35 Burst results for "Drug Overdose"

Justices side with doctors convicted in pain pill schemes

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 d ago

Justices side with doctors convicted in pain pill schemes

"The Supreme Court has ruled on doctors who face criminal charges for overprescribing powerful pain medications in a case arising from the opioid addiction crisis AP correspondent Norman hall reports The ruling came as the U.S. has been seeing record numbers of drug overdose deaths many from the highly lethal opioid fentanyl justice Stephen Breyer wrote for the court that prosecutors must prove that doctors knew they were illegally prescribing powerful pain drugs in violation of the federal control substances act The justices were asked by advocates for patients and doctors to distinguish between criminal behavior and medical errors made in good faith According to the national pain advocacy center which filed a brief with the court fear of aggressive prosecution already has led doctors to avoid prescribing opioids against their best medical judgment Norman hall Washington

Norman Hall Stephen Breyer Supreme Court National Pain Advocacy Center U.S. Norman Hall Washington
"drug overdose" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

The Addicted Mind Podcast

07:16 min | Last month

"drug overdose" Discussed on The Addicted Mind Podcast

"Be able to find it. Yeah, absolutely. And for example, when, you know, we're treating, say, type two diabetes. A requirement for treatment isn't complete and total abstinence from all sugar ever. That's not how it works. Even if someone keeps eating sugar and making decisions that aren't really helpful for treating their type two diabetes, they're still going to get care. And I don't think that total absence should be a requirement for treatment or services or ability to access those the same way as type two diabetes doesn't require total abstinence from sugar. Right, yeah, exactly. I'm curious with this. Have you gotten any pushback against it? Or people who don't support you or against this approach so I think some people have asked some questions that we're a bit probing, like, well, this enable people to use drugs and the answer there is no people are going to be using drugs either way. And this offers the opportunity for them to stay alive and not die of an overdose. But for the most part, we've had an incredible amount of support. I think that the only really barriers we've had is that we're all mostly just young adults trying to come into the space and make a difference without a whole lot of qualifications. So being taken seriously, like you guys are serious about this and you know your stuff and you know what you're doing and then kind of getting that bias of like, oh, you guys are young college kids, you know, you don't know what you're talking about. Yeah, so a little bit of that, but mostly we've had a lot of support. A lot of people rooting us on and a lot of people welcoming us into their space and into their work and yeah, just a lot of encouragement for the most part. Well, it's awesome. I think what you guys are doing is amazing. And you are younger, I guess, younger than me. But it just brings so much hope for the world to see people like you out there making these positive changes and it's really inspiring to see it and so hopeful. I think it's inspiring and hopeful too. It's very easy to feel pessimistic a little bit about this issue as overdose deaths are just continuously all of the wise. But seeing my team, which has grown from myself to three people onto over 30, almost 40 volunteers. I am incredibly hopeful. And I think a big issue within the field of recovery is there just aren't enough people working in it. And so one thing that I found is really my passion through the lookout project is mentoring other young adults and volunteers who are in our organization to pursue things that they're passionate about within this field and to give them the encouragement and resources and information they need to do so. Awesome. And I think just how you're doing this and bringing your own story to this and I think it's just really amazing. Thank you. I appreciate it. So Victoria, one thing I like to ask guests when they come on the show. I like to ask one final question. And that's if someone out there is struggling and you'd want to say one thing to them, what would you tell them? What would you say? Yeah, that's a great question. I would say that there are people out there that want to support you and want to help you even if that has been lacking in the past. And as I said before, recovery does not have to be total assets. Recovery is any positive step towards change, and so for someone who's living in the middle of addiction and really struggling, even if it's just one positive change, like making sure you're using a clean needle, making sure you have Narcan nearby. Talking to someone about how you feel or drinking a glass of water and getting a good night's sleep. All those positive steps they add up and you have to take care of yourself first. And so that's what I would recommend, just do something to take care of yourself. And to show yourself first and foremost that you're worth being taken care of because you are. Thank you, Victoria. It has been so awesome to have you on the addicted mind. Where can people find you if they want more information about the lookout project, how can they find that or get one of those kits if they want to get one of those kids? Yeah, so our website is lookout project dot org. And we were originally shipping nationwide, although we've decided to narrow our focus down to just Michigan, although who knows what the possibilities are for expanding. And so we're completely run off of donations and grants. And so if people would like to donate our cause and help us continue to spread overdose kits around our stay and potentially the country again someday, they can do that at lookout project dot org and there's a little give button. And then for me, I would love anyone to be a part of my journey as well. And so if anyone would like to reach out to me, my email is Victoria at the lookout project dot org. Unfortunately, our email address is not lookout project dot org, but the website is lookout project dot org. So that's a bit of a bummer. But also, if anyone wants to follow my personal account and just stay up to date on what I'm doing, I'm currently doing van life and traveling while leading lookout project and writing a memoir and getting ready for medical school and so people can follow me on Instagram if they want it to dot the dot explorer. You got it. And I will put all those links in the show notes too at the addicted mind dot com. So people can find all that information there. Victoria, it's been a pleasure. Thank you so much. It was great to meet you. All right, thank you for listening to the addicted mind podcast. As usual, all the shout outs will be at the addictive mind dot com and there you can get all a big information about her project and even look at how you can get one of those kits if you're living in Michigan, reach out to them. And once again, if you're enjoying the addictive mind podcast, don't forget write us a review, share the podcast with a friend or join our Facebook group, just go to Facebook and type in the addictive mind podcast, click join, and continue the conversation online. All right, everyone. Have a wonderful day, and I will talk to you on the next.

diabetes Victoria Michigan Instagram Facebook
What Country Does Mitch McConnell Actually Represent?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:21 min | Last month

What Country Does Mitch McConnell Actually Represent?

"Has come out and he has said, look, the most important thing happening in the world right now is the war in Ukraine. What country does Mitch McConnell represent exactly? The country that has the wide open border and a 100,000 plus drug overdoses that has double digit inflation, you see, for Washington, D.C., WarGames are always more important than the livelihood of their citizens. Always. They will always care more about some far distant land than their own constituents. Does Mitch Mitch McConnell as senator from western Ukraine? Or is he a senator from Kentucky that has incredible problems right now? Kentucky's dealing with drug problems, inflation, unemployment, you see Rand Paul, who also represents Kentucky, actually cares about his voters. Rand Paul stood up and said, I represent my voters and I swore an oath to the United States Constitution. And I'm not going to just all of a sudden authorize $40 billion to go to some far off distant land when we do not know what success looks like. Will this bring us closer to peace or closer to war? You see, there should be solutions put forward other than just giving Raytheon Northrop Grumman and Lockheed Martin, complete and total blank checks to be able to have their chance at pillaging the United States treasury. Here's

Washington, D.C. Ukraine Mitch Mitch Mcconnell Kentucky Mitch Mcconnell Rand Paul Raytheon Northrop Grumman United States Lockheed Martin United States Treasury
Dems Are Hoping a New Vote on Abortion Will Help Them Win in November

The Trish Regan Show

02:24 min | Last month

Dems Are Hoping a New Vote on Abortion Will Help Them Win in November

"The political stuff for just a moment, I am sure you saw the news. The vote that everybody is very, very upset about, well, those on the left. And the Democrats are now saying they intend to use this and Senate abortion rights vote to quote galvanize their supporters ahead of midterms. The quote was from one of these congressional Democrats. Today we start the march towards the November elections. So the problem with all of this and regardless of where you stand on this issue is just that the horrible political theater. That's involved. I mean, they're just, you know, topping of the bit, the Democrats anxious to politicize this and really stir up negative emotions from so many people so that they can get them to the ballot boxes in November because I think they know things really are that bad. With the economy with what we saw in Afghanistan, the tragedy that there's not a lot we can do, but I think a lot of people feel frustrated. We haven't been able to be more helpful overseas. And then, of course, the border. Oh, and did I forget there was a new study that came out today saying that more people than ever before died from drug overdoses. And you can't tell me that it doesn't have a little something to do with the amount of drugs that are coming into this country from our southern border. There's a lot of reasons and we can go into them another time. But it's part of it, right? So you got the border mess, you get the economic mess, you get the international mess, and so what do they do? They say, oh, well, we're going to, we're going to now use this to galvanize and excite our voters. For November. It was a very close vote, 49, 51, I think we all knew it would fail. It was certainly expected to fail, but you see this now becomes a political hot item for them, and they are going to maximize the return as much as possible. I get it. It's a political place Washington D.C.. And they know that they have nothing else to run on. I mean, they really don't, because

Senate Afghanistan Washington D.C.
Drug Overdose Reaches Record High in 2021

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:11 min | Last month

Drug Overdose Reaches Record High in 2021

"Prices for groceries rose, dining out airline travel, other services, gasoline prices reached a new high this week. There is a very troubling story.

