35 Burst results for "Dr. Martin"

22-year-old poet Amanda Gorman delivers stirring inauguration performance

the NewsWorthy

00:36 sec | 4 d ago

22-year-old poet Amanda Gorman delivers stirring inauguration performance

"Have heard about it by now. The words of the youngest inaugural poet in recent. Us history quickly spread around social media after she spoke on stage twenty two year old. Amanda gorman delivered her original poem the hill we climb. During yesterday's inauguration ceremony it was about overcoming obstacles coming together as a nation and taking part in positive change. Gorman told cbs news. She researched speeches. From abraham lincoln. And dr martin luther king as she began writing she told npr. She struggled to finalize the poem until the capital riots. Then she completed it that night. A variety of celebrities including oprah winfrey praised her performance online.

Amanda Gorman Dr Martin Luther King Gorman Cbs News Abraham Lincoln United States NPR Oprah Winfrey
In open letter to Dr. King, Stevie Wonder calls for equality

AP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 6 d ago

In open letter to Dr. King, Stevie Wonder calls for equality

"Singer songwriter Stevie Wonder releases an open letter to Dr Martin Luther King Jr on The holiday honoring the slain civil rights leader in the video, wonder laments the lack of progress against racism. In this 36 years since the holiday became a reality, it makes me physically sick. I am sick of politicians try to find in the easy solution to a 400 year. Problem Wonder once the new administration to form a Truth commission to find solutions and recommendations for

Dr Martin Luther King Jr Stevie Wonder Truth Commission
Dr. Martin Luther King honored in New York City

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:34 min | 6 d ago

Dr. Martin Luther King honored in New York City

"Honor honor the the message message and and spirit spirit of of the the Reverend Reverend Dr Dr Martin Martin Luther Luther King King Jr Jr on on the the Monday Monday closest closest to to his his birthday. birthday. Dr Dr King's King's fight fight for for Equality Equality and and Justice Justice for all continues today. This year. The pandemic forced the cancelations of gatherings for day of service events, but The National Action Network in Harlem. The mayor and governor were among those joining Reverend Al Sharpton for an annual celebration of King's legacy, Mayor de Blasio said. Those who don't believe in equality don't deserve to work for New York City. Let's be clear on this King Day. There's no room for any racist in public service. They need to be gone. That there is no room for any white supremist list in public service or in any uniforms anywhere in America. They need to be fired. Now around the country. King's words are especially resonant right now. Margaret Wong is the president of the Southern Poverty Law Center. And on this MLK Day she reflected on the uprising at the Capitol Less than two weeks ago, they pointed out that hate does not drive out hate. Only love can do that. And it can be very hard to hate. Those toe. Love those who hate you, but it is more important than ever that we understand what drives that hate. Also important to help the poor Martin Luther King led the fight. Against poverty and we need to restore that, and one adds the Biden administration is a start. But we have to commit ourselves to enabling their efforts to be felt and doing what we can in our communities to help one another. I'm surely antler. Wins

Reverend Reverend Dr Dr Martin Dr Dr King Equality Equality And And Just Mayor De Blasio King National Action Network Reverend Al Sharpton Margaret Wong Harlem Southern Poverty Law Center New York City America Biden Administration Martin Luther King
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:00 min | 6 d ago

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his legacy

"Today is Martin Luther King Day a day when we look back on Dr King's commitment to nonviolent civil disobedience to advance civil rights and reflect on his famous 1963 speech delivered here in D, C. I have a dream. A little Children. One day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin. But by the content of their character, I agree. Following last year's death of a black man, George Floyd at the hands of a white police officer and this month's deadly attack on the U. S Capitol by supporters of President Trump include including far right extremists. Is Dr King's dream still alive? Well, joining us now to talk about that Maya King with politico who covers politics, race and campaigns. My It's always good to talk to you. Thank you so much for joining us today. Hi. Thanks for having me. What might Dr King think of the protests going on today? How far have we really come on racial issues as we mark his birthday. I think it's king were alive today he would be able to draw a number of parallels between his time in his experience and activism and what we've seen really over the past 12 months, with massive protests and civil disobedience, calling out Systemic racism and police violence on But of course, the current threat that we face of violence largely led by white supremacist groups, who have felt largely emboldened by a number of Government leaders of these are things that Martin Luther King also warned us against, and said that you know if America really did continue to try to advance on the platform or legacy of racism and racial terror. That that could cause issues for more than just racial minorities. But the broader community that we see across this country and I think that's especially evident, of course, looking at just how tight security is around Wednesday's inauguration.

Martin Luther King George Floyd White Police President Trump Maya King U. America
Many MLK Jr. Day events go virtual this year

Steve and Ted

00:42 sec | Last week

Many MLK Jr. Day events go virtual this year

"Mark the observance of the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. It's federal holiday. Many spend that day in service in their communities. Dr Martin Luther King Jr Day is observed each year on the third Monday in January, and it's also a national day of surface as designated by Congress in 1994. Today celebrates the life and legacy of King who fought for civil rights and racial equality before he was killed in 1968 this year Due to the pandemic, many service opportunities are virtual and the presidential inaugural committee is collaborating with AmeriCorps on volunteer opportunities. AmeriCorps, which is a service network, supported by the federal government lists MLK Day Service events and you can sign up for those at national service dot gov. Tanya J.

Martin Luther King Jr. Dr Martin Luther King Jr Day Presidential Inaugural Committ Congress King Federal Government Tanya J.
"dr. martin" Discussed on Chai With The Pre-Med Guys

Chai With The Pre-Med Guys

04:28 min | 3 weeks ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on Chai With The Pre-Med Guys

"So when you think of how much you have to learn now that's going to be about four times material all in medicine right so instead of polly sty and bio and historical studies. it's now all anatomy physiology of the human body. So i think being able to organize yourself and at least understand how you A similar material as always going to be key and something that i picked up essentially from undergrad. And see i see. That's perfect on dr fan. We wouldn't be like you know Bring on hold on bring on our guests are we just saw. Do like a thorough background search. And everything like that to know more about you and I believe one of the podcast. You did. I think it was like day on it was like life and death And talking to a neurosurgeon and in that podcast you mentioned how different your undergrad career was essentially with in regards to medicine and If you'd like to expand more on that. And i just wanted to ask you that. A lot of people will look at your undergrad rear end. Say that oh that's that's actually very different out you respond to that. You definitely did do your research. I i believe the podcast referring to his surviving. This and back in two thousand eighteen. I think was the very first one I did with frank. Mono i think and And that's true so You know what you're referring to as an undergrad. You know i knew that i wanted to be. I knew i wanted to go to medical school. So your listeners. Who aren't familiar. I wanted to go to medical school when i was in undergrad. But i didn't know the pack my My mother never graduated college. So i came from a single parent home There's my family who's a physician. And i was fairly oblivious to things you know i i made it to college. It seemed grade But i sort of use that opportunity to find myself like most people do in college. I pursued a lot of hobbies. I i played pool. I you know. I had a an ebay business time. I i bought my own car..

dr fan frank ebay
Ossoff, Warnock 'play the race card': Alveda King

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:38 sec | Last month

Ossoff, Warnock 'play the race card': Alveda King

"Sunday nights. Georgia Senate runoff debates The niece of Dr Martin Luther King had some thoughts about the elections Lance Bride has more from the USA Radio News West Coast Bureau. Georgia Senate Race Debates took place Sunday night. Dr Martin Luther King's niece, Alveda King on Fox says Democrats are playing the race card and that's dangerous. John Assad Rafiah Wanna car a debt that teaching fear anger? Stirring up bitterness. It's called playing the race car, so starting up emotions and fear is very dangerous, but giving solutions Ginger Howard and I and our book, We're not color blind. Teach people how to do that from the West

Georgia Senate Dr Martin Luther King Lance Bride West Coast Bureau John Assad Rafiah Alveda King USA FOX Ginger Howard
Interview With Dr Matteo Luzzeri

Physical Activity Researcher

05:53 min | Last month

Interview With Dr Matteo Luzzeri

"In this last part of our discussion. We review the lessons learned from the empirical work as avella's mateos thoughts on future directions. In this gnassinde line of research from the show notes. You will find a link to mattel's research which will help in exploring his work for dr martin. Luther terry completed his doctoral dissertation in the field of sports psychology at florida state university. He's also professional water skier. A coach and has a very popular water skiing. Podcast i hope you enjoy the last part of our discussion. A new already. Obviously done a massive amount of work of in- inputting this research together. But i was wondering if you have looked at The actual content of those findings or kind of that would be interesting to take the actual writing and do more qualitative research and analysis on those writings to more. Understand what what's going on there. Yeah so that's that's step two This was definitely something that i want to to follow up on Hopefully when i when my current job winds down in a couple of months. I'll be able to to dive into that. I have obviously read all the old writings And i have done some quantitative analyses on them so Defending the fact that was stopping the tricon of me of meaning. What i ended up doing was analyzing The the words of the type of words that were used. And i use the a what is called dinning quiz. Sticking quired word count so this is A software essentially dead categorizes richton words a bits of text of any length in categorizes the amount of wards in percentage across the totality of words on some categories. It's It's called the liw. See any something that has been used He's being used quite a beating psychological research. And so what i did. Was i analyzed for the intervention group. Six writing Sessions the six writings and suffering since if the expressive the expressive writing exercise about a negative. Like the most traumatic event in sports would elicit more negative emotion than the one about the positive and uplifting event or for instance if the reflective writings would elicit more innovative processing words than dependent. Back your exercises. So i did this type of analyses of tried to see more of like a manipulation of of sorts. So were might writing exercises actually eliciting what they were supposed to release it and fortunately that seemed to be seemed to be the case But in terms of qualitative work. Even i haven't done anything formerly on the data yet. Okay so that would be something that. At least i am very much looking forward to hearing when you when you had the time to look into that and in terms of your intervention. So you mentioned that it was fairly short if you had all the time and resources in the world would you look to do something. That is a longer timespan or what. What would you do differently. If you had all the time resources you needed Seats you might. You might be surprised by my answer. But i would actually make it shorter That's interesting provided a war to do this. Study again because one of the point that in my defense the mike committee made is that you're already working with athletes who are burnt out. And you made the case that they're burned out that you screen for them You we can. We can argue about the criteria. Used to of course. But i went through the effort of screening and taking those who were hiring burnout so the less the least demanding of intervention the better and despite my intervention. I don't think. I don't think was super demanding. Because the average time that is spent on these activities was twenty minutes so twenty times. Three was two hours total across two weeks. Some murky enslaving took more So i i don't think he was very demanding but if i had to do it again with burn out athletes i would probably do. It even shorter if i were to just try to increase. Presence of meaning in sports in athletes not necessarily burnt out athletes Probably i would either do the same or more but the the gold standard would be to to being person as opposed to online There are that are studies he now during interventions a lot of mindfulness intervention studies showing a lot of benefits from an online intervention compared to a nonintervention certainly in not a lot of differences between an online intervention in in-person intervention. Buddy seems to me therefore topics that are these There so the the manding and somewhat strange to talk about how to write about possibly im- person might. We might see something a little different. Yeah i mean as a qualitative researcher. I

