18 Burst results for "Dr. Ivan Misner"

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"I created the foundation with my late wife in one thousand nine hundred eight and And we support children and education. That is our focus. Its foundation dot com and children represented twelve percents delicious but one hundred percent of our future. Absolutely i want to thank you for showing up in joining dr ivan. Meisner i in this conversation because you are the most important part of the conversation. I'd love to hear from you any comment you have about. Today's show send me a text. This is my personal cell. Give it out. Nobody's ever abused it. Just send me a taxed. Gimme your url. Tell me something that gonna take from today show and implement into your business or life myself three zero three six four one zero four zero one and dr meisner. Thank you so much for being featured guest today. Truly my pleasure. Thanks for having me on listening. A conscious million immediate podcasts radio network. The host producer known of the show distributors and broadcast media make claims that the tragedies and information discussing show results in province and may result.

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"Move <Speech_Male> <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> to the people that you're <Speech_Male> a credibility with <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> the people that <Speech_Male> you're visibility with <Speech_Male> having <Speech_Male> that relationship <Speech_Male> makes all the difference in the world <Speech_Male> i <Speech_Male> chapter where <Speech_Male> someone was really struggling <Speech_Male> and in a one <Speech_Male> to one. She said <Speech_Male> to somebody that she's <Speech_Male> really struggling. And he <Speech_Male> said you got to tell the chapter <Speech_Male> that and <Speech_Male> she sitting her. I'm not going to tell <Speech_Male> everybody that he <Silence> said let me tell them. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And she's well. Okay if <Speech_Male> you wanna do that. <Speech_Male> And <SpeakerChange> he stood <Silence> in meeting. He said <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> longtime member here. <Speech_Male> We love <Speech_Male> her. 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Our reason <Speech_Male> for being on the planet. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> that that's why we <Speech_Male> build businesses <Speech_Male> if we build conscious businesses. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> What is your <Speech_Male> own sense of <Speech_Male> your life purpose. <Speech_Male> And how if you've <Speech_Male> been able to turn it into <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> money as an entrepreneur. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> If <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> i had to pick a verb <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for my <SpeakerChange> life it <Silence> <Advertisement> would be inspire. <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> My <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> goal is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to inspire <Silence> people <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> who inspire <Speech_Male> other <Silence> <Advertisement> people. <Speech_Male> I just <Speech_Male> want inspire one person. <Speech_Male> I want to inspire <Speech_Male> people who inspire <Speech_Male> other people. <Speech_Male> And that's really. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> my role today <Speech_Male> would be an eye <Speech_Male> as we joked around <Speech_Male> a little bit of. I'm sort of the <Speech_Male> colonel. Sanders <Speech_Male> benign l. <Speech_Male> But that's really <Speech_Male> my roles. So i wanna <Speech_Male> i wanna light people <Speech_Male> on fire. I want them. <Speech_Male> I want them to be <Speech_Male> working in their flame. <Speech_Male> And if i can help <Speech_Male> them do that that's <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Male> a life well lived <Speech_Male> i. <Speech_Male> It's it's interesting. <Speech_Male> i'm laughing because <Speech_Male> i love your verbiage. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> My verbiage <Speech_Male> not because we want to put <Speech_Male> out flames folks <Speech_Male> use i. I work <Speech_Male> with people who want to create <Speech_Male> a big wave with their life. <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> but i'm a water <Speech_Male> person so <Speech_Male> but the water's <Speech_Male> not put out <Speech_Male> the flame. The flames <Speech_Male> on top <Speech_Male> me. <Speech_Male> The metaphors still <Speech_Male> work. The let are <Speech_Male> still work <Speech_Male> so again. You've <Speech_Male> got twenty <Speech_Male> six books. <Speech_Male> I want to congratulate <Speech_Male> you on that <Speech_Male> of the connector <Speech_Male> effect. <Speech_Male> We're going to have a link to <Speech_Male> that on the show notes. <Speech_Male> What's a book <Speech_Male> that you'd recommend <Speech_Male> someone else's <Speech_Male> book for <SpeakerChange> entrepreneurs <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> so i mean <Speech_Male> the book they really launched. <Speech_Male> My business was <Speech_Male> the e myth by michael <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> gerber. I believe <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> had on show <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> it just it absolutely changed <Speech_Male> my career. It <Speech_Male> taught me how to work on <Speech_Male> the business not in the <Speech_Male> business <Speech_Male> talked about <Speech_Male> franchising <Speech_Male> your business. Even if you don't <Speech_Male> writing <Speech_Male> everything down though <Speech_Male> you planned on franchise <Speech_Male> in your business even if you <Speech_Male> didn't plan on franchising <Speech_Male> your business <Speech_Male> and that was mind blowing <Speech_Male> to me. And that's what i did. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> i ended up franchise <Speech_Male> my business because of michael <Speech_Male> and so <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> i would highly recommend. <Speech_Male> That book has been around <Speech_Male> for many years. But it's <Silence> still powerful today. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> What is the best way <Speech_Male> for listeners. To get a <Speech_Male> hold of you <Speech_Male> through my blog. <Speech_Male> i've been meisner dot <Speech_Male> com.

Sanders thirty twenty six books michael Speech_Male today gerber Jv > days one
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"Every step of the way and now it's time for the twenty four hour challenge ivan. What's the challenge you have for everyone listening today so we talked about the vp process. And one of the things. I've recommended that you take your database. Your whether it's an outlook list or sales database that you have and look at each and every name in there and try to determine where you think they believe you are in the process so you had visibility with this person or a. You had credibility with this person or profitability and profitability. You should be pretty clear. These are people that have referred you business. You refer them business. You have a an ongoing relationship the others you need to take your best estimate at where you're at now. Here's why it's important to do that. And you want to do it in in a short period of time because the way you communicate with the people in your contact database will substantially vary depending on where you are in the process. You know when you're somebody just a visibility and you say hey. Would you tell people about my seminar. I've got going. You're going to wait a minute. I don't even know you. Well know if you do it credibility. They might be willing to do it. But they don't really know you will but profitability. Those people say yeah man. You've helped me. I'll help you. She kinda learn how to communicate with people based on where they are in the networking process. Well i really appreciate that and again. We'll have that on the show notes at conscious millionaire's show dot com. And i just want to reach out and tell you how much i love you. How much i appreciate you how much i support you. And most of how much i admire the difference that you're choosing to make with your life. That's what we're all about at conscious. Mooner make a difference turned into prophet and get a life that is totally happy. And fulfilling for you. I specially want think all of our listeners fans are friends in austin texas and banglore india. And now it's time for the conscious millionaire questions and the first one of courses about mindset. Probably my favorite topic on the entire planet. What's the mindset and. This is a curious. I'm really curious about your answer on this when ivan you develop for discovering your best business opportunities i'll give you i'll give you three one. Is you want.

twenty four hour banglore india three today austin texas one first one each ivan dot com things
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"Dr meissner is the founder and chief visionary officer be an eye with ten thousand chapters two hundred and seventy thousand members worldwide. You can learn more about him at his website. Ivan meisner that's a n meissner. Mis npr ivan miser dot com. And if you're driving say pushing the baby carriage taking the job. Whatever you're doing and you can't write all this down no problem. Remember your headquarters for the conscious millionaire. Show that's right. It's conscious millionaire. Show dot com. Just go there. Scroll down to today's show how to work your network. Click on it and you can go to the show notes and we're going to have all the answers to the questions. The ways that you can get in touch with dr ivan meisner his website. Everything about him about an. I just go there and that can give you all the information..

