The bottle has A. Distinctive old school Bourbon bottle look in so for that very reason acid. Hey of this sucks. I've got a really cool bottle. I can make laugh at of or something like that. But in terms of Value Tara, see I can't one of the favorites. When I. I took a drink of it I was. Overtaken actually. by. The kick that he gave me in any I. I wasn't quite sure if I was been like it. However, the more I'm began to allow it to air out the more out to the gases to come off of this Bourbon A. The the smoother found it to be in. It's a great mixer with a Co Colo back Dr Pepper. Anything that you can imagine. In therefore recommend variable Barton one hundred proof to those that are seeking the flavors of the top chef bourbon budget. Price. With its deep amber color. It's honey butternut toast in dried fruit AROMAS. It's around entry which leads to a dryest medium to full bodied caramel corn top. Spice and mineral flavors finished with a warm response in Wet Stone Fade. You can't go wrong. With very bargain and again at around twenty bucks I think that you're gonNA find this to be very very appealing and satisfying spirit. Second on my list, today is going to be the Evan Williams Cherry. Now Evan Williams extra age bourbon infused with natural cherry flavors to produce a sweet in easy drinking liquor. Get on his own or mixed with the color of your choice and I've got plenty of recipes for this Jake Drake. And so you may think that you've run the gamut. Of American Bourbons, but if you haven't tried it in Williams you're. You're quite finished with your foray into of America's export. That in seventeen, eighty, three on the banks of the Ohio River Evan Williams is one of the oldest still reason. The country and the first Bourbon still read Kentucky because of its history secret recipe Evan. Williams is the Premier Kentucky Bourbon to suit your taste. So as soon as you open a bottle of Evan Williams black label, for example, you're met with a rich Roma of Annella admit. But. This is just a precursor when a hit your lips hands of Oak, caramel brown sugar great you in linger through the satisfying finish. Although parasite that. The drink bourbon is on the rocks. Evan, Williams black label tent lends itself to any number of lavish cocktails, eminent Colas all-american choice among cocktails while an evident mineral water brightens the flavor without any harsh. Harshness. Excuse me. It is only right that we bland are smooth bourbon. With America's one of America's most iconic flavors, Evan Williams Cherry Combines Classic Cherry Flavor was Kentucky Straight Bourbon to create a sweet delicious plan that is full of mercy, not goodness. Enjoy Shield of rice, mixed cola or as a shot when you're toasty, when France. It is a sure fire way. To up your flavor game, smooth bourbon with tears in Kane. Go wrong with it in a fitting bucks. Your Century will not be disappointed. In while the cheapest on our list, lots of cheese on our list today, this has been one of my favorite burstow drinks for mixing by the way Capri Sun Give you a quick recipe right here? Take two ounces of evidentiary two ounces of great. Apple juice. Or excuse me. Greatly cranberry juice two ounces of pineapple juice in two ounces of lemonade. Mixed together, and you've got a drink. That's GONNA like agree. Absolutely delicious. Some of the flavor profiles that you're gonNA find from. The interiors could include Cherry Berry fruits. Obviously, you're going to smell those along with. Academic Cinnamon Spice. When you tasted, it has a bit of plumbing teary sweetness. Follow back up with that Caramel. Tastes it's. Typical with a good bourbon. In the you can have that cheery pop tobacco in a Marzipan finish. Next on our list is four roses. Four rose a small badges to step up in a classic four Roses Bourbon. Showcasing in the variety of mash bills, the steelers have to work with. And their talented, making them sing together ten Bourbon recipes are produced by four roses in four or blended together to create this approachable but some expression. Gray value for the money stuff this is. Four roses small batches straight bourbon that is comprised of four of the ten recipes, four roses, employees, the using equal measure of both of their mash bill, sixty percent corn, thirty five percents absent barley, said fabrics and core twenty percent ride, amfar percent barley. They also use East rings which highlight build a light in spicy profile along with a rich in forty-one. At about forty dollars this. The nose needs toffee sentiment that big pit fruit to know the Palette has. The mouth field along with a flight flavors of Raspberry served in a bowl with mild honey and cinnamon sugar. The finish is