Avella Dr Martin Luther Terry Florida State University Mattel Skiing Mike Committee Burnout
Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:16 min | 3 months ago

Politicians, Constance Baker Motley

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia Britannica. Today's politicians but most of her life fighting for civil rights, she put her life at risk to change the course of American history, but she's often left out of history books. Let's talk about Constance Baker Motley. Constance Baker Motley was born on September fourteenth nineteen, forty one in new haven connecticut she was one of twelve children born to working class immigrant parents from the West indies. Constance. Was a bright child who grew up attending integrated schools and quickly fell in love with reading. She didn't learn much about black history in school. But what she did learn about civil rights leaders inspired her she decided she wanted to become a lawyer, but constance couldn't afford higher education. She took a job as a maid for a while before moving on to work for the National Youth Administration an organization focused on providing work an educational opportunities for young adults. Constance was giving a speech at a local community center one evening when her oratory skills impressed a wealthy white philanthropist. He, offered to pay for constants college tuition. So in nineteen, forty, one constance began attending college at Fisk University in Nashville. She later wrote that the train ride down to Tennessee was the first time she experienced overt racism and Jim Crow laws after being forced to ride in a broken down segregated train car, it was a perspective changing moment for constance two years into her attendance at Fisk Constance transferred to New York University and finished her bachelor's degree in economics. Then in nineteen, forty, four constance became the first black woman to be accepted to Columbia law school. After graduating from Columbia in nineteen, forty, six constants worked for the NWC peas legal staff under Thurgood. Marshall who later became a court justice over the course of her work at the N. double ACP constance assisted with almost sixty cases that ended up reaching the Supreme Court. She also personally argued ten supreme court cases and one nine. Constance is work integrated multiple southern state universities putting her toe-to-toe with racist governors determined to bar black students from schools. She also helped protect the right to peaceful protests and opened up parks for. Black. Americans. She did all that despite the sexism and racism personally experienced during her legal career. Some judges actually turned their backs on her and refused to hear her speak. But Constance didn't let others biopsies bar her from success. Her work made her a key player in the civil rights movement and she even occasionally represented Dr. Martin? Luther. King Junior. Constance was constantly in danger when she was working in the south racists threatened her life and the lives of other prominent figures in the black community constance was barred from staying in hotels. So she had to stay with local activists, but even that didn't make her feel completely safe her friend Mississippi civil rights leader Medgar. Evers. was murdered his own driveway. So in nineteen, sixty, five constance left her work in the south and moved back to New York City. Shortly thereafter, she became the first black woman to serve in the New York State Senate. She was also elected president of the borough of Manhattan which made her the first woman in that role. During her time as a politician constance focused on raising up under served communities in the city like Harlem and East Harlem in nineteen sixty, six president Lyndon Johnson appointed constance to the US. District Court in the southern district

Constance Baker Motley Fisk Constance Constance District Court Supreme Court Jenny Kaplan Wonder Media Network New York State Senate Fisk University Columbia Law School New York City West Indies New York University National Youth Administration Connecticut Nashville Mississippi Manhattan Lyndon Johnson
Politician, Cardiss Collins

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:40 min | 3 months ago

Politician, Cardiss Collins

"Today's politician was one of the longest serving women of color in the US Congress. She spent several of her over two decades of service being the only black woman in the chamber. Let's talk about Cardis Collins. CARDIS. Robertson. Was Born on September twenty fourth nineteen thirty one in Saint Louis Missouri. When cardis turned ten, her family moved to Detroit where she attended high school. After graduation, cardis moved to Chicago to live with her grandmother and find a job. She worked in a mattress factory before joining the Illinois Department of Labor as a stenographer. At the same time, she also studied accounting at Northwestern University. In. Nineteen fifty eight Cardis Mary George W Collins. The couple had a son Kevin the following year. After graduating from college in Nineteen, Sixty, seven, Cardis was promoted to secretary then became an accountant and auditor for the Illinois Department of Revenue. All the while she supported her husband's campaigns, for Alderman, committee men and US representative. Cardis also gained her first direct political experience as Committee Woman of the Twenty Fourth Ward Democratic Organization. In nineteen seventy George won seat in the US House representing the predominantly African American west side of Chicago. He was elected following the death of his predecessor. He served two terms and was particularly passionate about improving the lives of black people serving in the military. Shortly, after winning election to serve another term George died in a plane crash. Carts was devastated by the loss of her husband. Through her grief. She announced her candidacy to fill her husband's congressional seat. She was supported by the city mayor and won the nomination with eighty four percent of the vote. She then won the election on June Fifth Nineteen, seventy-three with ninety, two percent of the vote that made Cardis the first black woman to represent Illinois in Congress. Transition into her new congressional role wasn't easy. She was politically inexperienced and wasn't confident enough to voice all of her opinions right away. She relied on her colleagues to show her the ropes and she later said once people learned I had something to say I gained confidence. Hardest is main goal is a representative was to improve life for the on Chicago's West Side. Along with other low income communities and people of color across the country. She always kept the well being of her constituents as her main focus. Spending eight days a month in her district to remain accessible. Because of the attention, she paid her voters she went back her seat comfortable margins for two straight decades. Throughout her tenure, she would serve on several committees including the influential committee on Energy and Commerce. She started serving on the committee on government operations. She participated in two different subcommittees later, working to tighten regulations on the transportation of toxic materials and improve air travel safety. In nineteen seventy nine. Cardis was elected president of the Congressional Black Caucus. She was only the second woman to earn this honor. She openly criticized President Jimmy Carter's record on civil rights, as well as his failure to make Dr Martin Luther King Junior's birthday a national holiday. Cards spent much of her time in Congress defending affirmative action programs and ensuring equal funding and attention to women and people of Color. Curtis staunchly advocated Breast Cancer Awareness. In nineteen ninety, she wrote a law expanding Medicare coverage for elderly and disabled women to receive. Mammograms. She also designated October as national breast cancer awareness month. In nineteen ninety-seven after twelve consecutive terms cardis decided not to run for re election she returned to Chicago and later decided to move to Alexandria Virginia. She passed away on February third twenty thirteen. She was eighty one years old. Cars Collins overcame grief and hesitation to speak up and make a positive difference for people in her district and across the country.

Cardis Mary George W Collins Chicago Congress Illinois Department Of Labor Congressional Black Caucus Committee Woman Representative Robertson United States Twenty Fourth Ward Democratic Illinois Department Of Revenue Northwestern University Us House Saint Louis Missouri Detroit Illinois Kevin Breast Cancer Awareness Cardis Energy And Commerce
Miami-Dade Public Schools Officials Discuss Reopening Safety

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:42 sec | 4 months ago

Miami-Dade Public Schools Officials Discuss Reopening Safety

"Holding a special meeting this morning discussing specifics about reopening schools. Quote unquote safely, board member, Dr Martin Karp says. It's very emotional in a difficult decision, but every opinion, he says, will be taken into consideration all of the things that not only the medical experts have said At all of the information that was provided by district and, of course, input from our stakeholders, whether they be students, teachers, parents. He says Miami Dade is a school district of choice, meaning that no student or teacher will be forced to return and can finish the school year. Online Superintendent Alberto Carvalho is recommending October 5th start date. Broward School Reopening workshop set for tomorrow.

Dr Martin Karp Alberto Carvalho Broward School Miami Dade Superintendent
Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:19 min | 4 months ago

Civil Rights Activist, Patricia Stephens Due

"Hello from Wonder Media Network I'm Jenny Kaplan, and this is encyclopedia will Manica. All month we're talking about activists. Women who stood up against injustice and four a better world. Today we're talking about an American civil rights activist whose work began as a student and extended throughout her life and beyond. She was one of the leaders of the sit in and Jalen movements continuing to fight for a more just society even when faced with serious harm. According to The New York Times her FBI file was over four hundred pages long. Let's talk about Patricia Stevens do. Patricia Gloria Stevens was born on December ninth nineteen, thirty, nine fifteen months after her sister Priscilla who would go on to be partner in many organizing efforts. Patricia was the second of three kids born to Lottie Mae Powell Stevens, and Horace Walter Stevens. The Stevens family lived in Belgrade Florida for most Patricia Youth. By the time she was thirteen years old Patricia was very aware of the discrimination she faced for being black and was ready to protest. She and her sister refused to go to the designated colored window at their local dairy queen. Instead, they stood in line for the window marked whites only. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, Eighty, seven Patricia started school at Florida Am University. Two years later in Nineteen fifty-nine Patricia and Priscila attended a workshop put on by the Congress of racial equality or core on nonviolent civil disobedience. Patricia then started a local chapter of the organization in order to continue the work, she tried to tackle it just thirteen years old integration. The following year on February. Twentieth Nineteen Sixty Patricia, her sister, and some other students sat down at a whites only lunch counter at a Woolworth Tallahassee and refused to get up until they were served. Nineteen days earlier, four guys sat down at a similar lunch counter in Greensboro North Carolina officially kicking off. Since movement across the South Patricia and ten of her peers were arrested rather than paying three hundred dollar Fine Patricia and. Out Forty nine days in jail. Their determination to serve their time as a statement became a norm when others were arrested and charged on fairly. Patricia leadership and courage caught the attention of people around the country support of the cause including Jackie Robinson Eleanor Roosevelt Harry Belafonte, and James. Baldwin. Dr Martin. Luther King. Junior. Sent the sisters telegram that said. Going to jail for a righteous cause as a badge of honor and a symbol of dignity. After she was finally released, Patricia continued the fight to change her city and country. One of her fellow activists was a man named John D do junior. He was law school at Florida Am University. The two got married in nineteen, sixty three and would go on to have three children together for their honeymoon Patricia and John went to the march on Washington and heard Dr King's I have a dream speech. The following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, Patricia took on a new role in corps. She served as field secretary for a voter education and Registration Project in North Florida under her leadership. program. More. Voters than any other regional program in the south. Patricia also worked to improve the lives of workers, the poor and other underserved populations in the US. But her activism took a physical toll on her. After being hit in the face by a can of tear gas, Patricia is were injured and she was forced to wear dark glasses for the rest of her life in nineteen sixty, seven, ten years after she enrolled. Patricia graduated from Florida Am. University it took her all of a decade to get her degree because she spent periods of time traveling around the US to rally energy behind the civil rights movement. She was also suspended multiple times by the

Patricia Patricia Gloria Stevens South Patricia Patricia Youth Florida Am University Florida Lottie Mae Powell Stevens Horace Walter Stevens Luther King Harry Belafonte Stevens Jalen Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan United States FBI Woolworth Greensboro John D
The March ON Washington, 57 Years Later

