32 Burst results for "Dreyfuss"

"dreyfuss" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

04:27 min | 11 months ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"So that was fascinating to me like. How quickly does this take place in this idea that i've kind of lethality rising. That's taking place and at the same time. Why is it that certain names are remembered and others are completely forgotten. There could be as many as fifty thousand people in the warsaw godot in nineteen forty three when the germans began what seems to jews nagato to be the final liquidation. There might be five six hundred members of these fighting organizations who have arms who are actually sort of fighting in the ghetto and you have over forty thousand people who just bury themselves in bunkers underground. Which is what everybody does. In the ghetto. We remember the names of lists that are sent out of over two hundred names. These are the fighters names to remember. People who finally get in every movement lists their people. But you have a couple of hundred names that are down not the forty to fifty thousand tour who are in the right so that also that sort of dichotomy is like certain heroes. We're gonna remember but who are the heroes right. Why do we remember some names. And we don't remember the masses right all the people who who are hiding out in the ghetto which is also a form of resistance at me one of the bigger questions that i'm trying to look at it as dichotomy between armed resistance versus passivity right like why is this sort of enshrined in memory that you have to take up arms to fight back havi dreyfuss In her book about the end of the worst sogo she makes it very convincing case. That actually digging yourself into a bunker. Underground in the warsaw ghetto to hide out and says evade nazi deportation is probably the most successful form of resistance. Because you're preventing them from rounding up taking the ghetto you're not going onto street to shoot them and then die right. You're resisting this way. So this is something that happens right. That these frameworks are..

warsaw havi dreyfuss
"dreyfuss" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

Lex Fridman Podcast

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on Lex Fridman Podcast

"The thing that truly ways as down is the inefficiencies and i think if you think about other other contexts like what. What are the moments when i mean. We're unique in this respect. This period in history is unlike any previous nobody. Nobody ever felt that way. But think about but it's also true that nobody no previous period in history was nihilistic so our condition is tied up that sort of thing is meant to be a response to the felt lack of aground and so no no previous epoch. In history felt that they didn't have our problem but think so so they they. It was much more natural to them to experience moments in ways that feel Unachievable for us what we were calling moments of aliveness before think about where the context in which they felt them. They weren't efficient optimized context. Think about that. The greeks if you ever read home rate is bizarre. Worlds back there but one of the things. That's bizarre is that they're so unmotivated by efficiency and optimizing that the only thing that seems to run through all of the different greek cultures is the idea that if some stranger comes by you better take care of them because zeus is the is the god of strangers and zeus will be angry. That's what they say. But what does it. How does it manifest itself a dishes. He's trying to get home and he gets shipwrecked on an island. And you know. He's trying to figure out how he's been at sea for ten days. He starving he's bedraggled he sees Now cisa the princess who's beautiful and he's like boy. I better get to get some clothes or something. I don't want them to beat me up and kill me. And so the so she takes him to the palace. They have three days of banquets and festivals before they even ask his name. It's like here's a stranger. Our job is to celebrate the presence of a stranger because this is where significance lies. Now we don't have to feel that way but but the idea that that's one of the places where significance could lie is pretty strongly at odds with the idea that our salvation is gonna come from optimization efficiency and maybe something about the way we live our lives will have that integrated into it But it's but it's at odds with other other moments. lemme ask you a question about hubert burt dreyfuss. He is a friend. A colleague a mentor of yours. Unfortunately no longer would this. You wrote with him. The book titled all things shining reading the western classics to find meaning in a secular age. I ki- may be speak about who that man was what you learned from him. And then we could may be ask. How do we find sued classics. Meaning a secular age okay. So bert dreyfuss was Fairy important philosopher of the late twentieth. Early twenty first century. He he died in two thousand seventeen about little over four years ago He was my teacher. I met him in nineteen eighty nine when i went away to graduate school in berkeley. That's where he taught. He plays in an interesting and important role in the history of philosophy in america because in a period when most philosophers in america And in the english speaking world were not taking seriously twentieth century. French and german philosophy. He was and he was really probably the most important english speaking interpreter of heidegger the german. Fluster that we're talking about. we've been talking about. He was an incredible teacher. A lot of his influence came through his teaching and one of the amazing things about him as a teacher was his Sort of mix of intellectual humility with sort of deep insightful authority and he would stand up in front of a class of three hundred students. Utah huge classes because people love to go see him and i taught for him for many years..

hubert burt dreyfuss bert dreyfuss america berkeley Utah
"dreyfuss" Discussed on Bald Movies

Bald Movies

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on Bald Movies

"I don't know because the other thing. I guess that they did in. The adaptation is that the novel is more of like Chris's story and the d- intentionally with the narration and the divisive You know richard dreyfuss thinking about his childhood and in terms of his own children they use that to deliberately centered a story on gordo which is how they. I guess this is all go- last minute kind like on filming decision as i. Why don't we have. We'll go for the gun and it just made so much sense When you're changing the perspective of the movie sure and that's the thing. That's what i think is so amazing about like adaptations is like the choice to like. Well we want this to be a little bit more. Relatable slits centered on kid. That's a writer. And because we got the obvious hook there and like the that little butterfly flap ends up changing the end in a way that so satisfying. Never done that if you hadn't chain pov. I just love that. He's just so let's make it more relatable by making more about the writer and this is like the writer thing to do right it. This is exactly what you said about your childhood. Assume that like all kids have the same childhood. I have writers assume oh writer is default position for human beings. So let's write about that and it's also me when that happened it's also telling like centered on the middle class kid right. That's just on on hard times. Because his all american brother died in a jeep accident. And he's slumming with the hoods because he's more relatable because we don't get the kids. Yeah because what. The fuck is rob reiner. Has you going to identify with the guy lake. He grew up in hollywood and he wasn't chasing bodies across train tracks and shit hanging out with felt crazy. People like george kelvin. A rob reiner more of a moon or accuser. Do you think had.

richard dreyfuss Chris rob reiner george kelvin hollywood
"dreyfuss" Discussed on Bald Movies

Bald Movies

05:48 min | 1 year ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on Bald Movies

"Left out or left behind and that to me is the strength of this movie and i think that's the the idea that A couple of dreyfuss Dean aerator observes like he's lost touch with this person or that person and like the idea that like that is part of life. Then that's something you learn euro That not everyone is going to be around. And that's another thing it's like. I feel like the goodwill hunting bites the hell out of this movie goodwill goodwill hunting. Is this this movie except for instead of about going into high school. It's about going to college but like you know like the river. Phoenix thing is like it's not an asshole to like. Stop hanging out your friends if your friends are holding you back You know like if you got the opportunity escape this shit whole town should fucking take it because we would We thought we could. I think there's like i don't want to spoil everything but there's like there's one final years a couple of final tragedies towards the end of the movie that i thought you know really hit this kinda and i guess that's the thing is like this movie is like so well liked and beloved by such a wide smell swath of americans i. It's hard sometimes mind-blowing in as i grow up. And i see this stuff that we all grew up with and then i look at the landscape of where we're at culturally and like how in the hell did we get there. And the other thing is i feel like those types of people. I'm talking about. Watch this movie and think the exact same thing but they would be thinking about like terms of like you know whether kids should be allowed to take hormones are whether the government should force us to do something and i'm thinking just ensures of like basic empathy incivility and the understanding. That cruelty is bad and you know loyalty is good anyway. 'cause this movie just like really hits home how fucking arbitrary everything is and the only thing we can do is to be there for each other to stand stand by friends. You know how unfair it is like the to me. The best scene of this movie is when river phoenix. Explains the milk money. yeah. I.

dreyfuss Dean Phoenix phoenix
Joe Biden Dismisses Afghan Airplane Deaths: 'That Was Five Days Ago!'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Joe Biden Dismisses Afghan Airplane Deaths: 'That Was Five Days Ago!'

"Was the president of the united states sitting down with four former clinton administration. Official and confident confidant. George stephanopoulos on abc news. We've all seen the pictures we've seen those hundreds of people packed into a c. seventeen we've seen afghans filings four days ago. Five days ago. What did you think when you first saw this shop at mean. Pause it right there. First of all a fact check. No it wasn't. It was like two days prior. He doesn't even know what day it is when people say he doesn't know what day it is. That's what they mean. And what's that got to do. you think. Bodies falling out of the sky from the plains isn't so bad if it's four or five days ago wasn't this morning george. What the hell is he talking about. Four or five jar and it was. It was two days ago. And it's still horrible or go back to the beginning again. Listen to this catastrophe. I'm telling you it's right out. Veep this i give you julia. Louis dreyfuss claim the president of the united states on veep. We've all seen the pictures seen those hundreds of people pack into a c. Seventeen we've seen afghans pilings four days ago five days ago. What did you think when you first saw this pictures. Well i thought was weird. We have to gain control this. We have to move this more quickly. We have to move in a way in which we can take control that airport and we did said he could have been handled. This could have been handled better in any way. No mistakes no. I don't think it could have been handled in a way that they're going to go back in hindsight and look but the idea that somehow there is a way to have gotten out without chaos ensuing. I don't know how that happens. I don't know how that happened. I don't know how we got to put that get isolate that. I don't know how that happened. I don't know how that happened. george. I don't know what a what a disaster we're in trouble were as a nation. We're in big trouble.

