36 Burst results for "Dr. Martin Luther King"

22-year-old poet Amanda Gorman delivers stirring inauguration performance

the NewsWorthy

00:36 sec | 14 hrs ago

22-year-old poet Amanda Gorman delivers stirring inauguration performance

"Have heard about it by now. The words of the youngest inaugural poet in recent. Us history quickly spread around social media after she spoke on stage twenty two year old. Amanda gorman delivered her original poem the hill we climb. During yesterday's inauguration ceremony it was about overcoming obstacles coming together as a nation and taking part in positive change. Gorman told cbs news. She researched speeches. From abraham lincoln. And dr martin luther king as she began writing she told npr. She struggled to finalize the poem until the capital riots. Then she completed it that night. A variety of celebrities including oprah winfrey praised her performance online.

Amanda Gorman Dr Martin Luther King Gorman Cbs News Abraham Lincoln United States NPR Oprah Winfrey
Fresh update on "dr. martin luther king" discussed on WAOK On Air

WAOK On Air

00:24 sec | 20 hrs ago

Fresh update on "dr. martin luther king" discussed on WAOK On Air

"And that's the game. That's the game taking a look back in today's game with our post game show on the Hawks radio network. 17 point fourth quarter comeback for the lock, so they get the Pistons and overtime tonight. 1 23 21 15 a remarkable came the locks are proud to honor the life and legacy of Dr Martin Luther King with this season's Nike City edition uniforms in court proceeds from the sale of this.

Dr Martin Luther King Pistons Hawks
In open letter to Dr. King, Stevie Wonder calls for equality

AP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 2 d ago

In open letter to Dr. King, Stevie Wonder calls for equality

"Singer songwriter Stevie Wonder releases an open letter to Dr Martin Luther King Jr on The holiday honoring the slain civil rights leader in the video, wonder laments the lack of progress against racism. In this 36 years since the holiday became a reality, it makes me physically sick. I am sick of politicians try to find in the easy solution to a 400 year. Problem Wonder once the new administration to form a Truth commission to find solutions and recommendations for

Dr Martin Luther King Jr Stevie Wonder Truth Commission
Dr. Martin Luther King honored in New York City

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:34 min | 2 d ago

Dr. Martin Luther King honored in New York City

"Honor honor the the message message and and spirit spirit of of the the Reverend Reverend Dr Dr Martin Martin Luther Luther King King Jr Jr on on the the Monday Monday closest closest to to his his birthday. birthday. Dr Dr King's King's fight fight for for Equality Equality and and Justice Justice for all continues today. This year. The pandemic forced the cancelations of gatherings for day of service events, but The National Action Network in Harlem. The mayor and governor were among those joining Reverend Al Sharpton for an annual celebration of King's legacy, Mayor de Blasio said. Those who don't believe in equality don't deserve to work for New York City. Let's be clear on this King Day. There's no room for any racist in public service. They need to be gone. That there is no room for any white supremist list in public service or in any uniforms anywhere in America. They need to be fired. Now around the country. King's words are especially resonant right now. Margaret Wong is the president of the Southern Poverty Law Center. And on this MLK Day she reflected on the uprising at the Capitol Less than two weeks ago, they pointed out that hate does not drive out hate. Only love can do that. And it can be very hard to hate. Those toe. Love those who hate you, but it is more important than ever that we understand what drives that hate. Also important to help the poor Martin Luther King led the fight. Against poverty and we need to restore that, and one adds the Biden administration is a start. But we have to commit ourselves to enabling their efforts to be felt and doing what we can in our communities to help one another. I'm surely antler. Wins

Reverend Reverend Dr Dr Martin Dr Dr King Equality Equality And And Just Mayor De Blasio King National Action Network Reverend Al Sharpton Margaret Wong Harlem Southern Poverty Law Center New York City America Biden Administration Martin Luther King
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:00 min | 3 d ago

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy

"Today is Martin Luther King Day a day when we look back on Dr King's commitment to nonviolent civil disobedience to advance civil rights and reflect on his famous 1963 speech delivered here in D, C. I have a dream. A little Children. One day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin. But by the content of their character, I agree. Following last year's death of a black man, George Floyd at the hands of a white police officer and this month's deadly attack on the U. S Capitol by supporters of President Trump include including far right extremists. Is Dr King's dream still alive? Well, joining us now to talk about that Maya King with politico who covers politics, race and campaigns. My It's always good to talk to you. Thank you so much for joining us today. Hi. Thanks for having me. What might Dr King think of the protests going on today? How far have we really come on racial issues as we mark his birthday. I think it's king were alive today he would be able to draw a number of parallels between his time in his experience and activism and what we've seen really over the past 12 months, with massive protests and civil disobedience, calling out Systemic racism and police violence on But of course, the current threat that we face of violence largely led by white supremacist groups, who have felt largely emboldened by a number of Government leaders of these are things that Martin Luther King also warned us against, and said that you know if America really did continue to try to advance on the platform or legacy of racism and racial terror. That that could cause issues for more than just racial minorities. But the broader community that we see across this country and I think that's especially evident, of course, looking at just how tight security is around Wednesday's inauguration.

Martin Luther King George Floyd White Police President Trump Maya King U. America
Many MLK Jr. Day events go virtual this year

Steve and Ted

00:42 sec | 3 d ago

Many MLK Jr. Day events go virtual this year

"Mark the observance of the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. It's federal holiday. Many spend that day in service in their communities. Dr Martin Luther King Jr Day is observed each year on the third Monday in January, and it's also a national day of surface as designated by Congress in 1994. Today celebrates the life and legacy of King who fought for civil rights and racial equality before he was killed in 1968 this year Due to the pandemic, many service opportunities are virtual and the presidential inaugural committee is collaborating with AmeriCorps on volunteer opportunities. AmeriCorps, which is a service network, supported by the federal government lists MLK Day Service events and you can sign up for those at national service dot gov. Tanya J.

Martin Luther King Jr. Dr Martin Luther King Jr Day Presidential Inaugural Committ Congress King Federal Government Tanya J.
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on 3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

06:46 min | 3 d ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on 3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

"Almost hatton last evening. I might soon call with local women's ministry book club reading a book however compromise and one of the women says all of a sudden. This summer i have. He was a murder. virtually. And i don't know much time learning and here's what i'm doing. I'm joining this vocals. Who were and. I'm gonna have this is to ask. She is a learner. We're all learners not arrived. Brazil learner. She stepped into her woke states for her. And she's going to have to ask questions. But i'm also that if you're a white woman and you have children if you live in a neighborhood where most of the people around you a white church when most of the people around you away you send your kids to schools where most of the people are white where you're circles of influence and engagement and exposure. You're just exposed to more of the same bowl suggestion is that you get out of that bowl. You go to other places other churches that are not what you begin to join groups that have people of color in those groups. You actually go to places in town that you've never gone to before and you start to begin to expose yourself to the basis outside of the bubble and instead of talking about dr king while we listen to the words of darpa king by reading the books dr king wrote in those books not just ourselves but actually read those votes works heads and the again to have this special groups around the things that dr king road is not the wrote about the negro american revolution government wrote about the negro american and yet the vast majority of people don't know anything about the american revolution. I think right to the thing often as humans. We bring defensiveness is. Let's explore places as you do. Why if we can just be intentional about letting go about the business so that we can listen and be curious. Learn using things at cachet. Her has okay. Because that's good and so we've listened while we form these relationships and we comfort. Yes and i love this emphasis on expanding outside of what's familiar. What's comfortable and learning and reading and embracing other people's stories and asking questions. That's where this all begins. And i think we need more women in government. I think we need more women who are educating themselves in all of these issues and where would you recommend that women start as we wrap it this interview. I'd love for you to give them a resource. You would love for them to start with given the fact that we are coming up from week day and then going right into walk history month recommendation. Is this that every person. Hearing the of michael's get dr king's book why we can't wait and read that book. Starting point. read that book and then discussing not just read it and walk away from it but actually read it and discussing storrow a reading roofer or reading circle. Have this sessions about what those issues are in that book because what dr king describes in that book is exactly what we're living through today I read this book in preparation for the interview. And i loved it and i found it inspirational and also convicting. Made me think deeply about how i'm participating in not participating in things that matter. And i completely agree that this is a book i read it and underlined it. But now you're right. I need to take that and discuss it with somebody. Make it really part of me by discussing it with other women who i care about and other people that i care about generally and i can't thank you both enough for your time and energy that you've put into educating us in the three and thirty community and thank you so much for the work that you're doing for the world rachel thanks so very much. Thank you rachel. you're doing great work as well. We appreciate while friends. I hope you learned as much from this conversation as i did. It is fascinating to dig into the history of our country and learn more about our systems. Today are still deeply impacted by twentieth centuries segregation azam. When we honor. Dr martin luther king junior. It's important to remember that. He fought to in segregation and discrimination in three major areas education housing and banking. These three are very connected to each other and unfortunately research shows a huge disparity between white america and black america continues to exist in all three of these areas. Today as mike said in the interview we inherited a society that we did not have a hand in creating but we do have a role to play in the society that we pass on to future generations. Dr king's work is far from over and we as mothers can take the first step towards helping his work continue by listening and learning reading and researching and also getting outside our bubble to get to know people of color and to get involved in our local communities as emily said towards the end of the interview even though this learning can feel overwhelming. The truth is that as we learn a next step really does open up for us. Start with the learning and your action steps will become clearer. I want to remind you mike. And emily's organization common ground conversations on race in america which will link in shona. I'll keep you updated when they offered the next session of their ten week facilitated online course this spring and in the meantime please take. Mike's challenge to read dr king's book why we can't wait with a group of people you trust and discuss it together. As i mentioned. I read this book in preparation for the interview and going into it. I thought it would be really heavy dense and long. But i found that i couldn't put it down. It was so inspirational. Dr king tells the story of the movement in birmingham alabama and the summer of nineteen sixty three that began with meticulously organized and bravely executed lunch. Counter sit ins. I love getting to know him and his work more intimately through his first person account a link. The book in the show notes from a small black owned bookstore my friend. Thank you for being here and for carrying about creating a better world for our children for all children. I appreciate you and all the work you do within your homes and communities that. I hope you have a beautiful week with your family..