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"You have to first be visible people have to know who you are and to know what you do and then when you get visibility then you move to credibility and this is the piece that takes time usually. That's where people know who you are. They know what you do then. No you're good at it and once you get to credibility then and only then. Can you get the profitability. Where people know who you are. They know what to do. Or you're good at it and they're willing to pass you referrals now. This is not a sales process. This is a referral process. So a lot of people say to me vice it to them. Where are you with your clients. They'll saint woma profitability. Oh really so your clients give you referrals regularly. Oh well no. They don't do that. Well then you're not a profitability with your clients. You might be a profitability nece sales since but not in a referral sense. You're only profitability with your clients when your clients are referring you and so when you understand the bbc process then you know how to communicate more effectively with the people that you're talking to so if one of these leads guys if i was at profitability with that person because i was doing something with them and they reached out to me i'd respond but basically i was at a fourth phase that i haven't said yet and that's invisibility. I didn't know them. They didn't know me they're trying to pitch me. They're trying to work with me. As though i was at profitability worse. They want you to beat their sales of their salesforce right. Yeah we by the way. We call that. One of my books premature solicitation which. You don't wanna ask three times now especially after a martini So profitability. This is a fascinating concept. The way you're utilizing it in a way. If i got it right it's about your client. Who's already paying you becoming an asset to create more cash flow to refer people to yeah. Yeah and that's why many times it's your clients that are your best referral sources. They could be they should be. But it's not always the case. It might be strategic alliance partners where you're in a compatible non-competitive profession. I call those power teams or context fears where where they refer business to you. Refer business to them. You're an attorney. Many many attorneys have a like a a an accountant in their context. Fear or possibly or possibly a consultant. You know other professions that are made for referring each other effectively so let's go over the visibility credibility profitably. Let's just go over those one final time before we go to break and then folks. You're going to want to stay tuned because we have an incredible twenty four hour challenge for you and of course we have the conscious millionaire millionaire entrepreneur interview questions coming up after the break but visibility credibility profitability. How can you know with clear criteria where somebody is when you go. Oh well based on this. That's where i am with them. Yeah the truth isn't it's not my perception of the relationship it's fair perception of relation accounts and so it really involves having discussions with them. You know if you reach out to them and they say to you. I'm sorry remind me. How do we know each other. You're not even disability. Got it okay. Okay now if you reach out to them and you you ask them for a favor and they're like We gotta talk a little bit. Then you're not at credibility and if you start asking them for referrals then you know you're certainly if they say no then you're certainly not profitability..

twenty four hour fourth phase one first one final bbc One of my books three times these leads attorneys
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"Y to do it because people don't care about how until they understand why and so you've gotta be constantly explaining the wise for doing the kinds of things that you have observed works or doesn't work and that was really. The first part of the process was writing it all down and train people so to transition. Because i want to get to how to work your network what you. Let's drill down on that. What have you learned from building these ten thousand chapters thousand one hundred sixty four. So it's okay because that's eight hundred. Sixty four probably paid the rent this month. Well it might have. But here's the thing and it brings up a good point. Entrepreneurs need to know their numbers. Absolutely i mean and when i say that people are like no no no. I'm a tax attorney. I get it you get it. You gotta know your numbers. I literally get a daily report daily. Report. i can tell you exactly how many members we have and exactly how many chapters we have. every day. Five days a week. I get a report. I think it's really important to know that information from an entrepreneurial perspective. I got sidetracked. What your question. So how what did you learn from building this. That helped you drill down and get the essentials of how to work your network rate so two things. The first thing i saw was that people would go to networking events and use it as a face to face. Cold calling opportunity. Hi jamie my name's ivan. Let's do business. Let's you know maybe you could refer. Here's three copies of my business card once for you give to others and it's like whoa wait a minute. Who are you what do you do you know. I don't know you are so they use. It is a of calling process and that never works. I mean look. We'll you stumble over business doing that. Yeah but even a blind squirrel confined nut. That's not what i'm talking. No i do a lot of stuff on lincoln. I do not do the stuff. I'm about to tell you about. It's the same thing when i connect with someone at you know this and i get something if i printed it out. It'd be a whole word document trying to sell me on having this call 'cause it's clear they want to sell me something. I'm going folks. Do not do this to me. Because i typically go to the person disconnect right then i'm done right my favorite work. It doesn't work. Not effectively and in my favorite one is the the people who reach out to the lincoln. And say i have got a great leaves list. That will help you build your business. And i'm like oh jolly good. Thank you even know. Did you even look at my profile. I'm not yes yes and just took just so we can trash it all at one time. I love it when people send me the automated email. That says what do you do. I'd like to get to know more bouchier. i'm going. It's in my headline. It's pretty clear in my headline what i do right that you've been looking at the headline right. No so if found that didn't work. What did you find did work. Something i call the process of networking and it's the foundation of everything i teach. If you don't get this right nothing you do. We'll work effectively at networking so begins with visibility..

jamie eight hundred first ten thousand chapters two things this month one time three copies Sixty four one hundred sixty four jolly Five days a week once first thing thousand lincoln
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"And that year. I was like okay. That wasn't part of my plan. what do i need. I need to pay attention to this. This is important. I think this will actually scale. And it was in december of eighty. Five that i created the plan to scale be an i because i was just being pulled through the marketplace. Luckily i recognized it so 1985. Let's fast forward. Where were you in three years in three years. We had only sixty chapters. We open twenty chapters a year for three years within four years. We up to a ninety chapters and then it just kept going up and up and up during the middle of cova craziest year ever experienced. We opened four hundred chapters four hundred chapters so needless to say some point early in this journey you decided to being a consult was not going to continue to good call. Oh we'll typing and entrepreneur instead. Yeah well you know as it was my own company. So i kind of was an entrepreneur. One of the things. That i considered was as a consultant. I can work with four or five. Maybe ten clients at a time. But we've seen i could work with hundreds maybe potentially thousands now hundreds of thousands in that attracted me. I actually took a cut in income to transition from being a consultant. To be an i. Because i made great money as a consultant and be and i was new. It was about nine hundred. Eighty nine where i basically sold off my consulting practice and decided to being fulltime so sellers. What were the factors that you found that gave you leverage because you this is about leverage your way that you've grown this. Yeah so you got to write everything down. And i'm sure some of your listeners have heard this but you gotta do it whatever processes or systems you. Have you have to write them down. What doesn't work. you have to write it down. Because education training employees is a leaky bucket process. If you train me on something some of the information leaks out. If i train someone else more information leagues when they train another person you have a half a bucket of information and then what happens is people start throwing their own stuff in and probably isn't as good as the original so you have to write everything down and then train people on how to.

twenty chapters three years 1985 five thousands hundreds four hundred chapters Eighty nine sixty chapters ten clients Five four four years One hundreds of thousands about nine hundred half a bucket ninety chapters december of eighty year
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Show ~ Business Coaching and Mentoring 6 Days a Week

"Happy that you're here if you're a longtime fan welcome back this. We're very happy to have you here today. Because i have incredibly special guests are featured guest is the founder and chief visionary officer of be in with ten thousand chapters and two hundred and seventy thousand members globally. He's a new york times bestselling author. He's written twenty six books including the connector effect. And he's called the father of modern network by cnn and one of the top networking experts by none less than forbes magazine. My guest today. Of course dr. Ivan meister from from tech lost in texas austin texas dockyard visor. Thank you so much for joining us. thank you so much for having me. I appreciate it and please me. i haven't well. I will because you know i'm excited. You have been a long time fan of yours. I've known about you for years. You really have no. You didn't tell me that before. We started yeah. No oh i heard if you yesterday no you for thirty years and You know i'm curious. I know you're listening. You're probably curious too because you've probably heard of this. Enormous networking event Network bullet is a networking event. But it's networking circles in all these countries and all these cities. How did you come up with the idea. Let's start there. I think is a great example of necessity being the mother of invention. I'd like to tell you that. I had this vision of an international organization. But i didn't i just needed referrals. I was a management consultant. I needed referrals. Had friends that i wanted to refer. I hope they would refer me. I put together a group. I put together a group in my vision of what a good network would be. Because i went to a lot of networks that were mercenary. I'd go there. Everyone was selling to me. I felt like i when i went home. I had to get a shower. Because i've been to some of those groups and then i've been to networks. That were totally socialist. Happy hour d'oeuvres. Nobody was doing business. I didn't like either of those. And so i wanted to take the idea of doing business with the idea of being relational but not totally social merged them together in the glue. That would hold it together in. My mind was this philosophy of givers game which is our principal core value. If i give business. If i help other people they'll help me little. Did i know that. I was not the only person that wanted something like that. In less than a year we open twenty groups really by accident. It was not my goal to do that but when that happened. I was like wait a minute. I need to pay attention here..