US overdose deaths hit record 107,000 last year, CDC says

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

US overdose deaths hit record 107,000 last year, CDC says

"Drug drug drug drug overdose overdose overdose overdose deaths deaths deaths deaths reached reached reached reached a a a a record record record record last last last last year year year year the the the the CDC CDC CDC CDC estimate estimate estimate estimate is is is is more more more more than than than than one one one one hundred hundred hundred hundred seven seven seven seven thousand thousand thousand thousand Americans Americans Americans Americans died died died died of of of of drug drug drug drug overdoses overdoses overdoses overdoses it it it it translates translates translates translates to to to to roughly roughly roughly roughly one one one one overdose overdose overdose overdose death death death death every every every every five five five five minutes minutes minutes minutes the the the the previous previous previous previous record record record record number number number number of of of of deaths deaths deaths deaths was was was was set set set set in in in in twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty twenty the the the the director director director director of of of of the the the the National National National National Institute Institute Institute Institute on on on on drug drug drug drug abuse abuse abuse abuse called called called called the the the the latest latest latest latest numbers numbers numbers numbers truly truly truly truly staggering staggering staggering staggering the the the the White White White White House House House House says says says says it's it's it's it's unacceptable unacceptable unacceptable unacceptable and and and and called called called called for for for for measures measures measures measures like like like like connecting connecting connecting connecting more more more more people people people people to to to to treatment treatment treatment treatment disrupting disrupting disrupting disrupting drug drug drug drug trafficking trafficking trafficking trafficking and and and and expanding expanding expanding expanding access access access access to to to to the the the the overdose overdose overdose overdose reversing reversing reversing reversing medication medication medication medication naloxone naloxone naloxone naloxone experts experts experts experts say say say say the the the the pandemic pandemic pandemic pandemic has has has has been been been been very very very very difficult difficult difficult difficult for for for for people people people people with with with with drug drug drug drug addictions addictions addictions addictions as as as as lockdowns lockdowns lockdowns lockdowns and and and and other other other other restrictions restrictions restrictions restrictions isolated isolated isolated isolated them them them them and and and and made made made made treatment treatment treatment treatment harder harder harder harder to to to to get get get get I'm I'm I'm I'm at at at at Donahue Donahue Donahue Donahue

CDC Drug Drug Drug Drug Overdose O Drug Drug Drug Drug Overdoses National National National Nat White White White White House Drug Drug Drug Drug Drug Drug Drug Drug Addictions Donahue Donahue
Overdoses, not COVID-19, drive spike in LA homeless deaths

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 2 months ago

Overdoses, not COVID-19, drive spike in LA homeless deaths

"Overdose overdose overdose overdose is is is is not not not not covered covered covered covered nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen drove drove drove drove a a a a spike spike spike spike in in in in homeless homeless homeless homeless deaths deaths deaths deaths in in in in Los Los Los Los Angeles Angeles Angeles Angeles almost almost almost almost two two two two thousand thousand thousand thousand homeless homeless homeless homeless people people people people died died died died in in in in Los Los Los Los Angeles Angeles Angeles Angeles county county county county during during during during the the the the first first first first year year year year the the the the pandemic pandemic pandemic pandemic and and and and authorities authorities authorities authorities say say say say drug drug drug drug overdose overdose overdose overdose was was was was the the the the main main main main cause cause cause cause for for for for the the the the fifty fifty fifty fifty six six six six percent percent percent percent increase increase increase increase in in in in deaths deaths deaths deaths from from from from the the the the previous previous previous previous year year year year not not not not covert covert covert covert nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen the the the the findings findings findings findings released released released released Friday Friday Friday Friday in in in in a a a a report report report report from from from from the the the the county's county's county's county's department department department department of of of of public public public public health health health health showed showed showed showed that that that that despite despite despite despite initial initial initial initial fears fears fears fears the the the the virus virus virus virus itself itself itself itself was was was was not not not not the the the the main main main main cause cause cause cause of of of of death death death death among among among among California's California's California's California's largest largest largest largest in in in in the the the the nation nation nation nation on on on on house house house house population population population population but but but but the the the the corona corona corona corona virus virus virus virus did did did did cut cut cut cut people people people people off off off off from from from from mental mental mental mental health health health health and and and and substance substance substance substance abuse abuse abuse abuse treatment treatment treatment treatment after after after after services services services services were were were were drastically drastically drastically drastically reduced reduced reduced reduced to to to to prevent prevent prevent prevent the the the the spread spread spread spread of of of of the the the the virus virus virus virus I'm I'm I'm I'm surely surely surely surely Adler Adler Adler Adler

Los Los Los Los Angeles Angeles Angeles Angeles Angeles Angeles Angeles County Drug Drug Drug Drug Overdose O Department Department Departme California House House House House Substance Substance Substance Adler Adler Adler Adler
"drug overdose" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:41 min | 2 months ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on WTOP

"55 in Sterling 58 at the wharf in D.C. at three 41 The drug overdose death toll hit a new record of nearly a 107,000 during the past year Now President Biden is setting his administration's first national drug control strategy to Congress Stephanie smiley Johnson with Montgomery rescue checked out with Montgomery recovery services and addiction treatment center in Rockville to join WTO's Mark and Debbie to explain how harm reduction can help We at Montgomery recovery services Willie do believe in the harm reduction model So how many duction is really about connecting individuals who suffer from substance use disorder with not only overdose education but the resources and tools such as naloxone and the fentanyl test strips We also want to provide counseling and referral to other treatment So that might be primary care mental health as we know a lot of individuals who suffer from substance use disorder also have mental health concerns A lot of times and we want to really push the distribution of the tools that can help prevent the fatal overdoses that we're seeing right now What is needed most to combat opioid abuse We know that opioids are driving this high rate of drug overdose deaths Do you feel that the Biden plan addresses the opioid problem well enough So I think that his plan is really good and it really does highlight the need for funding of the two items that I just discussed which was the Narcan or naloxone and the fentanyl test strips Into the community and into the hands of individuals and family and friends of individuals who suffer from substance use disorder It could really save someone's life Stephanie you're on the front lines of this issue What do you see as the most important aspect of tackling drug addiction I would just say opening up avenues to treatment opening up more treatment centers and like I said just really getting the tools into the hands of individuals And when I mentioned opening up treatment avenues I'm actually the program director for a newly opened treatment center in Frederick Maryland We just opened September 1st So we're really just trying to open up the avenues treatment and really experience treatment for people that need it because it's really needed right now Stephanie smiley Johnson is with Montgomery recovery services It's three 43 a man suffered Talk serious here injuries after and being even stamped on a breathe metro bus And Saturday she's afternoon far from alone a metro spokesperson A baby is born with a cleft every three minutes This hurdle could have.

Stephanie smiley Johnson Montgomery recovery services a Montgomery Biden Rockville WTO D.C. Debbie Willie Congress Mark Stephanie Montgomery recovery services Frederick Maryland
Psaki: Teachers Should Talk With Kids About if They’re 'a Girl or Boy'

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:08 min | 2 months ago

Psaki: Teachers Should Talk With Kids About if They’re 'a Girl or Boy'

"Cut 72 Jen Psaki saying that it should be normal for teachers to talk with kindergarteners, but if they're a girl or a boy. Now mind you at this bar we're like bikers and truckers, welders and plumbers, mechanics, police officers. It's who we call the muscular class. You want to know why the muscular class have become like rabid right wingers? This is why. Play cut 72. And so what do you do if a parent or a kid should I say a kid in one of these elementary schools says, what about Sally, Sally has two moms, or I'm not sure if I'm a girl or a boy. I mean, these are kids who are experiencing these moments in their lives. Yeah, you want to know why all of a sudden the local neighborhood bar has been activated into now kind of mobilizing for local Republican action. It's because you have the top levels of our government, not concerned about inflation or gas prices, not concerned about the deterioration of kind of national morale, not about drug overdoses, but they're worried about whether kindergarten teachers are able to talk about some of the most controversial and radical subjects and topics.

Jen Psaki Sally
J&J's Janssen settles with WVa for $99M in opioid lawsuit

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

J&J's Janssen settles with WVa for $99M in opioid lawsuit

"West West West West Virginia Virginia Virginia Virginia will will will will receive receive receive receive ninety ninety ninety ninety nine nine nine nine million million million million dollars dollars dollars dollars in in in in an an an an opioid opioid opioid opioid settlement settlement settlement settlement with with with with Johnson Johnson Johnson Johnson and and and and Johnson Johnson Johnson Johnson subsidiary subsidiary subsidiary subsidiary Janssen Janssen Janssen Janssen pharmaceuticals pharmaceuticals pharmaceuticals pharmaceuticals West West West West Virginia Virginia Virginia Virginia has has has has long long long long led led led led the the the the nation nation nation nation in in in in drug drug drug drug overdose overdose overdose overdose deaths deaths deaths deaths and and and and was was was was one one one one of of of of several several several several states states states states that that that that sued sued sued sued over over over over the the the the drug drug drug drug maker's maker's maker's maker's role role role role in in in in perpetuating perpetuating perpetuating perpetuating the the the the opioid opioid opioid opioid crisis crisis crisis crisis state state state state Attorney Attorney Attorney Attorney General General General General Patrick Patrick Patrick Patrick Morrisey Morrisey Morrisey Morrisey says says says says he he he he believes believes believes believes it's it's it's it's the the the the largest largest largest largest settlement settlement settlement settlement in in in in the the the the country country country country per per per per capita capita capita capita we're we're we're we're pleased pleased pleased pleased with with with with the the the the settlement settlement settlement settlement of of of of because because because because we we we we think think think think it it it it represents represents represents represents a a a a major major major major step step step step forward forward forward forward to to to to start start start start to to to to get get get get money money money money in in in in the the the the door door door door to to to to help help help help west west west west Virginians Virginians Virginians Virginians who who who who have have have have been been been been devastated devastated devastated devastated by by by by the the the the opioid opioid opioid opioid epidemic epidemic epidemic epidemic Johnson Johnson Johnson Johnson and and and and Johnson Johnson Johnson Johnson and and and and Janssen Janssen Janssen Janssen said said said said the the the the settlement settlement settlement settlement is is is is not not not not an an an an admission admission admission admission of of of of liability liability liability liability or or or or wrongdoing wrongdoing wrongdoing wrongdoing by by by by the the the the company company company company I'm I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker

Johnson Johnson Johnson Johnso Virginia Janssen Janssen Janssen Jansse West West West West Virginia Drug Drug Drug Drug Overdose O West West Attorney General General Gener West Virginia Virginians Virginians Virginia Johnson Johnson Janssen Janssen Janssen Jansse Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker
Dale Wilcox: Illegal Aliens Are a Health Risk & Security Risk to All

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:50 min | 2 months ago

Dale Wilcox: Illegal Aliens Are a Health Risk & Security Risk to All

"So health wise, we've seen a rise in measles. We got rid of the measles in 2000. 2000 we eradicated the measles, but it's making a resurgence. It's coming back. So there's a health risk. When you have people coming across the border who aren't screened, and anyone who's been through our legal system with immigration. No, you have to go to a doctor. You have to have tests. You have to have a TV test to prove you don't have TV. Illegal aliens just come across and they're intermingling and their kids are being sent into our schools immediately. So it's a health risk. It's a national security risk. Crime is rising. And I think the one and on drugs, drugs pouring across the border. With a porous border, we've seen rises and deaths is specifically a 100,000 deaths last year because of drug overdoses. And now fentanyl, which comes as principally comes across the southern border, sentinel is the number one cause of death for people ages of 18 to 45. Number one cause of death. So everyone should be interested in this. Taxpayers. If you're just, you know, you feel that you don't live near the border. All this doesn't affect me. Well, first of all, Biden is flying those people into your backyard in midnight flight. So you should be interested. But taxpayers are getting soaked. Having to pay higher taxes to for government services to educate the illegal alien children because of a terrible Supreme Court decision many years ago that said that K through 12 education has to be free for illegal aliens. So this affects everyday Americans all taxpayers.

Sentinel Biden Supreme Court
A Deep Dive on U.S. Alcohol-Related Deaths in 2020

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:13 min | 3 months ago

A Deep Dive on U.S. Alcohol-Related Deaths in 2020

"Alcohol related deaths increased 25% from 2019 to 2020, with alcohol related deaths among adults younger than 65 outnumbering deaths from COVID-19 in the same age group in 2020, a new study finds. Alcohol related deaths including from liver disease and accidents increase to 99,017 in 2020, up from 78,927 a year prior. So let's just say this again, that alcohol related deaths, including liver disease and accidents, nearly a 100,000 people a year die from that, not to mention a 100,000 from drug overdoses. Now, why did alcohol related deaths go up from 78,927 to 99,000? It went up by over 20,000 because you locked down all of society. People are gonna try to find something to do with their time and unfortunately drinking culture prevailed. While 74,408 Americans ages 16 to 64 died of alcohol related causes, 74,075 individuals under 65 diet of COVID-19 to study found. The rate of increase of alcohol related deaths in 2020, 25% was greater than the rate of increase of deaths from all causes. The study shows just another unintended consequence of COVID-19 lockdowns and mitigation measures.

Covid Liver Disease
Is the Biden Administration Funding the Distribution of Crack Pipes?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:39 min | 4 months ago

Is the Biden Administration Funding the Distribution of Crack Pipes?

"So there's a new story that came out, which is that the federal government was going to help people that are doing drugs by providing them with funds to make drugs you safer for addicts. It's a $30 million grant program which closed applications on Monday and will begin again in May. It'll provide funds to nonprofits and local governments to help make drugs use drug use safer for addicts. Including the grant, which is overseen by HHS, our funds quote for smoking kits and supplies. Now the director of the smoking kits and supplies is not Hunter Biden, although he is a subject matter expert in smoking crack cocaine and getting away with it. But the position of the federal government now that we have a 100,000 drug overdose deaths is, you know, the problem is, we don't have enough crack pipes. If you think I'm joking, listen to it yourself, cut 65. Should the Biden administration now has a new plan, they are funding a $30 million program that will distribute smoking kits. These kits include crack and meth pipes. Okay, they're using taxpayer dollars for this. President Biden claims this was part of his executive order that it's supposed to help reduce harm in marginalized communities. No, I'm just going to point out the obvious here. That's the very same federal government that went on an all out Jihad against Ivermectin. So they go out on an all out campaign against hydroxychloroquine and Ivermectin, all while in the same breath saying, hey, you know what we need to do. We need to give people pipes so they can smoke crack on the side of the street because

Hunter Biden Federal Government Biden Administration HHS President Biden Jihad
Biden: U.S. Military Raid in Syria Results in Death of ISIS Leader

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:43 min | 5 months ago

Biden: U.S. Military Raid in Syria Results in Death of ISIS Leader

"We had the ISIS raid that just happened. Let's play cut 55, Joe Biden taking credit for it saying last night operating on my orders. The United States military forces successfully removed a major tariff threat to the world play cut 55. Last night, operating in my orders, the United States military forces successfully moved in major terrorist threat to the world. The global leader of ISIS. Known as Haji Abdullah now, one of the main reasons why Biden is executing a lot of these foreign policy decisions right now is obviously trying to resurrect his abysmal poll numbers. And the consensus in The White House is not that he's actually doing a bad job. It's that Afghanistan was for whatever reason, the alleged turning point when things started to go awry. In The White House a lot of people say, yeah, that was really, you know, kind of where people had a misunderstanding of how great our administration actually is. This is also exactly why Joe Biden wants to mobilize troops to the Ukrainian Russian border. You see Joe Biden thinks he can get moderates and people on the center right to think more highly of him if he's going to try to quote unquote put wins on the board for foreign intervention. Play cut 50. The current situation demands that we reinforce the deterrent and defensive posture on NATO's eastern Flank. President Biden has been clear that the United States will respond to the growing threat to Europe's security and stability. Our commitment to NATO article 5 and collective defense remains ironclad. As part of this commitment and to be prepared for a range of contingencies, the United States will soon move additional forces to Romania, Poland and Germany. So you're starting to see a lot of activity overseas, and it's by no mistake. This is all by design. You know, I'm glad to see the leader of ISIS taken out obviously. I'm not glad to see the escalation of troops in the eastern theater. But it's all trying to distract from what is happening domestically, which is a rise in crime, drug overdoses, suicides, incredibly weak economic figures, half a million people, displaced from the job market, otherwise that would not. A total failure when it came to allowing early interventions when it comes to treatment to the COVID-19 virus or the Fauci virus as we'd call it, and so when you look at what's happening overseas, you could call it a wag the dog effect. Here's the big

Joe Biden Haji Abdullah United States Board For Foreign Intervention Isis President Biden Biden Nato White House Afghanistan Romania Poland Europe Germany
4 charged after overdose death of actor Michael K. Williams

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 5 months ago

4 charged after overdose death of actor Michael K. Williams

"Arrests arrests arrests arrests have have have have been been been been made made made made in in in in the the the the drug drug drug drug overdose overdose overdose overdose death death death death of of of of a a a a popular popular popular popular actor actor actor actor authorities authorities authorities authorities in in in in New New New New York York York York say say say say four four four four men men men men are are are are charged charged charged charged with with with with being being being being part part part part of of of of a a a a drug drug drug drug ring ring ring ring that that that that sold sold sold sold a a a a deadly deadly deadly deadly mix mix mix mix of of of of drugs drugs drugs drugs to to to to Michael Michael Michael Michael K. K. K. K. Williams Williams Williams Williams the the the the men men men men are are are are accused accused accused accused of of of of selling selling selling selling Williams Williams Williams Williams fentanyl fentanyl fentanyl fentanyl laced laced laced laced with with with with heroin heroin heroin heroin in in in in a a a a sidewalk sidewalk sidewalk sidewalk deal deal deal deal that that that that was was was was recorded recorded recorded recorded on on on on surveillance surveillance surveillance surveillance video video video video last last last last September September September September federal federal federal federal prosecutor prosecutor prosecutor prosecutor Damian Damian Damian Damian Williams Williams Williams Williams says says says says such such such such sales sales sales sales already already already already public public public public health health health health crisis crisis crisis crisis ironically ironically ironically ironically Williams Williams Williams Williams gained gained gained gained fame fame fame fame by by by by playing playing playing playing Omar Omar Omar Omar little little little little on on on on the the the the wire wire wire wire and and and and HBO HBO HBO HBO series series series series that that that that portray portray portray portray drug drug drug drug crews crews crews crews like like like like the the the the one one one one authorities authorities authorities authorities say say say say the the the the four four four four defendants defendants defendants defendants belong belong belong belong to to to to I'm I'm I'm I'm Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar wells wells wells wells Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel

Williams Williams Williams Wil New New New New York York York York Michael Michael Michael Michae Damian Damian Damian Damian Wi HBO Omar Omar Omar Omar Oscar Oscar Oscar Oscar Gabriel Gabriel Gabriel Gabrie
Why Lt. Col. Allen West Is Running for Governor of Texas