George Stephanopoulos Louis Dreyfuss Clinton Administration Abc News United States George Julia
"dreyfuss" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

"Reviews and then we're going to bring back the ghostbusters. Retrospective series from two thousand. Sixteen with the optimism. That ghostbusters afterlife will live in november. And bring back our tom cruise series again. It is seems to be the most available series. We've done. I think it's been like two years straight our top donation level. You can get tom cruise because someday topgun to will take off and it's currently scheduled for november so a lot of new shows planned again if the movie does change dates if you donate for these retrospectives you will get that show whenever the movie is released if you donated for tom cruise back in the spring. If you donated for candyman back in spring twenty twenty you will get shows just as part of the promised donation drive for that so if you donate now you will get these reviews when those movies come out and you're gonna get something else from now playing thanks to some friends. We're giving away some more digital download movies to win. A copy of richard dreyfuss is new movie frame story. It sounds really good to me. Because it's apparently like john wick or taken instead of tianhu or leon richard dreyfuss wads richard dreyfuss. And you know what i saw that film. Nobody were bob. Odenkirk did that and nobody was really good so i looking forward to more of those kinds of films. If dreyfuss can do the stunts it'll be great. You're right if bridge drivers can do the kung fu. It's going to be amazing. The giveaway for crime story is happening now. And if you're in our facebook group you're already answered as well as if you are a subscriber to are now playing in focus newsletter. Those are the two ways to enter. If you subscribe to our newsletter the sign ups on our homepage. Jason puts out weekly content contributed to by everybody at now playing both in front of the mike and behind. And you could just get more news and reviews from us it now playing by signing up for this now laying in focus newsletter. And if you join our facebook group. Which i'm going to be one hundred percent honest. I'm not just like pimping us. This is the best facebook group i've ever been in. Most of them are train wrecks. I loved the people in this group. It's a lot of very friendly very civil conversations about movies..

tom cruise richard dreyfuss john wick tianhu leon richard dreyfuss Odenkirk candyman dreyfuss facebook bob Jason
"dreyfuss" Discussed on KFC Radio

KFC Radio

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on KFC Radio

"Would you rather wear cargo shorts every day forever or never allowed to wear socks ever again so everywhere you go. You got to go to a fancy event a presentation of funeral. A party What you're on stage or acting cargo shorts or you're just going raw dog in the in every contract it has to be every every role he ever does cargo guy. You're just you're begging to get arrested. The comeback blockbuster would be wearing cargo. Come on a cargo. Shorts guy toys. Maybe using. I'm going to be using rod argument. The here's the thing might fleet sweat. Man can never get people. Don't do socks. I can't do the whole like feed in just makes now as a service to the world. I don't think that would be good. I don't think it'd be a good service to what it seemed. in cargo. shorts better option become like a bull. Bill murray kind of type where it's just like. Oh yeah works. I also think they are the cargo. Shorts in the fanny. Pack while maybe not the most fashionable are very. There's a lot of utility. They're very useful. I joked i jokingly recently quote unquote jokingly war cargo shorts and socks and tebas to disneyworld. 'cause i wanted to look like a dad and he it all altogether. I think kinda works. You need to go into you get really creative. Like all those pockets on the cargo that you could pull something out and make it into a pantheon you can get pretty you get different pattern cargo shorts and then all of sudden they turned into a pant. You've had the pleasure of working with. I think two of the greatest actors actresses ever in julia. Louis dreyfuss and jessica walter. I'd be remiss if we didn't bring her up. I know she passed away. I mean just the greatest. I can't tell you how many times i've struggled to pick my favorite character interested development. It's impossible to do so. But i usually end up landing on lucille. And he was put in her. Her timing was so solid and and also my favorite. My favorite joke was when she'd said about like. It's a banana michael. How much going to be ten dollars. I. it is so good and every single line she said was just stolid solid. She landed at every time and she when she came on set she had her script and it was all tabbed and the night before she she like almost mapped out her timing like she wasn't ready for the day. My my favorite of hers is when michael tells job to get the seaward outta here and she's standing in the doors was ali. When i'm and ready. That is good. I'll never forget like i on when we were doing that. Scene with Her and michael they were talking about buster and i was just sitting on the bottom just right next to them and just i remember just watching her and going. Oh this is gonna be fun right. She just she just knew. Every single thing was the sharp sharp sharp now. It's funny you offer her..

Louis dreyfuss jessica walter Bill murray rod julia lucille michael ali
Episode 222 Summer Movie Madness pt 2 - burst 14

The Moratorium

01:38 min | 1 year ago

Episode 222 Summer Movie Madness pt 2 - burst 14

"I can't even imagine if you see a guy that looks like george buck flower hanging. Where you're your cheerleader camp immediately. Call the police. Some of his lines he and one line actually says this is in the the stuff for. Imdb i almost wrote it down. But then i saw it was here that judge and the orange skirt because it was a cheerleader camp. They were judging each other. They were trying to you know they were given away trophies and shit will make your pcp harder than a ten pound bag of nickel jaw breakers if you know what i mean. I don't know what that means. Let's just stop the podcast right forever if you wanna look a little deeper okay. Don't know you don't travis mckenna who we just talked about. Because he was jack. And roadhouse as names. Jack they i sure never said his name. He was an ex bodyguard and bouncer. Which makes imperfect for roadhouse but adopted. George buck flower as his uncle. Oh okay wait a minute. Can you do that by the way that makes him on. Google buck flower. If you look at george buck flowers. Imdb it's just bum bum bum wino- bomb homeless man bum. It's

Imdb Celebrity TV Horror Funny 1980'S Cult Obscure Movie Review Comedy Travis Mckenna George Buck Flower George Buck Bubis Lorin Dreyfuss Jack Colo Google Davidson Tom Villard Tom Villers Paris Moore
"dreyfuss" Discussed on Mom and Dad are Stoned

Mom and Dad are Stoned

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on Mom and Dad are Stoned

"Dougher. That's and elissa one hour. The hell else that hyper check. either. I don't know who is purpose. Oh okay is that a is it your turn. This is our award winning podcasts. Are you ready okay. I'm ready dre alone. Create guys up here enjoying. Let me have a big drink. Says place on four. Okay shit nores okay. This is a famous sitcom starring for older women. Golden girl yes. This is a famous show. From when i was a teenager starring sarah michelle gellar. Yes this is the show where that super hot guy like breaks out of jail tattoo. What is about the prisoner. It's called breakout four. I know you're talking about. It's called prison pursue okay. What did i say famous show about medical things that are done done got it. Oh god this stars. The lady julia louis dreyfuss Vape yes okay. This is a david lynch show. And now it's another show fucking would show home. I don't know man forest something all at once again at zoom very past it what it was the answer you Some or all of the twin peaks. And i said the forest show. That's the same thing all right.

Dougher elissa sarah michelle gellar julia louis dreyfuss david lynch
"dreyfuss" Discussed on The Moratorium

The Moratorium

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on The Moratorium

"Trent if you're listening. I remember you missing in action posters But that reads after a plane is hijacked by terrorists. The delta force is sent in to resolve the crisis by shooting. Everybody killing everybody. I thought it was more of a war movie but so delta forest but then pow. The escape is colonel charity. They just kept his name by the way partly because he was too drunk to answer to anything but his own too confusing at that point. Colonel kerry leads a group of american. Pow's battling their way to freedom as saigon falls to the viet com. Wow david carradine. Steve james again also did lone wolf mcquade to which i feel like as i love that movie. Yes oh yeah. It comes on periodically. I and i'm happy to watch the the last thirty minutes right which is probably the best part of the movie. Yeah but at the end he wins and ends up leaving his wife and daughter on the sidewalk. There chase more bad guys like. Can we get a ride home. I or we no doubt. Work news Detective school dropouts. Oh wow detective school. Yes this this one we have not talked about. And if you look at it. I remember the box art but i've never seen this movie. It reads two bumbling. Private detectives get themselves hired to define a missing person. They find themselves in the middle of a mob war when it turns out the missing person is somebody. The mob wants to stay missing. I don't know if that's the way read that or if that is just the strangest description. Oh it's italian it's down. Now that makes sense. George george in it. It's written in part and starring lorin dreyfuss and who you might ask is more and drive. How many dreyfuss is do you know i am asking that question right now. Who the fuck is lorin dreyfuss. Older brother of richard dreyfuss lauren's girl's.

delta forest Colonel kerry wolf mcquade delta force Steve james Trent david carradine lorin dreyfuss George george dreyfuss richard dreyfuss lauren
"dreyfuss" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on The Big Picture

"Tv show coming next year called secret invasion that where this group of characters figure prominently so i don't know if that means i would be surprised if florence pugh is the star of an emcee you. Tv show. I kind of feel like she's above. That i feel like she should have her own movies. But maybe that's not how this is gonna work. What do you think is going to happen there. I assumed it would be movies. Because she's a movie star but then also as previously discussed they don't make movies anymore and people are pretty wild about these tv shows. And if julia louis dreyfuss is going to be in the thunderbolts is that what is. I almost said thunder cats on. It's not the thunder cats. I can also too so ever been camp without revenge right. She was ever the last two minutes. I've just been trying to remember how revenge panned out. Finally did she get revenge. Should we get eileen in here. Because she felt revenge so closely she liked. Yes finish it. I watched like the first season and a half just devotedly and then. There's no idea what happened. I couldn't tell you what happened on that show except that. Henry's ernie was on it. The guy cherney. How do you pronounce his last name. No the guy who plays plays opposite. Ethan hunt you know who's who says you've never seen me very upset age agent. Which is that his name. I think that's his name anyway. Great character actor terrible. Show anyway if joya louis-dreyfuss is is willing to lead up the thunderbolts. In whatever medium. They deem they decide as appropriate then florence. You can show up for like eight episodes..