20/20

06:18 min | 5 months ago

The March ON Washington, 57 Years Later

"Hello I'm Deborah Roberts those images from today an echo of something fifty seven years ago when a quarter of a million people I descended on the nation's capital protesting for jobs and freedom. On today's anniversary of Dr Martin Luther. King Junior's I have a dream speech we at twenty twenty or proud to present the march a documentary directed by Jonah Comfort and narrated by Denzel Washington originally made in twenty thirteen to commemorate the Marches Fiftieth Anniversary. Some of those voices sadly are now gone, but their legacy lives on. I have had to tell my children about the segregates what it means. Seven year old daughter she wanted to go from town. And we found it necessary to explain to That she couldn't go to fun town because she was colored. To attempt to explain a system like unjust and. Segregation. Six year old child is very difficult thing. In nineteen sixty three. The Movement for civil rights came to the most segregated city in the American. South. Birmingham Alabama. All. Resistant to the gration. Thoroughly, segregated. City the United States. had. More on saw on. WILL HOMES ENSURE A. United. States. Many other southern city. Okay. Birmingham is bombing him. They have quarries and conducting the quarry business you used dynamite. So there are a lot of local people who are expert in Isa Dynamic. Teenage. Board riding a bicycle had been knocked off the bike and castrated. Young couple had gone to the City Hall to get a wedding license. Came around the corner. And Brush shoulders with Birmingham policeman and he pulled out his pistol and pistol whipped the more to the ground. It was a horrible heinous place. The campaign was to be led by the organisation's Ben Thirty four year old leader. The Reverend Dr Martin Luther King Junior. WHO HEARD PEOPLE? who except in dusted oppression and second-class citizenship. in an attempt waiting go the Paul Pompidou. The time all we ripe to do right. Dr King was the voice of Civil Rights from the bus boycott on but by the end of nineteen, sixty, two, he recognized. That the civil rights movement. was. Losing what he called its window and history. The. South was still segregated and he said we need to take more of a risk. We need to go for broke I need to go for broke. I think he felt that. We have to be willing to give our lives to put an end to segregation. If we do. Then segregation will end even if we die. That was the reason he chose. Birmingham. For the victory won some even have to face physical death. We must come to see the now some things. So eternally true that they're worth dying for, and if a man has not discovered something that he will die for he fit live. In January of Nineteen, sixty three. One man was determined to stop kings desegregation message from spreading any further. Birmingham's police chief Eugene. Bull Connor. Negro is off the attempted takeover of our country the lazy. The beat nate, the ignorant and buy some misguided religious and bleeding ought. Do, you think you can keep coming in the present situation of segregation I may not be able to do it, but I'll die trying. Overcoming Bull Connor segregationists zeal not to mention his jails would take something special. And in the winter of sixty, three king would find out just how special that effort needed to be. Spent all of January February and March nineteen sixty three training people to accept nonviolence to go down into marches and be willing to go into bull connor's jails. But. Conner's jails were so fearsome that no matter how much they exhorted people no matter how many freedom songs they sang, how many prayers they prayed, how much fervor there was in the meetings, people wouldn't show up to risk going into those jails.

Birmingham Bull Connor Dr Martin Luther Dr King Deborah Roberts Negro Denzel Washington Isa Dynamic Twenty Twenty Jonah Comfort City Hall Alabama Paul Pompidou United States. Ben Thirty Conner Nate Bleeding
March On Washington Demands Racial Equality

Wealth Creator Radio

00:13 sec | 5 months ago

March On Washington Demands Racial Equality

"Some 57 years after Dr Martin Luther King Jr is I have a dream speech, and thousands turned out yesterday in Washington, D C to commemorate the historic address. People travelled from across the country take part in that rally.

Dr Martin Luther King Jr Washington
Alveda King says of MLK's iconic speech, 57 years later: 'We still have a dream'

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:47 sec | 5 months ago

Alveda King says of MLK's iconic speech, 57 years later: 'We still have a dream'

"Capital Friday. 57. Years after Dr Martin Luther King Jr delivered his I have a dream speech will fill my father's dream. 12 year old Yolanda Renee King joined thousands of demonstrators in the nation's capital exactly 57 years after her grandfather, Dr Martin Luther King Jr delivered his iconic I have a dream speech generation that this mantle systemic racism. What's it like the 1963 march on Washington? Friday's demonstration was Also held up the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. It comes during a summer of reckoning on race and police violence following the deaths of George Floyd in May and this week shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin. CBS's Dentally brand Caltrans work on the

Dr Martin Luther King Jr Yolanda Renee King George Floyd Lincoln Memorial Caltrans Jacob Blake Kenosha Wisconsin CBS Washington Dentally
March on Washington: Civil rights leaders, families of Black victims rally against police violence

KCBS Radio Weekend News

02:34 min | 5 months ago

March on Washington: Civil rights leaders, families of Black victims rally against police violence

"Thousands showed up at the National Mall for the commitment march. Get your knee off our necks. This on the 57th anniversary of the 1963 march on Washington for jobs and Freedom, where Dr Martin Luther King Jr gave his powerful I have a dream speech. I have a dream. My four little Children. One day live in a nation. Robbie will not be judged by the color of skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream. Among the speakers Friday. Eric Garner Jr. Son of the man who died in an illegal police choke hold in 2014 in New York City. I can't breathe. I can't breathe. It's been six years since my father words became our words. You have to make a change. I'm challenging the young people to go out and vote. It's possible for change. You just have to put in the work. CBS's Debra Al Faran has more. We've been too long, too much to bear. Just days after another police shooting of a black man, civil rights advocates call for comprehensive police reform and racial equality. And to say once and for all. Get your knee off our necks and do it. Martin Luther King, the third addressed the crowd. We must come together and join with the Black lives movement. To raise our voices and say Enough is enough. Reverend Al Sharpton also spoke. If we've gotta march every day if we got a vote every day. We will get your knee off our pick your people safe and helpful during the pandemic. Everyone is required to wear a face mask and also organizer's are fine to keep everyone socially is also to be a part of something like this, really. Family members of men and women killed by law enforcement officers were among the speakers. I wish dogs were the seed is right now. That's what marks and four So much for George. Briana. Or mine. What cycle? And after the speeches concluded, the crowd marched to the Martin Luther King Junior Memorial. Debra Al Pharaon. CBS

Dr Martin Luther King Jr Martin Luther King Junior Memo CBS Debra Al Faran Debra Al Pharaon Reverend Al Sharpton Eric Garner Jr Briana National Mall New York City Washington Robbie
Thousands gather at March on Washington commemorations

Markley and Van Camp

00:44 sec | 5 months ago

Thousands gather at March on Washington commemorations

"Morse, we must answer the call of institutional racism. Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee among the speakers at today's march on the National Mall. It comes On the 57th anniversary of the march, led by Martin Luther King Jr The anniversary comes amid a summer of nationwide protests and racial unrest following the death of George Floyd. It also comes amid protests after the police involved shooting of Jacob Blake, who was shot multiple times in the back. George Floyd died after a police officer pinned him to the ground by his neck. And the March on Washington today has been named by organizer's as Commitment March. Get your knee off our necks. Speeches today or at the Lincoln Memorial site of Dr Martin Luther King Jr is I have a dream speech and just blocks away from a memorial in King's

Dr Martin Luther King Jr George Floyd Congresswoman Sheila Jackson L Lincoln Memorial Jacob Blake National Mall Morse Washington Officer
How Does Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Exercise Work?

BrainStuff

05:49 min | 5 months ago

How Does Jane Elliott's Blue Eyes/Brown Exercise Work?

"The past fifty, two years teacher and diversity trainer Jane Elliott has been stirring up trouble on the subject of racism. It can still be uncomfortable squirm in your seat stare at your shoes uncomfortable when she subject someone to the very same exercise she I unleashed on third graders more than half a century ago designed to expose racist thinking. Something, her method can get downright mean but again, the subject is racism, it should be troubling. Elliott came to prominence when the day after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Junior in nineteen, sixty, eight, sheep herself a white woman took her classroom of all white third graders in. Riceville Iowa and decided to teach them what it was like to face discrimination. She separated the kids into two groups those with Brown eyes and those with blue and proceeded to proclaim the. Brown. Is these superior group she allowed the group extra privileges more time recess seats at the front of the room they were told they were cleaner smarter more talented. How children reacted to this newfound pecking order was startling. The Brown eyed group immediately began to wield their dominance. The blue is almost immediately slipped into the role of subordinates. Anger flared disputes popped up. After switching roles a few days later, which gave both sides of the classroom taste of being in the lesser group the exercise ended. Many parents complained after reading about what had happened in Elliott's classroom through student essays printed in the local paper. A month or so later, Johnny Carson invited Elliott to appear on his late night talk show she became a national story. Many praised efforts at her students is but not everybody a two, thousand five storied Sonian magazine reported hundreds, viewers, wrote letters, saying Elliott's work appalled them how dare you try this cruel experiment out on white children? One said black children grow up accustomed to such behavior but white children, there's no way they could possibly understand it. It's cruel to white children and will cause them great psychological damage. Elliott spoke with us for the article that this episode is based on from her home in Iowa. She said, you think that's traumatizing try living that way for a lifetime. Elliott taught for years before she decided to take her anti-racism lesson out of the classroom and Corporate America. She's also led the exercise for the US Department of Education and other governmental groups. She's appeared before numerous church and school assemblies she was on. Oprah Winfrey's TV show several times in June of twenty twenty. She appeared on the tonight show starring Jimmy Fallon. She often faces uncomfortable and sometimes angry reactions but her goal as it has been for the past fifty two years is education. She says, it's the best weapon against racism. But good education about racism and race is hard to find. Elliott said, that's because the educators believe the same thing that they were taught and they were taught the same thing I was, which is that there are three or four different races and you can tell what a man's intelligence is by the color of his skin or the shape of his head. You can't lead people out of ignorance if you're still teaching the Columbus discovered America and we came here to civilize these savages. Will need to teach the three RS of rights respect responsibility if teachers would respect the rights of those students to learn the truth and be held responsible for seeing that they present them with the truth we could kill racism in two generations is not a doubt in my mind that could be done. Elliott at eighty seven years. Old has seen. America, grapple with racism all her life. She's marked major mile posts in the struggle over the past fifty years or so the civil rights movement and the assassination of doctor king in the sixties, the race riots in Miami's Liberty City in nineteen eighty and in Los. Angeles after the Rodney King beating in nineteen ninety, two, the protests in Ferguson. Missouri and twenty fourteen after the killing of Michael Brown and in Baltimore Maryland in two thousand fifteen after that of Freddie Gray and in Charleston south. Carolina. That same year after a church massacre. There are many others. But the problem she has been relentlessly attacking Elliott says, goes far beyond the occasional race-based. Clara. For people of Color in the United States facing racism is an everyday fight every minute of every day. Elliot said. It's only been going on with me for fifty two years. I know black women who have been doing this for eighty nine years and their mothers did and their grandmothers dead and their great is dead and their daughters and their granddaughters and their great granddaughters are going to have to do. It must be get off our polyunsaturated fatty acids and do something about this. I get paid to talk about it. They aren't even allowed to talk about it. One of the biggest hurdles in educating people about racism in the United States Elliott says is that most everyone knows it exists and knows that it's harmful but few are motivated to change it. She stood in front of. and asked who among the white people in the room would want to switch places with a black person no one ever volunteers. She cautions that recognizing the problem is only the first step but Elliott is nothing if not persistent, she says, she'll continue to educate for the next fifty years. She'll push her mantra of one race the science behind the simple words it's clear. According to the National Human Genome Research Institute your genome, the bodies blueprint that contains all of your DNA is ninety, nine point nine percent the same as every human around you. And she says, she will urge people to get out and vote November no hope of electing leaders who will attack racism as she has had on.