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:07 min | 6 months ago

Why Lt. Col. Allen West Is Running for Governor of Texas

"I'm talking to the lieutenant colonel, but he since we're friends now I can just say colonel. Colonel Allen west, you're running for governor of Texas. I want to talk to you about January 6th, but I also want to talk to you about why you're running for governor of Texas, not in Texas, but when I was decided to do this, will you be running up against Greg Abbott? Is he stepping aside? What is your where do things stand in the world of Texas politics today? Yeah. Well, first and foremost, I'm not running against anybody. I'm running for the state of Texas and really when you think about Texas is so important to the survival of our constitutional republic America. And when you look at what is happening here in Texas, you know, it's January and January is national slavery and human trafficking month. Texas is the number one state in the United States of America for human and sex trafficking. Dallas and Houston and I live right outside Dallas, Dallas and Houston are the top two cities with sex trafficking in the United States of America. You talk about the drug trafficking crisis that we had last year over 100,000 drug overdoses. All that fentanyl has come across the border right here in Texas. And so I was taught in the military that warriors moved to the sound of the guns. And as you know, I was the chairman of the Republican Party of Texas. And so there are many legislative priorities that you can advocate for that for whatever reason. We're not getting past here in Texas. And so that's why I stepped down as the chairman of the party to run to be the governor party. And I can tell you one of the most heinous things happening here in Texas is that we have child gender modification processes and surgeries going on. And so we have hormonal therapies, gender transition therapies and puberty blockers being given to our children as young as 8 years of age, we're seeing surgeries being done to remove healthy body parts, but yet we couldn't get that pass. We couldn't go to school choice pass. We couldn't get historical monument marker protections passed. So there's a lot of those things that, you know, people came to me and said, hey, look, we need a strong constitutional conservative, to stand up for Texas. And that's why I ended up running for

Texas Colonel Allen Dallas United States Of America Greg Abbott Houston Republican Party Of Texas Governor Party
Julie Kelly Describes Jan. 6 Incident D.C. Police Are Covering Up

Mark Levin

01:42 min | 6 months ago

Julie Kelly Describes Jan. 6 Incident D.C. Police Are Covering Up

"In one instance two D.C. police officers one supervisor attacked a woman named Victoria white who I interviewed twice and wrote about her last month D.C. supervisor takes his baton and strikes her on top of her head At least 13 times with a baton Now this is a small woman who is trapped in this tunnel She can not get out He then throws his baton aside and punches her directly in the face 5 times You then see her face is bloodied You see another officer with a woman who has fallen down and can not get out of this tunnel He stomps on the top of her head These are the kind of police brutality that was happening in this tunnel against women This is also the location Mark where Roseanne boyland a 34 year old woman from Georgia Trump's supporter died D.C. coroner said she died of an accidental drug overdose but she was in this tunnel She was overrun by the mob of both police and protesters We're not sure yet There is looks like some evidence that she also was beaten by a female D.C. police officer in that tunnel But she's lying face off dead in front of this tunnel And is then dragged back into the building by police officers including celebrity police officer Harry Dunn and officer aquilino but now who take her body and keep it near steny Hoyer's office until paramedics arrive She's pronounced dead at 6 O 9 There is a very good chance and this is why they don't want the video

D.C. Victoria White Roseanne Boyland Donald Trump Georgia Harry Dunn Mark Aquilino Steny Hoyer
As COVID fueled the drug crisis, Native Americans hit worst

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 6 months ago

As COVID fueled the drug crisis, Native Americans hit worst

"As as cove cove it it fuels fuels the the drug drug crisis crisis in in America America native native Americans Americans are are being being hit hit the the worst worst the the white white earth earth nation nation tribe tribe in in Minnesota Minnesota worked worked hard hard to to save save its its people people from from addiction addiction and and in in many many years years lost lost no no one one to to overdoses overdoses on on the the reservation reservation but but then then the the pandemic pandemic arrived arrived improved improved too too painful painful for for some some like like Rachel Rachel Taylor Taylor son son who who became became addicted addicted after after being being prescribed prescribed pain pain killers killers as as a a teen teen haven haven this this Hellebuyck Hellebuyck and and it it felt felt like like this this pandemic pandemic wasn't wasn't nothing nothing compared compared to to the the pandemic pandemic of of all all that that you you know know the the Dr Dr Linda Linda Fenton Fenton all all want want opioids opioids that that have have taken taken over over a a record record high high one one hundred hundred thousand thousand Americans Americans were were lost lost in in the the year year to to drug drug overdoses overdoses as as the the pandemic pandemic sent sent addiction addiction up up by by nearly nearly thirty thirty percent percent with with native native Americans Americans twelve twelve times times more more likely likely than than others others to to die die from from meth meth amphetamine amphetamine I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker

Cove Cove White White Earth Earth Rachel Rachel Taylor Taylor Minnesota America Hellebuyck Hellebuyck Dr Dr Linda Linda Fenton Fento Julie Julie Walker Walker
Late musician Tom Petty receives posthumous Ph.D. for music

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 7 months ago

Late musician Tom Petty receives posthumous Ph.D. for music

"The the university university of of Florida Florida is is awarded awarded an an honorary honorary PhD PhD to to rock rock legend legend Tom Tom Petty Petty Tom Tom petty's petty's hit hit I I won't won't back back down down is is almost almost an an implement implement Gators Gators games games he he had had deep deep ties ties to to the the university university of of Florida Florida in in Gainesville Gainesville the the city city where where he he grew grew up up and and even even worked worked as as a a groundskeeper groundskeeper at at the the campus campus to to earn earn money money as as he he tried tried to to break break his his way way into into the the music music industry industry students students there there have have always always been been proud proud of of the the connection connection to to the the rock rock and and roll roll hall hall of of Famer Famer and and now now the the university university board board of of trustees trustees has has awarded awarded Thomas Thomas Earl Earl petty petty a a posthumous posthumous doctoral doctoral degree degree in in music music petty petty died died of of a a drug drug overdose overdose in in twenty twenty seventeen seventeen hi hi Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn

University University Of Of Fl Tom Tom Petty Petty Tom Tom Pe Gators Gators Gainesville Florida Famer Famer University University Thomas Thomas Earl Earl Petty Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn
US overdose deaths topped 100,000 in one year, officials say

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 7 months ago

US overdose deaths topped 100,000 in one year, officials say

"Experts are using words like devastating and terrible to describe the number of Americans who are dying from drug overdoses drug overdoses now surpassed deaths from car crashes guns and even flu and pneumonia about one hundred thousand Americans died of drug overdoses in the year ending in April of twenty twenty one according to the CDC that's a never before seen tragic milestone the top two reasons the coveted pandemic which left many people socially isolated and the availability of the highly lethal fentanyl which drug dealers are mixing with other drugs say health experts twenty twenty one says one drug policy expert is going to be terrible I'm Rita folate

Drug Overdoses Drug Overdoses Pneumonia FLU CDC Rita Folate
"drug overdose" Discussed on NoCo Now ? 1310 KFKA

NoCo Now ? 1310 KFKA

05:58 min | 11 months ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on NoCo Now ? 1310 KFKA

"I think you'd get more done behind the scenes and in front of the scenes. And so i'm just really good to help people you know. Move through the process. I know the game Been there done that. And so i think that My job and and my my talent is better served. You know doing things that people don't want to do you know. Say the things that you need to say in order to protect our businesses. So i love heavy on because you're not afraid to say that we're title to michelle vans. The executive director of the windsor area chamber of commerce. Michelle with all of that said well. Let me ask you a personal question here. You just Are here out of california down. You haven't been living here too long if memory serves me correctly. Our you adapting personally living here in northern colorado. Well my husband. And i you know we. We've heard why started one community for twenty years. He worked at one company for twenty eight years We used to live to work and that was it kinda ran our lives. Now we work to live and we do things that give us joy and i love business advocacy. So i'm working job. I want to We sold everything in california. We bought a condo. Rv that we play and We're all n plus one we mountain bike hike kayak we do all the fun things and we don't worry about mowing the lawn and we can pack our stuff up and leave at any moment. I love it but you have no plans on during that raid. Not going into a windsor businesses at ease their okay. You got going anywhere. no. I'm not going anywhere. I'm i'm doing a job. I love. I haven't been this happy and i can't tell you how long You know the appreciation there from our community our town. Oh my gosh. They are the most supportive council. I've ever worked with that. Are pro business The city manager the economic development team. Stacey miller over very outstanding. I mean just the like you said. We're all pulling on the rope together. And i think you get more done working together and then you do battling. There's no doubt about it. Michelle any final thoughts from you today. I'll let you go so that you can go. Cut that ribbon. I know right. We got ribbon-cutting in a minute and i'm just super excited. Thank you for giving us an opportunity to tell her story. Thank you for carrying about winder and We're here to stay. We're not going anywhere we're here to just keep roll with it right. Yeah i love it and and we really do to set that up. We can be my co-host firday eleven. I'm addicted to podcast and talk radio. So i don't that's my world and so right now. I'm a huge adam. Corolla fan if anybody out there listening. I got this outstanding I went and saw him up in golden. He came to go a couple of weeks ago so if he's anyway i just love that a year. Absolutely we're going to. We're going to set that up because that would be a lot of fun. I've heard you talk and like you said you're not afraid to say what needs to be said so we're going to set that up. Michelle thank you so much for your time. Short notice you jump on really appreciate it and The best of your future endeavors as well. And i'm sure we'll be talking real soon. Have a great day thank you. Tanner says michelle. Vance the executive director of the windsor area chamber of commerce desert her..