Mike mike darpa king emily last evening birmingham rachel three twentieth centuries dr king ten week Today both today first step Brazil one king dr this spring
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on 3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

08:17 min | 3 d ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on 3 in 30 Takeaways for Moms

"Country as a whole incredible bonus it a really kohl's abating talent not just because it's you perhaps i would do the right thing to do to prevent equal access access education but also because we are missing out as a nation so much beauty in houston passion and purpose because there literally is not mechanisms in place to support a call today growth. Yeah i was struck by that. When i read through your outline about the data that you have that shows how much better we would be doing economically as a nation if we were really all of our citizens. It's this isn't just the right thing to do. It's also the smart thing to do for our country in so many different ways Came with a report last year. That said we're missing out on sixteen trillion dollars because of the racist suburban policies that we continue to foster this country instead of disrupting as fast as well and redesigning reform reconstructing a more equitable inclusive america benefits all in a multicultural society Yeah and let's talk more about the housing. So that was another thing that dr king fought for and and i think the keyword there is fought for you know we often wide america paints him as this man who was all about only love and peace which he was but he was fighting actively as you say he was a warrior. Fighting for these causes was it was a nonviolent warrior fighting against segregation. All of these practices that protected white supremacy and he defined himself is that he all is is volunteer army of volunteers and he had the capital our revolution and he gave speeches about his nonviolent revolution. That must rise up to change the status for this is our dr king that we know and all of this was born out of the christian church and all of this was opposed by the christian church. And it's this so we're talking about black and white poor in wealthy and how we can live together in a country that benefits everyone. The housing is a big part of it. Because housing leads to generational wealth is the very first step of biggest asset when we start to talk ownership of assets man's homes and businesses and so housing is key. But how do we get to that point. Where we're owning homes while today. Forty four percent of black americans own homes and this these are pre pandemic numbers. Well that's what it was in the sixties today. Seventy six percent of white people on there. Or how can we increase the number of people that own their homes if we are intentional about black children growing up in homes at their families own worst strategy for them. Yeah and is there an answer. I mean what is the strategy for that whether is no strategy in the. that's the reason why we created. The national institute for pattern is to work with historically by colleges and universities have a long legacy hundred plus year old legacy of cultivating that talent among the most vulnerable populations it is imperative that we extend these economic strategies to prioritize the productivity in black and brown communities because in the next twenty years. That's going to be the majority of our population and may currently produce allegedly less than four percent gdp and we have is gdp in the world twenty trillion where the world's wealthiest nation and that majority of our minority groups are are producing less than four percent of with virtually. No job grow in. It's not the lack of trying. They're offering worship. Activity is off the charts. Their productivity is flat and negative because they don't have access to the capital that brings us to painting they don't have the infrastructure needed in order to be exposed to the growth sectors of calm to be mentor in the ways that they need to be so we have to. We have to start to think seriously about how we're going to take what we inherited from the twentieth. Century is these segregationist policies and practices. That are writ large across the nation ubiquitously deserving our communities of color and how we want to redesign and howard going to reform them and howard launch a week our communities that there is infrastructure so that our pathways to prosperity or communities of color in the is that are born in the house. But we have to be intentional about that. It doesn't happen by magic. And by the way those beneficiaries of the status quo it went to fight to sustain it to maintain. Yeah and i think. I think if we're honest with ourselves we can feel it within ourselves if you have a urge of defensiveness or you know. I don't want things to change because things are working for me. You know like that is the worst in us. And i think we all have that that instinct of what does this mean for me and we have to be bigger than that. And how does this all play into the banking and the financial piece that dr king was fighting for will certainly when we talk about banking and access to capital dhaka kings. Why caro- scott king is on record than saying that. She believes that her husband had he stayed on a focus. With social justice ideology social justice features. Had he stayed there. He would still be alive today or winning inc econ into his office. He didn't last very long at all. And so when we talk about changing the economy of this country. We're talking about changing the identity of his country in if it's wanted to be a multicultural. Country than the opportunities to access capital has to be extended to people of color the check yearly people of color who have been marginalized and ostracize in the ny academic going all the way back to the freemen's may when that was destroyed and from that point all the way to this point the banking industry has had a disproportionate relationship with people of color than it has with white community. In the last ten years the banks have been fined two hundred and forty three billion dollars for discriminating against like able now that being said they paid and they continue to discriminate and they know this is the banks themselves that are producing. These reports. Back gives us hope though because as generations change minds. Change attitudes changed and people come in and they're not willing to maintain the status quo. They're starting to ask questions. Why our policies different for these people over here than they are those who were there even with the same credit scores so the challenge of changing the banks is something that is not going to happen overnight but it can happen people within the system that are educated in the same way that i i helped educate economic development plans were inheriting policies at are still builds on segregation is the same way that i talked to school. Districts who inheriting education policies and by the way curriculum history civics economics social studies. These are all tests that are steeped in white supremacy and so the ideology that we we incorporate interest rules and we teach our children so when we see this white supremacist mindset is because it's being we need to find ways to disrupt it and the way we do that is through.

last year sixteen trillion dollars twenty trillion Forty four percent Seventy six percent houston less than four percent today caro- scott king two hundred and forty three bi christian hundred plus year old first step next twenty years last ten years america dr king sixties twentieth. black
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

08:19 min | 3 d ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on Words Matter

"Enforced by both law and culture black citizens faced legal and economic oppression and violent retribution. When they attempted to even draw attention to these conditions. The birmingham campaign would become a pivotal moment in the civil rights movement of the nineteen sixties. President kennedy's address to the nation on civil rights in june of nineteen sixty three the august. Nine hundred sixty three march on washington and many other significant events were a direct result of this campaign and dr king's now famous letter after his arrest. Dr was subjected to unusually harsh conditions in the birmingham jail. During his incarceration an ally smuggled in a local newspaper contained a call for unity a letter from eight white alabama clergyman criticizing dr king and his methods while these white clergyman agreed that social injustices existed. They argued that they should be fought in the courts. Not on the streets in the margins of that newspaper dr king began writing his response as you listen to his words pay particular attention as he calls out the tepid. Support of so-called white moderates quote. I must confess that over the years. I've been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the negroes great stumbling block in his stride towards freedom is not the white citizens counselor or the klu klux klan her but the white moderate who is more devoted to order and to justice who prefers a negative. Which is the absence of tension to a positive piece which is the presence of justice who constantly says. I agree with you in the goal. You seek but i cannot agree with your methods of direct action. Who paternalistically believes that he can set the timetable for another man's freedom who lives by mythical concept of time you constantly advises the negro to wait for a more convenient season. Shallow misunderstanding from people of goodwill is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from illinois will luke warm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection. End quote as noted. Dr king confronted another issue that the fight for civil rights and social justice still faces today. Fifty seven years later calls mostly from white people for patients come an incremental ism. Dr king had an answer for them as well quote for years. Now i've heard the word. Wait it rings in the ear of every negro with piercing familiarity. This weight has almost always meant. Never we must come to see with one of our most distinguished jurists. The justice too long delayed is justice. Denied we have waited for more than three hundred and forty years for our constitutional and god given rights and quote as you watch and read the news today. It should be lost on no one. The three hundred and forty years has now become four hundred years and the oppression and injustices. Dr king fought and died to change still exists in every corner of this country with that. Let's listen to the reverend. Dr martin luther king junior and his letter from birmingham jail my dear fellow clergyman while confined in the birmingham city jail. I came across your recent statement calling my present activities unwise and untimely seldom. Do i pause to answer criticism of my work and ideas. If i saw down all the criticism that criticisms that cross my desk my secretary would have little time for anything other than such correspondence in the course of the day and i would have no time for constructive work but since i feel that you are men of genuine goodwill and that your criticisms are sincerely said for. I wanted to try to answer your state in. What i hope will be patient and reasonable times. I think i should indicate why. I am here in birmingham since you have been influenced by the view which argues against those coming in. I have on serving as president of the southern christian leadership conference and organization operating in every southern state with headquarters in atlanta georgia. We have some eighty five affiliated organizations across socil- and one of them is alabama krisztian movement for human the right frequently. We share staff educational and financial resources without affiliates. Several months ago. The affiliate here in birmingham. Ask us to be on. Call to engage in a nonviolent direct action program if such would deem necessary. We readily consented and went our came. We lived up to our promise. So i along with several members of my staff here because i was invited here. I am here because i have organization is here but more basically. I'm in birmingham because injustice is here just as a prophet so the century bc left now villages and caridad saith the lord far beyond the boundaries of their hometowns and just as the apostle paul left his village of tarsus and carried the gospel of jesus christ to the far corner of the greek or roman the world so am i compelled to carry the gospel of freedom beyond my own. Home town like paul. I must constantly respond to the macedonian call for aid moreover. I am cognizant the interrelatedness of all communities and states. I cannot sit idly by in atlanta and not be concerned about what happens in birmingham. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are called an escape network of mutuality tied in a single government of destiny. Whatever it affects one directly affects all indirectly. You deplore the demonstrations taking place in birmingham. But you'll statement. I'm sorry to say fails to express a similar concern for the conditions. That brought about the demonstrations. I'm sure that none of you would want to rest. Content with a superficial kind of social analysis is that deals with effects and does not grapple with underlying causes. It is unfortunate. That demonstrations are taking place in birmingham but it is even more unfortunate that the city's white power structure left the negro community with no alternative in nonviolent campaign that data four basic steps collection of the facts to determine whether injustices exist negotiation self purification and direct action. We have gone through. All.

atlanta georgia four hundred years atlanta washington june of nineteen sixty three three hundred and forty years martin luther more than three hundred and fo paul macedonian nineteen sixties Fifty seven years later Several months ago tarsus one today jesus christ klu klux klan king President kennedy
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on Words Matter

Words Matter

08:07 min | 3 d ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on Words Matter