florence pugh julia louis dreyfuss cherney eileen Ethan hunt ernie joya louis Henry dreyfuss
"dreyfuss" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"They went through his files and they didn't find anything. And this just convinced the more. The dreyfuss was not only guilty but sneaky as well because clearly he had hidden all of the evidence before they had managed to get to it next they went and looked through his personal history for any incriminating details. They talked his teachers. They found that he had studied foreign languages in school which clearly showed a desire to conspire with foreign governments in later in life. His teachers also said that dreyfuss had a good memory known for having a good memory which was highly suspicious right because a spy has to remember a lot of things so case went to trial and drives us was found guilty and afterwards they took him out into this public square and ritualistically tore his insignia from his uniform and broke his sword into this was called the degradation of dreyfuss and they sentenced him to life imprisonment on the aptly named devil's island. Which is this barren rock off the coast of south america. So they're he went there. He spent his days alone writing letters and letters to the french government begging them to reopen his case so they could discover his innocence but for the most part friends considered the matter closed. So one thing that's really interesting to me about the dreyfus affair. Is this question of why the officers were so convinced. That dreyfuss was guilty. I mean you might even assume that that they were setting him up that they were intentionally framing him but historians don't think that's what happened as far as we can tell. The officers genuinely believed that the case against dreyfuss was strong. Which makes you wonder what does it say about the human mind that we can find such poultry evidence to be compelling enough to convict a man. Well this is a case of what. Scientists call motivated reasoning. It's the phenomenon in which are unconscious. Motivations are desires and fears shape the way we interpret information so some information some ideas feel like our allies and we want. We want them to win. We want to defend them. And other information or ideas are the enemy and we want to shoot them down so this is why i call motivated. Reasoning soldier mindset. And probably most of you have never persecuted a french jewish officer for high treason. I assume but maybe you've followed sports or politics so you might have noticed that when the referee judges that your team committed a foul for example. You're highly motivated to find reasons. Why his wrong but if you judges that. The other team committed a foul awesome. That's a good call. Let's not examine it too closely. Or maybe you've read an article or a study that examined some controversial policy like capital punishment and as researchers have demonstrated if you support capital punishment and the study shows that it's not effective. Then you're highly motivated to find. All the reasons why the study was poorly designed but if it shows capital punishment works awesome..

dreyfuss french government dreyfus south america
"dreyfuss" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"So i'd like you to imagine for a moment that you are a soldier in the heat of battle. Maybe you're a roman foot soldier or a medieval archer or maybe you're zulu warrior regardless of your time and place. There's some things that are constant. your adrenaline is elevated. And your actions are stemming from these deeply ingrained reflexes reflects his rooted in a need to protect yourself and your side and to defeat the enemy. So now i'd like you to imagine playing a very different role that of the scout so the scouts job is not to attack or defend. The scouts job is to understand. The scout is the one going out. Mapping the terrain identifying potential obstacles and the scout may hope to learn that. Say there's a bridge in a convenient location across the river. But above all the scott wants to know what's really there as accurately as possible and in a real actual army both the soldier in the scouter essential but you can also think of each of these roles as a mindset a metaphor for how all of us process information and ideas in our daily lives. And what. I'm going to argue today. Is that having good judgments making accurate predictions. Making good decisions is mostly about which mindset. You're in so. I'm going to take you back to nineteenth century france where innocuous looking piece of paper launched one of the biggest political scandals in history. It was discovered in eighteen. Ninety four by officers in the french general staff and it was torn up in a wastepaper basket but when they piece it back together they discovered that someone in their ranks had been selling military secrets to germany so they launched a big investigation and there are suspicions quickly converged on albert dreyfuss. He had a sterling record no past history of wrongdoing. No motive as far as they could tell but dreyfuss this was the only jewish officer at that rank in the army and unfortunately at this time the french army was highly antisemitic so they compare dreyfus's handwriting to that on the memo and concluded that it was a match even though outside professional handwriting experts..

scott albert dreyfuss france dreyfuss germany french army dreyfus
Why You Think You're Right -- Even if You're Wrong

TED Talks Daily

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Why You Think You're Right -- Even if You're Wrong

"So i'd like you to imagine for a moment that you are a soldier in the heat of battle. Maybe you're a roman foot soldier or a medieval archer or maybe you're zulu warrior regardless of your time and place. There's some things that are constant. your adrenaline is elevated. And your actions are stemming from these deeply ingrained reflexes reflects his rooted in a need to protect yourself and your side and to defeat the enemy. So now i'd like you to imagine playing a very different role that of the scout so the scouts job is not to attack or defend. The scouts job is to understand. The scout is the one going out. Mapping the terrain identifying potential obstacles and the scout may hope to learn that. Say there's a bridge in a convenient location across the river. But above all the scott wants to know what's really there as accurately as possible and in a real actual army both the soldier in the scouter essential but you can also think of each of these roles as a mindset a metaphor for how all of us process information and ideas in our daily lives. And what. I'm going to argue today. Is that having good judgments making accurate predictions. Making good decisions is mostly about which mindset. You're in so. I'm going to take you back to nineteenth century france where innocuous looking piece of paper launched one of the biggest political scandals in history. It was discovered in eighteen. Ninety four by officers in the french general staff and it was torn up in a wastepaper basket but when they piece it back together they discovered that someone in their ranks had been selling military secrets to germany so they launched a big investigation and there are suspicions quickly converged on albert dreyfuss.

Scott France Germany Albert Dreyfuss
"dreyfuss" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

Good Seats Still Available

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on Good Seats Still Available

"And washington. Just go away. They said fine but we want of money. They were asking for around one hundred fifty to two hundred thousand dollars in compensation to go away. Nobody wanted to pay that and sorry and some of those were actually for sale right where they were also the word that so even more resistance i guess to paying off a teams a couple teams that were for sale right right. What if. What if they sold them to somebody with apple something that you wouldn't be able to get rid of them even more so because nobody's going to buy something just to have it on out from from underneath them louis for sale Cleveland was forced for sale. Well baltimore struggled. Washington said they would they would sell the team at somebody would buy it but nobody wanted to be the first guy out and they wanted the as much money as they could get from the established league the national league to go away in the end. The national league did it achieve that to some extent when they bought them out. But that's why they didn't close out in eighteen ninety eight now. They had another problem when the players league with belly up and eighteen ninety and after the little war between the american association and national league in eighteen ninety one a new national agreement was signed that formed the twelve team big-league within that there was a clause that said these are the twelve teams that are in there. This agreement will run for ten years. And you can't drop somebody from the league without their consent during that period so the national league was stuck with twelve teams till one thousand nine hundred two if nobody was willing to go. That's why they kept asking for more money because they knew they have the leverage to ask. So let's also now throw in barney dreyfuss Previously mentioned right because he's integral to the story and surprisingly to me even even more so down the road as as a member of the baseball hall of fame and all that stuff.

barney dreyfuss washington baltimore american association apple Cleveland
The 'What About Bob?' Test

The Attention Collection

04:43 min | 2 years ago

The 'What About Bob?' Test

"Legend has it. There was a stone at the entrance. To apollo's temple in ancient greece and on this stone two words. No thyself is the legend true. I don't know the better question. Is it possible to know thyself. We've been exploring this question as humans for thousands of years through introspection and self examination through religion and mindfulness and therapy. But i tend to think it's not possible to know thyself at least not fully to bump into the borders and edges of who we are but i do believe it's possible to uncover more and more of yourself in the course of everyday life. I think one of the best ways to do this is through connection to other people. I think of the waste. Cs lewis describes the connection of friendship in his book. The four loves he says. Let's say you have. Three friends will call them. A b and c if a dies which dark turn then be loses not only a but as part in see the explains what it means. He says it each of my friends. There is something that only some other friend can fully bring out by myself. I am not large enough to call the whole man into activity in other words. What i spend focused time with my wife or one of my children or a family member a best friend one on one time. Which is the closest connection in the world. Because these are people i cared deeply about how even if i give them my full undivided attention. I will still be unable to experience them in their fullness. And why is that. Because i'm only experiencing the part of them that i draw out of them now. If we added another person into the mix someone else that they cared about they would change right in front of me because that person would draw out another part that i don't have access to another part that we don't connect on i'll take it further a while back. My wife threw a surprise birthday party. I had no idea was coming and she brought together. This group of my friends who don't have much experience around each other in a few days after one of my close friends somebody who knows me. Very well mentioned. He'd never seen me laugh that way before. And that i. I was confused as trying to like go back in time in revisit the night and then i remembered who was there and it made perfect sense. My friend larry was there sitting right next to me. And there isn't a person on the planet who makes me laugh like him and you can probably relate to this right you get around certain people and they bring out that other side of you. That element of mischief that twinkle in your eye you tend to get in trouble with that group or you have more fun with that group and it's not because you're being fake or putting on a show. They're pulling something out of you just by their presence. Because people bring out different elements of you elements you might not even know you possess until they arise getting around others is one of the best ways to figure out what you have kicking around inside. That's a wonderful thing. It's also a little scary because we might be surprised by what we find so this brings us to the. What about bob test but first a little context if you haven't seen the film what about bob is a comedy from the early nineties about an esteemed psychiatrist and the patient who follows him in his family on vacation. Bob is the stalker patient. Played by bill murray and when he meets with his new psychiatrist. Dr marvin played by richard dreyfuss. His introduction is direct keeps it real the simplest way to put it. I have problems. He goes on to describe. Ocd panic disorder with agoraphobia. Hypochondria multiple other phobias and a list of other struggles.