michelle windsor area chamber of commer Stacey miller california colorado windsor winder adam Tanner Vance windsor area chamber of commer
"drug overdose" Discussed on Daily Coronavirus Update

Daily Coronavirus Update

06:56 min | 1 year ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on Daily Coronavirus Update

"Drug overdose deaths have risen sharply in the country by thirty percent in twenty twenty with over ninety. Three thousand deaths. A large driver of those debts were the result of the synthetic opioids sentinel as it has been frequently mixed into other drugs. The pandemic also played a role in this as people who are receiving treatment or wanted it at difficult 'accessing it early on isolation and other life disruptions also feel the uptick betsy mckay senior writer at the wall street journal joins us for the rise in overdose deaths. Thanks for joining us. Betsy thank you for having me. We have some not so good news to talk about over. The pandemic obviously was a tough time for a lot of people is a big disruption to our lives. There was a lot of isolation going on. But we're learning now that something that was already a problem before just got exacerbated by it also drug overdose deaths. They soared nearly thirty percent in twenty twenty driven largely by sentinels like synthetic heroin basically. So that's what are we seeing in these new numbers that we're getting dramatic dramatic increase. It's the largest increase in at least three decades but probably more probably in the history the country. Now you know last year there were more than ninety three thousand people who died of a drug overdose and he said you know it's driven primarily by kind of proliferation of sentinel into the drug supply. Illicit sent knows mixed with a lot of drugs. And so you know. Many times people who are using drug. Don't realize that it's actually more powerful than they know because fendt noah's in it and so you know it's been a growing problem for the past. Few years deaths started ticking up in late twenty. Nineteen but after march twenty twenty. Which if you remember was when the pandemic really struck here and and restrictions kicked in and people started losing jobs and there was a lot of social isolation over the next month the depth just really took off and so there's kind of a perfect storm of two twin epidemics in this country that have unfortunately fed off each other and left us in a really bad place. There was also the debts from the overdose deaths from methamphetamines. Cocaine went up and and as you mentioned there was over ninety three thousand debts last year from twenty nineteen. That was about seventy two thousand. So you know more than twenty thousand. Extra people died as as you mentioned just dramatic shift. There let's talk a little bit more. About how the pandemic affected this part of it part of it was people that wanted to get treatment or needed treatment. They couldn't get it in the early months of the pandemic that's right clinics either closed or went online. People were having trouble even if they wanted to go in person you know knowing where to go or being able to get there so it cut off service for some people or people face disruption children providers say in most places did move to offering therapy sessions on zoom or you know other telehealth platforms. That doesn't necessarily work for everybody. They need to face to face contact or they just don't have the technology to do it. People who lost their jobs and lost their livelihoods. Some of them ended up homeless and on the street harder to get into treatment there and then honestly the big disruption to lives you know deaths of family and friends losing a job losing a home that produces a kind of trauma. The when you think about it people who are trying to come out of addiction or looking for needs stability and needs support and just kind of getting hit from from all sides have the support systems coping mechanisms even just closing a businesses and in the office. You know this reduced social interaction that could you know. Take your mind off things or whatever however people do cope that that was also taken away from a lot of people and it's tough and you even mentioned like you said this zoom things that you could have done with with whoever Drug counselors all that. Just not the same when it's over video as it is when it's in person so we have these numbers now these unfortunate numbers now what our public health officials would lawmakers saying that they want to do about this. How are they trying to get a handle on this well. It's clear that what's been done. Today is not working. You know people. I talked to said just need a much. Bigger much. bolder approach much more. Comprehensive the federal government has made it easier over the past year and a half for people to get treatment. They've moved a lot of barriers. But there's a lot more they need to remove. I mean some of the things cited are removing the limits on the number of people a physician can prescribe treatment to you know they can prescribe pain pill or widely in some cases then they can actually treatment for addiction to opioids and the other thing is making treatment which more widely available in clinics and pharmacies. So that you don't have to go through lots of bureaucratic hurdles and the final thing and it's a pretty big thing. Is that lawsuits. That state and local governments have filed against the opioid manufacturers and distributors seeking a cost to recoup their costs for daily with the opioid pandemic. Some of the settlements are starting to be made. And they're you know. Altogether state and local governments are seeking more than twenty six billion dollars from opioid manufacturers distribute distributors around the country so some of those trials are just getting underway and some of the settlements are starting to happen in the idea. Hope anyway is that this money would be used for treatment prevention and other programs to help deal with with addiction. Yeah i mean as you mentioned that the twin epidemics of we had the pandemic going on and then this other problem these opioid drug overdoses. That have been happening for quite some time already. Just got worse throughout that whole process so hopefully things begin to change. But you know as you just kind of alluded to. There's a lot of work that needs to go into that. Betsy mckay senior writer at the wall street journal. Thank you very much for joining us. It's nice to be here. I'm oscar ramirez and this has been reopened america. Don't forget that for today's big news stories. You can check me out of the daily podcast every monday through friday so follow us an iheartradio or wherever you get your podcast. Hey it's danielle. Monaro from elvis duran and the morning show on iheartradio here to tell you chucky cheese the best place to play the summer they're welcoming families back with an all new summer fun pass starting at only thirty nine ninety nine each pass offers weekly game play and e tickets and other great perks learn more on their website in store or on the chuck e. cheese app limited time at participating locations only terms and conditions apply see website for.

betsy mckay fendt noah the wall street journal Betsy federal government Betsy mckay oscar ramirez elvis duran Monaro danielle america
"drug overdose" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Million people. It's all opened up way. Understand it, and we are doing a job. We're literally setting records. Unemployment. Look at housing look. Att automobile production. Look at how you're doing in Nebraska. Look at how you're doing. Biden even once the lock down young and healthy Americans yet for those under the age of 50, I hate to say this is you're under the age of 50. How many are under the age of 50? I have good news for you 99.99. Okay. You know what That means? That means you're in good shape. That's what that is. But you noticed the fake news that all they talk about his covert covert, covert covert covet, and we've made such progress. It's incredible. Excuse me. I'm here. I mean, I wasn't exactly feeling great. It's been a long time. I wasn't exactly feeling great man. I bet with great doctors. One thing when you're president, you got plenty of doctors way. Have one of them here today. I think we have a great White house Doctors. Traveling shot has become very famous. Oh, is that Shawn? Look a John, look at him. He's got a big ego. He loves it when I mentioned his name. He's a great doctor. And they were great doctors from Johns Hopkins and from well to read everything else and What we know today is like so different than what we knew six months ago. Incredible progress they've made and with the vaccines, which it coming immediately, even without turning that corner, you know, at some point which, turning that corner, and it's been pretty amazing. Florida had a rough time. Boom. Step back is all the way down Texas all the way down Arizona. Great governors all the way down by this cruel and senses lockdowns would cause Countless deaths from suicide drug overdose and delayed medical care alcohol. I've been so many so many different problems. Remember, I'd say the cure cannot be worse than the problem itself. That's what you have when I banned travel from China. Remember, he said. Now, he says, always should have done it sooner. Except what I bad it would have months. He said. He shouldn't do that. He xenophobic, right. And now he says, I should have done it earlier, and he had a thing called the swine flu. It was a disaster much less lethal. He was It was a disaster. He was a disaster. He's still a disaster. Actually way. Listen to Joe. Countless more people would have died. They were anticipating It could be 2.2 million. You don't hear that 2.2 million, and you know the number one is too many. As far as ever concerned. One is too many. This shouldn't have happened. There's too many, but it could have been 2.2. It could have been more than that, by who is willing to sacrifice your lives on the altar of open borders. He wants open borders without borders..

White house Doctors Johns Hopkins Biden John drug overdose president Nebraska Florida Shawn Texas Joe Arizona China
"drug overdose" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on KQED Radio

"York, are suspended today without pay back in March, These officers arrested a man named Daniel Prude Ah, 41, year old black man with a history of mental illness. They put a hood over prudes head. He later died of suffocation. Ah medical examiner ruled the death A homicide protests in Rochester have now taken place for two nights after the family of Daniel proved released a video of the incident which they had obtained through a public records request. NPR's Liz Baker is in Rochester and joins us now. Good morning, Liz. Good morning. You were at the protest last name. What can you tell us? I was there earlier in the evening and joined a crowd of a couple 100 people. We marched from the site where Daniel Prude encounter the police to the public safety building where police are headquartered, and when I left, it was still peaceful, but a little later, the crowd started pushing against a police barricade. And there are multiple eyewitness videos showing police responding with tear gas, pepper spray and what sounds like pepper balls or rubber bullets. So you were able to talk with protesters before those clashes with police began. What did they tell you? A few people said that the suspension was a step in the right direction. But they wanted further action and a lot more. People said that this was too little too late so they would keep pro testing. All the black protesters I spoke with said they're paying goes back. Much much further than this incident with Daniel Prude. Shamika Lot grew up on the block where Daniel proved was asphyxiated, and she's holding the video affected her so much. She had a panic attack at work When she saw it. I am at Ray's right now. I raised right that they see in video on that rage. I am a mother of a black sudden who is 21 who I am scared for every day about the star. Protect him, killing them because I'm black. I mean, she's giving voice there to what so many people feel in this moment, and the video is horrific. There's obviously Just like incredible rage throughout the town in Rochester, how our city officials responding Well in a press conference yesterday, Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren said she was disappointed in herself for not acting sooner when she learned what happened to Daniel Prude, and she apologized for what she described as listening to her lawyers instead of listening to her humanity here. She is in that press conference. We must as a society as a city face. The truth. Institutional and structural racism led to Daniel proves death. Mayor. Also police blame on the chief of police, and she said she was initially told Prue died of a drug overdose, and she only found out about officer involvement after the New York state attorney general opened an investigation. Did we mention the protests happening in Rochester over this? Also in New York City? There was a rally protest rather last night. What happened? Things got violent. A car went through a crowd. Yes. Well, according to our colleague, W. N. Y. C. Who was out reporting on this Glen Hogan. The crowd of several 100 people had just begun to March out of Times Square Plaza. When a car approaches protesters. It stops a little bit. Nobody gets out of the way and then it accelerates into the crowd. All the protesters were able to jump out of the way and there were no deaths or major injuries. But police say the car belong to a group of pro trump counter protesters enough people on social media. We're speculating that it was an unmarked police vehicle that the New York Police Department Confronted that misinformation on Twitter, saying the Black Tour sedan is not a police vehicle and an investigation into the incident is ongoing. NPR's Liz Baker reporting from Rochester, New York. Thank you. Thank you. Yesterday. Joe Prude told me about his brother, Daniel. We had a one off his brothers, you know, And you know, like I said before, and I keep saying, you know, Danny was very charismatic. He's good..