Jane Elliott Michael Brown Iowa United States America Dr. Martin Luther National Human Genome Research Us Department Of Education Oprah Winfrey Jimmy Fallon Johnny Carson Sonian Magazine Twenty Twenty Corporate America Missouri Elliot Rodney King Clara
"dr. martin" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

The Stem Cell Podcast

04:13 min | 6 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

"C fifty seven black genetics and of one to incorporate in a lot of mass genetic diversity into what it does and thereby the already strong evidence coming from our lab and from others a not my lab but the jackson-lee other labs that shows that by using mouse genetic diversity brive at better in vivo models of human conditions and so that's another thing we're very excited about and i think that you know it's it's it's very shortsighted indeed to to assume that we're going to learn everything we need no by look so culture uncles or organoids models powerful though they may be well certainly. There's a lot left to be to be done when it comes to the basic biology of stem cell pluripotency. And perhaps some of these models are going to help us better understand that as well and so thank you so much for joining us here today. Dr pera and before we let you go. We're going to ask you a couple of science peripheral questions to kind of help. Our audience gets no you a little bit better so starting off. What non science book are you reading that you've read. That is really great and that you wanna share with our listeners. So just recently. I read a book called killing comandante. Tori by haruki murakami the great japanese novelist and i just love his work. He puts or very ordinary people in ordinary situations and suddenly. They're going down very very strange pathways and it's fascinating. There's a lot of philosophy in it great storyteller and on top of that. He's fascinated with cats and jazz. You're not the. I guess who's recommended that particular author so I guess great minds are total maniac. Insane scientists think. Oh like it depends on how you classify There the next one last. We love this. I think you know rare that a science is willing to put himself out there. But you know you can do whatever you want at this point in your career. Tell us what was your greatest science blunder. Okay well that that's an embarrassing. What i would say i say. This quite seriously was a group leader at the university of oxford in the mid ninety s Being relatively young and foolish. I build up. A scientific portfolio that consisted solely of high risk high payoff projects with binary outcomes binary. Meaning i the you get the answer and is fantastic. Or you don't and you have nothing and those two projects. The first one was trying to purify growth factor that did for human cells. What lift does for the mouse. We had human terror carcinomas that were feeder dependent. This factor substituted for the second project was trying to isolate human pluripotent stem cells from either the blast assist or fetal germ cells within the timeframe of our grant there. We failed at both and what he told me was in. It's probably good advice for young people. Definitely take these projects on but make sure they're not the only thing in your portfolio Wow that's a bit is in there. Thank you for sharing for simeon. Now reframe every single project. I thought make sure i don't have binary outcomes except a few a few. That are pretty. You know straightforward. Yes you got. You gotta run the shop right. But you're no stranger to risk. And i think you're an inspiration are listen to someone who's it's nice to know that you've taken big risk because you know some of your wrists have paid off and In a careful way. So i've always admired you as a scientist in the mount alone. Thank you so much for sharing those insights with us today. Dr pair will hope to.

Dr pera haruki murakami jackson lee Tori university of oxford simeon Dr pair
"dr. martin" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

The Stem Cell Podcast

02:03 min | 6 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

"You know. The first bone marrow transplant the defers bone marrow. Transplants in mammals performed at jackson lab so arguably this is the fertile ground from which the entire stem cell field has grown But you know like a ruined said. It's also the world source for more than eight thousand strains of genetically define mice right so you just answered how they're trying to incorporate the disease understanding disease in humans and beecher mouse in vivo genetics. All this But also impart you think that your migration there someone who has a strong emphasis in human embryonic stem cells from human pluripotent stem cells. Either institutionally jackson or more broadly in the scientific community is part of an expansion kind of beyond our transcending mice as the preeminent model for addressing human disease. And i say this because at the isis cr as well as i that we're getting into all these compounds assembly organoids models where it seems like you know it's no longer. There's a lot of benefits to looking at it. There's in the physiological context of a living organism. but it seems like we're addressing questions that were beyond imagination even a few years ago. So i think the real future laze in lies in exploiting both and there's no question but that the in vitro models and and i've been an advocate of that from day one. I always saw that. One of the biggest. Contributions of blurring bucknell stem cells would not be too transplantation medicine but in their uses research tools. For all of the things that we're doing now that said. And i've been a proponent of that approach entire career i do recognize as i think most people do that powerful though these models will be they will never completely and intact organism and so What what the jackson particularly trying to do is to move away from the use of one strain..

jackson
"dr. martin" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

The Stem Cell Podcast

03:58 min | 6 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

"Thought it would be a good idea if i did so so we try and go out of our way when we see an exciting reprint two to draw attention to it so i think these things are really valuable and i think they just helped to heighten awareness of what's going on in a very rapidly changing fields so we keep an eye on all that stuff and we try and keep up with it though i have to say it is challenging certainly challenging. But let's let's help dr parag at his twitter followers up. Its artan para jacks for all of you. Twitter's there and shifting gears a little bit dr perez at the jackson laboratories which is evidenced by your twitter. Handle and the jackson labs for most american. Biologists is known as a place where their mouth strains come from right. But it's way way more than that. It has such a storied history when it comes to human biomedical research in genetics. And actually i. Was there on vacation in bar. Harbor maine with my wife a couple of years ago and i made sure that we actually stopped by jackson. Labs just to kind of soak in the ara. And also. Because i'm a huge nerd who visits laboratories -cation. So you haven't been at the jackson labs for too long but what drew you there. And what makes it such a special place scientifically in your eyes. So that the particular reason i came to the jackson lab was a few years ago when i was working at melbourne university. A number of were talking about an initiative around traumatic brain injury so speaking to lot of neurologist neurosurgeons neuroscience is to tell you ration- if you look at to patients similar age similar health status similar brain lesion often you see that one obtains achieves the better functional recovery than the other and when i asked the courts about this they said well we don't really know much about it but we're very very interested in it because we're beginning to appreciate how recovery varies in how important that is the patient outcome so i got the idea. Well maybe i could use stem cell dish to model some of those recovery processes and unfinished and some of the genetics behind it. But i also cried to me that really there was only so far you could go without. You'd need to go to whole animal models. And that's whereafter conversations with nadia rosenthal. Who became. The scientific. Director of jackson was then one of my colleagues down in melbourne. I decided to move the lab appear and have a go at looking into that precisely. So we're using a combination of in vitro human functional genetic genetics along with mouse embryo stem cells. Which i would say greatly underrated source now those in combination and then through moving through to the in vivo situations so that's general idea of what do here the jack sets the. Jags now has a real emphasis on using mouse models to understand human disease to make the crossover between human genomics and mass genomics to build better models and There are also a taken a big push to exploit cellular resources in vitro resources as well. So it's kind of a great situation so this may be a little bit redundant here because you did a good job at answering that back question to completion but it goes back to this idea of the evolving role of the mouse. He said that malcolm brown stem cells are vastly underrated as a resource. So i think that's part of what you're getting to answer this question just to circle back..

dr parag dr perez jackson laboratories twitter jackson labs melbourne university jackson brain lesion nadia rosenthal Harbor maine drew melbourne malcolm brown
"dr. martin" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

The Stem Cell Podcast

05:01 min | 6 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

"Do you think we're ready for prime time. What sets intense. That do you think. I mean it's been twenty years now over twenty years and i think that a lot of people predicted Near -cations and i think now we're suddenly really on the precipice of it but is it. I mean maybe there was that same expectation. Ten years fizzle. Do you think that we're actually now really on the cusp or do you think that we need to really Stall our enthusiasm and take care in. The vein of minority sites. Conservative view is dealing with assault type. That has some profound ethical issues associated with it in terms of an location to.

"dr. martin" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

The Stem Cell Podcast

02:24 min | 6 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

"I have is pretty. Do you think we'll ever actually be able to isolate in. Maintain these so-called toady potent stem cells. And what obstacles do we have to overcome before we can make that happen. That's really the kind of sixty four thousand dollar question in the field. At the moment can we stabilize toady. Potency and there have been some very strong efforts. I'm sure most people will be aware of. But i don't think Anyone has nailed it just yet and the question is Mammalian element at this stage of the blast is clearly regulated. The cells can two different signals to do different things. It just depends on whether that very early state is something that can respond to external signals that will ultimately amplified and keep it in one place. And i'm a little. i'm. I'm a little bit agnostic about that. I'm not sure whether that's possible or not. Certainly people will. I suppose continued to screen a lot of conditions and perhaps small molecules etc to see using appropriate reporters to see if this state can be captured. But we have to remember that there may be a lot of synthetic states that can be captured. That may be a little bit different to. What's real. And i think janet ross point was really to say what we have to have pretty tough criteria to divine such sal and and let's be clear about what those criteria are so yeah just stay on the note of todi potency minority site to receive the momentum award at this year's i assess cr much desert in in my view is i think he deserves a lot of the credit for making germ cell derivation a reality from themselves. Something i think many assumed. At least i can speak for myself. I assumed it'd be on par with the challenge of amount of poetic stem cell generation. Which were still not quite there yet. Although exciting news at this year's meeting in that regard but minori was very cautious in his assessment of the clinical translation of that technology specifically and..

janet ross minori
"dr. martin" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

The Stem Cell Podcast

04:28 min | 6 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on The Stem Cell Podcast

"The twenty twenty interviews. We have with us. Dr martin para whose principal investigator at the jackson laboratories para two main areas of research using pluripotent stem cells. They look at extrinsic factors that regulate pluripotency lineage specification during early human development also interest genetic factors that influence regeneration repair in the central nervous system. Dr pera thank you very much for joining us today. Thank you so we'll get right into dr pera. Both dalen i attended your is cr. Talk discussing your recent paper which is focusing on a subset of human pluripotent stem cells with a high capacity for self renewal. And this is something. That's become a bit of a hot topic in our field. The idea that a even theoretically homogeneous population of cells. There's more homogeneity heterogeneity than we thought right so if all of our pluripotent stem cell cultures. Have these high self renewal capacity cells as a subset. The natural next question is how can we harness them to actually improve stability in differentiation potential over cultures. So tell us a little bit more about these special cells in our in our cell cultures. Sure we model got interested in heterogeneity and stem cells. Some years ago and over the years we've tried to dissect this using a range of different approaches. Biological lasts as matab. Lomax transcript dome makes you happy. Genetic approaches and it's clear that the subset of self renewing cells in human pluripotent stem cell cultures is a minority with some very special properties and in latest. Work we try to understand where that population mapped In terms of Primate embryonic development and it turns out it's closest to an early early post implantation state but as i say the population is minority. And so what we're trying to do now is to explore whether we can stabilize that state more because what you have at. The moment is a very dynamic situation where cells are beginning to be lineage prime beginning to head down a pathway towards differentiation..