moderately long with more honey, Vanilla, coming through typically with four roses. I'm not GONNA mix it. I'm going to drink it straight and we'll drink it, nate, I want to to be able to. To have that. That flavor of cinnamon and nutbag that is the the the true profile of a good for a small batch, and that's what I'm looking for, but each is. Lastly on our list today as Woodford Reserve. If you haven't tried with a reserve, you're not in the Bourbon Guy. In a whiskey world, where nearly every major brand can now be expected to release. CASK three. Batch proof, very pointed becomes fascinating to compare the standard strengths release is that we say on the shelves every day to the more burly intense limited editions. Such, as heaven seal, Alagic Greg. To follow conceptual. Three line to where you can taste and understand the barrel versions mirrors most of the same flavor standing neighbor day product. MORE STRENGTH THAN Others, however saving to undergo a total transformation from windfarm to the next in Woodford reserve badge, proof optimistic or Setting the final product is powerful intriguing, but it is sure as hell doesn't doesn't remind you of Standard Woodford Reserve. Some of the differences, they certainly explained by the significant jump in proof, the standard Woodford reserve in a fairly approachable ninety point four proof, but the twenty twenty bottle of batch proof Craig's up to one hundred twenty three point six, not necessarily the highest of cash strength releases, but a of more than thirty three points from the flagship product. Like the flagship. With a reserve in most other ram, former bourbon such as a forester. this barrel proof releases also non h stated so they're definitely leaning on that prove is justification for a premium price tag ran twenty nine dollars. That does seem a bit high comparison with other Donald stated cast drink bourbons. After all the locks of junior are often available for less than eighty, and even his lowest fifty to sixty dollars. However, it is what it use in the Woodford reserve match proof does at least come in a lovely bell shaped bottle. What more can ask for so ran hundred thirty dollars a choice cubs. With taming, the nose is darkened deeply caramelized for then Caramel it really. Is more like a molasses with hands of dark fruit cherry blackberry. spiciness distinctly makes one think of Chola or root beer spice. Oddly the heat really doesn't show it much here on the nose. Even without water it does. It doesn't sting at least on the ethanol has been well hidden. On. The Palate is going to be very interesting Something that you may not expect is A. Savory Bourbon with plentiful tobacco leaf cigar wrapper owed notes some earthy nece There's GonNa be some richness of molasses. That almost veers into Bert, sugar territory. But yet the dark fruit firmness of the Black Cherries also there, but it goes even further into dried fruit with raising big a major component. Yet likewise the spice. Is there also a big way? Which is really nate? But despise all of that. The residual sweetness is really only moderate. It isn't as rigid as as it first appears it would be. the heat lock quasi surprisingly hidden on the fron, but it will come roaring back in the Finnish. You're going to get that hate that is typical with the BURBOT. Throw in a notably vicious only mouth feeling. You have a very interesting to be sure. And honestly this is. This actually has made a bit stopped. It's strangely easy to drink. Elise the fron. In Drier than most barrel proof irs with an interesting combination of dark fruits, angry Odeon Spicy Impressions. Adding a bit of water. In a more traditional caramel in baking sponsors profile will begin to merge, but yet it still lacks a more unique nature of the undiluted spirit. All that said. I think that those who enjoy the spicy but drier barrel proof expressions may find this particular of this one of particular interest. But that hundred thirty dollar prostate will put it out of the reach for some and I get that. So, it may be something to keep an eye out for at the whisky bar. If that's something that you're looking for, or you can always go down to say no logic, rag or something of that. But WOODFORD reserve even if you get the traditional Version of Woodford reserve is always a good choice because of that particular flavor profile. So. Those are my burdens today. That I particularly Vonda in an I highly suggest. If you've never drank bourbon? Each assumed drought Break a couple of fingers were and have that great conversation makes next one, not cabin. You're GonNa Sleeps Luther the night. In ways that's it for now hope everyone is doing well in until the next time. God Bliss.