"Welcome towards matter given all that has happened in this country. Over the last few weeks we thought an important this week to highlight one of the most significant and consequential calls for racial equality and social justice in american history. A letter from birmingham jail on good friday april. Twelve nineteen sixty three. The reverend dr martin luther king junior and fellow civil rights leaders were arrested in birmingham alabama. As they lead he now. Famous campaign of nonviolent direct action to protest racial segregation and oppression in that southern city in the early nineteen sixties. Birmingham was one of the most racially segregated cities in the united states enforced by both law and culture black citizens faced legal and economic oppression and violent retribution. When they attempted to even draw attention to these conditions. The birmingham campaign would become a pivotal moment in the civil rights movement of the nineteen sixties. President kennedy's address to the nation on civil rights in june of nineteen sixty three the august. Nine hundred sixty three march on washington and many other significant events were a direct result of this campaign and dr king's now famous letter after his arrest. Dr was subjected to unusually harsh conditions in the birmingham jail. During his incarceration an ally smuggled in a local newspaper contained a call for unity a letter from eight white alabama clergyman criticizing dr king and his methods while these white clergyman agreed that social injustices existed. They argued that they should be fought in the courts. Not on the streets in the margins of that newspaper dr king began writing his response as you listen to his words pay particular attention as he calls out the tepid. Support of so-called white moderates quote. I must confess that over the years. I've been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the negroes great stumbling block in his stride towards freedom is not the white citizens counselor or the klu klux klan her but the white moderate who is more devoted to order and to justice who prefers a negative. Which is the absence of tension to a positive piece which is the presence of justice who constantly says. I agree with you in the goal. You seek but i cannot agree with your methods of direct action. Who paternalistically believes that he can set the timetable for another man's freedom who lives by mythical concept of time you constantly advises the negro to wait for a more convenient season. Shallow misunderstanding from people of goodwill is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from illinois will luke warm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection. End quote as noted. Dr king confronted another issue that the fight for civil rights and social justice still faces today. Fifty seven years later calls mostly from white people for patients come an incremental ism. Dr king had an answer for them as well quote for years. Now i've heard the word. Wait it rings in the ear of every negro with piercing familiarity. This weight has almost always meant. Never we must come to see with one of our most distinguished jurists. The justice too long delayed is justice. Denied we have waited for more than three hundred and forty years for our constitutional and god given rights and quote as you watch and read the news today. It should be lost on no one. The three hundred and forty years has now become four hundred years and the oppression and injustices. Dr king fought and died to change still exists in every corner of this country with that. Let's listen to the reverend. Dr martin luther king junior and his letter from birmingham jail my dear fellow clergyman while confined in the birmingham city jail. I came across your recent statement calling my present activities unwise and untimely seldom. Do i pause to answer criticism of my work and ideas. If i saw down all the criticism that criticisms that cross my desk my secretary would have little time for anything other than such correspondence in the course of the day and i would have no time for constructive work but since i feel that you are men of genuine goodwill and that your criticisms are sincerely said for. I wanted to try to answer your state in. What i hope will be patient and reasonable times. I think i should indicate why. I am here in birmingham since you have been influenced by the view which argues against those coming in. I have on serving as president of the southern christian leadership conference and organization operating in every southern state with headquarters in atlanta georgia. We have some eighty five affiliated organizations across socil- and one of them is alabama krisztian movement for human the right frequently. We share staff educational and financial resources without affiliates. Several months ago. The affiliate here in birmingham. Ask us to be on. Call to engage in a nonviolent direct action program if such would deem necessary. We readily consented and went our came. We lived up to our promise. So i along with several members of my staff here because i was invited here. I am here because i have organization is here but more basically. I'm in birmingham because injustice is here just as a prophet so the century bc left now villages and caridad saith the lord far beyond the boundaries of their hometowns and just as the apostle paul left his village of tarsus and carried the gospel of jesus christ to the far corner of the greek or roman the world so am i compelled to carry the gospel of freedom beyond my own. Home town like paul. I must constantly respond to the macedonian call for aid moreover. I am cognizant the interrelatedness of all communities and states. I cannot sit idly by in atlanta and not be concerned about what happens in birmingham. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are called an escape network of mutuality tied in a single government of destiny. Whatever it affects one directly affects all indirectly. You deplore the demonstrations taking place in birmingham. But you'll statement. I'm sorry to say fails to express a similar concern.

atlanta georgia atlanta four hundred years Birmingham june of nineteen sixty three nineteen sixties friday april three hundred and forty years washington tarsus early nineteen sixties Several months ago more than three hundred and fo Fifty seven years later macedonian birmingham leadership Twelve klu klux klan illinois
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

04:56 min | 4 d ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Can you talk a little bit about that? Dr Martin Luther King played a significant role within the at this, you know, during during his time frame during the civil rights movement, many of the organizations or the organizing that took place on the civil rights movement. Took place with the shape and Dr Martin Luther King being right at the right of the helmet a lot of these efforts, and I think that speaks glowingly because, while um Dr Martin Luther King was not leading the end of the paper say. There was an alignment as far as idea ideas. There was different that there was a line and as far as what the ultimate goals were, and I think that speaks to the fact that you could have You're different groups were different organizations that you're supporting, advocating. But you could find the linemen around things that are significant, and in this case, it was alarming around equitable treatment for communities of color, and he played a significant role in helping to organize with protest. Organizing with the John Lewis is an individual's of that sort. Throughout his time frame here, sacrificing so much in these moments many do while Dr Bob Dr Martin King is the one that's often time, um, champion and that any ship be in many respects. There's so many others that place to significant role in this movement during that time frame, those within the city those who were not, ah, part of the city itself, and so Wait can be in and we celebrate. Dr. Martin was the team because of the sacrifice that he made because he was a symbol of so much something much greater symbol of that sacrifice. The killer that the commitment that was needed in order to see the changes that were looking, um, that they're really ongoing. You know, we haven't seen the full manifestation of that dream that he spoke of But it's an ongoing commitment. It's not something that we're going to check a box on, but it's something that we have to continue to be routed in going forward. And so I think those alignment with Dr King and the association throughout the years is what has allowed us to continue to push forward in many respects to this day. I'm joined by Trevan Williams, the vice president of marketing and communications for the deep. All Americans have learned about the work that Dr Martin Luther King Jr did for this country. But As a person of color. I'm sure you have a very unique perspective on all of that. What does his work mean to you? Uh, Dr Martin Luther King, Dr Martin Luther King Jr means so much to Me because it really goes back to what I just made makes it to it's the level of commitment. You know, I looked up a few years ago at the trajectory of our country, and I made a decision. But I wanted to get involved with the piano larger level, and I was blessed with the opportunity to join the organization almost two years ago to help an advocate on behalf. I have my own Children, and I'm trying to That set the course so that when they get to my age, they're not having the same battles that I'm having at 30. Plus, you know, 30, plus years of age at this point, and I look at Dr Martin Luther King as that example of the commitment to beyond just Today, but commitment to the future and how much we have to sacrifice in order to do so. In some cases, it's sad that we have to continue to sacrifice at the level that we are, but the reality is is that if it's going to push things forward My three Children down the line that it's completely worth it. And I think many people there are off the country, whether you're black, right or what have you You have the same sense of what you want to do whatever is necessary. You want to commit yourself to ensuring that your family your future? Your Children have a better life than you have. That was the commitment that I get from document document everything I think about him as the father and what it meant to sacrifice or to put his Children. In a better position, and I think that commitment if that's something that at its base level that we can all kind of, um, take that in and realize the commitment that's necessary in order to do that. That's that's it. That's a powerful thing is what wouldn't you do for your Children? Right? That's how I think about it. When I think about Dr Barlow, the king is what the sacrifice that he made for his Children. I want to do that same level of commitment for my Children so that they have a better life. And I am we certainly saw a lot of young people involved in the racial justice protests during the summer of 2020 from those that you talked to the younger generation. How much of an impact has Dr Martin Luther King Jr is legacy had on them and the work they're doing now? I think what was unique about this opportunity is that it provides us with the with the amount of protest in public displays that we've seen over the last few years. I think it allows us To galvanize the young. Basically, that you made mention two and allow them the opportunity to say you're doing many of the same things that are John Lewis or Dr Martin Luther King did in these moments. Um, there's there's interesting video that we did. Leading up to the virtual march in Washington last laugh August as well in which we had one of the long time Snake organizes Courtland Cox, who spoke to effectively the mantle being passed..

Dr Martin Luther King Dr Bob Dr Martin King Dr. Martin Dr Barlow John Lewis vice president of marketing Trevan Williams Washington Courtland Cox
Ossoff, Warnock 'play the race card': Alveda King

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:38 sec | Last month

Ossoff, Warnock 'play the race card': Alveda King

"Sunday nights. Georgia Senate runoff debates The niece of Dr Martin Luther King had some thoughts about the elections Lance Bride has more from the USA Radio News West Coast Bureau. Georgia Senate Race Debates took place Sunday night. Dr Martin Luther King's niece, Alveda King on Fox says Democrats are playing the race card and that's dangerous. John Assad Rafiah Wanna car a debt that teaching fear anger? Stirring up bitterness. It's called playing the race car, so starting up emotions and fear is very dangerous, but giving solutions Ginger Howard and I and our book, We're not color blind. Teach people how to do that from the West

Georgia Senate Dr Martin Luther King Lance Bride West Coast Bureau John Assad Rafiah Alveda King USA FOX Ginger Howard
Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:16 min | 3 months ago

Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Britannica. Today's politicians but most of her life fighting for civil rights, she put her life at risk to change the course of American history, but she's often left out of history books. Let's talk about Constance Baker Motley. Constance Baker Motley was born on September fourteenth nineteen, forty one in new haven connecticut she was one of twelve children born to working class immigrant parents from the West indies. Constance. Was a bright child who grew up attending integrated schools and quickly fell in love with reading. She didn't learn much about black history in school. But what she did learn about civil rights leaders inspired her she decided she wanted to become a lawyer, but constance couldn't afford higher education. She took a job as a maid for a while before moving on to work for the National Youth Administration an organization focused on providing work an educational opportunities for young adults. Constance was giving a speech at a local community center one evening when her oratory skills impressed a wealthy white philanthropist. He, offered to pay for constants college tuition. So in nineteen, forty, one constance began attending college at Fisk University in Nashville. She later wrote that the train ride down to Tennessee was the first time she experienced overt racism and Jim Crow laws after being forced to ride in a broken down segregated train car, it was a perspective changing moment for constance two years into her attendance at Fisk Constance transferred to New York University and finished her bachelor's degree in economics. Then in nineteen, forty, four constance became the first black woman to be accepted to Columbia law school. After graduating from Columbia in nineteen, forty, six constants worked for the NWC peas legal staff under Thurgood. Marshall who later became a court justice over the course of her work at the N. double ACP constance assisted with almost sixty cases that ended up reaching the Supreme Court. She also personally argued ten supreme court cases and one nine. Constance is work integrated multiple southern state universities putting her toe-to-toe with racist governors determined to bar black students from schools. She also helped protect the right to peaceful protests and opened up parks for. Black. Americans. She did all that despite the sexism and racism personally experienced during her legal career. Some judges actually turned their backs on her and refused to hear her speak. But Constance didn't let others biopsies bar her from success. Her work made her a key player in the civil rights movement and she even occasionally represented Dr. Martin? Luther. King Junior. Constance was constantly in danger when she was working in the south racists threatened her life and the lives of other prominent figures in the black community constance was barred from staying in hotels. So she had to stay with local activists, but even that didn't make her feel completely safe her friend Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar. Evers. was murdered his own driveway. So in nineteen, sixty, five constance left her work in the south and moved back to New York City. Shortly thereafter, she became the first black woman to serve in the New York State Senate. She was also elected president of the borough of Manhattan which made her the first woman in that role. During her time as a politician constance focused on raising up under served communities in the city like Harlem and East Harlem in nineteen sixty, six president Lyndon Johnson appointed constance to the US. District Court in the southern district