Daniel Prude Liz Baker Rochester New York Police Department Ray Joe Prude NPR York New York City New York Times Square Plaza Danny drug overdose Prue Mayor Lovely Warren Twitter Glen Hogan
"drug overdose" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Richard Gordon junior. Gordo Richard born junior was a NASA astronaut walk in space on German I eleven in nineteen sixty six orbited the moon on Apollo twelve in nineteen sixty nine every birthday little Stevie Miller. take the money and run Steve Miller today is seventy six. Nikki from Greece before that he was we learned on taxi actor Jeff Conaway born nineteen fifty died two thousand eleven it was not from a drug overdose it was aspiration pneumonia and encephalitis fee which were attributable to previous drug overdoses birthday Sunday the man we called bomb. H. R. bomb bright oil real estate ranging banking football team owner of the Dallas Cowboys passed away in two thousand four born on this day in sorrow skews me on Sunday San Antonio Texas went to macarthur high school played at Trinity university and played in four World Series to with the Mets to with the Dodgers my friend Jerry grow tea today turns or Sunday turned seventy seven and last and least every birthday Sunday to Kevin Cronin. started our ride the storm out Golden country and look what they left us with well.

Steve Miller Gordo Richard Richard Gordon drug overdose Dodgers Jeff Conaway Mets San Antonio Texas Dallas Cowboys NASA Nikki Stevie Miller. encephalitis macarthur high school Greece Trinity university Jerry H. R.
"drug overdose" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"But I am all in on kids and I need you to be too and why is that because kids have got so many evil forces out there whether it's drugs whether it's sex traffickers whether it's people who are negative meaning evil and take advantage of kids shame on you I hope you rot in hell the thing about the summer that I want to remind you is this an opportunity to connect with your kids so please I am begging you to talk to your granddaughter talk to your grand son little Charlie Hey little Charlie how you doing kids need to be heard they need someone to listen and encourage them that they can do anything if they have goals they have dreams and they work hard enough another topic that I want to talk with you in this morning segment is my niece Samantha Ross know many of you know my story my niece summing up the Ross she died at age twenty of an accidental drug overdose and I bring this up because of course her birthday is on July thirteenth and of course I miss her so much and I just wanna make sure and remind you not only do I want you to talk to your kids and truly listen and see how they're doing plus encourage them and tell them as often as possible how much you love them I want you to check in on them as it relates to drugs and unprotected sex you see I didn't do that and my niece Samantha is dad and I live without regret every day of my life so I am begging.

Samantha Ross drug overdose Charlie
"drug overdose" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:41 min | 3 years ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"They become addicted to opioids. So how how big how big is the problem? The problem is very big. It's we have a significant drug overdose problem in this country last year over seventy thousand Americans died from a drug overdose. Almost fifty thousand of those America's died as a result of opioid drug overdoses. This is a significant problem that not just affects the people that are directly impacted those who die and those who are dictated, but their family members a few months ago, I met a woman who came up to me at an event, and she shook my hand and she held my hand. And she told me her son had died just a few months ago from a drug overdose. And when I looked in your eyes, I could see enormous amount of pain when you see that in a person, you realize that that's pain. It's never gonna go away and that for every person that dies drug overdose. Their family members and friends who are suffering every single day. So when you look at it that way, this is a huge national problem. And and the. Addiction is to prescriptions, which you wouldn't necessarily think if someone prescribed medication you're supposed to take. But well, that's right. I mean, people who are prescribed these drugs can become addicted to them if there's an over prescription of too many of drugs prescribed, so we working with HHS is partnering with HHS to help educate doctors about over prescribing drugs, and we've been pretty successful actually over the last couple of years opioid drug prescriptions are down about twenty one percent in this country. Oh, that's good. I wasn't aware of that. So progress is being made what kind of drugs are collected during the the take back day. Well, the the purpose of prescription drug take back day is to take back prescription drugs. But basically, we take back all unwanted unused or expired medications that anybody wants to bring people shouldn't worry too much about that. If there's something in their medicine cabinet that they no longer use that they don't longer need. They should feel free to bring it to collection location near them. Is there any issue with privacy? Because a lot of prescription drugs has your name and other valuable information just on the label. Is there any issue with that? There isn't this is a completely anonymous program. Nobody is collecting any information about the prescriptions or what you bring or your name or anything like that. If you blur uncomfortable about that. They're welcome to take the drugs, put them into a baggy dispose of the prescription labels any way, they see fit and still bring the drugs into the location. Yeah. I have a tendency to do that with mine. When I get rid of appeal that label off. There's nothing wrong with that. If people are more comfortable with that. But they should know this is a non IMAS. The government is not collecting any information on you. We're not collecting any data from the prescriptions. Everything is going to be disposed of actually it's all incinerated in an EPA approved incinerator. So nothing is going to be collected. No in for personal information is collected or utilize as a result of prescription take back day. Yes. I was gonna ask about that. So they're they're incinerated. You said, yes. One of the reasons this started was because people thought the one way to get rid of prescription medications was to pour them down the drain or flush them down the toilet that actually pollutes our water supply. So what are the reasons we decided to do this was because it was just more environmentally friendly? Again, another big reason for doing it. The most important reason is just to get those drugs out of people's medicine cabinets to prevent people from becoming addicted to them, right? All right. We're talking with Udom Dylan the acting administrator DA Drug Enforcement Administration. What we're specifically talking about national prescription drug take back day this happens in April and October every year, but you can do this pretty much anytime during the year, and we will explain that part of it in a minute. What types of drugs are not collected on that day. Well, we'll really take anything. Our goal is to get two types of. Prescription drugs that people become addicted to, but we're not really asking Americans to sort through and figure out which one they should and shouldn't bring they should just bring anything to the nearby collection facility that they want to dispose of. So my best advice is go through your medicine cabinet. If you're not using it if you if it's expired bring it to a collection facility, that's the safest way to dispose of it. And it was looking at the at the website. There are plenty of locations an account of them. There's more than a hundred just within fifty miles of where we are right now. How does someone.

drug overdose Drug Enforcement Administratio HHS America Udom Dylan EPA acting administrator twenty one percent
"drug overdose" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Now, we'll treat drug overdose sites as crime scenes pushing police to collect more information from each incident in hopes of building more serious cases against those who sell the drugs. The first of its kind initiative was launched last month in Erie county, New York home to buffalo which has been ravaged by the nation's opioid epidemic. Here's what's happening from Jeff more, doc Justice department reporter at the Washington Times. Jeff, what are they doing? Well, this is fascinating Gordon what they're doing is any kind of overdose site, whether it's fatal or nonfatal they're going to treat it like a crime scene. And what that means is that officers they'll have to follow specific evidence gathering procedures. They nail have to add different pieces of information like the drugs packaging, chemical composition into the computer system. And the reason why this is important is what they hope it'll do is. It'll give them the evidence. At the federal level for federal prosecutors to pursue stronger charges against drug dealers. Interesting. So this likely increases police paperwork, I presume here. What? So what actually all is involved? You reference some of the different notes, they have to take it increases increases both their paperwork what they have to collect at the crime scene. It makes the little more cumbersome for police because they they'll have to document so much more than they did before when they would come across an overdosing. But they think it's worth it because they think the evidence what they're going to gather is going to naval prosecutors to to make stronger cases in get longer jail sentences for dealers because for example, if it's a fatal overdose with the evidence they collect they feel that they can pursue a home aside charge against the dealer, or if it's somebody comes back the refi, but three nor can they can pursue. H charge of inflicting bodily harm against a dealer and that carries a twenty year minimum in federal prison. And none of that is being done. Now, a ba-, generally speaking. That's correct. A few pockets here, and there are pursuing those charges, but nobody except for western New York and business in Erie county, which is home to buffalo, which is the which is the state's second most populous city dirty once you have really formalizes procedure. They did a pilot program about a year ago. And they got a dealer who had sold heroin waste with that. And all that caused the debt. They just got sentenced to twenty years minimum in federal prison. And they look at that has such a success that that's why they wanna keep pursuing..