Dr martin para jackson laboratories para Dr pera dr pera dalen Lomax
John Lewis, Towering Civil Rights Icon, Memorialized At Atlanta

KYW 24 Hour News

01:15 min | 6 months ago

John Lewis, Towering Civil Rights Icon, Memorialized At Atlanta

"The sound in Atlanta as masked Mourners air filing into a church where a funeral service for the legendary civil rights fighter and longtime congressman John Lewis is being held ahead of his burial. A winnable use. Mike Doherty has a preview. For half a century, John Lewis dedicated his life to civil rights and civil service. President Obama will deliver his eulogy at Ebenezer Baptist Church. That's the same church where Dr Martin Luther King Jr used to deliver sermons. Former presidents George Bush and Bill Clinton are expected to attend the services Well, President Donald Trump says he will not go Georgia governor Brian Kemp says no matter where you go, everybody knows the name of John Lewis and Mohr importantly, They know his record of standing up. Speaking out and shaking up the status quo. Lewis made a name for himself by getting into what he calls good trouble. Atlanta Mayor Keisha Bottoms says he laid the groundwork for her and others and she will carry on his legacy and so governor when the good trouble continues to know that it is with the blessings of Congressman Lewis Lewis is the first black lawmaker toe lie in state at at the the Capitol Capitol Rotunda Rotunda in in Washington, Washington, D D C. C.

John Lewis Congressman Lewis Lewis Capitol Capitol Rotunda Rotund Atlanta Dr Martin Luther King Jr President Donald Trump Congressman Ebenezer Baptist Church Keisha Bottoms Mike Doherty President Trump Brian Kemp Washington Barack Obama George Bush Bill Clinton Mohr Georgia
"dr. martin" Discussed on Analysis of Murder by Dr. Phil

Analysis of Murder by Dr. Phil

09:45 min | 9 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on Analysis of Murder by Dr. Phil

"An issue that will last and create problems for them potentially for the rest of their lives now. I've spoken with many fractured families. Where a spouse has passed. I've been doing this a long time. It's monumentally important. That the parent takes their time if they move on and introduce a new romantic interest and they also take the feelings of the children into consideration. Do they need to get the child's permission? Do they let the children set the agenda? No but there is such thing as human decency there is such thing as taste and decorum and I think having that replacement at the mother's funeral and then having her move into the house violates every moray every foe kway every expectancy and less. You've been raised by wolves he has absolutely no respect for anybody's thoughts feelings or wishes except his own. Alexis alleges that it wasn't long after Gypsy moved in that she made it clear she didn't have much interest in cooking cleaning or caring for younger children. Nanny just wasn't on her mind. Any kind of definition of nanny was not what she thought she should be expected to do. She had allegedly gotten what she wanted and now she was his sole focus. She was living with him and she certainly didn't look at it as being the hired help you move in nine days after he buries this woman in to her house rights. Like why Martin and his family wearing indeed chaos and my background is nursing. I thought I can help. She'll nine days nine days. After they've buried this woman she moves in and tensions. Continue to build between Martin and his daughters. Anyone could see that. They say that whenever they confronted him about their New Nanny. Martin would just become irate and then flip it around on them and say that. Gypsy was a guest in their home. Wait a minute I thought he was employee but no no no. He says she is a guest in their home. They needed a show her respect. You heard Gypsy tell me. She moved in in part because of her nursing background Martin claimed have a myriad of health issues ranging from multiple sclerosis to cancer in his toe. The story he pedal is at he needed gypsy. They're not only to tend to his children but also to help him with his medical problems. Yeah you remember. He's a doctor but he needed her to help him with his toe it might sound laughable but he was very vocal about how these ailments affected him. He even claimed that part of the reason he couldn't lift his wife out of the TUB was due in part to his so-called token zor when it came down to Gypsy versus his children. Martin Joe Sides and guess who won the Children Lost Gypsy was in the catbird seat every single time. His daughter Rachel alleges that she was unceremoniously kicked out of the House without her phone because she refused to kind Egyptian he had no qualms and cutting off his own flesh and blood if they stood in his way he was clearly clearly taken with this woman a few months into her moving in he accompanied her on a trip to Wyoming to meet her family. Just we all know you've got to meet Nannies family. This is what Gypsies mother had to say about. Martin said I know Love Michelle not and I said that she had a family of Michelle he says actually I loved her as a friend. I love his assistant but I never loved her like I love Gypsy. Never Romantically left. Michelle commod you just saying. Whatever serves you at the time unless we're dealing with. Someone is just incapable of feelings. Who Wore a mask of normalcy? For Thirty Years Martin keeps proving that you just simply can't believe a word. He says he will say anything at the time. Michelle was considered the bell of the ball a true catch and anyone who knew them. During the course of much of their marriage said he was very much in love with her so he was lying now he was lying in with a man like him could very well be both. It's also dishonorable to speak of your wife. Who has passed in such a way? What could possibly be gained by demeaning her in that way to say I never loved her. What could possibly be gained? How could anyone think that he's becoming to them to speak of their dead wife in that way it reflects not on Michelle? It reflects brightly on Martin and it is so odd to me that Gypsy did not look at this. And say wow. I wonder when it will be my turn to be spoken of just that way now that he could be with gypsy. He wasn't going to waste any time I he moved her in. Then he proposed for a frame of reference. Michelle had not even been buried for ninety days before he turned around and pop the question to Gypsy the timing of this surprise Gypsies own family. He knelt down and professed his love to her during the very same visit. According to her family he seemed like a man truly in love and invested in building. Future with her he wept as he asked her for her hand in marriage. At this point he doesn't even seem to be pretending degree for his wife. He's acting as though he is above reproach that is in his rear view mirror. It is all about the here and now and what's coming up on the horizon. As far as he's concerned the case on Michelle is closed. He's not a suspect in her death and he has every right to move on at whatever pace he deems fit. Of course a narcissist would think that because it's only their agenda that matters and in my opinion and it's just my opinion I could be wrong but that's how this is justified in his mind in my opinion according to the Gypsy. This seemed like a natural progression. It might have been natural for Gypsy and Martin because they'd been involved so long. They were head over heels for each other but for everyone else is engagement was a shell shocking development. Now of course you have to realize. They hadn't been around for all of this long courtship that they had been through. They missed out on that because that was hidden. This seem sudden everybody else because they weren't there for all the buildup had he killed his wife. If so at this point it seemed like he was going to get away with it was shell was gone and Gypsy was his bride to be and just as his daughters. Were trying to piece together evidence against him. He had cast him out of the House and essentially disowned them on our next episode. We'll dive into Martin's next move in his dangerous game of chess. He was about to find out that he might not be as untouchable as he thought. I found that arrogance catches up with people. There's only so much someone can get away with before their consequences for their misdeeds. I've often said when you choose the behavior you choose the consequences. Was it about to come home? Resists all about to come around improve Karma's bitch and now the people who were most determined to expose the truth about Martin were his very own children and what he would do next would show just how far he was willing to go to win. That's all coming up next. You've been listening to devious doctor. The life and lies doctor. Martin McNeill mystery and murder analysis by Dr Phil..

Martin Gypsy Michelle commod Martin Joe Sides Martin McNeill Nanny moray Rachel Alexis Dr Phil Wyoming murder
"dr. martin" Discussed on Analysis of Murder by Dr. Phil

Analysis of Murder by Dr. Phil

07:55 min | 9 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on Analysis of Murder by Dr. Phil

"The person that finds the body always goes really high on the suspect list at least initially. So in the midst of all of this chaos. He once again delegates to his six year old daughter. Ada to go next door to get help because you heard on the nine one one call. Martin was saying he was unable to lift Michelle from the TUB. Now remember Martin has been working out. He's been hitting the gym. He's been losing weight. He's been getting fit and even with adrenaline pumping. He can't lift his wife out of a bathtub. So eight runs next door. I can only imagine how and confused. His child is over everything that's going on but she finishes the mission and returns with a male neighbor. Now remember this detail because it will be important later on according to Martin. When he came up on Michele in the bathtub she was seated on the edge and slumped over her head completely submerged in the water. If you believe this story then it seems feasible. That Michelle may have been lethargic possibly on pills and in the midst of drawing a bath when tragedy struck but right off the Bat Martin's version of events. Will they just didn't add up when the neighbor dug arrived at the scene? He claimed that she was lying down in the bathtub and that he grabbed her legs. While Martin took a hold of the top part of her body and together they picked her up and placed her on the bathroom floor to begin performing. Cpr while doing CPR. Michelle with the neighbor. Martin was making it a point to convey that he was in emotional. Turmoil like a great Shakespearean actor he would stop in the middle of CPR to to scream out things like why why when the ems arrived he was so hysterical that they pulled him into another room so they could focus on trying to revive Michelle. First responders could still hear him bellowing in the background. And here's another interesting fact when Martin. The doctor was performing CPR. No water escaped Michelle's mouth when medics arrived and began performing compressions tons of water. Came pouring out head. Martin tried at all. His next move was to speak with. Alexis and very abruptly tell her the news and tell me about that phone call. Well I had called. I actually had received a voicemail from my father while I was in class and I listened to it and it said your mother is not not listening to me. She's getting out of bed. You need to call her and tell her to get back to bed and I just thought this is really strange. Because she'd been doing so well I mean she wasn't staying in bed so I called home and No one answered and during next break I called home again and my father answered the phone and said your mother's in the bathtub and she's not breathing has called an ambulance searched. All my first thought was he killed her anyway. I dropped all my bags and and jumped in the car and started driving to the airport and I was just screaming. Iii kilter. He killed her. Can you imagine being on the other end of that phone? Call all of a sudden things are clicking into place for Alexis and she is realizing now when it's too late that her mother's worst fears may have come to pass. It's also interesting to note that Martin left his daughter that voicemail earlier that day. He's making a point to create the narrative that Michelle needed to be in bed and that he did not trust her to be up and moving around alone that sets up his story of why she'd be taking a bath alone while in an unhealthy physical state and yet just twelve hours before this. Alexis had seen her mother and saw with her own is that she was recuperating otherwise she would have never left at this point. Alexis was the only one her mother had confided in. She was the only one who had known that. Her mother suspected that her life might be in danger despite the best efforts of paramedics Michelle McNeil was declared dead. Alexis arrive back home. She was devastated but she immediately switched to investigative mode in her eyes. Martin was no longer just her father. He was also her prime suspect. What was your first thought? I thought was. He killed her. You so you get whole you drive to the airport. You get a flight you get home. Tell me about your first interaction with your father when you saw. I walked right back into the bedroom and I went right to where the medicine was kept and all the medication was gone and so I turned to my father in the first thing I said to him as whereas the medicine and he said I don't know I think the police must have taken it later. Found that he had had my brother and his girlfriend of flesh. The medication down the toilet and throw it out. Why would he do that? According to Alexis Martin said that the medication made him too sad to look at. This wouldn't be the first time. Martin told his daughter something that did not add up so at this point we have a deceased mother and a husband who is doing everything in his power to seem distraught but soon it will become clear that Martin didn't feel the need to spend time grieving over the sudden death of his longtime wife. In fact what he did next would make him appear like quite the Mary widower on our next episode. The Saga of the McNeil Family continues. We'll meet the object of Martin's affections Gypsy Willis who is? And what does she have to say about all of this? That's all coming up next. And you do not WanNa miss what Gypsy Willis has to say. You've been listening to the first episode of devious doctor. The life and lies doctor. Martin McNeill mystery and murder analysis by Dr Phil. I'm Dr Phil You guys know my wife. Robin McGraw has rubbed Gras revelation. Which is a great skin care? Product and one of hers is called. Let there be bright. This is a triple action. Brightening serum it brightens a complexion and even skin tone with seriously fast acting serum that combines. Luma skin lactic acid and vitamin C. It's Robin McGraw Revelation Dot Com. That's the only place you can get it and right now you get thirty percent off all products thirty percent off all products. Just use code R. M. R. Thirty. Ram are thirty..