Constance Baker Motley Fisk Constance Constance District Court Supreme Court Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network New York State Senate Fisk University Columbia Law School New York City West Indies New York University National Youth Administration Connecticut Nashville Mississippi Manhattan Lyndon Johnson
Politician, Cardiss Collins

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:40 min | 3 months ago

Politician, Cardiss Collins

"Today's politician was one of the longest serving women of color in the US Congress. She spent several of her over two decades of service being the only black woman in the chamber. Let's talk about Cardis Collins. CARDIS. Robertson. Was Born on September twenty fourth nineteen thirty one in Saint Louis Missouri. When cardis turned ten, her family moved to Detroit where she attended high school. After graduation, cardis moved to Chicago to live with her grandmother and find a job. She worked in a mattress factory before joining the Illinois Department of Labor as a stenographer. At the same time, she also studied accounting at Northwestern University. In. Nineteen fifty eight Cardis Mary George W Collins. The couple had a son Kevin the following year. After graduating from college in Nineteen, Sixty, seven, Cardis was promoted to secretary then became an accountant and auditor for the Illinois Department of Revenue. All the while she supported her husband's campaigns, for Alderman, committee men and US representative. Cardis also gained her first direct political experience as Committee Woman of the Twenty Fourth Ward Democratic Organization. In nineteen seventy George won seat in the US House representing the predominantly African American west side of Chicago. He was elected following the death of his predecessor. He served two terms and was particularly passionate about improving the lives of black people serving in the military. Shortly, after winning election to serve another term George died in a plane crash. Carts was devastated by the loss of her husband. Through her grief. She announced her candidacy to fill her husband's congressional seat. She was supported by the city mayor and won the nomination with eighty four percent of the vote. She then won the election on June Fifth Nineteen, seventy-three with ninety, two percent of the vote that made Cardis the first black woman to represent Illinois in Congress. Transition into her new congressional role wasn't easy. She was politically inexperienced and wasn't confident enough to voice all of her opinions right away. She relied on her colleagues to show her the ropes and she later said once people learned I had something to say I gained confidence. Hardest is main goal is a representative was to improve life for the on Chicago's West Side. Along with other low income communities and people of color across the country. She always kept the well being of her constituents as her main focus. Spending eight days a month in her district to remain accessible. Because of the attention, she paid her voters she went back her seat comfortable margins for two straight decades. Throughout her tenure, she would serve on several committees including the influential committee on Energy and Commerce. She started serving on the committee on government operations. She participated in two different subcommittees later, working to tighten regulations on the transportation of toxic materials and improve air travel safety. In nineteen seventy nine. Cardis was elected president of the Congressional Black Caucus. She was only the second woman to earn this honor. She openly criticized President Jimmy Carter's record on civil rights, as well as his failure to make Dr Martin Luther King Junior's birthday a national holiday. Cards spent much of her time in Congress defending affirmative action programs and ensuring equal funding and attention to women and people of Color. Curtis staunchly advocated Breast Cancer Awareness. In nineteen ninety, she wrote a law expanding Medicare coverage for elderly and disabled women to receive. Mammograms. She also designated October as national breast cancer awareness month. In nineteen ninety-seven after twelve consecutive terms cardis decided not to run for re election she returned to Chicago and later decided to move to Alexandria Virginia. She passed away on February third twenty thirteen. She was eighty one years old. Cars Collins overcame grief and hesitation to speak up and make a positive difference for people in her district and across the country.

Cardis Mary George W Collins Chicago Congress Illinois Department Of Labor Congressional Black Caucus Committee Woman Representative Robertson United States Twenty Fourth Ward Democratic Illinois Department Of Revenue Northwestern University Us House Saint Louis Missouri Detroit Illinois Kevin Breast Cancer Awareness Cardis Energy And Commerce
Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:19 min | 4 months ago

Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is encyclopedia will Manica. All month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up against injustice and four a better world. Today we're talking about an American civil rights activist whose work began as a student and extended throughout her life and beyond. She was one of the leaders of the sit in and Jalen movements continuing to fight for a more just society even when faced with serious harm. According to The New York Times her FBI file was over four hundred pages long. Let's talk about Patricia Stevens do. Patricia Gloria Stevens was born on December ninth nineteen, thirty, nine fifteen months after her sister Priscilla who would go on to be partner in many organizing efforts. Patricia was the second of three kids born to Lottie Mae Powell Stevens, and Horace Walter Stevens. The Stevens family lived in Belgrade Florida for most Patricia Youth. By the time she was thirteen years old Patricia was very aware of the discrimination she faced for being black and was ready to protest. She and her sister refused to go to the designated colored window at their local dairy queen. Instead, they stood in line for the window marked whites only. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, seven Patricia started school at Florida Am University. Two years later in Nineteen fifty-nine Patricia and Priscila attended a workshop put on by the Congress of racial equality or core on nonviolent civil disobedience. Patricia then started a local chapter of the organization in order to continue the work, she tried to tackle it just thirteen years old integration. The following year on February. Twentieth Nineteen Sixty Patricia, her sister, and some other students sat down at a whites only lunch counter at a Woolworth Tallahassee and refused to get up until they were served. Nineteen days earlier, four guys sat down at a similar lunch counter in Greensboro North Carolina officially kicking off. Since movement across the South Patricia and ten of her peers were arrested rather than paying three hundred dollar Fine Patricia and. Out Forty nine days in jail. Their determination to serve their time as a statement became a norm when others were arrested and charged on fairly. Patricia leadership and courage caught the attention of people around the country support of the cause including Jackie Robinson Eleanor Roosevelt Harry Belafonte, and James. Baldwin. Dr Martin. Luther King. Junior. Sent the sisters telegram that said. Going to jail for a righteous cause as a badge of honor and a symbol of dignity. After she was finally released, Patricia continued the fight to change her city and country. One of her fellow activists was a man named John D do junior. He was law school at Florida Am University. The two got married in nineteen, sixty three and would go on to have three children together for their honeymoon Patricia and John went to the march on Washington and heard Dr King's I have a dream speech. The following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, Patricia took on a new role in corps. She served as field secretary for a voter education and Registration Project in North Florida under her leadership. program. More. Voters than any other regional program in the south. Patricia also worked to improve the lives of workers, the poor and other underserved populations in the US. But her activism took a physical toll on her. After being hit in the face by a can of tear gas, Patricia is were injured and she was forced to wear dark glasses for the rest of her life in nineteen sixty, seven, ten years after she enrolled. Patricia graduated from Florida Am. University it took her all of a decade to get her degree because she spent periods of time traveling around the US to rally energy behind the civil rights movement. She was also suspended multiple times by the

Patricia Patricia Gloria Stevens South Patricia Patricia Youth Florida Am University Florida Lottie Mae Powell Stevens Horace Walter Stevens Luther King Harry Belafonte Stevens Jalen Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan United States FBI Woolworth Greensboro John D
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

02:33 min | 4 months ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

"His change. Dr Martin Luther King was assassinated. Police are still killing black man Edwin and nothing has changed. And in Portland a milestone 100 nights of protests on CNN Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie responds to a magazine article that says President Trump mocked American more dead. That would be offended, too, if I thought it was true. Public health record and hot record. Hot weather pose conflicting threats in the West more from CBS's Tom Foti as the nation past 188,000 covert 19 victims, the president's Corona virus response coordinator, Dr Deborah Berke said. We really have to ensure that we stay 6 ft apart and we socially distance even with your family and your friends. But in California and much of the Southwestern mountain region, the social distancing warnings are colliding with the reality of record, Heath. As people thinking beaches, even his officials say, Avoid them or at least avoid the trouts. Three fast bread in California wildfire sent people fleeing with one trapping campers at a reservoir in Sierra Nevada. Net National Forest Cal fire sending out a warning to residents in Alpine, leading people like this man concerned up on the hill. There's all wilderness. We have trails up there. It's thick brush. So have feeling the whole valley will go. That's going to burn right down to where all the houses are Authorities in Birmingham, England, investigating what they're calling a random stabbing spring. We say the stabbing incidents happen in a two hour stretch. Early Sunday morning, One man was killed in seven other people were injured at several different locations across Birmingham. A motive is unclear, but police say they do not believe the attacks are terror related. Detective Steve Grahame is with Midland police disappear if you're under attack, because we have a friend Hey, links between the victims right now. Officials are looking for a single male suspect in the stabbing spree. Maria Garcia CBS news This is CBS News. You can listen to CBS News Radio 24 hours a day, seven days a week on radio dot com or the radio dot com map de loaded today..