Apollo's Temple Legend Greece Lewis Larry BOB Dr Marvin Bill Murray Richard Dreyfuss Agoraphobia Phobias
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 2 years ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Policy Technology Economics Science Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
"dreyfuss" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff..

DREYFUSS BBC
"dreyfuss" Discussed on Talks With John Podcast

Talks With John Podcast

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on Talks With John Podcast

"Only Mexican I. Wonder. If that has to do with all that does right Right Because why else what the hell was that come from? I'd never do that. Though I've got his autobiography I know his son. Became A. An Asian agent. Yeah. What's his name Jack? Jack Jack Right yeah. He's down in Florida I know is. Because I know I know bans are actually do beat elax He. Threw him. Yeah, and he was he was big. Wolfman he was. He was an. And will also helps to introduce been like concerts one of them. Yeah. It wasn't midnight special or was it either midnight special or in constant I think it was special. I think you're right especially Florida time. Time, he did. Because he was like on Oh, God, yes, he was an icon I people would call him for requests right? This is Janice other because you know. Horace wants to know that he loves you baby and this is for you. We know that scene in American graffiti that is how it would have been with. Wolf right you know he wouldn't have let on that. He was Wolfman, Jack Benny wouldn't let you in right and he would have talked to you right you're the wolf. With Richard Dreyfuss. I love that scene because that is that's him. He I dealt with him in in Las, Vegas say and. I was backstage with my friends from Paul, revere, and the raiders. They were GonNa go on Wolf introducing that okay and I got to say Wolf was so blasted. I mean he was staggering about backstage and I'm thinking Oh God no surprise deer and but. I really. I thought. Oh He's going to go out there and make a mess. Oh, my God mini walked out there. He's Wolfman..

Jack Jack Wolf Richard Dreyfuss Jack Benny Florida raiders Horace Janice revere Paul Vegas
"dreyfuss" Discussed on Kar Dishin' It : All Things Kardashian

Kar Dishin' It : All Things Kardashian

06:26 min | 2 years ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on Kar Dishin' It : All Things Kardashian

"It's just like it's clearly very complicated, but it's like you see a week like this that it's like it's not about a guy who's just like doing living how he needs to live. It's about the other lives that you brought into that orbit so I think the bigger I mean bigger, but the trigger for him that He. He is has a really hard time with figuring out is when he's working like this and not sleeping that is it that is what that's. What set him off on that tour? That is what he's coming out with albums when he is working like this he gets. This is what happens. He's not. He's like probably running on steam a he looks like in the pictures of him at the hospital. He looks very like, hollow and frail. He doesn't look like. Like well. Let me think this thing happens a lot I I last. Lesson I watched a had not finished seen part of it before, but the Whitney Houston documentary that came out a couple years ago a witty. Don't watch it on a Saturday night. Guys. It's very sad. Very deeply sad. You know the ending. But there's a lot of overlap in terms of like just the larger conversation about celebrity about the pressure of black celebrity. When you are forwarding, i. think like perceived as the progress of like Unin tire. People the pressure that sits on new and I think also like where you also are able to achieve when you are hollow when you are not well, and you are still achieving. You're still making money hand over fist, and it reinforces in very much like Whitney story is. It's like she's a fool drug addict, but she can walk out and the. And it's the best version that has ever been recorded in human history, and you begin to believe a narrative that does not sustain that you are Super Humam you know, and you are only surrounded by people who you pay. An. Who Tell you exactly what you WanNa hear and you push the people who don't do that further and further away, and there's so many stories like this, but I think it's like. It was really making me think of Kanye so much and just like the you start function. You're falling apart publicly and like for Whitney it's like that interview. The famous crack is wack interview. It's like. There was no need to do that. They put her Hon fucking date or not dateline or whatever you know. They put her across the Diane. Sawyer and it was a train wreck. It was unwell woman in it became a joke. She became an absolute punchline. Absolutely on death's door, because publicists, people had money, and she had a really expensive record contract that they wanted her to finish, and it's like. Anyways I. IT reminded me a lot and there's a lot of pain in these stories because you see like that. They've reinforced reinforcing narrative that you can still function when you are like to your. T.'s your word like hollow. And that you can still achieve in support this like empire. Yeah, your functional in a way that only you and a few select few humans alive like you are an alien. Yeah I. SO medical help and professional on all the things that we know help so many people. I think you probably believe doesn't help you because you're not like other people. Yeah, you're living in different life. How could that affect you? There's no research for like there's a big research study for billionaire rappers. Polar now, and what mitigation is best for them I? mean the best you got is like a Richard. DREYFUSS DREYFUSS drive. Okay. Kerry. Fisher. People who? Struggled and still struggled struggled struggled struggled for a long time. So I don't know what the answer is I'll also WANNA to say before we like rap out the Connie portion of this this so far over an hour. Is it like we're not. Absolving him because he has mental. Illness were saying it is more complex. He has a very problematic views is problematic views about women. He has problematic views about his own race. ideas in what in like all like slavery hair tubby. It's like it's all very. Hard to digest and I do not sign it and it is bad. A fan of it, and then there's another layer of like I. Don't know how I don't know how much it's like. Yeah I don't know we're in the scales we tip or he tips, because is that really authentically him, or is that a person in crisis and extreme paranoia impossibly delusion? I think it's just yeah, it's it's to me. It's just important to Parse it 'cause it's it's a really important piece of like what's happening culturally unlike not just him to a lot of people. I was the misogyny and Shit, though that is a three line every day in his life so. I mean I'm not. I'M NOT INTO COGNAC AT THIS POINT I'm wishing the best I desperately hope he's okay. I want kids to be okay. For me is of M. I a Fan I'm I'm that is no longer on the table. I, also you feel like it's now moved into a different realm altogether. At Hungary figure in crisis. Now and and it's interesting. The beginning of the pandemic I did float something out there that maybe we. Maybe. We do have to separate the artists from the art because we're GONNA run out of it and I I. have to watch a woody. Allen Film at some point. Just as this drags on, we're going to have to veer into Gansel GERNA. Say Like I KINDA WANNA. Listen to Michael Jackson Song and sure you're watching. Then watching the cosby show. Yeah, that's going to bring you some comfort sometimes the. Spring Twenty one. We're like full Miramax Film Festival interspersed with Louis. I. Still all of those people accountable and say hey kinda..

Whitney Whitney Houston DREYFUSS DREYFUSS Gansel GERNA Kanye Unin Sawyer cosby Hungary Diane Michael Jackson Kerry Louis Fisher
Jaws 45th Anniversary And Power Ranking Spielberg

Filmspotting

04:05 min | 2 years ago

Jaws 45th Anniversary And Power Ranking Spielberg

"Welcome to film spotting. Josh, we've done our share of top five over the years five hundred or so, but when it comes to power rankings, we are mere novices. We did this for the first time two years ago. Almost to the day, we power ranked the Chris's Anna the. Moments history of film spot right episode six, Eighty six Oh, surely one of our more significant shows. And this week we're going to power rank the five decades of Steven Spielberg's career. Maybe someday will power rank our power rankings. Come to that. So little preview. Was this tougher than you thought you know? There's two ways to go about this I think initially we both thought just of look at the filmography, and and get on the mic and kind of riff where we think things are, or you sit down and chart things you move them around. You have tears. Which of course is what I think? We both ended up doing so yeah. It was a little bit more of a project than I anticipated, but a rewarding one. Yeah, I put in the work on it. Because I knew it was going to be hard enough deciding which decade put first. and which would slot right behind it? I didn't think it would be so hard with the other decades actually, and then after spending a good deal of time on it I actually ended up flipping two decades around that I thought were set in stone. So I'm excited to get to that, and we'll share listeners power rankings of the Spielberg decades as well we have. Their poll results a bit later I though the beaches are open, so let's talk ause. There is a creature alive today. WHO has survived millions of years of evolution? Without Change. Without Passion. And without logic. It lives to kill a mindless eating machine. It will attack. And Devour. Anything. It is as if God. Created the devil. Gaping. Jaws. Sometimes. Probably often we have a convenient hook for one of these setups that doesn't really reflect the whole substance of our conversation about a movie, but a convenient hook is a convenient hook, which is all to say for those of you who aren't particularly interested in hearing a discussion of jaws framed around our current administration. Just give us a little wiggle room. Here I'm pretty confident, were both more excited to talk about Steven Spielberg's camera tricks then his politics, but it's a little. Little Eerie how prescient his game changing nineteen seventy-five blockbuster is forty five years later. The movie The promise will never go in the water again also presents an all too dangerously familiar type of huckster politician, a crisis who fails to heed the warnings of scientists dramatically downplays and dismisses the potential loss of life can't wait to pat himself, and his cronies on the back loves to PREEN FOR A TV camera and who demands those beaches be open because business demands. They be open. Sorry even the scary shark movie is actually about Corona. Virus and I'm far from the only one who noticed my twitter timeline has jumped the snark over the past couple of months including this from frank rich just a few nights ago. Commenting on a New York Times breaking news tweet read Vice President Mike Pence encourage governors to repeat a misleading claim about corona virus outbreaks rich wrote. Pence makes the jaws mayor look like Churchill. Mayor. Von is played with a pen. See an affable smugness by Murray Hamilton and one line I'd always kind of overlooked. This struck me on. This rewatch is when he's spurning. The please of Roy Scheider is chief Martin Brody and Richard Dreyfuss is Matt. Hooper to keep the beaches closed on July Fourth America's Day, to celebrate its independence and preeminence. Any explains I. Don't think either one of you are familiar with our problems.