drug overdose Erie county New York Jeff doc Justice department reporter heroin the Washington Times Gordon twenty years twenty year
"drug overdose" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"We'll treat drug overdose sites as crime scenes pushing police to collect more information from each incident in hopes of building more serious cases against those who sell the drugs. The first of its kind initiative was launched last month in Erie county, New York home to buffalo which has been ravaged by the nation's opioid epidemic. Here's what's happening from Jeff more, doc Justice department reporter at the Washington Times. Jeff, what are they doing? Well, this is fascinating. Gordon, what they're doing is anytime there's an overdose site, whether it's fatal or nonfatal they're going to treat it like a crime scene. And what that means is that officers they'll have to follow specific evidence gathering procedures. They now have to add Pete different pieces of information like the drugs packaging, chemical composition into the computer system. And the reason why this is important is what they hope it'll do it'll give them the evidence at the federal level for federal prosecutors to pursue. Stronger charges against drug dealers. Interesting. So this likely increases police paperwork, I presume here. What? So what actually all is involved? You reference some of the different notes, they have to take it increases increases both their paperwork what they have to collect at the crime scene. It makes it a little more cumbersome for police because they they'll have to document so much more than they did before when they would come across an overdosing. But they think it's worth it because they think this evidence what they're going to gather is going to naval prosecutors to Perdue to make stronger cases and get longer jail sentence for dealers because for example, if it's a fatal overdose with the evidence they collect they feel that they can pursue a homicide charge against the dealer, or if it's somebody comes back the refi, nor can they can pursue HR of inflicting bodily harm against deal. Taylor. And that carries a twenty year minimum in federal prison. And none of that's being done. Now. A generally speaking. That's correct few pockets here, and there are pursuing those charges, but nobody except for western New York and business in Erie county, which is home to buffalo, which is the which is the state's second most populous city dirty. I want to really formalizes procedure. They did a pilot program about a year ago. And they got a dealer who had sold heroin wait with that. And all that caused the debt they eat just got sentenced to twenty years minimum in federal prison. And they look at that has such a success that that's why they wanna keep pursuing. That's why they wanted to formalize it and and keep pursuing the crime scene protocols. We're talking with Jeff more doc Justice department reporter at the Washington Times. He's written a piece about how police Erie county New York are treating drug overdose sites as crime scenes right now trying to take down big dealers. Who's opposed to this some some drug policy experts are opposed to this? They feel that what you're doing. In. These cases is you're taking a drug dealer who warmly would be normally would be jammed up on a low level drug offense, and you're turning them into a hardened felon instead of getting maybe three years or west for dealing offense in a local or state prison. We're sending them to federal penitentiary. Presumably speckled penitentiary for twenty years under these charges. And now you're making them hard core offender win at most typically, they'd be a low level dealer. And they say there's no evidence that, you know, prosecuting people under his penalties really makes a difference to end the opioid crisis. Another point that they've made is in a lot of these cases the person who overdosed has received the drugs from a family member, a friend, not the dealer itself. But there's usually an intermediate rare that they're doing the trucks with I talked to James Kennedy, who's the US attorney for the western district of New York about that. And he told me, well, it's there's not a white line. But they look at it on a case by case basis has to who they want to charge and why they want to charge, and you sit in some cases, we have skipped prosecuting the person that did drugs with the victim. But we've gone straight for the dealer. But obviously they decided on a case by case basis. Has there been progress in this or is a tour later tell? It's too early to tell because they just started it. But there's been one case where they've got a twenty year sentence, and they got the enhanced penalties by using the crime scene protocols, and there's another sentencing pending that should be in another week. And they're kind of hopeful that they'll get a strong sentence there as well. But this only started earlier this month. So they're just has there's just not a large enough sample size to determine its success. So far is Jeff Jeff Murdoch Justice department reporter at the Washington Times twelve minutes now after.

Jeff Jeff Murdoch drug overdose Erie county New York the Washington Times reporter doc Justice department Gordon James Kennedy heroin Perdue Pete Taylor US attorney twenty years twenty year twelve minutes
"drug overdose" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"This story is just insane. I have to share this with you. And then we'll get into some some more local stuff switched it death. A horrific hospital mix up. Left. A Brooklyn woman grieving for nine days. At the bedside. Of a brain damaged man who doctors insisted was her brother. This according to a lawsuit. Now, the stranger had a same. Exact name is your brother. Identification made off of a social security card. So again based on that, you would think that there wouldn't be this mix up. But there was. Those are the women's called in. Hey, your brother's here. He's been in horrible horrible something. Was it a drug a giant drug overdose? All right. She shows up at first she's looking at this guy's laying in the bed going. Kind of. But that doesn't really look it looks bigger and my brother. Obviously, I want to say they were estranged, but they didn't spend much time together. And so she brings it up to the doctors who basically say, well, the reason we're having trouble recognizing him is just do everything that he's been through. He is he's very swollen especially around the face. So just keep that in mind, which is actually you ever seen somebody that you've known who who's been in a tragic accident or a disfiguring accident, I actually have. And I know it's probably a rare thing, but it mentally other from a mannerism standpoint, you kind of saw saw what was going on there. But from a visual standpoint, especially for at the time they were getting surgery this was after a car accident and basically used his face several times to stop himself from bouncing around the cab. Normal now. But at the time, I don't know that I would recognize him. So I guess I kind of get that. Here's the problem. This is where it's going to get pretty crazy. So she actually calls family members to come in. And the reason is is because the prognosis is not a good one including demands two daughters. Who come down to? I think they were in Virginia. So they come up against would be technically true from Virginia to New York and say goodbye to their father. She then makes the in their minors, by the way. So she makes the decision as the the adult who's is next akin to pull the plug. Not an easy decision. Some of you might have been through it. And for a week and a half she lives with that. Then.

Virginia drug overdose Brooklyn New York nine days
"drug overdose" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

Chapo Trap House

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on Chapo Trap House

"LA district attorney for not stopping him when they had the opportunity to CAC wrote on Twitter in late July when you note it that's exactly what happened as a setting in basically in fewer about to about a half a year two. Very young gay black men who are like basically homeless have died of Odidi from drug overdose in this guy's apartment. The second one just happened. In July two thousand seventeen Gumbo. More twenty six year old black man died from methamphetamine overdose in bucks apartment. Shirley afterward. Cannock followed a tip from a colleague and reached out to Moore's friends and family who had discovered a journal among the possessions returned with Moore's body they were disturbed by what they said they found Moore's journal said that book got him hooked on meth and had drugged him against this will since Moore's death chemicals collected a trove of information and attempt to make the case that Ed book is a predator who preys on down on their luck black men by inviting them into his apartment and suggesting they try methamphetamine injections or slamming. Cac forty one an award-winning social commentary and former congressional press secretary started to investigate book just a few weeks after Moore's death Kennex sedative from a colleague led her to look into the prominent political activists Titian Nixon Moore's mother told Kinnock she had a lot of concerns and was not getting a lot of answers from the thority. We started to figure out there is a pattern and practice where he solicited. And went after young gay black men usually men who were homeless HIV positive, and we're need of food or money can said citing in person interviews. He conducted published people who said they had met buck for sex and drugs, not all these men were on drugs, and they met at bug Cannock added. But Ed buck got them on drugs. So this guy this is now two people fitting the same profile with died in exactly the same way in this guy's house, and in neither cases charges been filed. No the first time they just talked to an accident. And to at this point that doesn't seem like there's any indication that they're going to charge him this time either just like well, listen to this actually Marie Preston. A transgender activists and former board member of the stonewall democratic club of Los Angeles said she and Ed buck we're friends temporarily during their time on the board Preston later work to check book from the club where he'd been a lifetime member during a Mon retreat for the stonewall democratic club..