Bourbon Kentucky United States Bourbon Whiskey Bourbon County French Bourbon Dynasty America Evan Williams Woodford Reserve steelers BURBOT Kentucky spotify Barton Jake Drake nate Kelly Spears Lee Spears Evan Williams Cherry Full Kentucky Derby
Patty Griffin On Restoring Her Voice And Her Soul

World Cafe

29:50 min | 1 year ago

Patty Griffin On Restoring Her Voice And Her Soul

"Hey, you're listening world cafe I'm Talia Slanger today, the one and only Patty Griffin. It's men. He. In March Patty Griffin released a new self titled album, it's reversed release since she was treated for breast cancer. Patty, says the radiation and drugs you took in were so physically depleting at afterwards when she tried to sing there was just nothing there. I walked up stage went. Wow. So I had to be so scary had it's humbling moments. And I wasn't really sure supposed to keep going with the Patty is doing really well now, and her voice is back. We talk about these soul searching she did during her treatment. And how it led to her new songs? I love Patty Griffin and really excited to share this chat with you. That's coming up in a moment. But she starts us off with a live performance of her new song the river. This is Patty Griffin on world. Cafe. Isn't you? Doesn't need it down. And. You can have. Can't. The. Shoe hold. Visit us stews John. She's real. Spit out the. Krill. Evian cinci the. Susan. Don't need to say the sea to the just soon wa. And it should. On de fun. She's. Is. Sue. He's. Catholic seeing man. See? Don't you candidate than Caesar? Is this you. Doesn't need it. Monisha? So people thought. She's. Is sees any pieces. Says down. Terms keeps coming home. There what and the. Auntie? She's. That's river Patty Griffin here at world. Cafe. It's such a stunning song. And the you're welcome the notes that you hit those high notes at the end there is there is really something to me about your voice that has mystical. It's like cosmic do you think about the the source of of it because there is something very special about it? I think so I I I know my my father's parents were from western Ireland, which is, you know, all magic, you know, and the side that sings that I'm aware of my mother's side. So there's some something going on there. She's that French Canadian, and and it's just in me to do that. Yeah. And there was a period of time while you are making this record that you lost that you had lost your voice when you're going through treatment for cancer. If it's okay to talk about I'd really like to talk about that part of exp. Yeah. But you'd be my guide. So first of all how are you doing? Now. I'm doing really really well like super well. Yeah. Yeah. Caffeine. Oh, you with cancer. You always monitoring for years to come. But I just had great great reports recently. And yet very exciting Latham do or do you mind talking a little bit about your diagnosis? And how you started to know that something was amiss while I was touring for servanta love, actually, even just making serving eleven new isn't feeling well and your last record. Yeah. Or American kid. I was having trouble singing it in the studio. And I knew knew my voice should do this. But it wasn't doing this and just from you know, always kind of having a little bit of a respiratory illness. And so that just went on for a couple of years toll finally by the end of in. Summer of two thousand sixteen. I was just really depleted muscular -ly from singing, and then I had a meeting with my managers. And I said, you know, I think I I've got to take some time off in sort out my health. I don't know what's going on. It's not healthy, and I had a mammogram the following week which almost cancelled because we're so busy, and they said, no, don't cancel it. And I did it and I had cancer. So, you know, everything you do from there on out for a while is not good for a singer. You know, you're cutting into muscles that you need to do surgery. And then you're doing I was lucky I had a type of cancer that they no longer do chemo on they stopped doing chemo on it. And so I I only had to irradiation, but radiation is actually really physically depleting as well. You know comes with the Teague that lasts for six to eight months. And and then there's the drugs, and so it was pretty pretty shocking. How far my I went down physically to the point where I did a little show with a friend of mine later in Tooth's twenty seventeen. And there was just nothing there. I walked up on stage when I went. Wow. So that had to be so scary at its humbling moments. And I wasn't really sure supposed to keep going with it. But I did. And I kind of had a like, you know, a lot of soul-searching to do around it. Well, yeah. Your whole your identity. Your gift is built around the ability to to do that thing. Yeah. So uh song that I wanted to ask you about that that crushes me in a good way on the record as