Steven Spielberg Mike Pence Murray Hamilton Spielberg Martin Brody Corona Josh Chris Frank Rich Twitter Hooper New York Times PAT Vice President America Roy Scheider Richard Dreyfuss Churchill Matt
Julia Louis-Dreyfus Takes The Lift For 'Downhill'

The Frame

10:38 min | 2 years ago

Julia Louis-Dreyfus Takes The Lift For 'Downhill'

"To the fray mom John Horn for Valentine's Day weekend. Here's an idea a new movie. That might leave you contemplating the meaning of marriage. The film is called Downhill. And it's dramatic and dark comedy adapted from the Swedish movie for Moore. The Film Stars Julia Louis Dreyfuss and Will Ferrell as a couple whose family is on a European ski vacation when the resort sets off. What's supposed to be controlled? Avalanche that threatens them and their kids. Each parents reaction reveals deeper divisions in the marriage. Julia Louis Dreyfuss is also a producer of downhill. We got together at the Sundance Film Festival. A couple of weeks ago. Where the movie premiered. She said she. I discussed the idea of an American remake of force majeure with Fox searchlight back in two thousand fourteen but I had just finished making this movie enough said with them and we were talking about further projects and I said believe it or not. I said you know I'm really intrigued. By stories in which reality is seen one way and then a lens is taken off and you look at reality a completely different way within the story and they said well we just came back from con. We saw this movie. You should see this movie. Because we're trying to get the rights to it to rebuild force majeure. Yeah so I said your love to see it and so they screened it and I was utterly hooked. I remember watching force majeure on my laptop and there's a scene in which there's an avalanche and the father without giving too much way doesn't exactly do the right thing that kind of and remember when I watched it. I backed up and watch like ziprecruiter film. I went frame by frame. Like what is he really do? How does he really react? And in the original movie. It's a little vague in your version. It's not I guess. It's a little more clear in your adaptation. I'M GONNA ask about that moment and in your adaptation why that was key to amplify that choice. Well we wanted to be clear what he did but unclear as to the fallout from it. So in other words The wife in this situation play by myself is in utter shock and we wanted to unravel the sweater from that point. From a storytelling point of view. This movie is certainly about the repression of Truth and truth and denial of truth. Which is I think an interesting theme particularly right now. And denial of facts But on both ends because you know initially the couple that you know. It's a stunning moment and then rather than a direct confrontation or conversation. Even about what had happened. They don't have that because I think what happened feels unmentionable because it's so shameful and so They they begin. This is a credit to Jesse Armstrong. Who did the adaptation they begin By attacking an outside source that is to say these safety. The mountains safety guy played by Christopher Hindu and on the enforce measure who is also enforced measure and wonderful in that movie as well as in our movie. Here's what I think you're not picking up on. This was a huge event for our family. Okay and Sir. I don't WanNa make this a legal matter between us. I don't know I don't I but I'm saying that I don't want nothing lyrica. Were you sue. Because your coffee's hot madame school you I'm an attorney okay. You've heard our complaints. Yeah will someone needs to hear it. Thank you for your time. And no. Thank you for your time for me. That is for certain. I thought that was such a great idea to put it away from themselves. Put that anxiety in that tension Onto somebody else before they turn on one pretty cool. We're talking with Julia. Louis Dreyfuss producer and actor in downhill on as about castain and are talking about the kids the couple because they're older than the original film and that changes something because they understand what's happening in the marriage. The kids in the other movie. I think are too young to really appreciate it. These kids are older and they know what's happening and was at written. Was that just something where you start thanking us our producer. What does it mean if these kids are twelve as opposed to seven? We totally discussed that at great length. I mean look both will and I are old right and I'm really old. No no no I am and so and when we first started doing this I was like we gotta get this done soon because pretty soon it's going to be implausible for me to have two young children and in fact they needed to be young because they had to you needed to feel as if they were vulnerable in the situation of the avalanche Had they been in their teens? You might have felt that they were possibly less vulnerable. Not that teenagers can't be vulnerable. But somehow being younger sir heightens the the the the sense of danger I think And then additionally we sort of wrote it into the script or pretty subtly implied that we were an older couple who decided to have children late in life Wills character refers to fertility treatments that we went through and whether or not it was going to work so this was a sort of a later in life choice for this couple which is sort of an interesting idea to what about. Well how did you end up? Casting him He read the script and he was super interested in it and I had seen stranger than fiction and was a very big fan of his work in that I mean I'm a fan of his work period. I mean the guys have stone cold genius but he was able in stranger than to embrace a dramatic tone and therefore he would be able to sort of tackled this material and then we met believe it or not. We never met before not some random. Hollywood party and we have these parallel lives you know because of SNL and Etcetera Etcetera. But no. We have lots of friends in common but we never met. We met four this project and we had a long coffee and talked at great length about the material and He hadn't seen force majeure he'd only read the script of downhill so and he was like I really want to do it and I said well before you sign on make sure you really want to watch the original you know and make sure you WanNa step. Put your toe into this water. There's a expression that a friend of mine who worked in marketing uses an. It's an overcome as like a marketing. Obstacle that a film has. This is a serious movie about marriage and it stars people who are generally known for doing comedies. You think that's an issue in terms of either people come in thinking it's GonNa be funny or people who WanNa see a dramatic film and being unsure of. Comedians can do it completely. It's been a challenge from a marketing point of view. I mean the trailer was very Intentionally I if you watch the trailer you'll see. That's not chock full of That's by design. It looked like it was going to kill us full moment. The kids were screaming because it felt like we were gonNA dot keet and he had grabbed his phone. Keep left us nice. I didn't leave you to bear. Even though there are plenty of jokes within the film I mean there are comedic beats but I would say more dramatic beats than comedic beats when I watch downhill. I went back and rewatch force majeure because I wanted to see how that movie ended and I'm not going to talk about what specifically happens in the ending of your film. There's a scene in both films ski run and there's a scene in your film that is new. That is I. Think my favorite scene in the movie where there's a conversation about what will Ferrell's character can do and it feels like a really interesting way to end the movie. I'm wondering about that scene about its importance in how you try to figure out how the movie should end totally without talking about what she says to her husband. Well I think that we wanted. We did not want the movie to end up with a neat little bow. We wanted to have ambiguity at the end of this film. I think it's safe to say that people might leave the theater thinking either. This couple is gonNA work it out or maybe this couple Is got a real problem on their hands and I think. Both truths are acceptable It's up for. She makes a decision and I think it's questionable decision. Okay I mean you know as a standing outside of it. I can understand why she did it but I'm not sure it's exactly the right thing to do in that moment but that's okay because They're trying to crawl their way out of this mess and this is their kind of muddy messy way of doing it. And you know it's up for discussion as to whether or not it's the right. The right move. I really liked playing that scene because I understood why she would come to that conclusion. But it was very important to me in this in the film that we made that this character that I played was flawed Because I we didn't want it to be a movie about you. Know sort of cowardice and masculinity and just that it needed to be a little more balanced and that was important to me and the wife character in our film makes a couple of pretty miserable decisions.

Julia Louis Dreyfuss Producer Will Ferrell Fox Searchlight John Horn Moore Louis Dreyfuss Jesse Armstrong Christopher Hindu Attorney Hollywood SKI SNL
"dreyfuss" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