Alexis Martin Michelle McNeil Martin McNeill Dr Phil Michele McNeil Family Gypsy Willis R. M. murder Gras
"dr. martin" Discussed on Analysis of Murder by Dr. Phil

Analysis of Murder by Dr. Phil

09:15 min | 9 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on Analysis of Murder by Dr. Phil

"Is this paranoia or is this just a very realistic concern on her part. This is what Lexus has to weigh. And at this point if Martin does have ill intentions. He's got his wife right where he wants her. She's just been under the knife. She's medicated she's blind. She's not in any position to take a stand against him. He has the power he has the control. Okay WanNa Brag on my wife again. You Know Robin Has Robin McGraw revelation. Which is a company that takes care of your skin and like I said I've used the top of my head for the lab on this. They've used it to test out some of these things and they really do. A lot of testing on this stuff and one of their products is called today every day all day. Rose Atia Day Lotion. Now this is something that reduces redness and reveals radiance in your skin now. This lotion calms say Shia and Tames Future. Flare ups for a glowing healthy complexion. There's a hydrating. Alpha hydroxy acid that goes along with antioxidants vitamin K peptides and Hyler onic acid and these are absorbed into the skin and it happens twenty six times faster because they have this dynamic infusion technology that they got patented. Let me tell you when you have a skin care product that they actually issue a patent on that means Dave really got something special and this helps you clear up your skin and you deserve this as soon as possible. You can only get this at Robin McGraw Revelation Dot Com and right. Now you get thirty percent off all products thirty percent off all products. Just use code R. M. R. Thirty. Ram are thirty. Hey you know. We're coming into springtime and it looks like we're going to have a lot of time sitting around home so shopping online is the smart play you can give yourself a springtime spruce up enjoy brighter. Healthy your skin. Thanks to my wife Robin regards. Revelations brightening trio this unique triple action skin. Brightening Kit will help you shine bright all day every day by eliminating sunspots rejuvenating dull skin and restoring your youthful glow hydrate your skin by applying the serum every morning and the cream every night and exfoliating three times a week for a clear bright complexion this skin brightening kit features potent botanical extracts. That worked together to provide everything your skin needs to be at. Its best all day and all night long. This trio features let there be bright starlight face bright and twinkle twinkle your star and they all have triple action brightening serum and you can only get them at Robin regard revelation dot Com. And Right. Now you get thirty percent off all products thirty percent off all products. Just use code R. M. R. Thirty. Ram are thirty rubbing McGraw revelation which is owned by my wife Robin. So you know. It's quality has a great new product line for Adult Acne. Now there are two products one ZAP. You're covered all day long. Which is day Acne Lotion and relax? You're covered sweet dreams which is a night. Acne cream are really powerful. Products for adults that have ACNE ISSUES. These products he'll breakouts fast without overdrawing. Your Skin Robbins new treatments for adult. Acne won't trigger SKIN PURGING OR FLARE UPS. When you introduce it into your regular skin care routine natural silica. Acid made from willow bark clears pours to prevent future blemishes while anti aging antioxidants. Keep skin firm and if you order now and get this acne fighting do. Oh you get a fifty fierce sunscreen for free and you're going to need that because we're coming into warm weather as you know you're going to spend a lotta time in the sun. You could only get this at Robin McGraw. Revelation Dot Com Robin McGraw Revelation Dot Com order. Now and get your free. Fifty fears sunscreen and right now you get thirty percent off all products thirty percent off all products. Just Use Code R. M. R. Thirty R. M. R. Thirty two. But then things seem to be getting better in the McNeil household in fact the night before Alexis was set to return to school. She was relieved to see that her mother was doing better. She was on the men. She was recovering and she was not overmedicated on this last night before she returned to school little bit. Alexis no it was last time she would ever see her. Mother live April Eleventh. Two thousand seven started out like any other normal day. Martin woke up to go to work at around eleven thirty in the morning. He picked up their six year old adopted daughter. Ada and return to the family home once they got back to the house. Martin told the little girl go check on her mom while he remained downstairs in the kitchen. Eight of course did she was told. She ran upstairs to see her mother. Once it was in the upstairs bathroom. She started screaming for Martin. Michelle was in the bathtub and she wasn't breathing. Let's take a listen to that nine. One one call made by Dr Martin Whitney'll Okay Ishikawa. Chess is unconscious. Okay get out of the water. Isn't she breathing at all as you heard for yourself? He sounds hysterical on that call. At least he was portraying himself as a man who was distraught in fact he was so frantic that he ended up hanging up on the nine one one operator. She had to call him back on their way. Okay do not address. They're on their way. Is Your Wife Breathing Position? Okay do you know how to do? Cpr You can be your own judge about mark. Mcneill sounds on his call and of course we all react differently in times of extreme stress especially if someone we love is in harm's way some people go into shock. Some people become hysterical. Some people just don't know what to do but Martin is a doctor. I very much doubt that he doesn't know what the best course of action is in a situation like this and that he wouldn't know that the best thing he can do to help his wife is to remain calm. Give the nine one one operator all the necessary information so that help could get to his wife as soon as possible instead. This guy's hanging up on the operator. He's not speaking clearly. He's not giving the House address. Clearly he's barking at her nothing. He's doing is seeming to help the situation. I have to tell you my read of the situation is that one could conclude that he is stalling. Getting Michelle potentially life-saving help. It also seemed odd at the last moment in that nine one one call. He chimes in with the fact that he's a doctor. Wouldn't you think he would share that information right away and be well acting more like a doctor instead of hysterical in Snappy? I mean doctors know how nine one one works. Doctors know that when you make the call even though they're talking to you there multitasking and already dispatching an ambulance but the most troubling thing. There's the question of why on earth this doctor would send a child his six year old into check on Michelle in the first place. It's just plain common sense. It was his responsibility to do that unless his daughter go in was another part of a sinister master plan..

Robin McGraw Dr Martin Whitney Michelle R. M. R. Thirty R. M. R. ACNE Lexus Alexis R. M. Dave blemishes McNeil Mcneill mark
"dr. martin" Discussed on Analysis of Murder by Dr. Phil

Analysis of Murder by Dr. Phil

01:57 min | 9 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on Analysis of Murder by Dr. Phil

"The McNeil's were perfect but then image was about to be shattered soon with. Shell would meet a very suspicious death and the father of these children had always known would reveal himself to be a stranger to them a man capable of unspeakable evil. The case of Doctor Martin McNeill had all the murder drama and betrayal fit for a lifetime movie except for his children. This was an TV special of the week. This nightmare had actually happened to them right when his case was at the peak public interest. I had the chance to sit down with not only Martin's oldest daughter Alexis but also with Martin's girlfriend turned nanny gypsy. A lot has been said about gypsy. In the press. Especially by Martin's daughters. My intention was to go into this interview with an open. Mind and really listen to what she had to say and what she revealed about her relationship with. Martin a Man. She says she truly loved was as fascinating as it was revealing on this first episode. We'll dive into the McNeil Family Dynamic. What was brewing beneath the surface in that sprawling house what was actually going on between Martin and his wife. Michelle and what happened the day she died? It's all coming up on devious doctor. The life and lies of doctor. Martin McNeill mystery and murder analysis by Dr Phil. I am Dr Phil..

Doctor Martin McNeill Martin McNeill Dr Phil McNeil murder McNeil Family Dynamic Shell Michelle Alexis
"dr. martin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

02:57 min | 10 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Very foreign is often. There's another trend that they had for example bells of Kyoto with Swiss air. As well right this kind of look to the world. Yeah I think I think it's also the how Switzerland is you know. I mean I'm French but I'm living interested in for six years and I think it's super open to the world and Fiji. There is an incredible artist. We we're GONNA work with life after this release because he has a lot of materials and as always interested in the Middle East culture and sounds and we thought well you know. It's it's it's coming from Switzerland and and anytime these exotic as you said and it's also even more interesting. You know to to share these to the world and Mattias if we want to end interview with a song from the compilation your choice which one which one shall we end this. Oh we're going to play a clip of it as well with the end for our listeners. I don't have any pre I. I love them a chance to be directing the completion but I think one of the most interesting for us because story. Super Nice Peter Vice. The trekkies called subway. It's very personal. I because he does the mentioned ninety nine my date of birth and in Paris and I'm from various at the beginning. But that's that's an interesting information. What is very interesting? Is that when we contacted paedophilia way? I'm super happy and I'm and I'm really. I would really like to have it in the compilation but I some food. That is really depressing. Me since eighty nine is the fact that the original version and the instrumental version or having elements that are Super Nice. And I really would like to do this. completion is to combine both version. So I can leave happy. We the big version so you went back to shoot and you did this. Special Intensive version for us which is the only BITs Let's say remix but made by Creator. So He's pretty nice and yeah. I think it's Super Nice. It's super weird at the same time of experimental. There are some homeless people from Perry that you recorded in the subway. That are having some song at the beginning. Get some talk and some other them so yeah. It's a pretty funny one that I think it's it just depends ice on good choice. Thank you so much not as messy. Thank you that was my set intent experimental and electronic music from Switzerland. Nine hundred eighty one. Two ninety-three is released by Bongo Joe.