twenty six books yesterday thirty years twenty groups today ten thousand chapters new york two hundred dr. less than a year texas austin forbes seventy thousand members texas cnn Ivan meister one of the top networking expe years
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Official BNI Podcast

The Official BNI Podcast

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Official BNI Podcast

"Episode number 680 a Beacon of Hope in a sea of fear, you're listening to the official BNI podcast would be ni founder and chief Veterinary officer. Dr. Ivan misner stay tuned for networking and referral marketing tips from the man who's been called the father of modern networking along with suggestions and insights into getting the most of your membership in the world's largest networking organization being. Hi. Hello everybody and welcome back to the official BNI podcast. I'm Priscilla Ross. I'm coming to you from Live Oak recording studio in Berkeley, California, and I'm joined on the phone today by the founder and the chief Visionary officer of BNI. Dr. Ivan misner. Hello, Ivan. How are you? And where are you? Oh, I have been traveling. It's been online, but I have been traveling over the last week or so. I've been to Singapore the United Kingdom dog. Conference UK Ireland Australia, the United Arab Emirates Italy. I have really been talking to be and I remembers all over the world in the last week or so. That sounds like fun. Actually it had been great. And I think today's message is one of the more important ones that I've ever done on being a podcast. These are really difficult times and some people want to give up don't it's actually time to double down on your efforts. Not abandon your network be and I am here to help you get through these challenging times. In fact, I believe we are in a position to actually help even more people this year than we've ever helped before others May struggle during this time, but you'll be in a.

Dr. Ivan misner founder chief Veterinary officer official United Arab Emirates Italy Priscilla Ross United Kingdom Live Oak officer Singapore UK Ireland Australia California Berkeley
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Official BNI Podcast

The Official BNI Podcast

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Official BNI Podcast

"I'm Priscilla rice and I'm coming to you from Live Oak recording studio in Berkeley, California, and I'm joined on the phone today by the founder and the chief Visionary officer of BNI. Dr. Ivan misner. Hello, How are you? And where are you this week? I am in addition to many recorded visits all around the world. I am Live this week June for a regional compact. In event, so I'm in Canada this week. That sounds all right. Now also this week I have a guest this is his fifth visit to as a guest to be an iPod cast and his name is Mark Applebaum. Mark has been would be and I for over 15 years. He's been a director consultant for more than five years. He's long and successful chapters in the b&i Utah and North Region Marx married to his amazing life. He says Tiffany for almost twenty years with two children Ryan and Tom Jenna and one of the things that Mark loves to do is to teach chapter members how to give visitors a wow experience. I can't think of anything better than that. Welcome back Mark mm contest. Thank you so much. I've it's great to be back. What's good to have you here? And you want to start by talking about making visitors female wanted so the floors your home. Well, thank you, you know a little background of where my y about this topic came up his growing up. I grew up back east in New York and my dad owned a pet store or at the time when I was growing up and I worked for my dad for many years and my dad was the world to me and he struggled a lot financially. So if a customer ever left his store, but happy it really affects his livelihood. So I was did my best to if a customer wasn't having a positive experience at least have them leads as happy as possible and you know in vni every visitor is not only a potential customer to be an eye, but it's a potential customer for ourselves. It's a their potential referral partners for ourselves more could lead us to potential customers or referral Partners. So how we treat our visitors. It's just imperative. So this podcast, you know, if you're a visitor host. It's not just meant for the visitor house out there. It's really meant for every single member to take on the mindset of a visit. Post because we all play a role in that visitor experience and it's in the future success of our chapter know let me just add one thing to you real quick. I know if you know this, but when I started back we didn't have visitor hosts. One of the things I said was that if you invited a visitor you had to be there host and honestly that didn't work as well. So because not everybody's created equal as a host wage and we did create visitor host. But that was my initial concept with b and I was that everybody had to be a host especially the person that invited them and I love the story to share in in givors gained about the visitor you sent to a chapter who ended up going to a different chapter who's the chapter that actually designed to visit our house program. That's either story. So everyone listening think about the region your chapters in and the amount of chapters you have in your region and just here in the Utah North Region. We have fifty three chapters and just in the Salt Lake area we have over 2,000 chapter wage. So depending on what what a visitor does they really in a twenty-mile radius twenty-minute radius. They have a wide variety of of chapters to choose from. So if you if the for the people if you take a moment and think about your chapter and the culture that it has now imagine for a moment every chapter in your region met at the same time the same day in the same location as all the other chapters sure that's not possible. But imagine it was for a moment. Yeah, I would a visitor choose your chapter over all the other ones and you know, it really comes down to what the poet Maya Angelou says best people will forget what you said people will forget what you did but people will never forget how you made them feel. Yes, what a visitor feel welcomed and important. They're more likely to want more of that and yep. That's why we all play a role in that positive experience. Whether you're the visitor host or not your contribution to your chapter and that in your involvement with how the visitor enters the room and Enterprise is in call and and welcoming them really makes such a difference. So a few examples of ideas that members and chapters can take on that could be very beneficial to them. The first is off when the visitor is already registered in BNI connect. The leadership team will receive an email saying so-and-so is registered to to visit on this particular day. Right? Well, the idea would be that the president of the chapter soon after getting that email sends a personal email to that visitor and also on that email they copy on the email other members in the chapter that are complementary to the visitor and then purpose of all that is 1 to let the visitor know how excited they are to meet them to to give them any instructions. They they may need to you know, show up but yep. To really let the visitor know that these other members could be great power Partners together with that visitor and so a great success story. I'd like to share is about three years ago as a director. One of my roles was placing visitors helping visitors find Chapters and I was working with one professional and his business was custom mens clothing and because of his schedule I took it into three different chapters and the third chapter he went to the president at the time Steve level who's the business attorney in the chapter was phenomenal at doing this and so he sent this personal email to this month custom clothing gentleman, and he see see the financial adviser and the family law attorney on on the email who both of them also replied to the custom clothing gentleman saying Thursday, we looks so we look forward to meeting you we too could use help with their own wardrobe and that visitor ended up visiting and a couple of weeks later. He ended wage. Joining and a couple of weeks later. I called them to say to figure out why he picked that chapter over the other two and in his words. He said that that chapter had an unfair Advantage because without one month then, you know connected to the members before they even met them that he wanted to join a group and three years later. He still a member of the group though. That is a fantastic story and it's and it's a great example of what my what you're suggesting is powerful. One of the thing I would add is that I think you know leadership team people think man. Why am I doing all this for b&i? You're not doing this for being on you doing this to network? So one of the advantages that a president has is they have a reason to make a connection with somebody they have a reason to increase their visibility quickly talk with people. And so this isn't about doing something for being on this is about you increasing your visibility and being in a position as a leadership team member to be able Increase your visibility very quickly for not only you but others as this person was in making connections to other people which led to referrals. What what a perfect story. Thanks. Yeah, You said that any better you probably been with us for a very long time ago and over the next idea is.

Mark Applebaum president director Dr. Ivan misner Canada Priscilla rice Utah North Region Live Oak Maya Angelou California New York givors Salt Lake attorney Utah Berkeley officer founder Tiffany
How to Give Visitors a Wow! Experience