CBS Dr Martin Luther King Birmingham California Dr Deborah Berke Net National Forest Cal Edwin President Trump Steve Grahame Tom Foti Maria Garcia Robert Wilkie CNN Southwestern mountain president Sierra Nevada Portland Secretary
The March ON Washington, 57 Years Later

20/20

06:18 min | 5 months ago

The March ON Washington, 57 Years Later

"Hello I'm Deborah Roberts those images from today an echo of something fifty seven years ago when a quarter of a million people I descended on the nation's capital protesting for jobs and freedom. On today's anniversary of Dr Martin Luther. King Junior's I have a dream speech we at twenty twenty or proud to present the march a documentary directed by Jonah Comfort and narrated by Denzel Washington originally made in twenty thirteen to commemorate the Marches Fiftieth Anniversary. Some of those voices sadly are now gone, but their legacy lives on. I have had to tell my children about the segregates what it means. Seven year old daughter she wanted to go from town. And we found it necessary to explain to That she couldn't go to fun town because she was colored. To attempt to explain a system like unjust and. Segregation. Six year old child is very difficult thing. In nineteen sixty three. The Movement for civil rights came to the most segregated city in the American. South. Birmingham Alabama. All. Resistant to the gration. Thoroughly, segregated. City the United States. had. More on saw on. WILL HOMES ENSURE A. United. States. Many other southern city. Okay. Birmingham is bombing him. They have quarries and conducting the quarry business you used dynamite. So there are a lot of local people who are expert in Isa Dynamic. Teenage. Board riding a bicycle had been knocked off the bike and castrated. Young couple had gone to the City Hall to get a wedding license. Came around the corner. And Brush shoulders with Birmingham policeman and he pulled out his pistol and pistol whipped the more to the ground. It was a horrible heinous place. The campaign was to be led by the organisation's Ben Thirty four year old leader. The Reverend Dr Martin Luther King Junior. WHO HEARD PEOPLE? who except in dusted oppression and second-class citizenship. in an attempt waiting go the Paul Pompidou. The time all we ripe to do right. Dr King was the voice of Civil Rights from the bus boycott on but by the end of nineteen, sixty, two, he recognized. That the civil rights movement. was. Losing what he called its window and history. The. South was still segregated and he said we need to take more of a risk. We need to go for broke I need to go for broke. I think he felt that. We have to be willing to give our lives to put an end to segregation. If we do. Then segregation will end even if we die. That was the reason he chose. Birmingham. For the victory won some even have to face physical death. We must come to see the now some things. So eternally true that they're worth dying for, and if a man has not discovered something that he will die for he fit live. In January of Nineteen, sixty three. One man was determined to stop kings desegregation message from spreading any further. Birmingham's police chief Eugene. Bull Connor. Negro is off the attempted takeover of our country the lazy. The beat nate, the ignorant and buy some misguided religious and bleeding ought. Do, you think you can keep coming in the present situation of segregation I may not be able to do it, but I'll die trying. Overcoming Bull Connor segregationists zeal not to mention his jails would take something special. And in the winter of sixty, three king would find out just how special that effort needed to be. Spent all of January February and March nineteen sixty three training people to accept nonviolence to go down into marches and be willing to go into bull connor's jails. But. Conner's jails were so fearsome that no matter how much they exhorted people no matter how many freedom songs they sang, how many prayers they prayed, how much fervor there was in the meetings, people wouldn't show up to risk going into those jails.

Birmingham Bull Connor Dr Martin Luther Dr King Deborah Roberts Negro Denzel Washington Isa Dynamic Twenty Twenty Jonah Comfort City Hall Alabama Paul Pompidou United States. Ben Thirty Conner Nate Bleeding
March On Washington Demands Racial Equality

Wealth Creator Radio

00:13 sec | 5 months ago

March On Washington Demands Racial Equality

"Some 57 years after Dr Martin Luther King Jr is I have a dream speech, and thousands turned out yesterday in Washington, D C to commemorate the historic address. People travelled from across the country take part in that rally.

Dr Martin Luther King Jr Washington
Alveda King says of MLK's iconic speech, 57 years later: 'We still have a dream'

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

Alveda King says of MLK's iconic speech, 57 years later: 'We still have a dream'

"Capital Friday. 57. Years after Dr Martin Luther King Jr delivered his I have a dream speech will fill my father's dream. 12 year old Yolanda Renee King joined thousands of demonstrators in the nation's capital exactly 57 years after her grandfather, Dr Martin Luther King Jr delivered his iconic I have a dream speech generation that this mantle systemic racism. What's it like the 1963 march on Washington? Friday's demonstration was Also held up the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. It comes during a summer of reckoning on race and police violence following the deaths of George Floyd in May and this week shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin. CBS's Dentally brand Caltrans work on the

Dr Martin Luther King Jr Yolanda Renee King George Floyd Lincoln Memorial Caltrans Jacob Blake Kenosha Wisconsin CBS Washington Dentally
March on Washington: Civil rights leaders, families of Black victims rally against police violence

KCBS Radio Weekend News

02:34 min | 5 months ago

March on Washington: Civil rights leaders, families of Black victims rally against police violence

"Thousands showed up at the National Mall for the commitment march. Get your knee off our necks. This on the 57th anniversary of the 1963 march on Washington for jobs and Freedom, where Dr Martin Luther King Jr gave his powerful I have a dream speech. I have a dream. My four little Children. One day live in a nation. Robbie will not be judged by the color of skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream. Among the speakers Friday. Eric Garner Jr. Son of the man who died in an illegal police choke hold in 2014 in New York City. I can't breathe. I can't breathe. It's been six years since my father words became our words. You have to make a change. I'm challenging the young people to go out and vote. It's possible for change. You just have to put in the work. CBS's Debra Al Faran has more. We've been too long, too much to bear. Just days after another police shooting of a black man, civil rights advocates call for comprehensive police reform and racial equality. And to say once and for all. Get your knee off our necks and do it. Martin Luther King, the third addressed the crowd. We must come together and join with the Black lives movement. To raise our voices and say Enough is enough. Reverend Al Sharpton also spoke. If we've gotta march every day if we got a vote every day. We will get your knee off our pick your people safe and helpful during the pandemic. Everyone is required to wear a face mask and also organizer's are fine to keep everyone socially is also to be a part of something like this, really. Family members of men and women killed by law enforcement officers were among the speakers. I wish dogs were the seed is right now. That's what marks and four So much for George. Briana. Or mine. What cycle? And after the speeches concluded, the crowd marched to the Martin Luther King Junior Memorial. Debra Al Pharaon. CBS

Dr Martin Luther King Jr Martin Luther King Junior Memo CBS Debra Al Faran Debra Al Pharaon Reverend Al Sharpton Eric Garner Jr Briana National Mall New York City Washington Robbie
Thousands gather at March on Washington commemorations

Markley and Van Camp

00:44 sec | 5 months ago

Thousands gather at March on Washington commemorations

"Morse, we must answer the call of institutional racism. Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee among the speakers at today's march on the National Mall. It comes On the 57th anniversary of the march, led by Martin Luther King Jr The anniversary comes amid a summer of nationwide protests and racial unrest following the death of George Floyd. It also comes amid protests after the police involved shooting of Jacob Blake, who was shot multiple times in the back. George Floyd died after a police officer pinned him to the ground by his neck. And the March on Washington today has been named by organizer's as Commitment March. Get your knee off our necks. Speeches today or at the Lincoln Memorial site of Dr Martin Luther King Jr is I have a dream speech and just blocks away from a memorial in King's

Dr Martin Luther King Jr George Floyd Congresswoman Sheila Jackson L Lincoln Memorial Jacob Blake National Mall Morse Washington Officer
How Does Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Exercise Work?

BrainStuff

05:49 min | 5 months ago

How Does Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Exercise Work?

"The past fifty, two years teacher and diversity trainer Jane Elliott has been stirring up trouble on the subject of racism. It can still be uncomfortable squirm in your seat stare at your shoes uncomfortable when she subject someone to the very same exercise she I unleashed on third graders more than half a century ago designed to expose racist thinking. Something, her method can get downright mean but again, the subject is racism, it should be troubling. Elliott came to prominence when the day after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Junior in nineteen, sixty, eight, sheep herself a white woman took her classroom of all white third graders in. Riceville Iowa and decided to teach them what it was like to face discrimination. She separated the kids into two groups those with Brown eyes and those with blue and proceeded to proclaim the. Brown. Is these superior group she allowed the group extra privileges more time recess seats at the front of the room they were told they were cleaner smarter more talented. How children reacted to this newfound pecking order was startling. The Brown eyed group immediately began to wield their dominance. The blue is almost immediately slipped into the role of subordinates. Anger flared disputes popped up. After switching roles a few days later, which gave both sides of the classroom taste of being in the lesser group the exercise ended. Many parents complained after reading about what had happened in Elliott's classroom through student essays printed in the local paper. A month or so later, Johnny Carson invited Elliott to appear on his late night talk show she became a national story. Many praised efforts at her students is but not everybody a two, thousand five storied Sonian magazine reported hundreds, viewers, wrote letters, saying Elliott's work appalled them how dare you try this cruel experiment out on white children? One said black children grow up accustomed to such behavior but white children, there's no way they could possibly understand it. It's cruel to white children and will cause them great psychological damage. Elliott spoke with us for the article that this episode is based on from her home in Iowa. She said, you think that's traumatizing try living that way for a lifetime. Elliott taught for years before she decided to take her anti-racism lesson out of the classroom and Corporate America. She's also led the exercise for the US Department of Education and other governmental groups. She's appeared before numerous church and school assemblies she was on. Oprah Winfrey's TV show several times in June of twenty twenty. She appeared on the tonight show starring Jimmy Fallon. She often faces uncomfortable and sometimes angry reactions but her goal as it has been for the past fifty two years is education. She says, it's the best weapon against racism. But good education about racism and race is hard to find. Elliott said, that's because the educators believe the same thing that they were taught and they were taught the same thing I was, which is that there are three or four different races and you can tell what a man's intelligence is by the color of his skin or the shape of his head. You can't lead people out of ignorance if you're still teaching the Columbus discovered America and we came here to civilize these savages. Will need to teach the three RS of rights respect responsibility if teachers would respect the rights of those students to learn the truth and be held responsible for seeing that they present them with the truth we could kill racism in two generations is not a doubt in my mind that could be done. Elliott at eighty seven years. Old has seen. America, grapple with racism all her life. She's marked major mile posts in the struggle over the past fifty years or so the civil rights movement and the assassination of doctor king in the sixties, the race riots in Miami's Liberty City in nineteen eighty and in Los. Angeles after the Rodney King beating in nineteen ninety, two, the protests in Ferguson. Missouri and twenty fourteen after the killing of Michael Brown and in Baltimore Maryland in two thousand fifteen after that of Freddie Gray and in Charleston south. Carolina. That same year after a church massacre. There are many others. But the problem she has been relentlessly attacking Elliott says, goes far beyond the occasional race-based. Clara. For people of Color in the United States facing racism is an everyday fight every minute of every day. Elliot said. It's only been going on with me for fifty two years. I know black women who have been doing this for eighty nine years and their mothers did and their grandmothers dead and their great is dead and their daughters and their granddaughters and their great granddaughters are going to have to do. It must be get off our polyunsaturated fatty acids and do something about this. I get paid to talk about it. They aren't even allowed to talk about it. One of the biggest hurdles in educating people about racism in the United States Elliott says is that most everyone knows it exists and knows that it's harmful but few are motivated to change it. She stood in front of. and asked who among the white people in the room would want to switch places with a black person no one ever volunteers. She cautions that recognizing the problem is only the first step but Elliott is nothing if not persistent, she says, she'll continue to educate for the next fifty years. She'll push her mantra of one race the science behind the simple words it's clear. According to the National Human Genome Research Institute your genome, the bodies blueprint that contains all of your DNA is ninety, nine point nine percent the same as every human around you. And she says, she will urge people to get out and vote November no hope of electing leaders who will attack racism as she has had on.