Switzerland Peter Vice Middle East Bongo Joe Mattias Fiji Paris Perry
"dr. martin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

07:42 min | 10 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"Come across quite often as people who have been burnt out by ecological activism and one of the messages from. This is if you keep staring into hell you get incinerated in Greek myths if you're encountering something that is very dangerous if you approach head on it'll blast you two paces but if you look at its reflection on a shield then you may be able to interact with it and defeated and for me these stories especially the darker ones. The ones consenting said Baba Gar the under woke that is a way of looking at a very deep issue through the artistry of Gazing Assets. From another angle. That was Dr Martin Short. Talking to Monaco's Louis Hana o'meara and courting the wild twin is out now Towing just a moment to be hearing from tears or set a compiler of a new collection of experimental music from Switzerland. But I don't we take some for a spin. Let's do exactly that. Fernando what have you got for me we have the Swiss electro disco of Carol Rich with computed love. Pop Wow. That was carol rich with computed. Love Fernando I can see you're listening. Oh my God just to say that Word Swiss Electro Disco. Make me so happy. That's what we as well. We'll be hearing about that. And other experiments in music right off to this year with the Miracle Whip monocle twenty. You are with Monica Weekly. Fernando and Tom Edwards in the chest today in the and early nineties bold. Improvisation studio from Geneva to Saint Gallen helped create a fantastic scene in Switzerland of left field. Synth pop mixed with exotic jazz and you compilation showcases. The best artist in the period intend to experimental and electronic music from Switzerland. Ninety Eighty One. Thousand nine hundred. Three is a delightful compilation. I spoke to one of the man who put a compilation together. Matias or set. I started to work on this project. We someone called Mexican show. We are doing this wonderful story and in fact we ever label colder Kelly where we are doing some Ray shoes mostly French-speaking elements and at some point as maybe we thought about working on the on the calculation. So our French speaking fees music and then you get with other elements from France or Belgium. And so we started to dig. I think was three years ago to dig a bits about. She's busy and very fence relight. That's we equip the usage in these periods. And that's on the on the French speaking part that was soda beyond the course to grabbing a lot of things for show to the world. So that's why we. We decided to focus only on Switzerland two years ago and Mattias. I mean Switzerland an interesting country. You know there's you know French. German speaking italian-speaking reminded as well was this kind of community. During this period. There are all kinds of part of a movement or everybody was kind of doing their own thing. I think it's even that's about the language I think everybody at this time was in that particular type of which is more around experiment to and and I think most of the of the RT square during the things on their own at this time. What was huge was the punk scene and you can go to concerts and meet. Your relatives are the same as you. Well when you're doing experiments on music at this time I it's difficult to get some gears so you know it's like tough you don't have a lot of people supporting you in this in this In in this and then you don't have any concerns about it. It's pretty isolated so there was no scene and there were no relation to Joe. Graphic and Switzerland is a big Fan. You know of of of Electronic Music. Guys have a very strong Well so you guys. In the Swiss. They have a strong techno culture. You I know the band. Yellow for example is quite famous around the world. Do you think the sweetser quite good when it comes to electronic music away still today. They punch above their when it comes to that. Yeah I think it's a very active for for a long time. I think the periods where where we started to put the focus on is a very the sensation where really About getting into from life to tomorrow clip cultures since then he doesn't stop to to improve in diverse direction. You you have a lot of different types of music different types of labels even today. That are very active in all over the country and we recently and said we read in an interview from sweet charity saying that the scene is is dying or it's not the case. I told I mean. There are a lot of predictions or other parties as well. People are represented delivers Switzerland And I'm super happy to be not necessarily as sweet but as a liberal bus let's say Part of the story. What is intended by the way we wanted to have A name that fits into all Swiss languages that comes from letting so it fits and there are a lot of definitions behind it. It's one is the intention. I was saying that you know people were a bit. Isolated Yard. Seats were related. But at the same time we try to such that even without being too much in relationship there is Nothern Agreement that Somehow imagine eighteen the music that you can feel that it was around the same period and that there is a say that he's a bit you can you can feel it beats assuming that the commission and that's that's why we call it in Tampa. I think the intention and there was somehow an agreement between the artist. This is the first first destination the intention as well. That's why beyond discombobulation is also super strong. Because in fact we met almost all the artists that are that have been compiled. Everybody was super super happy and involved in the creation of completion. So that's also we thought about you. Know it's not only about doesn't only be presents the but also how it had been done. You know. I think the naming process is really like some at some point. You have the wow affected say okay. This and I was going to materials. I have two favorite songs I mean. Of course the CO compilations. Very nice but I really love Caro- reach computed.

Switzerland Fernando Carol Rich Baba Gar Dr Martin Short Saint Gallen Monaco Louis Hana o'meara Matias Monica Weekly France Caro Kelly Joe Ray Belgium Tom Edwards Tampa
"dr. martin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

16:25 min | 10 months ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Weekly

"We'll be diving into the enduring power of storytelling as mythology expert. Dr Martin Sean. Then we'll be discussing a remarkable period in Swiss music with the creator of a new compilation of time. Mattias all set and weeping into the dark corners. As we meet author Ben Myers and. Here's some of his coach. Who picks for the cooped up? That's all coming up and we've more great music for you to right here on the Monica. Weekly twenty four Well here we are again finance dough and the world if it hasn't tilted on its axis. It's certainly a very different place from week to week. But there's still a really important role I think. He played In terms of conversations and in terms of finding some cultural inspiration confident we are going to get the right mix of that on today's program. Oh I believe so tone and you know as you say. The world change dramatically in the week and is interesting to see our listeners. The Monica readers. How they're actually getting in touch quite a lot of hers as well because I think the kind of need some solace during this period. Don't you think I do indeed Fernando and can I say it always chase me up to chat with you of a Sunday lunchtime? Are you keeping yourself busy? How how do you? What's the Fernando tips for avoiding a bit of a cabin fever because it is difficult when you're mainly confined to your to your to your door manufacturer? How are you passing the time? Well I have to say one thing that I don't like tongues to stay still so I always find something to do in the house. Organize the bookshelves. And again you know Mirai. We need some good coach roofing to watch in fact on. I have a great recommendation. I just saw it last night and again. This is an example of. How do you know the world of Coacher is doing things? I saw the film the truth. Juliette Kadarshian cutting the nerve. I mean it was supposed to be in the cinemas but they made it available on Curzon Home Cinema. What a delight to seek out the window nerve and she's playing a famous actress in the film. So it's quite matter as well and it's the first time she started we've been washed so that's kind of a French classic already. I'm if I may say to absolute titans of French cinema on the silver screen and it's interesting Fernando you talk there about great storytelling on the screen. And we're going to kick off with a bit of an exploration of storytelling on this very program. You're listening to the Monica weekly Hero. Monocle twenty four with me 'til knighthoods them with Nando Gustavo Pacheco Dr Motti Shaw self-proclaimed mythologised has been studying the ways people tell stories for most of his life. His interest in storytelling extends to the pedagogical. He set up the oral tradition and mythic life courses at Harvard University over in the US. His also the author of a number of award winning books on the subject his latest is courting the wild twin he sat down to discuss it with Monaco's Louis Harnett Amara and explain why we continue to tell stories to win an order festival. I just wanted to ask you where to fairy tales. Come from what are they? And where do they come from? And how? They're different just ordinary stories? I think the difference between fairy tales or folk tales and the kind of novels that we tend to read and enjoy. These days is on a very basic level. Fairy Tales are older. Also you find that Fairy Tales Usually have their roots in an oral tradition rather than a literary tradition so it might be the last few hundred years the story is maybe a thousand years old has actually been collected by Grimm's then written down and then turned into a A story that we can read one of the things that I think is good to know about. Fairy Tales. Is that rather than assuming that? They have primarily for the education of kids or the enjoyment of kids really before they started to be Collected Nakai they were stories for the whole family. Everybody understood that there was a wisdom in fairy tales the grew as you grew so impacted in the images of a story like the six. Lonzo Tattoo Hood does all kinds of information about number one how humans live and get through struggles intervals. We go through a number two. This is interesting kind of ecological emphasis That we can relate to the wider world in a magical as well as practical y. You know you get brothers that ten into swans for example or a woman that is secretly a Fox. That's hugely interesting to cages. Exciting to us. When we're young. I mean I don't know what it was like for you but when I was a kid it was hard for me to stay the shape of a little boy for more than about ten minutes. I was always sort of contorted twisting into different shapes and different imaginings so fairytales made a lot of sense to me but just to recap stories like the fairytale. Tradition are older and grounded in or rather than literary tradition so to take something that we all kind of know for instance. How old is Digital Riding Hood and what? What does that tell us about about our culture a little red riding and I can't say exactly how old it is but I would imagine it's it's hold of years no I wouldn't say thousands. That's too big too big late term. But it's certainly hundreds of years old. Well let's think about Red Riding Hood you've got fair of the wolf. Sending notices a story of the village. First of all you get in a love stories A real anxiety and a genuine anxiety about going into the forest outside of the village and getting consumed either by an animal or spirit. So that tells us for a stock that this story is rooted long enough ago. That was a real possibility that you could actually run into a bat or a wolf. Send Me An eastern Europe and get yourself a lot of trouble so there is a relationship in fairytales between us want. You could call the other. The thing that we're unfamiliar with but looks near the village. There are all sorts of section implications to that story of course about red. Riding Hood Has South the wisdom of a grandmother even the colors. His really interesting thing that you get in red riding a but you gotta in many fairy tales is often this particular organization of colors Red Black and white the red the black on the white and you think of something like Snow White the red of the lip the white of the skin black of the hair. These charged colors Seem to be tennis something. It's almost like a kind of alchemy and what's interesting is A few years ago Well more than a few now back. In the twentieth century there was an anthropologist. Victor Turner who spent a lot of time in Africa and he was working with a tribe called the geese oop and a lot of his work was recognizing the significance of these three colors initiative practice in tribal Africa. But we see them showing up in fairytales as well so if you have the to see it or the air to hear it you can hear lots of information in these fairy tales about Medieval alchemy about initiative stages of one's life and the relationship between people of a settlement or a settled way of living a seated living and you know the power of the forest in the power of the nomad in a three three page story. If you can if you can decipher it. There's an awful lot going on. So you're kind of saying there's there are basic elements which form the foundations of coaches from tribes in Africa to fairy tales that spawn in middle Europe yesterday's. Yeah that's what I'm saying this fairytale particularly you've taken to fairy tales in this book that the streets be published coating the wild twin both deal with a couple who are king and Queen who Seeking to have a child and are advised on how to go about. Having a child they come through normal means and they birth to children one of which is a while twin. Which Matata tell me a little bit more about that I could. I in that I think is really interesting. Is Fairytales communications in a kind of shorthand so in two or three sentences. The story will usually tell you where the problem is. And the problem in both of these stories the Lindwall Tattoo Hood is that the Canaan Queen kind and gracious to all of this itizens that good to everybody that they cannot conceive a child fairytale speed. What that means is the center of the Kingdom is no fertile. It's no longer fertile. It's it's stuck so I was like. Wow you can even get stuck in politeness. You can get stuck in helping everybody else by yourself. So one of the stories deals with keeping the twin around and what happens when the wild twin the irascible mischievous story telling magical twin is allowed to live within the kingdom within the castle within the community and what flourishes from that most of us did not have that the second story the lend worm is more akin to most of our lives where actually on the night one babies boom and all is well but just before it came out still black snake came out from the Queen and the midwife throws it out of the window and for twenty years. We hear nothing about what happened to this night. We'll forget about snake but actually once the other twin oblivious to the fact that these twin goes out and tries to marry the first thing he finds on his way is blocked by huge black seven to says old brothers. Murray I and the rest of the story is how do you coat not trap not sedate not Viscera Eight. You'll while twin but cool it back into your life because actually that Twain and the characteristics of that twin have an enormous amount of energy a lot of information force. As I'm saying this to you you can probably imagine what A psychologist could do the story like this or a union. Analysts do distorted either statements as well as we grow we tend to send into exile the pots of ourselves. That substantiate launch doesn't approve of off spontaneity. Child ugly at troublemaking instead by the time. Rabat twenty we are a perfectly formed individual. We just don't have any energy because the energy got bit by bit sent to Weigh Migrate Mental. Full this book and for these two fairy tales is an American poet could rub a bly and Bligh was a mentor and a friend to me for some time and it was robot that really is kind of stores to my attention and book is actually dedicated to him. And so the stories As wonderful images to tapestries of how to become wise as you grow. However I'm very careful as a storyteller you'd Too much of that white on story at some point you just gotTa let storyteller itself. You can't pick IT PACES WITH ANALYSIS. So what quoting the wild twenty is trying to do. Is that delicate balancing? We use let the story breath. You just let the story itself. But then having told stories as I have for the last Lawson last ten to fifteen years old exit the world. I just add whatever insights or thoughts. I have from the beginning of the story to the end and tell me. What did you find this story? Because it's not what I've read before now. They're not massively. Well none they ought fairytales so you can come across them in books of European Fairy Tales. That fairly common is historical. Lind worm one of the two that I tell you can find that a northern England as well as Scandinavia or Eastern Europe. So the stories move about one of the things that I think is great about Fairy Tales. Is that no one is going to get halt under the color about cultural appropriation. There isn't a village in Yorkshire. Who's going to send you a furious? Saying why you telling our story of Lindwall in other words. Fairy Tales belong to rather poetic ten. But I think it's appropriate accumbens of the imagination. Anybody whether you are Choctaw. Seneca oil from Birmingham can stand up until one of these stories knowing that fairytales belong to all of us Dan note the religious stories of a particular place. So you can tell already if a stories being told in say five or six different countries than it's not rooted in a very specific joke riffing. It's not about a particular set of woods or particular bend in the river but it's actually a story sort of designed to travel and at this point in human culture where so many of us are on the move. I'm not surprised that stories. Like that having the impact that they have. Because actually there's a huge revival in fairy tales and storytelling A. Lotta people are very interested in it because I think it fits sort of migrating patterns of our lives. I under the Carter called what you call the The imaginative comments. She called it. The the public unconscious or the collective unconscious it so fairytales functions symptoms according to her of a of public Psychology an they The expressions of things that we don't necessarily address had on but we would like to tell stories around. Yeah Yeah I think that's a very wise saying it's one of many wise things that she said. I think a fairy tales as a kind of public dreaming. You know how every night we go to sleep when we have Ryan very personalized dreams. I see these stories is a moment where we as a small group of people are dreaming together because there were images from it whether you want to call it the subconscious or the other world which actually prefer that we all seem to recognize and it is a way where we workout deep issues without always having to refer to them directly one.