The Official BNI Podcast

06:45 min | 1 year ago

How to Give Visitors a Wow! Experience

"Priscilla rice and I'm coming to you from Live Oak recording studio in Berkeley, California, and I'm joined on the phone today by the founder and the chief Visionary officer of BNI. Dr. Ivan misner. Hello, How are you? And where are you this week? I am in addition to many recorded visits all around the world. I am Live this week June for a regional compact. In event, so I'm in Canada this week. That sounds all right. Now also this week I have a guest this is his fifth visit to as a guest to be an iPod cast and his name is Mark Applebaum. Mark has been would be and I for over 15 years. He's been a director consultant for more than five years. He's long and successful chapters in the b&i Utah and North Region Marx married to his amazing life. He says Tiffany for almost twenty years with two children Ryan and Tom Jenna and one of the things that Mark loves to do is to teach chapter members how to give visitors a wow experience. I can't think of anything better than that. Welcome back Mark mm contest. Thank you so much. I've it's great to be back. What's good to have you here? And you want to start by talking about making visitors female wanted so the floors your home. Well, thank you, you know a little background of where my y about this topic came up his growing up. I grew up back east in New York and my dad owned a pet store or at the time when I was growing up and I worked for my dad for many years and my dad was the world to me and he struggled a lot financially. So if a customer ever left his store, but happy it really affects his livelihood. So I was did my best to if a customer wasn't having a positive experience at least have them leads as happy as possible and you know in vni every visitor is not only a potential customer to be an eye, but it's a potential customer for ourselves. It's a their potential referral partners for ourselves more could lead us to potential customers or referral Partners. So how we treat our visitors. It's just imperative. So this podcast, you know, if you're a visitor host. It's not just meant for the visitor house out there. It's really meant for every single member to take on the mindset of a visit. Post because we all play a role in that visitor experience and it's in the future success of our chapter know let me just add one thing to you real quick. I know if you know this, but when I started back we didn't have visitor hosts. One of the things I said was that if you invited a visitor you had to be there host and honestly that didn't work as well. So because not everybody's created equal as a host wage and we did create visitor host. But that was my initial concept with b and I was that everybody had to be a host especially the person that invited them and I love the story to share in in givors gained about the visitor you sent to a chapter who ended up going to a different chapter who's the chapter that actually designed to visit our house program. That's either story. So everyone listening think about the region your chapters in and the amount of chapters you have in your region and just here in the Utah North Region. We have fifty three chapters and just in the Salt Lake area we have over 2,000 chapter wage. So depending on what what a visitor does they really in a twenty-mile radius twenty-minute radius. They have a wide variety of of chapters to choose from. So if you if the for the people if you take a moment and think about your chapter and the culture that it has now imagine for a moment every chapter in your region met at the same time the same day in the same location as all the other chapters sure that's not possible. But imagine it was for a moment. Yeah, I would a visitor choose your chapter over all the other ones and you know, it really comes down to what the poet Maya Angelou says best people will forget what you said people will forget what you did but people will never forget how you made them feel. Yes, what a visitor feel welcomed and important. They're more likely to want more of that and yep. That's why we all play a role in that positive experience. Whether you're the visitor host or not your contribution to your chapter and that in your involvement with how the visitor enters the room and Enterprise is in call and and welcoming them really makes such a difference. So a few examples of ideas that members and chapters can take on that could be very beneficial to them. The first is off when the visitor is already registered in BNI connect. The leadership team will receive an email saying so-and-so is registered to to visit on this particular day. Right? Well, the idea would be that the president of the chapter soon after getting that email sends a personal email to that visitor and also on that email they copy on the email other members in the chapter that are complementary to the visitor and then purpose of all that is 1 to let the visitor know how excited they are to meet them to to give them any instructions. They they may need to you know, show up but yep. To really let the visitor know that these other members could be great power Partners together with that visitor and so a great success story. I'd like to share is about three years ago as a director. One of my roles was placing visitors helping visitors find Chapters and I was working with one professional and his business was custom mens clothing and because of his schedule I took it into three different chapters and the third chapter he went to the president at the time Steve level who's the business attorney in the chapter was phenomenal at doing this and so he sent this personal email to this month custom clothing gentleman, and he see see the financial adviser and the family law attorney on on the email who both of them also replied to the custom clothing gentleman saying Thursday, we looks so we look forward to meeting you we too could use help with their own wardrobe and that visitor ended up visiting and a couple of weeks later. He ended wage. Joining and a couple of weeks later. I called them to say to figure out why he picked that chapter over the other two and in his words. He said that that chapter had an unfair Advantage because without one month then, you know connected to the members before they even met them that he wanted to join a group and three years later. He still a member of the group

Mark Applebaum Director Dr. Ivan Misner President Trump Utah North Region Priscilla Rice Live Oak Attorney Maya Angelou California New York Givors Canada Salt Lake Utah Berkeley Officer Founder Tiffany
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Official BNI Podcast

The Official BNI Podcast

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Official BNI Podcast

"Hello, this is Priscilla rice and I'm coming to you from Live Oak recording studio this week. We're going to have a rebroadcast of one of our earlier classic podcasts. We hope you enjoy life and thanks so much for listening episode 217 can't do or won't do, listening to the official BNI podcast with the N. I found her and chairman. Dr. Ivan. Misner. Stay tuned for networking and referral marketing tips from the man who's been called the father of modern life working along with suggestions and insights into getting the most from your membership in the world's largest networking organization BNI. Hello everyone and welcome back to the official BNI podcast brought to you by networking now. Com, which is a leading site on the net for networking downloadables. I'm Priscilla page and I'm coming to you from Live Oak recording studio in Berkeley, California, and I'm joined on the phone today by the founder and the chairman of B. And I, dr. Ivan misner. Hello Ivan. How are you doing today? I am doing great Priscilla. Thank you so much. It's nice summer day here in Southern California. I know it's not a summer day in the southern hemisphere, but here in Southern California. It's a nice summer day in August. I have a great topic today one that I I trained on a lot with being 15 people and directors, but I really haven't talked much about this on on a podcast and it's the concept of members being a can't do or won't do so, let me explain what I mean, right? Yep. Oftentimes leadership team people are director might come to me and say Ivan know we've got a member that's just not participating either. They're not bringing referrals or trying to bring in referrals or they're not sure if this is just not actively engaged. And so one of the first things I tell leadership teams is to sit down with the member and ask this question. It's it's my magic jack customer service. How can we help you? Bring in more referrals bring in more visitors support the group in some way whatever whatever the issue is, how can we help you? Do you think it's really important that you do that? Because if you just you just go to a member and start hammering them for not being engaged. They'll just get defensive Georgia State if you say, how can we help you do this? It's a very powerful technique. I mean, this is gold it really is. It is a very powerful technique because if you say, how can we help you do whatever. They will almost always give you one of two answers, you will virtually always get one of two answers to that question. They'll either give you a can't do both answer or a won't do answer. Let's say it's referrals. Let's say you're talking to a memory. I'll give you a real life example. We had a choice in a chapter that we asked once. You know, how can we help you bring in more referrals? Cuz he was dead last he'd brought in the the least number of referrals in the group dead last and we said, how can help you? And he'll answer was you know, I'm really struggling with this. I'm having a difficult time bringing in referrals because I don't really have much of a conversation with my clients about the things that they're they need come in and they slap suck down on my desk. They say I need you know, five thousand copies a week from tomorrow any questions great and they're out the door. I don't know, you know, if they need a CPA. I don't know if they need a florist. I don't know what's going on in their wage. I don't have that kind of dialogue with them. So I'm struggling. I want to bring in referrals. I just don't know how to do it. That is a classic can't do answer. They want to help they just don't know how to help them. Well, you know what Priscilla it's our responsibility to help those people because we've all been can't do so I was a can't do I didn't know how to network. I had to learn how to do this. And so that gives us an opportunity when she said something like that like, okay great. Let's let's come up with a solution. And by the way, we came up with a great solution for this guy you put up a a board with everybody's business cards in it and people would come on up and they took a business card from one of the members in it and they say hey Tom Wood, you know about this this person are they really good? And he said, oh, yeah, you know, I see him every week. He's really good. This guy went from being the wage worst referral generator in the group. Number one so many months in a row, they just made him the honorary winner for the year and they started recognizing the second-place person. It's a longer story than that, but yep. It's a classic example of somebody being a can't do and you teaching them how to do it. Yeah, it's the won't do people that are the real problem. And when you say to somebody that's a won't do you say well, you know, how can I help you? Bring in more referrals? They'll say something like oh, you know, it's really difficult for me in my profession to be able give referrals to the people in this group. And could you go you thinking of course so why are you here? So why do you think they're they're they're they receive referrals. That's why are there you got it. Yeah, they're together for or they're just not, you know willing to give her feels because whatever reason there are won't they are not going to do it. Yeah, and those are the people that are a little more difficult so you can immediately eliminate the overwhelming majority of people who are not performing and I think this applies in business in general business not just being a groups, but you can you eliminate the majority of problems by understanding whether the person they can't do or won't you suck So can't do we got retrain and redirect if there are won't do you basically need to say and if you open up the door to people it's amazing. How many people will quit if you simply say, you know, it's okay if you step down if this isn't a check for you at this time, it's okay if you stepped down and come back in some other time and you'd be amazed at how many people say. Yeah, you know, I probably should step down and quit and if they don't take the bait and they don't say no I'm I want to stay cuz I'm getting referrals. That's when you sit down. And you said okay in order for you to continue in the program. You have to contribute back to the chapter whether it's bringing in visitors or or referrals or you know supporting the group in some way you have to contribute back to the chapter and but that is a much smaller number and if you can recognize whether somebody's a can't do or won't do it's much easier for you to help solve the problem. Yeah. Have you seen situations like this at all the Priscilla or what do you think of this? Yeah. Absolutely. I mean, it's just about people's attitude towards being dead. Worker I think if you're a little bit embarrassed about promoting, you know your fellow members to your friends or to the people in the in your community. Then you're going to I'm going to hold back you're not going to you're going to be I won't do but if there's this attitude that it's very cool to know lots of great resources and talented people then you're going to you know, kind of jump at turning people on to your to your members. Yeah. Well, that's all I've got for today Priscilla. I leave a question for The Listener and the question is have you ever seen a can't do or a won't do in your BNI group. Have you seen a can't do person and it won't do person and how how would you handle them differently? How did you handle them may be and how would you handle them differently in the future based on understanding? This can't do won't do concept would love for you to leave comments about what you think of this. I'm telling you suck. It is one of the strongest most powerful Concepts that I trained on to help people a stay positive and solutions focused and be support people really want to be there and see to move on people who just are there to get and not to give yeah..