Jane Elliott Michael Brown Iowa United States America Dr. Martin Luther National Human Genome Research Us Department Of Education Oprah Winfrey Jimmy Fallon Johnny Carson Sonian Magazine Twenty Twenty Corporate America Missouri Elliot Rodney King Clara
Obama to deliver eulogy for civil rights icon John Lewis in Atlanta

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:59 sec | 6 months ago

Obama to deliver eulogy for civil rights icon John Lewis in Atlanta

"Report The Life and Legacy of John Lewis. Family, Friends, congressional leaders and former presidents have have gathered gathered at at Ebenezer Ebenezer Baptist Baptist Church Church in in Atlanta Atlanta to to say say goodbye goodbye to to congressman congressman and and civil civil rights rights icon icon John John Lewis, Lewis, CBS CBS News News correspondent correspondent Alison Alison Keith Keith at at the the beginning beginning of of the the Celebration Celebration of of Life for John Lewis Historic Ebeneezer Baptist Church. Joint with churches all over the nation, bringing a bill 80 times to honor the man who faced death throughout his life and his battle for civil rights. The funeral is being held at the church where Dr Martin Luther King Jr and his father once preached former President George W. Bush. John Lewis. Always looked outwards. Not in words he always thought of others. Former President Barack Obama will deliver Lewis's eulogy. CBS News Special Report. I'm Jim Krystle. And, of course, stay with

John John Lewis John Lewis Historic Ebeneezer Ebenezer Ebenezer Baptist Bapt Alison Alison Keith Keith CBS President George W. Bush Congressman Dr Martin Luther King Jr Atlanta Jim Krystle Barack Obama President Trump
John Lewis, Towering Civil Rights Icon, Memorialized At Atlanta

KYW 24 Hour News

01:15 min | 6 months ago

John Lewis, Towering Civil Rights Icon, Memorialized At Atlanta

"The sound in Atlanta as masked Mourners air filing into a church where a funeral service for the legendary civil rights fighter and longtime congressman John Lewis is being held ahead of his burial. A winnable use. Mike Doherty has a preview. For half a century, John Lewis dedicated his life to civil rights and civil service. President Obama will deliver his eulogy at Ebenezer Baptist Church. That's the same church where Dr Martin Luther King Jr used to deliver sermons. Former presidents George Bush and Bill Clinton are expected to attend the services Well, President Donald Trump says he will not go Georgia governor Brian Kemp says no matter where you go, everybody knows the name of John Lewis and Mohr importantly, They know his record of standing up. Speaking out and shaking up the status quo. Lewis made a name for himself by getting into what he calls good trouble. Atlanta Mayor Keisha Bottoms says he laid the groundwork for her and others and she will carry on his legacy and so governor when the good trouble continues to know that it is with the blessings of Congressman Lewis Lewis is the first black lawmaker toe lie in state at at the the Capitol Capitol Rotunda Rotunda in in Washington, Washington, D D C. C.

John Lewis Congressman Lewis Lewis Capitol Capitol Rotunda Rotund Atlanta Dr Martin Luther King Jr President Donald Trump Congressman Ebenezer Baptist Church Keisha Bottoms Mike Doherty President Trump Brian Kemp Washington Barack Obama George Bush Bill Clinton Mohr Georgia
John Lewis' funeral set for Atlanta church that MLK once led

The Lake Show with Henry Lake

00:32 sec | 6 months ago

John Lewis' funeral set for Atlanta church that MLK once led

"Ofthe final farewell for a civil rights giant. On Thursday. Here's CBS's Alison Keys. The funeral for Congressman and civil rights icon John Lewis is being held at the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, where the voice of Dr Martin Luther King Jr once rang out during the fight for justice, voting rights in equality. Jennifer Holiday will sing, Take my hand Precious Lord, a favorite of kings and a staple of black funerals. Former President Obama will give the eulogy for John Lewis before private burial. Also attending will be former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W.

John Lewis Dr Martin Luther King Jr Ebenezer Baptist Church Bill Clinton Alison Keys Jennifer Holiday Congressman Barack Obama CBS George W President Trump
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:46 min | 8 months ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on BrainStuff

"The O'Hara's says that Reagan's John was to frame king story as another example of American exceptionalism quote. We had an injustice and we corrected it. It's all about the power of individuals in the power of American democracy, these will be key elements in terms of how the civil rights movement comes to be memorialized international culture. By nineteen eighty seven four years after the creation of Mlk Day and nearly twenty years after King's murder on a hotel balcony in Memphis Tennessee, a full seventy six percent of Americans had a favorable opinion of king, and those numbers only continued to grow by nineteen ninety nine king came in second on a Gallup survey of twentieth century individuals that Americans admired most behind mother theresa. Political Scientists Sheldon Appleton wrote in one, thousand, nine, hundred, five younger college educated White Americans tended to support king, and both of these demographics were larger in nineteen, eighty-seven, than in nineteen, sixty six. He also noted that the widespread lack of knowledge about king and the civil rights movement in general, might have also influenced earlier perceptions. Appleton wrote perhaps recent media. Treatment of King has helped to induce selective memory by some middle, aged and older Americans. Of course Americans have every reason to venerate Martin Luther, King and to celebrate his accomplishments. He didn't do it alone, and he had his flaws like any other human, but as carton explains he also had an undeniable gift for challenging, Americans, then, and now to make good on the promise of our founding principles Carson said he had that ability to link the goals of the civil rights struggle to. That most Americans believe that they have that's what he was doing in the I. Have a dream speech in Washington we as a nation justified, our independence with a human rights statement called the Declaration of Independence The question is. Can we.

King Sheldon Appleton O'Hara Carson Tennessee Memphis Reagan murder Martin Luther John theresa carton Washington
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on The Daily Article

The Daily Article

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on The Daily Article

"If you're looking for Valentine's Day gift your loved one will remember. You might consider a handwritten note from Dr Martin Luther King Junior sometime sometime in the mid nineteen sixties. He was asked to define the meaning of love. Dr King Road love is the greatest force in the universe. It is the heartbeat of the moral cosmos. He who loves is a participant in the being of God then he signed the note. Best wishes Martin l King Junior. The rare note is for sale for forty two thousand dollars. If only everyone agreed with Dr King. One way our our culture rejects. Dr King's ethic of love is by rejecting those who most deeply share his faith. A Penn State study found that American society is is in a downward spiral of interreligious intolerance Highly Religious Protestants are among the groups that feel most targeted for their religious group. Membership and beliefs in the lead investigator noted when people see their religion or religious beliefs mocked in the public domain or criticized by political leaders. These experiences signaled to members of entire religious groups. That they don't belong a case in point the Academy Awards the Twenty Twenty Oscars were watched by the smallest audience ever according to variety twenty three point six million viewers tuned in Sunday night. The show had six million fewer viewers than last last year however an audience of twenty three point six million is still larger than the population of one hundred. Seventy seven of the world's countries the cultural the popularity of the Academy Awards together with the credibility they bestow on actors directors and films can make it difficult to resist the worldview Hollywood promotes. So if we are to believe the movie and Television Industry Gender is fluid same sex relationships are to be celebrated LGBTQ people are to be accorded accorded protected status marriage is optional and divorce is nearly inevitable and life begins and ends whenever we say it does I could cite popular ocular movies and TV shows that proclaim each of these values if we disagree we are branded as homophobic bigoted. And even dangerous and we haven't even discussed the sexualize super bowl halftime show. If my grandchildren had been watching the game with us we would have been forced to change the Channel One solution for Biblical Christians is to avoid all popular media but even if that were possible is it biblical.

Dr King Road Dr King Martin l King Junior Twenty Twenty Oscars Dr Martin Luther Academy Awards investigator Hollywood
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"I'm Shane Morris sitting in for Johnston Street today as the nation marks. Dr Martin Luther King Day I want to share with you. Chuck Colson thoughts on one of Dr King's most powerful legacies days for the Colson Center. This is break point in their eloquent defensive life marriage and Religious Liberty Chuck Colson. The authors of the Manhattan Declaration made this bold statement treatment. There is no more eloquent defense of the rights and duties of religious conscience than the one offered by Martin Luther King Junior in his letter from Birmingham Jail Today Day on Martin Luther King Day we wanNA share with you. breakpoint commentary Chuck Colson aired back in the year. Two thousand about letter from Birmingham jail. Although recent revelations point linked to Dr King's moral failings the issues Dr King raised about the nature of law what constitutes an unjust law and how we should respond to unjust. Laws are as true true today as ever. So here's chuck. Colson from January of two thousand adjust law is a manmade code that squares with the moral law or the law of God an an unjust law is out of harmony with the moral law. Do you know who wrote those words. It was with these very words in his memorable letter from Birmingham jail. That Martin Luther King Junior threw down the gauntlet in his great civil rights. Crusade King refused to obey what he regarded as an immoral law that did not square with the law of God all across America. Millions of the people are celebrating the birthday of this courageous man and deservedly so he was a fearless battle for truth and all of us are in his debt because he remedied past wrongs and brought millions millions of Americans into the full riches of citizenship in schools and on courthouse steps. People will be quoting his. I have a dream speech. It's an elegant powerful classic sick. But I would suggest that Dr King's greatest accomplishments one which will be little mentioned today because it has suddenly become politically incorrect is his advocacy of the true true. moral foundations of law king defended the transcendent source of laws authority and in doing so. He took a conservative Christian view of law in fact he was the most eloquent advocate of this viewpoint in his time as interestingly enough Justice Clarence Thomas is today writing from a jail. King declared that the code of Justice is not man's law. It is God's law. Imagine a politician saying that today. We all remember the controversy that in just a few weeks ago when George W Bush even made reference to his Christian faith in a televised was national debate but king built his whole case on the argument that an unjust law is no law. At all exactly as argued by Saint Augustine and Thomas Aquinas us to be just king argued. Our laws must always reflect God's law and this is the greatest you today in the Public Square is the law rooted in truth is it transcended immutable and morally binding or is it as liberal. Interpreters suggest simply whatever the court says. It is ever since Dr King's Day the. US Supreme Court has been moving moving a step by step away from the positions. This great civil rights leader espoused to continue in this direction. As I've written can only lead to the loss of self-governing democracy so so I would challenge each of us today to use this occasion to reflect not just on his great crusade for civil rights but also on Martin Luther King's wisdom in bringing law back to its moral foundations nations. Many think of king some kind of liberal firebrand but when it comes to the law he was a great conservative who stood on the shoulders of Thomas Aquinas and Saint Augustine striving without apology to restore our heritage of justice. This is a story. I tell my new book. How now should we live a great moment history when a courageous man applied the law of God to to the unjust laws of our time and made a difference? And that's the lesson. We should be teaching our kids on this holiday. This isn't just another day off from school or a day to go to the mall. In fact I have a suggestion. Take this data. Sit Down with your kids and read them. King's letter from Birmingham jail. It may be the most important civics lesson they'll ever get for breakpoint. This is Chuck Colson in Washington..