luminous places. Were you saying about having a voice, and what a voice is. And so is that song connected to that that time it is that was one of the earlier songs in the record. I wrote one song before getting diagnosed. And then then I didn't write anything else. And then I. Was in the middle of radiation treatments and at the same time. A friend of mine was going in Austin was a musician friend of mine was going through treatment for stage for everything he had cancer everywhere, and he was in really bad shape. But honestly, he had experienced in cancer. And he took me under his wing, and he would meet me for coffee after my radiation once a week, and he just Waddell into this cafe after getting dropped off by somebody seen sisters on doing it for as long as he could. So I mean that was what was going on. And I thought, wow, we've been musicians have we done anything with our lives. You know, you give up you know, he and I didn't have families. We didn't have you know, we we've sort of given up a lot to do this. And I thought have we given enough, you know, so I wrote luminous places to sort of explore not just me. Not just my work and my work so far in the world, but his too. So it's kinda wrapped into that song for me. Well, it's let's play it. Now. Listen. Is fun. Second. Become. It's such a it's such a gorgeous song. Thank you it. It feels like exactly what you have just described. I guess do you remember feeling like that was choice that you had to make that you had to choose to not have a family into live a more solitary life to do this thing that you wanted to do I didn't consciously do that. But it's been looking back. I know that's what I was doing sort of like this little my little nugget. I had to sort it put a little fence around it. Because honestly, I think I see men doing it a lot more than women. I think culturally were not necessarily in a place where a man actually knows what to do with that. When a woman is, you know, as had the training, at least my generation to know, what to do when a woman has her own work. And it's really demanding every time that way, I mean, there are definitely men out there that know how to do that. But I never met one and a relationship setting that did so I and I get it. I get why that would be hard. That's Patty Griffin here on world cafe. And we're talking about her new self titled album. So tell me a little bit about the place where you grew up when you are kid that I think you're saying about. Yeah. Right. Come from. I grew up in a place called old town Maine, which was on the Panov's car river, and there's a famous bay in bar harbor, which is where all the luxury houses are in the river. Goes pretty far inland is about fifty miles inland from there. And it's been the home of the collapse got nation for thousands of years. They have a reservation there. But it actually just discovered recently that that's been their homeland for many many, many millennia. So it's got those two things that are sort of more more, you know, ancient about it. And and then it has a sort of more recent history is the last year hundred years of being a place where people set up different factories or woman mills and all those workplaces are long gone, and I mentioned veterans in the song because I I have an image of a of a man who looked maybe like a Vietnam vet who was sitting outside. I was I was hanging out there with my mom driving down this country road. And there was a man on a Sunday afternoon to sitting out the big canopy here and very very. Ramshackle house and nothing wrong with that. But it made me wonder about him, and you know, what he had. And so put him in there too. Thank you for that setup. This is sort of like a love song, I guess to a forgotten spot in the way that you're describing it it's sweet, I'm so let's hear it. This is Patty Griffin live with where I come from. Is land many? The shoot. Liz. Is could. Oh, man live in Kim escape. Pain is. It's in. Thanks. This. Sits. On a Sunday. Ms close. The shoot somebody on Aksam. Son. Those will. Oh, schooled drown. As. As. Live here at world cafe Patty Griffin with where I come from. Let's talk a little bit about work. What did you think about what work was supposed to be based on what the grownups around? You did my father was a schoolteacher actually my parents were both schoolteachers when they met and then my mother had seven children. And so felt like that was all she could handle. And so and she had some she had them in such. We were all born in seven years time. So she was pregnant for seven years daughter teaching for while, and yeah, crazy. And so I knew my father was up at like four in the morning correcting papers, and then he would come home from work and pass out for an fall asleep for like an hour. And then you know, I just I come from a hard hard workers. Obviously, my mother was a hard worker. She. Did laundry all