dr. Ivan misner Priscilla rice Live Oak chairman Southern California official California Berkeley director Georgia founder Tom Wood
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

The Storytellers Network

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

"Went. And jumped into the lap of her co host a in where on live television, and she's screaming in the lap of her co host when I hadn't realized is that the cameramen this is old school cameras. They all got blinded. So three cameramen no one's asking the camera. They're all doing this. The directors in the back when this she screaming live television. She's clutching her chest. She says thank we're still on. Thank god. I didn't swear on live television. Go to swear on my television. Only thing her co said threaten entire said right now he looked off camera. He said what route new pants for her? Please. Erector says cut cut a commercial cut. Go to commercial. We went to commercial. There was my director off camera that was visual. We should leave. So in most states, I'm considered an expert in networking, but in Connecticut, I'm considered an arsonist. The point of the story that I make when I do the speech is look we all screw up. I bet you didn't. I bet your not going to screw up on live television. I have so don't worry about screen up. Nobody cares. Move past it figure out how to do is. Right. You can be highly successful in your networking, and you and you're not gonna mess up on live TV like that's the point. And the story really hits home that everybody makes mistakes. And that's where I say where you know, if you can if you can have some self deprecating humor, somebody looks at you dang. He's really successful. Then they look at me in the. Yeah. But he's done some pretty stupid things too. So we all have that's the story. If I couldn't tell that story life just would not be as as fun. Absolutely. Thanks for sharing the story. I haven't I appreciate it. Wonderful truly, my pleasure. Absolutely. So where's the best place? People can connect with you. So. My blog Ivan Meisner dot com, a lot of free content, including a new book that came out recently. Who's in your room? I was in your room, suite secret to creating your best life. Great book. I got a lot of content up there. It's offering everything up there is free. And of course, if someone is interested in in being I you to be an ied dot com and lots of chapters all around the world accent. And I'll linked to those the shots for listeners too. Great at the book is you can go to the book, you can get it on Amazon, but who's in your room dot online. If you want information about the book, who's in your room dot online, burbot excellent. What thanks again. I appreciate your time today. I've and this was a lot of fun. Thank you. Dan, yet, some great questions questions that I'm rarely ask. Thank god. Thanks. So you had a storyteller Dr Ivan miser of BNI what an incredible organization such a good guy. So I hope you enjoyed the episode. And if you did share it with somebody Senate on social media, Email texted tell somebody I just tell people on the street have a podcast. It up. But if you tell them even better, so thank you for that. And again, if you are new here you want to subscribe, text the word storytellers two three one nine nine six. Visit the website storytellers network dot com for more resources, and how to tell a great story from park howl from Donald Miller from other great resources and just connected me. But of the contact page on there will be a button says contact and send me an Email. Let's out conversation. All right. So there you go. Thank you for listening. If been reviews, thank you for being a part of the story tells us network next time, here's telling stories having stories. Jerry.

director Donald Miller Ivan Meisner Dr Ivan miser Connecticut Amazon Jerry Senate Dan
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