Martin Luther King Chuck Colson Dr Martin Luther Birmingham Colson Center Thomas Aquinas Saint Augustine Shane Morris Public Square Manhattan Justice Clarence Thomas US Supreme Court George W Bush America Washington
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on The Daily Article

The Daily Article

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on The Daily Article

"This is the daily Article podcast published by the Denison Forum or culture changing Christians to receive the daily article directly to your or email inbox each weekday morning visit the daily Article Dot Com. Now here's Today's news. Discerned differently elitist the latest volume and our perennially popular biblical insight to tough questions. Series is now available for volume for I answered each of its ten questions and a recent trip to Israel standing at the place I discuss. Each answer uses a holy land site like the garden tomb or the Western Wall as the basis for each insight plus us every chapter includes a full color photo of the Holy Land site being discussed with questions like when life gets hard. Where can I turn and do? I really have love everyone. This volume is sure to challenge and inspire you. Request your copy today at daily Article Dot Org The Kansas City chiefs defeated the Tennessee. Titans in yesterday's AFC conference championship game. The San Francisco Forty niners one at home against the Green in Bay packers in the NFC Conference Championship. oddsmakers are favoring the chief slightly in Super Bowl fifty four since this is not a sports column and our nation is celebrating the birthday of Dr Martin Luther King Junior today you may be wondering why I am leading with these results. Here's what the teams who competed yesterday and Dr King have in common. They illustrate the cultural leverage of excellence. The chiefs are led by CEO. Clark Hunt I was privileged to be his pastor for many years in Dallas and Kinda tasked personally to his family's strong commitment to Jesus when his team won the AFC championship yesterday. Clark told the World World I want to thank the Lord for blessing us with this opportunity. The glory belongs to him and this trophy belongs to the best fans in the National Football League Tennessee. Hennessy quarterback Ryan Tannehill made clear his faith in Jesus over the years as well recently telling reporters I pray before every game. I spend time with God before I get to the stadium and then when I lace up my cleats I thank God for the opportunity to go out there and attempt to glorify him. By contrast packers quarterback. Aaron Rodgers has made news in recent years for the fact that he no longer identifies as Christian after meeting and being influenced by Rob Rob Bell Rogers told. ESPN I think. Organized religion can have a mind debilitating effect because there's an exclusivity that can shut you out from being open to the world to people and Energy and love and acceptance. Rogers is one of the most talented athletes of his generation like car. CONT and Ryan Tannehill. His commitment to professional excellence provides enormous leverage for cultural influence whether the person uses that influence. For Jesus Jesus or not it may surprise you to learn the Dr Martin Luther King Junior never completed high school. That's because he was such an advanced student that he skipped his first and last years of high school and went directly into college at the age of fifteen he entered seminary at the age of nineteen and graduated three years later as Valedictorian and student body. President he completed a PhD at Boston. University at the age of twenty twenty five. Dr King was brilliant in his diagnosis of the problem. Facing our nation he said injustice anywhere is a threat to justice is everywhere. We are caught an inescapable network of mutuality tied to a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly affects? It's all indirectly. He was brilliant and declaring the ultimate answer to our melody as well while accepting the Nobel Peace Prize in Nineteen Sixty four Dr King stated. I believe that unarmed truth. And unconditional love will have the final word in reality that is by right. Temporarily defeated needed is stronger than evil triumphant. He was brilliant and inspiring others. Dr King told a group of students in October nineteen sixty seven. Be Nia Bush if you can't be a tree if you can't be a highway just be a trail if you can't be a son be a star for it isn't by size. Is that you win or fail. Be The best of whatever you are today. We remember with gratitude not just his legacy but the commitment to excellence. What's that made it possible? Daniel achieved in exalted place in Babylon because an excellent spirit was in him in proverbs. Twenty two twenty nine Solomon noted. Do you see a man skillful in his work he will stand before kings. Paul was known for his is great. Learning the person who lived with excellence more than any other was of course the Lord Jesus. He's the only person in history who was tempted in every way just as we are yet he did not sin the crowds said of his ministry. He has done all things well. Now our Lord's Passion Passion for excellence must be hours. We are to seek excellence in our thoughts as Philippians. Four eight says if there is any excellence if there is anything worthy of praise think about these things and in our actions as well as Colossians. Three twenty three says whatever you do work work heartily as for the Lord and not for men we most express such excellence through service. I Peter for ten says as each has received a gift use it to serve one another and in mark nine thirty five. Jesus was adamant if anyone would be I. He must be last of all and servant of all exactly two months before he was assassinated. Dr King delivered a sermon German at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta titled The Drum Major Instinct. He described this instinct as a desire to be out front a a desire to lead the parade a desire to be I. By contrast he proclaimed Jesus define greatness as service Dr King noted by giving that definition of greatness. It means that everybody can be great because everybody can serve. You don't have to have a college degree to serve. You've you don't have to make your subject and verb agreed to serve. You don't have to know about Plato and heiress title to serve. You don't have to know Einstein's theory of relativity to serve. You don't have to know the second law of thermodynamics to serve. You only need a heart full of grace a soul generated by I love and you can be that servant is your heart full of grace today. Did you know that the daily Article podcast cast is available on most major podcast platforms. It's also an Alexa flash briefing perfect for your morning routine consider subscribing to the daily article. podcast on your preferred podcasting platform and thank you for listening today..

Dr King Dr Martin Luther King Junior Ryan Tannehill Rob Rob Bell Rogers Jesus Israel Denison Forum packers chiefs Titans Alexa Tennessee Aaron Rodgers Kansas City Dallas Plato San Francisco ESPN Clark NFC
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on The Next Best Thing

The Next Best Thing

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on The Next Best Thing

"That reliable. In April nineteen sixty eight Betty Speights is carrying on an extramarital affair with her boss, Lloyd jars who owns Jim's grill. Early in the evening of the assassination spates is in the restaurant when she hears a spacious noise back, she cautiously advanced to the open door, and what did she see? She saw old Lloyd running toward her. Why does it ghost carrying still smoking rifle Betty is confused by what has happened until later when she learned about the killing and all of that she was convinced. Loyd had done it until she talks to pepper in nineteen Ninety-two Speights had told no one what she saw. She kept a secret she held an and it was partially out of fear Barsha of loyalty to to Lloyd. For twenty four years. John Lewis had maintained he had been in the restaurant when he heard the gunshot. In light of Speights revelations. He admits that was a lie. And in nineteen Ninety-three national television appearance tower, spins an elaborate tale that begins with frankly berto a businessman rumored to have mob ties. And I want to see if frankly Berta owned and ran a vegetable warehouse in Memphis, Tennessee, he was a member of the Marcello organization. He was given affectively the contract to kill Martin Luther King. Yes, they handle. This is the voice of Loyd jars. Handle. Monday fans. I. He asked me to handle they money transaction. From one fascinating, doc martyr, hire someone to assassinate Dr Martin Luther King. Verte told him he was going to receive a rifle from a medical Royal? And he was to hold onto that rifle. He was going to receive a large sum of money that would be delivered to him in a vegetable box, which it was John wars. Then gave the rifle to the shooter whom he does not name. But pepper sees a plot that goes beyond an alleged mobster and a small time businessman. The same year as John Lewis television appearance yet. Another revelation leads pepper to third party. The United States army. In March an article in the Memphis commercial appeal uncover sensational details about the army's vast surveillance activities in the nineteen sixties. The army like the FBI considered Martin Luther King potential domestic threat. King began giving speeches linking the antiwar movement to the civil rights are is fighting war in Vietnam and back home to politics, the nation was turning against them in the nineteen sixties. Christopher pile was an army intelligence officer. When king went to Memphis late March early April nineteen sixty eight army intelligence was watching him. William pepper is struck by one detail mentioned in the Memphis article. There was a an alpha one eighty four special forces team in Memphis on the day. And no one knows what they were doing there. Peppers suspicious about Wyan army special forces team would be a Memphis presses the reporters sources for answers. According to offer these sources former army green berets who wished to remain anonymous say there was an army back plot to kill king. He don't control riots with snipers. Snipers are put in place to kill me..