07:06 min | 2 years ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"I'm I can tell you which one it is I think they figured it was a Richard Dreyfuss I think they figured it out there wasn't that many so I was in charge of I Paul Mazursky put me in charge you guys you're going to get in a car every morning and you're gonna go pick up Nick Nolte sorry I blow and come to the set come to set hang out with Nick Nolte all day and then make sure you drive straight home at the end of the day and then the car bring you back was a long long day you know getting up at four in the morning but when you're twenty one you don't care I'm working on now I yeah and being and and a set of driving in a car for four hours a day with Nick Nolte and he was a huge star the past the biggest so Nick Nolte on day one pick them up in the morning drive to set he does this stuff and then we're leaving the Disney lot here I'm going to visit them and he says is why they have you with me why are you with me as well I'm here to make sure we go right home and we don't go to a bar it is okay well we're going to a bar and I said you're the king do whatever you like them I said whatever you want to do I'm just sitting here Bob and we went out probably you know eighty percent of the top expect that's twenty one expect you don't you know harness Nick Nolte right and and they picked the wrong guy for that clearly yeah because if Nick wasn't gonna stop I was going to stop and it was pretty cool just hang out with Nick Nolte you know literally for three months you know and if Nick wasn't on call that day out hang out Bette Midler Richard Dreyfuss it was really cool yeah but I it was called palm desert scheme I remember one more thing that happened on that on that movie Paul Mazursky what does as seen in Beverly hills and we're we shot a really early on a Sunday morning thing is in January and they had to clear all the street for back in January and Sunday morning Beverly hills is empty anyway back in the eighties so he wanted to double at February or March and it was supposed to be Christmas at least at all the Christmas decorations up in Beverly hills the windows they decorate the windows they put the big Santa with the reindeer up on the on the phone poll ID electric wires so sand was and is rain you're going across Wilshire Boulevard and they've seen look beautiful and then some guy takes his car and parks it about three blocks away any and we can see if he's in the back of the of the shot and so Paul grabs me and you guys get on a bike and go tell that a hole to move because we're shooting here and I said I'll okay I'll get down there I'll tell that idiot the move me Adam so I get on a bike race down their freedom I answer members cold as hell and I get down to the car is like a blue you know four door vehicle maybe a Mercedes and the windows were tinted a little so I knocked on the window I could see if somebody's in there and then knocked on the window and one to say Hey we're filming here could you please move the car we only have about ten minutes to get the shot as the sun was coming up that's what he needed the sun coming up so the guy rolled the window down I said Hey can you please move this car any of our our our our our you know I was in a way am I the H. Jimmy Stewart yeah true story Jimmy Stewart and Jimmy Stewart I mean I don't I don't think she restored some of this anymore but he would tell you that because he remember that for a long time why was he there he was there just going like a restaurant there and alive in the morning like five or six morning whatever was like going to get coffee or donate or something so did you say get the now then and then on the walkie talkie either say tell that a hall the move and I said Paul that a hall is also and and and so Paul came down and talked him for like you know fifteen minutes or so yeah finally gotten to move but may I put it in the movie that's a well yeah I don't think yeah probably right sure hold was Jimmy Stewart at that well the movie is done in nineteen eighty I don't maybe eighty three or eighty four so ever Ali was an eighty four around by diving but I remember role in that we roll that window down and he was very apologetic I say can you move this car is at all I I I don't know I was in the works Andy Benny but got this car and then are you know Paul came down talked him and he was gone but died how will he was born in nineteen oh eight or he was okay so he was he was seventy six years old that run yeah eighty four oh wait yeah a okay how old was I a I was I was twenty one was it what down number of was it die eighty four I mean let's say down I'm Beverly hills one eighty nine X. fees really seven eighty so I was really say that yeah we still eighty five to eighty four eighty five yeah that seems about right yeah right that's right that's not right and it was it's a really cool movie I'm Elizabeth Pena was also movie Little Richard I Tracy Nelson so I was it bad call movie so go check it out if you have five by you know if you have nothing going on the once you really cool movie it's about that well you'll you either know it's about it's about being down and out in Beverly hills it's not a homeless guy that comes in and saves a family because the families all dysfunctional and Richard Dreyfuss is the husband that Miller is the wife I think what's your name Nelson Tracy Nelson I was the kid was one of the of the girl and Nick Nolte comes in as the homeless guy and save them from themselves buy a talent by basically teaching them that you know they're moving too fast in life gotta slow down and enjoy yourself it really is a great move enjoyed down down and out in Beverly hills we're live will check with nori next okay five more now with Monica Rick's demand from LA's been convicted of illegally having and mistreating a tiger cub he was also found guilty today of illegal steroid possession the Bengal tiger cubs name is Neil now lives in the teachings you have more per college the nationwide college cheating scandal goes to trial in October and actress Lori Loughlin could be up first along with her designer husband the couple's accused of paying five hundred thousand dollars in bribes to get their daughters in two U. S. C. if convicted they face up to fifty years in prison and a house panels nobody getting whether dating apps such as tender and bumble could be allowing children and sex offenders to use their services the panel sent off letters to several companies today asking for info on how users ages and complaints of any sexual assaults are verified albums on the four or five next our money here and this is something I went through and.

Richard Dreyfuss Paul Mazursky
It's Sundance Time Again

The Frame

06:03 min | 2 years ago

It's Sundance Time Again

"Welcome to the frame. I'm Steven Cuevas in for John Horn. But he's actually sitting right here beside me because by the time you hear this. He'll be at the Sundance Film Festival. John Thanks for taking time before you pack your bags my pleasure. I love the fact that I'm here but I'm not here John. There are dozens of feature films film screened at Sundance. Of course tell me about some of this year's most anticipated entries. I'M GONNA lean towards documentaries if you look at the movies that are nominated for the documentary feature academy me where this year three of them premiered at Sundance a year ago. American factory honey land and edge of democracy. And if you look at the very first night at the Sundance Dance Film Festival. There are new documentaries from producers. You might have heard of Barack and Michelle Obama. They've called Crip camp which is about the disability rights movement. There's another documentary about Taylor swift and about why. She is becoming a little bit more political and that's just in one theater in one night. Well one of the documentary entries premiering at Sundance that I wanted to ask you about It's when it's trying a lot of controversy and that's the Kirby Dick and amy during documentary on the record. It focuses on the sexual assault allegations against hip hop mogul Russell Simmons. The film was being executive. Co produced by Oprah Winfrey set to be released on Apple. TV then Winfrey suddenly. He withdrew support and some say. It was under pressure from Russell Simmons. She denies this and says it's because of questions arising from one of the alleged victims. What's to become come of this documentary on the record? Well it is going to show at the festival I mean I think there is the question whether or not Sundance was going to pull it The fact that Oprah Winfrey withdrew her support that apple. TV Hit pause in. The documentary is very unusual. And Kirby and amy have said listen. We think we've made a really good good film. We don't understand what they are complaining about. All of the edits and suggestions up until the time. The picture was locked where minor little things it does feel feel like Russell. Simmons complained to Oprah about the documentary. It's unclear if Oprah thought it was unfair or that featured one woman story over others the Booze GonNa show but for a film to go to the festival with this much. Uncertainty is highly unusual. Yeah not to get too far afield on this but I wonder if Oprah pulling away from this the project could somehow damage her own brand in this in this era of me too. Well I think she has said that. She believes the women who are accusing Russell Simmons of sexual assault and harassment. So I don't think she's saying I am not believing them anymore. I think she has to her. Mind legitimate questions about the documentary. Yeah it is important that she is on board or not on board because her producing does suggest that there is a level of quality ability and credibility to it and the fact that she's leaving it does ultimately damage. I think the standing of the film Another film to ask you about. Was this four part documentary. On Hillary Clinton Clinton. It'll be available on Hulu. She will also be attending Sundance for the first time to do promotion for this film. What you know about it and you know any any buzz around it? I guess I know a fair amount about it I'm GONNA be doing. QNA With Hillary Clinton at the festival is a four part series. That has a behind the scenes footage of her running against against Donald Trump. But it's really about her political career and about how things stand today so words at all. Hillary is a participant in this documentary. It s you said she'll be at the festival and she'll be talking with me. She says a lot of the documentary. I hope she says even more when we sit down to have a conversation. There's one other film I wanted to ask you about. And that's a a little film called feels good man and it's an indie production looking at the rise of of this comic pepe the frog that was actually created by L. A. based cartoonist and it sort of became an emblem for the outright. Who took this image and kind of started using it for antisemitic means racists memes all kinds of really nasty stuff? What do you know about the film and Are you going to see it? Yeah I'm definitely going to see. The artist is named fury. And it's about how something something becomes an icon for hate. And how the artist behind that I contract reclaim it and I think if you look more broadly at a lot of the documentaries that are playing the festival a lot of them are about what's going on in the world right now. There's a new documentary about the kids who survived the park. Land shooting about what they're doing to fight against against Gun. Violence US kids. I think that there's another documentary called early. Bird it's about the helicopter news pilot Zoey Tur and about what her works has about the tabloid of news and the Oj. Trial Voice State is a documentary about seventeen year. Old Boys a thousand from Texas says who join up to build a representative government from the ground up so wherever you look Especially in documentaries. There are a lot of films about the current state of the country. And what we might do to fix it. And what are some of the feature films. You're looking forward to checking out. I know that things that are kind of top of our sundance card include downhill. This is a remake of the movie force majeure a Foreign Language move from a couple years ago it stars. Julia Louis Dreyfuss Will Ferrell. It's made by nat facts and Jim Rash. Who did a movie called called way way back not that long ago Vigo Mortenson who is one of my favorite actors hell yeah written directed stars in a movie called following that I think is partially in Spanish? So there's nothing Vigo can't do. There's an Anthony Hopkins movie based on a play called the father. There's a movie about Gloria Steinem in many different iterations directed by Julie. Taymor you might know her from the Lion King. You know the other thing that we should talk about our number of movies that are going to sundance that are looking Ford distribution and one of the things that a lot of people forget is that Sundance is not only a film festival. It's a film market and it'll be really interesting to see given how a poorly some of the movies from last year as well at the Box Office if the checkbooks will be open s much as they were a year ago.

Oprah Winfrey Sundance Russell Simmons Hillary Clinton Clinton Kirby Dick Assault Apple John Horn AMY Steven Cuevas Gloria Steinem Jim Rash Vigo Mortenson Anthony Hopkins Julia Louis Dreyfuss Donald Trump Barack
"dreyfuss" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"dreyfuss" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Okay have you seen from all our interview caustic Sheila Weller right away two questions I yeah I'm well that's another question I get asked a lot name like will die it's asking you why even picked her and then another one will do that's another question I get asked light and then finally it all came back to me I remember that she wishes she she's very New Yorker us what she should learn how to interview better because that's what she doesn't do a book tour well that she's just doing podcasts in these things when you said you review because the book is together we interviewed penny Marshall I never interviewed you are still getting really she's done a lot of stuff for Vanity Fair but it also says in the thing that she praises how other people praised her like Richard Dreyfuss penny Marshall was cleared UP you'd read the forward on the book chapter the last yeah okay point that out and say you know jury you got busted a bad question deal with it but it's really not it's a pretty funny it was funny because she was able to let herself go but the book is you guys see what she really yeah but you were so fat reminded me of years ago Frank L. adult not Frank Kelly no no when you in the late great Joan rivers and I don't she said yeah whatever get already in the view we were we were saying how much we loved her I cut you off I would I I don't have to be perfect like you know I'm not sometimes she goes on to long range no I mean you don't have to do what yes I know but it's all the fine line of when to stop thanks to do to get started he had stopped during the offices on the shows the vote would be just Sam and see how well you guys this is a.