day long, and and sort of figure out how she's gonna feed nine people every day. And yeah, I just was so I think work ethic is right there for me to tap into. Sometimes I don't feel like I'm tapping into very well at all. I know how to be lazy. But I prefer to work. Yeah. You on this on coins about some of your early working days in a different job, which we were saying, right? Yeah. Yeah. Did you enjoy that? I think that I needed to waitress because very shy. And it was like the first thing where you know, if you're gonna make one time you going to have to get out of this at least fake your way out of it. And so one of my early jobs was working in Harvard square and some of the most amazing behavior of people just beautiful generous people out of nowhere. And then, you know, really some of the most entitled, you know, not so great behavior. And the world there as well. So that's sort of coins is pointing towards for me. Oh, well, let's listen. Fragile. The backing vocals that we hear on that song. There's a there's a sort of mystical backing vocals from Robert plant, and I didn't recognize his voice until I looked at the credits album liner notes. And so tell me about an he somebody that you toward within band of joy, you had a relationship with for a time, you know, each other's voices. How does it work when you have him saying something on your record you saying like, hi, Robert like, this is what I want you to do or like, no you let them do. Do you like send him asong? No. We don't send him Assan k kids they'll start producing arranging it. So you wanna to get him in there getting quick don't give him too much time to think about it. As really one of the best arrangers, and we just plunked him down in there. And didn't really give him any indication of what the song was even going to be. So I think he was kinda like and this is the song. Do you have a person they're already I did? But you know, we took all the pretty stuff out. We just made sure he got the dryest bones possible. So and he had to sing around that just to sort of get the straight up, Robert. And and his voice he doesn't need much. He doesn't need to do much to that voice. I mean, even his speaking voice has that thing in it. You know, it's just it's really like what you said. It's just this very mysterious quality to that is moving. And and I knew that he would add that to these songs the songs needed it. We're gonna hear you perform another song for us from the record the last live song, and it's our glass, which has so much in it. Like every time. I listen to it or think about it something else strikes me and the last time that I listened to it before seeing down to talk to you, what struck me was the idea of of dreams and freedom, and that sort of the picture that I have in my mind as we're about to listen to it. But what is what is the song? What's the essence of it for you? When I sing it for me. It feels like when I was when I was writing it and sing it. I was feeling assorted in this period of time, which is so nice to get to. I I'm really glad I'm in my fifties. I'd like to even keep going lot longer. Could you know, because I think there's so much more can embrace about yourself when you get older, you know, and spent so much of my time fretting about very bad decisions that I make daily. And now, you know, the feel like our hourglasses sort of like recalling those moments and going, well, that's. Who I am? And that's how I got here. And how else would I have done it, by the way? Let's hear the song that Patty Griffin life. You're at world. Cafe. Yeah. Gets in. You just started upside down. Slagle book way stowing. Keeps John around. Liz. Music and train. Sits tracking. I was on last day. If. And some. Con in. Dome is sometime ago. As no who. Last. Heathen last don't goals with rivers. It says one me. Sanity freeze. As you. Stages. Canada. Round. Minutes. A dream is chairman of crazy machine. Spanned job out the killing into mandatory moves and just while it said that over shame down. In his face. Mean? Hourglass live at world. Cafe Patty Griffin. Thank you so much for being here at talk. It's been a real honor. I've had a blast. Thank you very much. It very kind. Thanks, go. Check out Patty, Griffin's self titled album start to finish it is worth ears. Thanks to our world. Cafe producer John Meyers for all of his work on that session. Thanks to. We'll off this here with me in studio. Dan Reed who books are talent Ellen opping who does an amazing amount of logistical. Magic works logistical magic to make guests appear magically in studio with us. All right. We have an amazing team here at world. Cafe. That's what I'm trying to say. I'm tallish linger. And I will catch you next time.

Patty Griffin cancer breast cancer Evian Liz Talia Slanger John Meyers Susan wa Ireland Caffeine Robert plant Canada Maine Dan Reed Caesar Latham Teague Tooth