The Storytellers Network

12:52 min | 3 years ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

"Keep really thought he was on the verge of bankruptcy. And he was gonna lose it all everything he had worked his life towards. And he joined to be chapter, and and through that being I chapter e started generating tons of business and today, he has it was a moving and storage yet one truck, no storage location today. He has multiple storage locations to offices in two different states, and a dozen trucks are more and your stories like that where somebody not only survives a recession, but the rides during recession your store like that. And it's it's life changing. That's that's the kind of story that you can see transformation. I'm glad to hear those stories. That's that's awesome. We hear so many negative stories that the fact that being I guess to share those among its ranks here. That's pretty powerful. I I have to believe that the early days for you similar to him had been a little bit difficult. And then now you get to where you are you look around. You've got milestones that in my eyes might show you that you've made it so to speak, right? How does that feel? How does can you think back to that those early days and see a path or is it just all kind of like here? I am now. No, I think there was a path. I'm first of all I tell people I'm a twenty year overnight success. Twenty years because people think I remember people thought I was just incredibly successful. You know, ten years independent. I know that I was just barely making ends meet. I mean, we were we were successful. But we weren't wildly successful one of the reasons for as I was pouring money back into the company to grow. And it really truly took me twenty years. I lived in the same house before I started being I. For nineteen years. So I started being I I lived in this house for a year. China lived in same house for twenty years before I bought my dream home. And and. The secret to success without hard work is still a secret it. It takes hard work. And so I had a path. I had a goal. I had a whole series of goals I stayed on that path and and achieve some level of success. I think one of the reasons for that. And I see a lot of business people that they don't get this. You want to be successful in business to six things of thousand times not. Thousand six times most businesses do a thousand six times they keep jumping around from one bright shiny object to another. And I'm here to tell you if you want to chief success, you gotta figure out what are the key success factors in that business. And then you got to be a dog with a bone, and I'm a dog with the bone. I may not be the when I walk into our room. I know I may not be the smartest guy in there. I may not be the most talented guy in there, but I can tell you. I'm almost always the most persistent guy in that room. And so you got to figure out what your strengths are run with those and do six things times. And so I didn't quite know exactly where I'd be. But I had I had a path ahead of vision. Dan, the torpedoes full speed ahead. There you go. Six things of thousand times. That's good powerful Ivan. Do you have a favorite storytelling platform stage? Books videos, stage deja state. I I can do it. This. I tell the same stories in a book, it's different by the way, towing a story in a book is different. I'll give you an example. I have a great story. It's an old football story that I've used for decades. When I was in high school football. And I tell this story and any in the story I recorded the story. So that I can put it into a book. And it didn't work without editing because you say things in a story that verbally don't work in writing, for example, when I met a I I had an opportunity to see the Los Angeles Rams in person full regalia. I was on the field. They walked out in my story on stage. I would say, and they were that big well that big doesn't work in a book. So I I actually had to change what I said, you know, and I changed my story. So I could write about it. And then now what I do as I say imagine that door frame with a helmet. So now, that's visual. Imagine the door frame with the helmet that works change your story in writing versus on stage. But I I love onstage because you get immediate feedback that you don't get in a book. You don't get that immediate feedback. Yeah. I think that's I mean just for me. I think that's where I'm leaning over the years. I love beyond the stage. I don't I I understand some people really fear public speaking. But I also just don't get it. It's just so much fun. It is fun. But you've gotta practice, and it's frightening to stand up there and have everyone, you know, watching you. I get a good friend of mine, Andy any LaPorta wrote the book title is and death came third, and it's based on a survey of people as to what they're most afraid of. Speaking was number one death was three. Dime was the third thing that were most afraid of. But speaking was number one, and he talks about the importance of speaking. And how you're in good improve your your business, whatever it is by learning. How to tell stories and speak. Man, gray stuff. I've and this has been absolutely incredible before I let you go. I wanna know my final questions my favorite. I want to know that if you consider yourself a storyteller, this may be difficult. But if somebody said you tomorrow Ivan, you cannot tell any more stories professional, you're done. You can't base storyteller. What would you laugh story be that? You'd wanna go out on. Why don't know if you have enough time for it? Sure. Absolutely. If you do. Well, I think probably one of the funniest stories. Is very meaningful story in my presentations would be and I'll give you context. I'm it's a presentation I do where I talk about. Practicing your networking and that it's it's so critical the practice, and I say the audience don't worry about making mistakes. You will it's inevitable. You're gonna make mistakes move forward. Do all the things that I've talked about for the last hour in my speech. Do all of these things you're gonna make mistakes you work it out as you go to worry about making mistakes. And then I tell a story about a mistake that I made on live television. Is back nineteen ninety five and nineteen ninety-five live television was live. I mean live. It was it was before Janet Jackson and the infamous. Clothing incident, you know, the wardrobe malfunction function yet now everything is taped delayed, but back then it was all live. And so my pulse is called me. And she said, you know, I just had a new book come out of months earlier. And she said, I have a great interview for you. It's called the Fairfield county exchange. It's in Connecticut. But it's a really really big show threat Connecticut, and they'd like you to come in and talk about networking should grant them in. She said, but it's live. She said, no, no, it's live. So whatever you say is gonna go out on the air. And they have like I don't know what it was like a million viewers. Are you can't that? I'm like, why was okay? You better this now, she said, well, you know, you gotta you gotta know what you're getting too. I'm like, okay. I can do that. So she's okay fine. So. I'll bring you an old. There's one of the things she said, you gotta do something visual to the visual visual when I going to run up and down the aisles pass business cards. You the networking expert? You gotta come up with some visual. So I'm like, okay, fine. So I came up with Dan, it was the dumbest idea the tools to network, and I went out and bought this little toolbox. And I put business cards car card box and baggage and all the stuff to network with. And I knew it was lame. But I didn't have anything else. And so I had to come up with something. And what I decided I would do is. I would I actually I asked my director said what do you think if I do a little magic trick? Because I am unsure magician. I am amateur magician. What if I do a little magic trick? And he said, well, what do you have in mind? So maybe I have the the host. I'll say I'll ever hold up a copy of my book. And when when I hold up a copy of my book when she holds up a copy of my book say we'll get cheerful. She'll say why house because that's hot and I'll do so magic tricky. And you've seen magicians flame comes out of their hands. A little magic trick a whole bookable from plane come out. He said. He said that that's good. So I just wanted to do it. So I go in. I'm ready to do this interview. I know I have a stupid thing with the toolbox, and I have a good ending. And I'm waiting for the interview we're in a big room the green room waiting and this guy walks by dressed as. A police officer. And then some guy walks by dresses, a native American and then somebody walks by dresses, a construction worker and in the green room, so because that looks like the village people now this is one thousand nine hundred ninety five and we're like, no that's not the village people. Really? And so we're watching the show live and they get on for commercial break, and they say as in. Axed on the Fairfield county exchange. Bellied people duck arriving Meisner to talk about network. Are you kidding me? Are you kidding me? I go on after the village people just going to be so embarrassing. So to get that flame. You have something which called flash paper, which is like cotton. If you put more in bigger flame. So I thought okay good. I'm gonna put just a little bit more of that stuff. Big plane. So I watched the village people go out there again were incredible everybody standing and dancing and singing. And I'm like, oh my God. I go on next. I'm going to put just a little bit more stopping. And then of course, what's the last on that the village people? Do I assume YMCA? Camera pans out to the audience the entire audience is doing this see. Like, so embarrassing toolbox thing and to make this big I'm gonna put just a little bit more that stuff. So they're running over time. Producer comes in goes Mayes Meisner who's Meisner. That's me. Okay. Look village people ran late. You're going to have to come in. And you'll only have a couple of minutes to get my up and talk to the host. And you're gonna be on just a few minutes on second place. More. So we go out there. And I say to the host a man and woman the woman was going to do the interview. I said, look, I'm. I'd like you to hold up a copy of my go replacing we hold up a copy of my book. I'm going to say at that moment. The director came up and said, no, no, no. I don't wanna holding up a copy of the book. It's too much the book Jay peg on screen. You can't hold up a copy of the book and she walked away and see the blood drain for my face because that was my big close. And so the hostess God bless her. The host. What do you wanna do? I sell. Thank you so much. I appreciate it. Would you? Hold up a copy of my book. Now while I'm doing some big burly guys putting a microphone on me. And I'm trying to have this conversation with her now the microphone is on. And I say hold up a copy of my book. And when you hold up a copy of my book, I'm going to. So I never got the say what I was going to do and the director came up again. And she said, hey to ice it cushy national could hear me on Mike. She said, hey, you said she can't hold up a copy of the book and you're on live in four three. No, don't worry about it. I'll just do whatever you want somebody. Okay, fine. So we get to the end of my interview, she being the consummate professional. She was held up a copy of my book. I said oh careful she's advise that I said because that's hot. And I went, and I maybe put a little too much stuff in thing. Because it went.

director Mayes Meisner Fairfield county Dan football Connecticut China Janet Jackson Los Angeles Rams Ivan Dime Mike Andy officer Jay Producer LaPorta twenty years nineteen years Twenty years
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

The Storytellers Network

06:46 min | 3 years ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

"How you learn how to network and became successful. So everything that we the unite- is the plus one it's the storytelling which covers all aspects of. That's really good. Excuse me. How do you think technology has changed what we do? And and I wanna get the two parts to this. The first part I wanna stay on the BNI track. How technology and social media and everything else changed how we do networking? So for me. I read a book in the early nineteen s by John Nesbitt called mega trends and in it. He said that we're we're moving he said one of the big trends in the world is network, and he said that in early eighties. And he said, we're moving towards a high tech high touch -ociety that more technologically advanced would become the more important is to have a high touch to connect with people we've arrived where there what he predicted in the early. Eighties has come true. And so to me on my networking social networking and face to face networking. It's not either. Or it's both hand that both have a place in building a successful business today. And that's the prices people to hear the founder of being I say that. But the truth is. It is true. It's and it's powerful technology has flatten the communication hierarchy when I started being I a conversation someone through zoom someplace else in the world for free was unheard of unheard of this one of my largest line items in my budget was the long distance phone Bill. It's not even I don't even know where it isn't a budget. Now there is no long distance from Bill to speak. So technology is really changed the ability to connect. And so I'm believer in social media. But it's not either ords both engineered to have both the face to face and social media. That's how I feel. So it's helped, but it's also hindered. I haven't talked about that also hindered it in the sense that sometimes people think all have to do is is post on on social media, and people are just gonna knocked on my door trying to do business, and that's just not true P applies online visibility credibility profitability applies online. But I think it takes longer to build a relationship online and does face to face. At I've really found over the years. Social media can be amazing when taken offline I used to love Twitter, I'm still on Twitter base. A love Twitter is we would have then conversations in real life that make friends through it make connections, but always happen offline south on you. So now staying with technology, then how his technology and social media anything else changes the craft of storytelling. Do you think? Well, it's it's been good and bad. It's it's been good because I'm able to get my message out to so many more people. I think the challenge with it is telling a story in one hundred forty characters you know, it's hard to do that. But if you include links, so I'm again, I'm a fan because you know, if you could just give a sound bite to get someone interested and then take them to a site where maybe you have a short video couple minutes video or you have content like in my blog where you can go a little bit deeper get a little more granular, it's powerful. So I think superficially, it's problematic because everything looks like sound bites, but, but if you can link stuffed where you can go deeper than I think, it's it's powerful and based on results I'd have to say, it's incredibly powerful. I mean, just look at the girl to being in the first eleven years of BNI. From nineteen hundred to nineteen ninety six we opened five hundred chapters now, nineteen ninety six is generally considered to be the start of the World Wide Web. So nine hundred ninety six thousand seven I eleven years, we opened five hundred groups, and I used to have people say to me, oh, the internet's going to really affect be an eye, and they're all right. It did from from nine hundred ninety six to two thousand and seven we opened five thousand groups. I eleven years five hundred second eleven years five thousand we're pushing nine thousand now and I think I'm a phantom online. But you just got it use it in a way that for those people wanna go deeper, they can they can follow you into a more granular kind of platform. Yeah. And it's interesting too because the hundred forty characters the six second videos Facebook lives, it can be done terribly. But it can also be done with an incredible skill and precision for storytellers makes me jealous of some people's, skills and creativity. Yeah. But then we go to school on them. And we improve our own storytelling as result. Absolutely. Which is kind of the cool part too. I think about this as a kind of what you said earlier kind of to echo that. To get our story out into with so many people around the world can be very powerful, we can learn so much. So that's that's huge. You've gotta believe you've heard all kinds of stories from around the world, all your travel, all the BNI participants. Everybody you've got to her tennis stories you have any favorites. Stick out, just maybe in general, maybe inspirational may be related, but what kind of stories impact you. Well, I think the stories that have a have a message. You know? I mean, a real meaningful message. Those are the stories that always impact me, and it may be in be and maybe how much money they made. But oftentimes, it's not the ones that really stick in my mind are are the transformation stuff how they were before. And how they are. Now like people who say, yeah. Yeah. Made a lot of money. But let me tell you something what I really love about the United. I can now stand and talk to a large group of people and be comfortable with that. You know, it's taught me how to speak to others. When I hear people tell stories about how they're in business today because of being I that that one guy in particular that I met he said that he put his entire life. Savings into starting his moving and storage company is entire life. Savings is retirement everything his wife, they hoard it into this business, and they opened their doors in January or February of two thousand eight. And he said the great recession hit. And he was keep