Dr Martin Luther King Lloyd jars Memphis Betty Speights John Lewis United States army Wyan army William pepper Loyd berto John wars Tennessee Verte Barsha Berta Peppers Jim Christopher pile officer
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on The Next Best Thing

The Next Best Thing

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on The Next Best Thing

"He knew as aliases suddenly is able to develop untraceable new identities based on names of Canadian citizens Raiwind never come out with any logical story about how he got the aliases. What's more the men whose names he took match raise general physical description? The key to the alias is not that they looked so much like James already. You wouldn't mistake them. But if you have description for the suspect fleeing crime in Dhaka, king's assassination would have fit these aliases just fine. One Inglis in particular stands out. Eric S got a name Ray uses for nine months before the assassination to Milan, it is a tantalizing clue to a wider conspiracy Ray signed his name Herrick starve ogled, and that look very much like the real goal signature whose middle name was Saint Vincent. And he scrawled it as something that looked like starve. I discovered that Mr. gall was a security cleared employees working for the United States at the Union Carbide plant. I began to suspect that that was a file appropriated by somebody in US intelligence. According to millennium. Not only was raid. Not the lone shooter. He may not have been the shooter at all on the day of the assassination. Dr king's movements were not predictable. Ray did not know when Dr king was gonna emerge from that balcony. But government agents who tracked kings every move would have known. Well, don't I feel like a horse's patupit because that's very that's the very question. I ask. And now here this loon is asking the same thing. I guess we're both Kuku for cocoa puffs. But government agents who tracked kings every move would have known. The intelligence agencies in their surveillance would know precisely that around six o'clock, Dr king was gonna come out in that second floor balcony, and there would be a window of seconds in which a sniper or snipers could operate. Professor millennium believes another indication of official involvement in the murder is the movements of the Memphis police on April third and fourth. The previous time Martin Luther King was a Memphis riots had arrested. That time king. Challenged in the eyes of the nation that he could show the ability to lead, a peaceful March in Memphis and was determined to come back. I am convinced that we can have here and in Washington, a massive nonviolent campaign. That was Martin Luther King in late March of nineteen sixty eight days before he went back to Memphis to lead a March and days before he was murdered this time the police wanted to be ready. There were four tactical units. Composed of three police cruisers each with three officers in each cruiser. They were there to intimidate Dr king's party and to prevent what the Memphis police thought would be a riot emanating from rain motel things, and they were circling within a five block radius of the rain motel. On April fourth the day of the assassination. Memphis, police redeployed the patrol placing them almost half a mile away from the motel. The withdrawal of the tactical. Units is very important step in a successful conspiracy. Because nobody not James array, not the other shooters, not anybody could escape that neighborhood after a loud shot when you head twelve cruisers within a five block area. That's just not true. I'm sorry. But he's a how many twelve losers within a what area could escape that neighborhood. After a loud rifle shot when you head twelve cruisers within a five block area. Why would there have been twelve cruisers within a five block area? I mean, Dr Martin Luther King was a hero civil rights leader. But he wasn't a president. He didn't have secret service detail. But regardless twelve police officers within a five block area. Yeah. That's a lot. But. There are people living in this city. There are people living in these houses, these blocks. I mean to say that so someone couldn't possibly get away. That's just nonsense. Police would later say one of Dr king's associates called off the squad cars, but millennium could not corroborate this claim he insists the evidence indicates that the king assassination was a large coordinated effort by rogue agents within different branches of.

Dr Martin Luther King Memphis James array Ray Inglis Dhaka United States Union Carbide Milan Mr. gall Saint Vincent Washington murder Eric S Professor Herrick official nineteen sixty eight days nine months
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

07:04 min | 2 years ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on WRVA

"R V A Monday afternoon, celebrating Dr Martin Luther King junior day. There's still low. Folks who question? Should we have the day off? Doc, one of Dr king's underlying messages and females. Consistently was that everybody that had the opportunity to get some sort of an education should get it. So I think there's there's very real question. Is it a day to take off from school? Yes. It's been decided we'd take off. Now. The question becomes what do you do all your off? And I do wonder what people do on this day, and there's some places that set up as a quote day of service. Okay. The little little part that I can play in all of this and half of the last couple of years. It's a share with you. This amazing speech. I have a dream. It is one that can resonate with anyone. And it's a speech, by the way that is utilized by political opportunists of all. Varieties on a regular basis because they pick and choose which part of the speech they'd like to address. So we've heard half of it now. I want to move on to clip number three. Realized that freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone. As we walk. We must make the good. We shall always March ahead. We cannot turn back. Now. Those who asking the devotees of civil rights. When will you be satisfied? We can never be satisfied as long as the negro is the victim of the unspeakable Haro police brutality. We can never be satisfied. As long as I bought is heavy with the fatigue of travel cannot gain lodging in the motel. The highways and the hotels of the citizens. We cannot be satisfied as long as the negroes basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto. We can never be satisfied as long as children are stripped and robbed of that dignity by fine stating for whites on. We've been not be satisfied as long as a negro in. Memphis, sippy cannot both anonyna- grow in New York believes he has nothing which. We are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until Justice rolls down like waters and righteousness. Macro mighty screen. I am not unmindful. Some of you have come here. Out of grad trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from our jails sale. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom. It by the of persecution. Staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Tenure work with the pain. Suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi. Back to Alabama. Go back to South Carolina. Go back to Georgia. Go back to Louisiana slums and get told. Knowing that somehow this situation can and will be chain. Not while I in the valley of despair. I say to you. Today. My brand. So even though we face the difficulties. Up today and tomorrow. I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day. This nation will rise up live out the true meaning of its creed. We hold these choose to be self evident that all men are created. So we're getting now into that final portion of the speech. Right. Dr king has taken us on a journey. He really has. In. In the course of twelve minutes thereabouts. He's taken us on a journey. And he has spoken to different people in the United States of America. He is addressed certain groups within the United States of America. And throughout this. He acknowledges that people are different, but people have common interests that people have some of the same concerns. He's not discounted. Anyone? And in fact, just the opposite. He has said to some people who may very well have wanted to discount this group over here because they weren't like this group over there. Wait a minute. That's not what we're doing. Now in the final four minutes or so. I think Dr king provides a message which is at both. Is both inspirational and enlightening. And perhaps perhaps the most important meaningful part of the speech for most of us cut number four. I.

Dr Martin Luther King Suffering United States Mississippi Alabama South Carolina Louisiana New York Memphis America Georgia sippy twelve minutes four minutes one day
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Reverend Dr Martin Luther King junior today. His legacy. What he stood for and welcome to the show, by the way, Paul here. Jordan has the day off she's out snowboarding somewhere out west. Not sure where she is. That's a need to know basis. She I think is where they Hawaii. That's where I prefer to do my snowboarding. Thank you. You'd wanna be man falling elegantly down the slope. But anyway, hopefully, she's safe she's out with the kids and she'll be back tomorrow. Pitcher, she'll have some stories. You think I think she will? I love you know, he had so many great quotes, of course, talking about Dr Martin Luther King. My favorite is our lives begin to end the day. We become silent about things that matter. That one that one has just stuck with me over the years. He had so many great quotes faith is taking the first step. Even when you don't see the whole staircase. We're gonna be talking more about Dr Martin Luther King his life his legacy his fight for civil rights. That's coming up at three twenty. And and interview you don't wanna miss at four ten today. But first the first thing we want to focus on bringing you in front of your TV yesterday afternoon. When this happened quick now breeze..

Dr Martin Luther King Jordan snowboarding Paul Hawaii
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

KROQ 106.7FM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on KROQ 106.7FM

"Dr Martin Luther King are twenty year theme is then. And now, I think that you should give people your website because you have a lot of information that people can get if you didn't if you're driving right now and your next chance to write it down. What's the website? Yes. So you can you can find all the information about the event the vendors of the sponsors all the pieces that we have at SGV in NAACP dot net. So that's SGV in a. C p dot net. There you go. So you guys can go on there. And you know, the company Entercom that owns all the stations that we are on and stuff for so committed to doing stuff in the community. And so I was telling them about it. They're just as excited as I am as far as coming on supporting you guys, so everybody at all the stations say, hey, thank you guys for asking us to be a part of it. Well, we thank you. We appreciate it. And we're glad to have you. We're looking forward to it. And we're honored to have your organization's support us as well. This has been Greg MAC for open line, and I've been talking to TJ Campbell of the San Gabriel valley branch of the ACP. Thank you. Corruption in LA's city hall. The FBI.

Dr Martin Luther King NAACP FBI TJ Campbell San Gabriel valley Entercom LA ACP Greg MAC city hall twenty year
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on In Black America

"Oh. We. Nine. Take. Dr Martin Luther King junior thirty nine at the time of death. He was shot while standing on the back of the Ray motel in Memphis, Tennessee. This has been a tribute to the late Reverend Dr Martin Luther King junior who would have been ninety this week. If you have questions comments suggestions as future in black America programs, Email us at in black America, K U, T dot ORG. Also, let us know what radio station you. Holders. Remember to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter views opinions expressed on this program are not necessarily those of this station or of the university of Texas at Austin previous programs online and K U UT that. Until we have the opportunity again for Texaco producer, Dave. And I'm John Hanson junior. Thank you for joining us today. Please join us again next week. Cd copies of this program are available and may be purchased by writing in black America, CDs K UT radio one university station Austin, Texas, seven eight seven one two that's in black America, CDs K UT radio one university station Austin, Texas, seven eight seven one two. The. This has been a production of K U T radio. What do you want to know about Austin, sorry, T explained project takes your questions about Austin's people places and things and goes the distance to answer them. Subscribe to the explain podcast find it on itunes, Google play or your favorite podcast app or go to eight explained dot org.

Dr Martin Luther King Austin America university of Texas Ray motel Texas Facebook John Hanson Memphis Twitter Tennessee itunes producer Google Dave
"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"dr. martin luther king" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"The night before dr martin luther king was assassinated he gave a speech that speech part of that speech has been turned into song that speech is so worth your time reading it you wanna talk about courage there was there was one line that jumped out at me reading it again over the last couple of days let us develop a kind of dangerous unselfishness let us develop kind of dangerous unselfishness now this is going to sound harsh because nobody likes to hear it about themselves but america is very selfish we all are very selfish right now all of us face book whose face you tube everything is about us we are increasingly inward focused and isolated our kids are on the internet our kids are not looking up or out it's all in we don't know our neighbours we are increasingly turning against church forget church we're isolating ourselves in little teeny communities were even our friends and our our closest friends and our family as being kicked out of that community if they disagree with us technology is pouring gasoline on this information entertainment has become art teacher and our god the more inward focus a person becomes the more susceptible he is to slip into the darkness the heart is deceitful above all things and desperately sick who can understand it when a person is too inward focused and slipping into darkness technology and the media is there with gasoline and the matches everything were talking about right now is selfish it's all about my problems my pain maya means mike 'cause my rights my vengeance now more than ever we need to develop a kind of dangerous unselfishness.

dr martin luther king america