Titian Nixon Moore Ed buck stonewall democratic club methamphetamine drug overdose Marie Preston Twitter Cannock Odidi LA Shirley press secretary Mon Los Angeles Kinnock twenty six year
"drug overdose" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Be my choice. Poison myself. No, and yeah today for the first time surveys show that most Americans say marijuana should be legal New York and New Jersey are likely to legalize so so far letting adults make their own decisions about what to put in their own bodies been working out pretty well. I love that should not be allowed to do anything want with. No, no, you should not. I want to control everything about you. Oh god. That drives me crazy enough. We've got real marijuana. It's not something. I sit there and go. Let's give me my dad. My dad who died of a drug overdose. It wasn't marijuana to kill them. He liked the little bit of the cocaine and a bunch of other things. I will tell you. It's it's insane. And we're talking about it, you know, as dissolve marijuana's this horrible thing. We have other issues that are very real. When it comes to things that are totally legal the opioid epidemic marches on in the CDC says one demographic that seen a dramatic increase in drug overdose deaths. Women between the ages of thirty and sixty four the agency said between nineteen ninety nine and two thousand seventeen the rate of overdose deaths for women in that age group increased by two hundred and sixty percent. It says synthetic opioids had the sharpest increase when broken down by drug type seeing more than a thousand percent increase in the number of cases, that's real. Just insane. So it's okay. Because you regulate that and we can get it. And then all of a sudden you become addicted to it. And then from there the addiction, and then you gotta turn to elsewhere. Do you look for fencing all and you buy stuff on the street? You're not quite sure what it is. It's like window cleaner mixed with just. My god. Crazy three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three. At Chad Benson show that there be your Twitter Trump at the Dan, mcallen speaking today. And just you know, doing his thing trying to frame his side of the story that everybody already knows and the Democrats are trying to frame their side of the story that everybody already knows. And they're both pointing fingers at one another and nothing is getting done and we're not moving the ball forward. And I'm I'm tired of both sides being this way. I think you are too. I think when I talked to most people. And I think part of the problem is is, you know, birds of feather, right like, you flock together, depending on what you are if you and too many of us live in a world where we want to surround ourselves with the echo chamber. Want to get into the same one? We want to hear the same thing. We wanna we wanna have our our confirmation bias on everything that we believe in and the whole nine yards. Whatever what that's why we go to FOX or MSNBC and all of those things when you do that you never get another perspective. Megyn you, not well rounded enough to understand a lot of the issues are going on because you're only trying to find out certain things that will confirm what you already believe. And it's, but I think the most of us out there. We just were sick and tired of the way that you know, this goes, and it doesn't matter. How did he say we're gonna be talking about this for the teen? Weeks and months ahead as we head into two thousand twenty. And the people that pay attention. To politics sporadically 'cause they're living their lives. Their voices isn't allowed as the people that live and die off this kind of crap. And who for whatever reason get to be the flea that wag the tail that wags the dog, and that dog will do is more worried about the flea right there. That singular flea than anything else. And it's stupid. And that's where the frustration. It goes for all of us. And then we demand things. From our politicians. That they go in there, and they do everything. To get one hundred percent. And if they can't as long as they showed they can fight for one hundred percent, and they walk away with nothing. We're okay with that. That's just so stupid three two three five three eight twenty four twenty three at Chadbensonshow is your Twitter. You could tweet at us. My pillow. Brought my my pillow tonight. In a hotel tonight. And.

marijuana drug overdose Twitter New Jersey cocaine CDC New York mcallen Chad Benson MSNBC FOX Dan one hundred percent thousand percent sixty percent nine yards
"drug overdose" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Interesting just about every parent who's lost a child. We'll tell you that it is a pain worse than anything else. But how that child is lost does make somewhat of a difference. The more sudden and horrific the the cause of death, for example, the harder it is to accept such as when a child is lost to a drug overdose. When things like that happen. It can make apparent kind of reevaluate. A lot of things. According to this writer, there was a rally to near the Saint Louis in support of border security this past weekend. It was sponsored by the gateway pundit several hundred people showed up to express their desire to see the president. Build the wall at the border one. In attendance, was a woman who identified herself as an embarrassed liberal. Who had lost a son to the opioid epidemic. Terry b. Who was a friend of the writer agreed to speak at the rally on Saturday. Terry lost a child to heroin five years ago. She's never spoken about her loss in public. Her son. Jason they say was an athlete in a top student in high school. During her address to the crowd, Terry. Who said she has another child is an addict. Admitted that she did not vote for the president President Trump in two thousand sixteen. And she added that once he declared a national emergency due to the opioid epidemic. She's decided she will vote for him in two thousand twenty because as she says he's been the only president since this crisis. Started to do anything serious about it. One of the primary reasons why President Trump in most Republicans are supportive of a wall, or or at least a much more significant physical barrier. Is because of the massive amounts of opioids being smuggled into the country. By Mexican drug cartels. But the epidemic did not start with the cartels. As the department of health and human services noted in the nineteen nineties. It was the big pharmaceuticals assured medical professionals that patients would not become addicted to opioid painkillers and as such. Providers began to prescribe them in grand numbers. Leftist healthcare policies under ObamaCare helps spread the pedantic. And by twenty sixteen one hundred thirty people per day were dying from opioid overdoses. The department of health and human services reports eleven point four million Americans have abused. Opioids. And President Trump has ordered all hands on deck to fight the epidemic. They also published additional figures. Based on data from two thousand sixteen and twenty seventeen in that time alone more than forty two thousand two hundred people died from an opioid overdose. Eighty one thousand people tried heroin for the first time. More than fifteen thousand four hundred sixty died from a heroin overdose. Two million people misused prescription opioids for the first time. And we'll return.

president Terry b President Trump drug overdose heroin department of health writer Trump Saint Louis painkillers Jason five years
"drug overdose" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Eight five moist nine that's one area code eight one eight five six six four seven eight nine now, one of the stories locally that's been getting a lot of coverage salacious deals with prominent prominent democratic donor. Otherwise, probably not known to most listeners named Ed buck, but he used to shovel a lot of money at Hillary Clinton. And apparently Jerry Brown was all set that figures. You think you think Jerry's been over the apartment says here. He's a prominent democratic donor who's given a Hillary Clinton and pose with former California governor, Jerry Brown. One party. Congressman Ted lieu is going to return the money that buck donated to him and visited I think Ted's giving it to a gay groups gay lesbian. Bisexual was groups LGBT. I would love to see the signing guestbook at bucks apartment problem for at buck. Who is sixty three years old is an last year and a half or so two African American men have died in his home. I one definitely from a drug overdose was a younger guy, and he allegedly was. A prostitute a male prostitute who needed the money and ended up that buck and he died of a drug overdose. But the Daily Mail, which we will tell you does pay people. The reason though, this story probably is true. Is this man is provided photographic evidence. Yeah. He took secret pictures inside and bucks home. His name is germane Gagman gag no gag known. They used to be a hockey player with that name. And I was getting gag known. Germain told Daily Mail TV how buck paid him to fly him for Minnesota Los Angeles drugged him with a substance dissolved in greater Gatorade doesn't say. What flavor and then injected him with crystal meth at the West Hollywood apartment and Gagman shared pictures, which show buck wearing white long Johns crouched over him on the mattress of a pullout bed during one of their nights together as well. As the tool box is the toolbox of sex toys. You see that picture? That's.

Ed buck Jerry Brown Hillary Clinton Congressman Ted lieu drug overdose Gagman Jerry Johns California Gatorade hockey Germain Los Angeles Minnesota sixty three years
"drug overdose" Discussed on Reason Podcast

Reason Podcast

04:34 min | 3 years ago

"drug overdose" Discussed on Reason Podcast

"It's really a lot of guys on scooters wearing beanies who who have figured that out yet. Right. Yes. Not like some genius move likely it early. How could we make money on weed isn't thing that the dumbest person you knew in college figured out? How to do? So. So yeah, I guess, you know, again, I think I think there is it it is a bad and lazy habit to attribute to your political opponents only interest in their personal material well-being that is almost never what's going on. Yeah. He broke your resolution for everyone else. He did break. My resolution for everyone else. Don't don't attribute bad faith. And you know, and I think this again this story that he's telling which and Peter mentioned this in his review of Oran casts book, I really think he can't be overstated like one hundred percent of this conversation seems to be driven by that one case Deaton study that says that like poor white dudes are dying at a slightly higher rate than they were in the last decade or so I think one hundred percent is an exaggeration ninety. Ninety. Monologue. In the monologue shows up everywhere. And I think it's it's such an interesting example of a study crystallizing and offering a kind of sense of scientific validity to a general vibe that people had been having. And frankly, it's often the case and Deaton are really smart and are and their study is probably solid as hell at the same time. Like, so often it turns out when you try to dig deeper on those those types of studies these studies that like pivot the whole political conversation, they're not as rock-solid as it turned out to be. I am looking forward to what I am sure is already underway, which is the undermining of that study. Now, it won't matter because everyone will already believe it's true. It's too late for that study to be under my show. So I mean, there's already an argument going on about this study. And an the basic argument is is not the study found that there was an uptick in what they are. What they describe as deaths of death, and despair which are achie- white white middle middle aged people in areas with poor economic performance are dying more often from suicide and drug overdose. And there's some research so that the overall death rate is and so they're arguing that this is caused by the declining economic opportunity for less educated. People in basically in rural areas that are struggling economically. There's a countervailing study that that came out that basically says no it's not about economic circumstances. In fact, it's about the the drug environment. Basically, what's what sort of drugs are available and how cheap they are. And that since about two thousand twenty ten or so that a a huge amount of the the deaths can be attributed to restrictions placed on. Corruption opioids in an attempt to keep people from abusing them. And so because of that the drug environment has shifted and people are now taking more dangerous synthetics and substitutes like funnel. So in conclusion legalize all the drugs. Yes, every time more more than ever, Nick. They're part of what Tucker was saying, which is kind of interesting or implying heavily was that Mitt Romney doesn't pay enough in taxes, and that too much of of conservative and Republican orthodoxy has all been about protecting the rich people from paying taxes. There's another politician who's almost as famous as Donald Trump who has been talking about the same thing over the past week on sixty minutes. That's Alexandria, ah Cossio Cortez. She has created single handedly a conversation about seventy percent marginal tax rates among people who are in ten million dollars more. You wrote about this over the weekend. What do you make of this new? Let's get back to Eisenhower brackets discussion it again as a as a sign that we are out of ideas when you look at how much of both on the right, and the left how much backward-looking there is the entire. I think the entire election between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton it was about to people kind of stuck in the nineteen seventies kind of dueling it out for who would run,.

Deaton Donald Trump Oran drug overdose Cossio Cortez Mitt Romney Alexandria Eisenhower Hillary Clinton Peter Nick Tucker one hundred percent ten million dollars seventy percent sixty minutes