Twitter John Nesbitt Bill founder Facebook eleven years five hundred second six second
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

The Storytellers Network

14:07 min | 3 years ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

"Life plan. You know, in general terms, I didn't I didn't say I want to be the founder of a global organization with eight thousand look I mean, that's what I said what I said, basically, I'll see if I can remember when I said, basically was in my twenties. Those were my learning years. I wanted to be a sponge I wanted to work crazy long hours and immerse myself into something and really learn in my thirties. I wanted to start to really improve my game. I wanted to pick a lane pick a lane pick a business and just charged forward in my thirties in my forties. I wanted that to be my my my my real growth years that I took that lane and just scale the business my fifties. I wanted to be at the top of my game. I mean, I wrote this all done it's in it's in my blog when I did decade by decade by decade, and my sixties and beyond and I wrote this noun forty years ago. I wanted to be the elder statesman of whatever it is. I did. So whatever I did the words I actually use was I wanna I want to be the elder statesmen. I want to be the person that people come to on whatever field. It is you do. And I didn't quite know in my twenties. What I was going to be when I grow up. Yeah. But I wanted to be the elder statesman and show from that sense. I had a pretty clear vision of where I wanted to go my life wasn't necessarily quite this would be an eye. But so you see what I'm saying? Yes. And no, absolutely. Is it too late for somebody in their forties to have that kind of vision? Absolutely. Not too late. It's never too late. Yeah. Yeah. You know, I was lucky I didn't in twenty. But it's absolutely never too late to to create a vision as to where you want to be for the rest of your life. And and today more than ever. You know, we live so much longer. You know, you're in your forties, man. You got fifty years ago. Right. Yeah. Don't wait until you're in your sixties to create a vision. Now's the time to a great Chinese same on the same. Wins the best time to plant an oak tree. The answer is twenty years ago. And then it goes on to say wins the second best time today. So if you didn't plan to twenty years ago today's the next best time that's fair. Absolutely. Sounds kind of like what you crafted your story back in your twenties. And then executed so you in back, then story probably is pretty important. I guess absolutely story stories so important and on so many levels. It's you know, it's nothing new. We're talking about it a lot more in the last few decades. But you know, I think culturally we as. Humankind have often used storytelling as a way of carrying on our culture. And if before there was writing there were stories, and so this is certainly nothing new, but it's kind of we're coming full, circle and really focusing more and more on on the storytelling again, which I think is power. So obviously you liked that. What do you think is one of the challenges to to that and to storytelling professionally? I think people. I don't think they know how to tell a story well on I think they sometimes make the story too much about them. I think they retell a story and the truth is if you really want to be a great storyteller don't retell a story. Relive a story. When I tell a story. I do my best to relive it. Not retell it. I visualize where I was I visualized who I was with. I try to set a scene for who is doing what Coa sitting where who said what are you could go into too much detail with that? There's a balance there got to relive a story. Don't retell the story. And I think people they don't get the story really isn't just about them. It's about a message. You gotta you gotta take them on a journey, and that journey has to compel them to take some kind of action that transformed some in some way, I think people don't practice their stories. You gotta practice practice. Practice your storytelling. You know, I never I never just do a story. Once I work on it. And you may say, well, how do you work on a story stories a story that you gotta you gotta get timing done, especially if like humor, you gotta know wyndha- pause, you make create the same scene, but the way to describe it could vary and the way describe it helps create a better seen and the timing is critical in story telling absolutely critical and the word you use are critical. And so the only way to hone all of that is to practice that. And and I don't think my my poor wife has heard every variation of every story that I have because I run a lot of these stories by her just to get her feedback. So you've gotta find somebody that you can run your stories by and practice, and and home them. And then when you stand on stage, and you do a story make a note what works, and what doesn't work because sometimes I'll be telling a story for whatever. Add a sentence and boom get a laugh or people go. Wow. And I will literally pull out my pen and Mark that page with with a word or two that I said to remind me I need to incorporate that into my story, she constantly honing your story. Yeah. And so- athletes watch film afterwards. Do you go back and watch you presentations to see that as well. No, no. I hate doing that. Yeah. I do I used to join a whole lot. I I don't do it as much anymore because I have found other ways to practice, but I recommend it. I absolutely recommend it, and it's painful. Painful, it's painful, even now and I'm pretty good storyteller. I sit back, and I want to say what what you know. Why why did I leave out that sentence that I always put right there? And I left it out or whatever. So. Yeah. I think you're right athletes. Do that you need to do that at some point. Maybe you get to the point where you don't do it as much, but ANC, you're right. You should watch always always improving always learning. That's a huge thing. So I was gonna ask you who gets the story. So your wife. It's funny. What if someone would be my mother? Okay. I would stand him from my mom and do all these stories, especially is in high school when I was in college. I would do them for her. And when I got married my wife took over that that mantle and she she she hears virtually every store I have before. All right. If I hate what do you think if I put this story into this talk, and she gives me incredible feedback that has helped making better. Storyteller. That's awesome. It's great Etta partner. Like that. We've been married thirty years. I met I met my wife NBN. I it was the best referral ever got. That's awesome. And there's a thirty years. That's credible. Congratulations thirty years this year. Yeah. What's what's the secret to that? Just finding one who can put up your stories, you know, everybody's different. And every relationship is different. And no relationship is easy. I think one of the things that we say because as you're married longer people, actually, what's the secret. I think one of the secrets for us is giving each other. Grace. We we have we've come to the place in our marriage. And we did this a long time ago where we both recognize that we love each other and ended if one of us does something stupid, usually it's make probably one of us. Does something stupid. The the other person recognizes that it was just something stupid. They did it wasn't wasn't done out of malice. It wasn't. Because there wasn't love. And and so we just have to give each other grace. And I think that's really important. I think the other thing is love and respect. And we read a book longtime ago on love and respect. And basically the theme of the book was that. And this is a gross generalization and not everybody fits this. But based on this book, they found that women when asked what is the most important thing to you from your? Spouse. Love or respect women, generally said love and men generally said respect. And that was a real eye opener for us because my wife was blown away that I sit when she asked me a question. She didn't tell me the answer. And I said respect, I assume you love me, it's respected. I would hope to get. She was blown away by that. So understanding each other and me going out on my way to speak to her in a loving way. And her going out of her way to speak for me. It's me respectfully that has nothing to do is storing. But that's the answer your question. That's that's part of. I love what I do because it's conversations, you know. And so just I mean, just get to know somebody and what they do. And how they tell a story I think is really cool part. So. Thanks for sharing that I have an appreciated where do where do you go to find inspiration? When you're getting ready to craft. Maybe a new presentation or read any story or shared his life lessons where does that inspiration? Come from for you as a storyteller. So I have found that my best stories come from my most embarrassing moments. And so what I often do. I think about some bonehead thing. I did some something that at the moment was horrifying to me. You know, I can't believe I did that it was really stupid. But people love it because it's. First of all of all if you have some level of success and you use self deprecating humor. People feel connected to you feel like okay, he's not on this. Pedestal. He's not in this ivory tower. He does bonehead things to now you gotta you gotta you gotta tie it in. You gotta make it work with the message you're trying to get across. But if you can find a story that you can cooperate in it hasn't dealt self deprecating humor. So I think about I think about things I've done I think about experiences in my life. You know, again, it depends on what message I'm trying to get across from trying if I'm talking about mentorship. I tell a story about mentorship. If I if I'm talking about now working I will often talk about stupid things, I did not working. So that people could see what not to do. Don't do this. I did it once don't do it does that make sense. Absolutely. And I have heard it said that relationship so the ultimate currency. And again, it sounds almost a little bit. Like, I dunno swampy or something. I don't know if the word is. But, but but what it means to me is that we are powerful enriched through our networks through our our circles that kind of thing. So that's the case for storytellers. What is one of the keys from from the the the grandfather the godfather networking the guru of networking? What's one of the keys to building a powerful network as a storyteller? Well, I think before you get to telling stories you have to understand the foundation of what I teach in networking, and that is what I call the VP process visibility credibility profitability. I you have to be visible in the community. People have to know who you are what you do. Then you move to credibility where people know who you are. They know what to do. Or you're good at it. And then you can move to profitability where people know who you are what you do know, you're good at it. And they're willing to refer you business. So you gotta understand that networking is more about farming than it is about hunting. It's all about creating relationships and one of the best way to create relationships is to help someone. So if you can find a way to help someone you start to build that relationship, and as you build that relationship, you you talked to them the language of referrals is done through storytelling, you tell stories about what makes it good referral for. You. You ask for stories as for what makes a good referral from. Someone else. Tell me your dream referral. That's a story. I'll tell you in being we train. Our directors are franchises. We call. We call three plus one for success three plus one. This is what it takes to be successful at building region of being I. Open chapters fill chapters with members retain members, and the plus one is tell stories. And plus one applies to all three of those. So for members we say. In members. Retain members engage in your chapter being gauged. So it's quality quantity engagement. Those are the three things for members plus one and you do all of that through stories bringing quality members by talking to them about stories about your success. You bring in a number of members by talking about your success, you engage people by talking about how