Fernando Africa Ben Myers Red Riding Hood Fairytales communications Dr Martin Sean Mattias Nando Gustavo Pacheco Dr Motti Harvard University Collected Nakai Europe Curzon Home Cinema Juliette Kadarshian Birmingham US Coacher public Psychology Grimm tennis
"dr. martin" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

The BreakPoint Podcast

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on The BreakPoint Podcast

"I'm Shane Morris sitting in for Johnston Street today as the nation marks. Dr Martin Luther King Day I want to share with you. Chuck Colson thoughts on one of Dr King's most powerful legacies days for the Colson Center. This is break point in their eloquent defensive life marriage and Religious Liberty Chuck Colson. The authors of the Manhattan Declaration made this bold statement treatment. There is no more eloquent defense of the rights and duties of religious conscience than the one offered by Martin Luther King Junior in his letter from Birmingham Jail Today Day on Martin Luther King Day we wanNA share with you. breakpoint commentary Chuck Colson aired back in the year. Two thousand about letter from Birmingham jail. Although recent revelations point linked to Dr King's moral failings the issues Dr King raised about the nature of law what constitutes an unjust law and how we should respond to unjust. Laws are as true true today as ever. So here's chuck. Colson from January of two thousand adjust law is a manmade code that squares with the moral law or the law of God an an unjust law is out of harmony with the moral law. Do you know who wrote those words. It was with these very words in his memorable letter from Birmingham jail. That Martin Luther King Junior threw down the gauntlet in his great civil rights. Crusade King refused to obey what he regarded as an immoral law that did not square with the law of God all across America. Millions of the people are celebrating the birthday of this courageous man and deservedly so he was a fearless battle for truth and all of us are in his debt because he remedied past wrongs and brought millions millions of Americans into the full riches of citizenship in schools and on courthouse steps. People will be quoting his. I have a dream speech. It's an elegant powerful classic sick. But I would suggest that Dr King's greatest accomplishments one which will be little mentioned today because it has suddenly become politically incorrect is his advocacy of the true true. moral foundations of law king defended the transcendent source of laws authority and in doing so. He took a conservative Christian view of law in fact he was the most eloquent advocate of this viewpoint in his time as interestingly enough Justice Clarence Thomas is today writing from a jail. King declared that the code of Justice is not man's law. It is God's law. Imagine a politician saying that today. We all remember the controversy that in just a few weeks ago when George W Bush even made reference to his Christian faith in a televised was national debate but king built his whole case on the argument that an unjust law is no law. At all exactly as argued by Saint Augustine and Thomas Aquinas us to be just king argued. Our laws must always reflect God's law and this is the greatest you today in the Public Square is the law rooted in truth is it transcended immutable and morally binding or is it as liberal. Interpreters suggest simply whatever the court says. It is ever since Dr King's Day the. US Supreme Court has been moving moving a step by step away from the positions. This great civil rights leader espoused to continue in this direction. As I've written can only lead to the loss of self-governing democracy so so I would challenge each of us today to use this occasion to reflect not just on his great crusade for civil rights but also on Martin Luther King's wisdom in bringing law back to its moral foundations nations. Many think of king some kind of liberal firebrand but when it comes to the law he was a great conservative who stood on the shoulders of Thomas Aquinas and Saint Augustine striving without apology to restore our heritage of justice. This is a story. I tell my new book. How now should we live a great moment history when a courageous man applied the law of God to to the unjust laws of our time and made a difference? And that's the lesson. We should be teaching our kids on this holiday. This isn't just another day off from school or a day to go to the mall. In fact I have a suggestion. Take this data. Sit Down with your kids and read them. King's letter from Birmingham jail. It may be the most important civics lesson they'll ever get for breakpoint. This is Chuck Colson in Washington..

Martin Luther King Chuck Colson Dr Martin Luther Birmingham Colson Center Thomas Aquinas Saint Augustine Shane Morris Public Square Manhattan Justice Clarence Thomas US Supreme Court George W Bush America Washington
"dr. martin" Discussed on In Black America

In Black America

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on In Black America

"Oh. We. Nine. Take. Dr Martin Luther King junior thirty nine at the time of death. He was shot while standing on the back of the Ray motel in Memphis, Tennessee. This has been a tribute to the late Reverend Dr Martin Luther King junior who would have been ninety this week. If you have questions comments suggestions as future in black America programs, Email us at in black America, K U, T dot ORG. Also, let us know what radio station you. Holders. Remember to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter views opinions expressed on this program are not necessarily those of this station or of the university of Texas at Austin previous programs online and K U UT that. Until we have the opportunity again for Texaco producer, Dave. And I'm John Hanson junior. Thank you for joining us today. Please join us again next week. Cd copies of this program are available and may be purchased by writing in black America, CDs K UT radio one university station Austin, Texas, seven eight seven one two that's in black America, CDs K UT radio one university station Austin, Texas, seven eight seven one two. The. This has been a production of K U T radio. What do you want to know about Austin, sorry, T explained project takes your questions about Austin's people places and things and goes the distance to answer them. Subscribe to the explain podcast find it on itunes, Google play or your favorite podcast app or go to eight explained dot org.

Dr Martin Luther King Austin America university of Texas Ray motel Texas Facebook John Hanson Memphis Twitter Tennessee itunes producer Google Dave
"dr. martin" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"dr. martin" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"Many professional skills. You may remember back at our month on sex workers. We talked to t bomb who's also from the body, electric school of the sacred intimate. So if you want more information on what that means, go back to that episode and listen to Dr Martin are you still little? Yes. Thank you. Excellent. Before we start can pass what your gender pronoun preferences. Are she? Perfect. Now I've spoken to as bedding Dr Martin, but I really. Ever asked and I really should've shame on me. What do you prefer people talking to you or or referring to you Dr Martin or Betty? Betty. Perfect. We're informal here, but we do have you know. Last month or the month before I can't remember. We had this lovely woman on who's talking to us about body more quarter and one of our hosts monkey. She swore she called him Mr. monkey through the whole thing. It was the cutest most adorable thing. She thought his last name was monkey. He just like prince, he is monkey. There's no. So Betty, can you tell us a little bit about yourself and what you think people should know about you? Yes, I'm on the grandma a race, three kids like I did that during chiropractic work in my early fifties. I close my chiropractic office and opened a new studios sacred internet, and that means that I died. People threw Roddick experiences for their awareness in gross than shielding, and and there's a wide range of what that actually looks like..

Dr Martin Betty Roddick