Sheila Weller penny Marshall Frank Kelly Joan rivers Sam Richard Dreyfuss Frank L.
Emmy Awards 2019: The hottest red carpet arrivals, winners and losers

Ringer Dish

11:54 min | 3 years ago

Emmy Awards 2019: The hottest red carpet arrivals, winners and losers

"Dash special edition really right littman. I'm Hellawell jam session teatime crossover event in the spirit of great television. We Love Crossover Event Lover Knock Great Television. What's going for it yeah. It's really negative because it was a really bad show we'll bounce Dallas and positively the phoebe Waller Abridge high of one in this is not fair. Thanks Jeff. Why why am I not in high too. I UH-HUH OH yeah yeah. It was a great night for her. That's true but to me. It was a television show true. No not definitely not what I mean. I think you know you're right on that note kate. Why don't you kick things off on a high for us. We're GONNA talk with highs and lows. We'll go back and forth all right start positive. I was the red carpet action pretty good pretty fun lot of color you know from the men and the women we love a color jacket. I'm I'm trying to do my best like Juliana ransack because it working your calendar at all you know mercilessly Nicolas Coster Waldo. They just like did the goal they are in Green. Yeah he looked really good. He looks great seen him look bad but I drew this award show as he does in every single still of photography taking him ever Israel. Where's the talks really well of any family well. It's a gift Lotta Pink and red dresses which I liked all of them. I think we were talking about just looks like a huge. Valentine onstage dynasty chic which I was into like Mandy Moore could've just like stepped off like an eighty soap op right and that's what I want for my fashion. We also have to Raji. GP Henson Great Yeah. All three of them have either watch dialing Hollywood on Netflix but I've heard it's really good it is really good and like the the first three episodes center around Dang Raji Henson's emmys dress code and yes this last year okay because Jason Baldness her stylist stylist and they're really good friends to show and so I was just thinking styling Hollywood and season two can't wait to hear about distress. They held it shadow styling Hollywood. One of Netflix few wins tonight. flicks yeah slow for them kind of great. Let's commercials now. ozark night were their networks commercials which wines the breaking bad movie. Yes that's true the Camino last hour. There were a few three just kept seeing the new netflix seven million. Leeann streaming sites now and there were commercials for all of them and there's a lot of apple plus huge. I feel like it anyway back to fashion. I also might think probably my favorite was purchase. There's Clarkson. She did like blonde more tissue atoms which is real kate everything you want from purchase. Clarkson ever but yeah it was great never looked great. We all oh really Zendaya so late though like we didn't really see your until she walked out in glasses she present which was fabulous. She's got the marvel money and she's a cool kid. So Oh yes you need to get there early. That's true. Actually she doesn't have marvel money anymore. Right right YEP per spiderman series is dead. Maybe they only mice. I'd still like to you see how that's ultimately resolved but yeah we know about that stuff too. I WANNA share that Kid Harrington who I generally have no interest in as John Snow or in real life but I thought he looks phenomenal Q. Like the Best I've ever seen him. Maybe yes maybe the best never looked tie really channeling Richard Madden which was a great look for him also recommended not show which was Sassou. Ask You guys see what Richard Man did in debt yeah bill t rex out of Lego instagram could for him huge flex. You know I'd like to nominate Emilia Clarke while around the gas are- if Valentino I I'd love to know about. I assume it's tape. That's involved in this attraction but she's wearing confidence. She looks great. I was so ready to root against I'm sorry I did but she made it a little bit more difficult than I had plans. At least you followed through my Rudolph and Michelle Williams both in floral patterns both looking great really really enjoyed that more Michelle Williams in a few minutes. I liked Natasha. Leones look also should we talk about Natasha. Leone clapping. Yeah you're cool. Kidman Adman clapping apparently it is interesting way of clapping. It is like she just learnt how a small child when you teach them how to do applies their hands together but she was consistent in it. She applauded for a lot of people which we appreciate. I really liked it. She was wearing glasses during the show. I just love glasses formal. Look look at the Oscars Golden Globes and EMMYS. It's very common and I think it's a great I would do it. Billy Puerto Ricans and also the formal yes. It's a great addition. It's fake furnished. We're on the same the same people to do it because like young always does it. Oprah as a love the former bosses Amanda. I'm happy to tell you that the Tasha Leo Gift of her clapping readily available for whenever you need that's great people are ready. I think that makes sense. I'm just going to try to do it in my own life. One more nomination. Naomi watts she looks phenomenal and black just logged in just great the new game of thrones star new game. It's just getting ready. I I liked we'll talk a lot more reckoning with routes but I like to the end of the show how David any off who is my one true love can be like and now it's over we did it and now it is over totally disavowing try to shut out any notions of the prequels and spin offs that are that are coming alright great injection positively positively we'll ride this enthusiasm into talking about the most awkward moment of evening which was allow a complicated one which was when. Phoebe Waller Bridge won on Best Actress in a comedy beating out Julia Louis Dreyfuss in her final season as Lena Meyer from beep and bridges incredibly happy. Kate was incredibly happy. Many people on the Internet were incredibly happy. Let's get this out of the way. This is a pro fleabag podcast. You're lovely about free. It's one of the best things that that I've seen in any medium in two thousand and nineteen. Maybe in the decade yet great up there yeah fix perfect episodes a season two. Yes at flawless sure but Julia Louis Dreyfus purpose is probably the best television actress of in history. Yeah I think she's like Lucille Ball and Carol channing. Yes and she had one for veep. I believe every season she had been nominated and she was going to break the record for the most emmy wins by a woman of of all time and she she is there's also a breast cancer survivor yeah and that happened between these seasons so I think we all assumed that this would be her emmy and and it was not and that's the way the cookie crumbles moreover everyone in the room assuming yes so it was like the most tepid response. It's a win from a show that is universally praised yes. I'm sure that no one's like fleabag doesn't deserve it deserve. It really sucks sucks. That's how the point just was such an incredibly awkward moment. Totally I think okay like root for history. It's like when you walk or it's and you want to see a record broken or you. You want like someone's got hot. Hand you want to leave him in the game but as long as possible like it's okay to root for history it's okay to experience that moment and it was just really awkward. Yeah and it's also a fever waller. Bridge did not really read the room in that moment. I was wondering I guess veep is maybe not a big deal in the UK. They don't care about it. They're like we have in the loop. We don't actually need the American version of IANUCCI stuff but she was like thanking her agent and I just it wasn't the note that you wanted at that. Moment also weird for her to be profusely thanking or agent given the feud between writers and agents right now. Yes weird moment. It was not mentioned once during the entire telecast now's house per day and there was a lot of ignoring everything going on TV. No one was talking about streaming services. Everyone was just you know thinking whatever likes Amazon that that helped them. A lot of Amazon wants by the way but yeah it just it. It was uncomfortable. Even though it was happy yeah it's like not undeserved served right with the moment felt wrong and it. Kinda sucks then for our bread shoes. True talent is actually Frank Kayla. I will say like she seems super for actress to me in that moment in a way. I don't like to acknowledge and I just like Oh. This is a real actress but she also had just been up there like I think it would have been different if she hadn't won anything yet yet right right right so she had just been up there. She's up there again. It's like Oh you again like everyone loves her but like it is. It would have been different than if it had just been the first win for few celebrity yeah so it's tough. It's a no win a little bit she continued to she did continue to win now. She did and it was awesome. That fleabag won best comedy. US totally detailing curling. Everyone say their favorite episode man you go first the last one I mean come on the answer here. I soon as you said that to me. I I also kind of don't think of them as discreet right so it's entirely it was just one you could put those together and it would be like one very long movie and it would be kind of perfect shorter then some worth celebrating movies kate the first episode the pilot was the second season yeah great one of the Jumpsuit Yeah Mine's the number three's Kristin Scott Thomas See Russia Kristin Scott Thurow's Jonzon hot priest socially tough but you got yeah Kristin Scott Thomas. Oh yeah that's a trade. That's funeral so many other version of one yeah one we don't talk about the new one in the really funny thing about season into fleabag is just like everyone acknowledges now including TV while our bridge how essential Andrew Scott as you play the AK Moriarty too many of us who watched Sir Lock. Yeah weird very greatest in yeah. It was really cool and she when she turned to him accepting best comedy. It was like we did this because Andrew. You're Scott came in and that was cool. It was great and also you finally got to be on stage which was good so a motive. Actually I just want to say I love back. I don't need any more Brett Gelman twenty twenty between fleabag and stranger things. Yeah Ozone Lot shred amount of everything done. We're done offense. I guess it's it's really inherently offensive thing okay moving on so that was like a low and then and then I within a low below the recovered itself yeah. Just I mean it is remarkable. It's saying that is a special as fleabag actually won the emmys. We don't see actually the best. Things don't usually win awards. That's literally every awards show and fleabag winning and phoebe Waller winning for writing. It's just like wow we did it. That's great yeah so that was good good job on this one thing good Johnson. Okay Okay Hi Michelle Williams speech amazing stuff amazing stuff. This is also what happens when you practice and you prepare and she had clearly given some thought to what she wanted to say and not. Maybe she wrote it. I'm not really sure because it was definitely well-crafted and she hit her points but it was more that she had an idea and she wanted to turn this into It's a speech about equal pay which is like something. She's been crosshairs about a lot. If you remember when they did the re-shoots for I guess it was called all the money in the world it was the Getty Nassar Getty show out of it so Kevin Spacey's the Laura for Christopher plummer and they did the re shoots her fi versus Mark Wahlberg fee. Yes she took like a daily fee and Mark Wahlberg at one point five million dollars and then it became a thanks so she I used that in order to talk about a Fosse verdant. FX And the support and what happens when you actually do support of working specifically women have car work. She just like she had the stats. That's she nailed it.

Michelle Williams Netflix Raji Henson Kate Fleabag Hollywood Andrew Scott Julia Louis Dreyfuss Kristin Scott Thomas Phoebe Waller Abridge Mark Wahlberg Clarkson Natasha Amazon Phoebe Waller Jeff Phoebe Waller Bridge Dallas Emmy
Emmy Special: Julia Louis-Dreyfus

The Frame

04:52 min | 3 years ago

Emmy Special: Julia Louis-Dreyfus

"Welcome to the frame emme special from KPCC in Los Angeles. I'm John Horn the host of the frame and I'm Lorraine Ali television critic for the La Times Save. We'll hear from a lot of nominees. It's about their work and their shows and we'll talk about. Emmys can tell us about the state of television right now. which is a really really interesting state? Yeah and one thing I want to talk about is he is late night. Talk shows I mean I know. We think that that's a place to go for humor and some jokes. I'm finding some of the best documentary reporting on television right now is happening on shows like John Oliver Samantha B so we'll cover that I am really looking forward to the limited series category this year because it is dumbass about stuff that has been on television talking about Chernobyl when they see us Fussy verdon escaping down more these are excellent shows and the limited series category used to be kind of like now. It's like that is the place that we're looking at it. I'm looking forward to see what happens with that but we're going to start with a comedy series and that Atas veep its lead actress could make some Emmy History Julia Louis and the emmy goes to even Julia Louis Dreyfuss. Let me try to annoy drivers now for most emmys one by performer and the same the same series peaches came back for its final season. There is another big final season it rhymes with game of thrones it is getting thrown and so on but before veep wrapped up its final season. I had a chance to speak with Julia Louis Dreyfuss. There's a lot of grief around the end of a series assuming the series has been a a good thing and a happy thing which in our case it has been and that has an incredible bitter sweetness to it that can really got you and it did. Let's talk about the final season running for President and she is asked a basic question of very early in the season which is why and other people are curious but here's a conversation. I bet she has with Gary who's played by Tony Hill because it is my God is was the game changer. I took bombed the glass ceiling. I shave my in the sink of the Old Boys Club for three years. He kept me chained to a radiator some basement in Cleveland. So as far as I'm concerned America owes me an eight year stay in the White House at this time. I want a war yeah. What is it like listening to that. It's gobs of fun. I think that's so well written so I was just sort of listening to the language you you know she's not a great candidate. That's not under state but I appreciate her her bitterness and her struggle when you are playing her. You'll have some way of saying okay. I know that this is a character and and I know that what she wants is not something that she's able to express but that's the actor plane her. I have to believe what it is. She wants here's how I would answer that. She's he's a very horrible human being and hideously behaved and really has no leadership skills whatsoever or no point view even other than her own narcissistic endeavor but when you player you have to come at it from well bill why and once you start to humanize that horrible nece you can find a way in to play it with a certain amount of well in a weird way. I say empathy and even though I'm not necessarily asking the viewer to be empathetic. I just want the viewer to laugh off but it just perhaps that keeps her from being hated by the audience right. What are the greater kinds of compliments. You can get from people who work in politics. I I hear time and time again. This is what it's really like in Washington and you know. I- winces I say that too but yeah that's that's what we hear. I had the great good fortune into meet Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan once and she told me that she got together with Justice Scalia. When veep was on on the air every week to discuss the past week's episode because there were both fans imagine that are can't? I know I would do anything thing to have those conversations. Let's hope somebody recorded them. I know maybe the FBI

Julia Louis Tony Hill Emmy Los Angeles Lorraine Ali La Times John Horn Elena Kagan John Oliver Samantha B Justice Scalia FBI Supreme Court President Trump Cleveland I Old Boys Club Washington America White House Gary
Julia Louis Dreyfuss, Toyota and Cocaine discussed on Red Eye Radio

Red Eye Radio

00:17 sec | 4 years ago

Julia Louis Dreyfuss, Toyota and Cocaine discussed on Red Eye Radio

"Toyota, a half sister of multiple award winning actress. Julia Louis Dreyfuss has died camping with a group of friends in northern California. The coroner's office ruled it an accidental overdose of cocaine and alcohol, Emma, Louise, Dreyfuss was a social worker in Oakland when she died in August, the half sisters shared father billionaire

Julia Louis Dreyfuss Toyota Cocaine California Oakland Emma Louise
Julia Louis-Dreyfus Has Come Out the Other Side After Breast Cancer Battle

AP News

00:28 sec | 4 years ago

Julia Louis-Dreyfus Has Come Out the Other Side After Breast Cancer Battle

"A comedy about life in the White House will be returning its ailing star is feeling better. Julia Louis Dreyfuss says she feels strong she has energy and she's back to her old tricks. The seventh and final season of veep has begun filming. Louis Dreyfus has helped design a t shirt with poppies that will sell for thirty five dollars at Saks stores in October it will raise money for the Air's foundation, which helps breast cancer survivors with reconstruction costs after mastectomies Louis drive. His says she's often

Julia Louis Dreyfuss Louis Dreyfus White House Alexa Archie Zaraleta Saks Air's Foundation Queen RON Thirty Five Dollars
Big & Rich singer John Rich goes on Twitter tirade over Nike's Colin Kaepernick campaign

AP News

00:21 sec | 4 years ago

Big & Rich singer John Rich goes on Twitter tirade over Nike's Colin Kaepernick campaign

"Country singer, John Richard big and rich is criticizing Nike for hiring. Former San Francisco forty Niners quarterback Colin Kaepernick for new ad campaign posted a picture of cut up Nike socks capper. Nick led the effort by players to kneel during the national anthem to protest police brutality, racial inequality, Nike stock was lower early trading following the capture Nick announcement.

Julia Louis Dreyfuss Nike Nick Louis Louis-Dreyfuss Ed Donahue White House Archie Zaraleta Saks Colin Kaepernick AP Niners John Richard Air's Foundation San Francisco Rich Thirty Five Dollars
James Gunn, Emily Dreyfuss and Cheri Preston discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

News, Traffic and Weather

01:42 min | 4 years ago

James Gunn, Emily Dreyfuss and Cheri Preston discussed on News, Traffic and Weather

"The Dow gained one hundred eight points the s&p five hundred picked up thirteen, the NASDAQ gained fourteen stocks boosted by a report. That the US and China are in talks to ease trade tensions. Facebook confirms it removed thirty two pages and accounts. It says were part of a coordinated effort to influence this. Country's midterm elections the social network says it doesn't yet know who's behind the campaign but the actors went to even greater lengths to obscure their identities than the Russian agency that's been charged with interfering in the twenty sixteen presidential election Scott Goldberg ABC news For what it's worth I'm Cheri Preston what should you. Do with your old tweets with the recent controversy surrounding guardians. Of, the galaxy director James gone a lot. Of, people are wondering that Emily Dreyfuss technology writer at wired magazine got rid of. All hers I paid fourteen ninety nine to delete all my tweets in one James Gunn had written some really offensive. Tweets seven eight years ago and when Disney the. Parent company, of ABC found out about it they fired him Dreyfuss says she. Gets it name reason, I deleted my tweets was because we have, seen a rise in people going back through people's old tweets and weaponising things you you've said and taking them out of context and I decided the, risk was too great To just keep my bad, jokes alive and. Facebook posts and Instagram pictures of. Course. Live on in screen shots so they're never really gone perhaps you should follow the old rule to never put up anything you wouldn't want published front and center everywhere forever. For what it's worth Cheri Preston ABC news It took, five decades but, a Redmond, woman finally knows who her, father is as komo's Brian. Calvert tells us science save the day.

James Gunn Emily Dreyfuss Cheri Preston Facebook ABC United States Wired Magazine Disney Scott Goldberg Calvert Komo Redmond Director China Writer Instagram
Jimmy Kimmel Sets the Record Straight After President Trump Fabricates a Story About Him

Morning Show with Sean and Frank

01:34 min | 4 years ago

Jimmy Kimmel Sets the Record Straight After President Trump Fabricates a Story About Him

"Jimmy kimmel complaining that trump lied about him at a rally it was having a south carolina trump claimed that he'd waited on hollywood boulevard degree trump jimmy kimmel did back when he was hosting the celebrity apprentice and sub to come on abc's jimmy kimmel live and kimmel said for the record not only was i not on the sidewalk waiting for him opening the door of his car i didn't even go to his dressing room to say alot before the show is as i never do it fifteen years i probably don't know i've never done it i like to greet the guests on stage so either one of them is prevaricating or they misremembered that event who knows prevaricating that would be lying the president's on polling the policies of previous administrations abortion obama james of separating immigrant children from their parents who are been convicted of violating us immigration law at the border that continues despite outrage from the left actress maggie jilin hall has teamed up with the aclu on a new video alisters in the video include ryan reynolds deadpool guy amy schumer that's chuck e chuck you schemers cousin julia louis dreyfuss from seinfeld chadwick bozeman and glenn close fatal attraction all participating in this video verging earlier this month chrissy teigen and john legend donated nearly three hundred thousand dollars to the aclu and honor of president trump's birthday.

Jimmy Kimmel ABC President Trump Maggie Jilin Hall Ryan Reynolds Amy Schumer Chadwick Bozeman Glenn Chrissy Teigen Aclu South Carolina Hollywood Julia Louis Dreyfuss Three Hundred Thousand Dollars Fifteen Years