founder ANC Mark Etta VP partner thirty years twenty years fifty years forty years
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

The Storytellers Network

04:21 min | 3 years ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

"And if you can you're talking about mentors, if you can mentor someone, and it's always amazing to me, how some little small thing, you might do can have a major impact on somebody's impression of you. Someone's impression of life. Someone's impression about themselves by some small thing that you may have said to them. And so it's it's more than just using your story to story you win which means that you need to be cognizant about being a mentor, even if it's not, you know, once a week talking to somebody, but just a one conversation with a person, you can add value to their life. Yeah. Now is that part of what being I was kind of founded on is that connection mentoring, helping others. Yeah. No, no, no question. I mean, our principal core. Value is givers gain the idea that if I hope you you'll help me we'll all do better as a result of it. And I'd have to say it's worked pretty well. We now have eight thousand eight hundred sixty five chapters in seventy three countries around the world. Wow. It's been Mr. toads wild ride. Really as amazing. I no longer manage the day to day operation for am sort of the Colonel Sanders of being the spokesperson for the organization, and you know, I love I love what I do. I love what being does last year. We passed eleven point two million referrals. Be an and and from those eleven point two million referrals. We generated fourteen point two billion with a B fourteen point two billion dollars worth of business for our members. Now, Dan, just you know for fourteen billion dollars is more than the gross domestic product for the country of Liechtenstein. That's incredible. Okay. It's a small country. I know but still but still that that we could do that you are your own country. It was bigger than Lichtenstein. That's incredible man. That's yeah. That's so speaking of the cut the company and your role in I love the title of chief visionary. Officer sounds really cool. But what does that mean for you, then like at a day-to-day basis? Well, so that title was bestowed upon me by our CEO about four and a half years ago. I brought in a partner into the company, and and he he suggested that I use the CBO title. That she was a little would be honest. I did is really. But then I looked into it. And oftentimes the chief officer of company is the founder because the founder is I believe uniquely positioned to represent the organization. They'll never be another founder of being I and so the founder of the organization if it's something like an I I love it. I think in entrepreneurs either working in their flame are working in their wax when they're in their flame there on fire. They love what they're doing. They're passionate about it. You can see it in the way, they act you can hear it in the voice when they're working in their wax. It takes all their energy away. You can see it in a way they act here it in their voice. So being the spokesperson for being I is my flame. I love it. And that's really the role is to is to help continue to carry forward. The vision of being I which begins with our principal core. Value of givers. Did you ever think that when this started that that would be your end goal to be the spokesperson that gets to gets do what you do every day? I love it. Okay. Yes. And no. No, not particularly would be an I mean, I didn't I didn't. I like to tell you this vision of an international organization with eight thousand locations, but when I serve me, and I was just looking for referrals for my consulting business. And I wanted to help my friends, and it just it blew up it just snowballed, and you know, a year into it. I created a plan. I thought that we could really scale this business. But when I started it that's not quite what I thought. However, I will tell you. I wrote a blog about this. You can find a blog. Ivan miser dot com and look at. Life lessons, just search on life lessons when I was in my twenties. I wrote my life

founder principal Colonel Sanders Officer CBO CEO Liechtenstein officer Dan partner fourteen billion dollars two billion dollars
"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

The Storytellers Network

08:59 min | 3 years ago

"dr. ivan misner" Discussed on The Storytellers Network

"So when I tell the story, I do my best to relive it. Not retell it and the truth is if you really want to be a great three tiller don't retell a story. Relive a story. From cave. Drawings to family histories, two stories around the fire, humans crave. Order among chaos connection amid 'isolation. So we tell stories our mission at the storytellers network is to bring the art of story to the masses. Whether you're in marketing, you're an entrepreneur or your developing your own personal brand telling your story effectively can make the difference between celebrating milestones and collecting unemployment. The storytellers networks strives to help storytellers tell their stories so you can learn from the best now your host, Dan, Moyle storytellers, welcome to the show. I'm your host in. Well, and I'm so excited to have you here today as we're talking to business storytellers, my guest today is an incredible figure in the business world, and we're about to get to his story and just a minute. But before we do quick reminder that you can find everything you need about the storytellers network at the website, the storytellers network dot com. How to contact me view on a semi no there's resources there in how to Legris story for people much martyr than me and other stuff pass episodes. Great guests. I'm so less against that. I've had so go to the storytellers network dot com for all of that. And if you're new and you want to subscribe, text the word storytellers two three one nine nine six you'll get a text back on how to subscribe on apple podcasts and Google has. And you can find us on Spotify to Melissa Spotify. So check that out. Not today's guest on storytellers network is the founder chief visionary officer of BNI business network international. He's also an author humanitarian and the expert in a field of business networking, Dr Ivan Meisner travels the world discussing referral networking, personal and professional development and so much more. He's been featured in the New York Times, the LA times the Wall Street Journal networks like CNN NBC so much more even a gray station. A great show in Connecticut. You'll hear about later in the episode. So stay tuned for that for sure. In the meantime, let's get. Stories. Thanks for joining me today. Doctor. I haven't Meisner appreciate you taking time to talk to the storytellers Network, My friend. Thank you. My pleasure. And please call me Ivan I will do so so I've I like start to storytellers, obviously. And I like to think of almost kind of anybody is that. But when I was when I was getting to know you a little bit behind the scenes, I looked at your bio you've written more than twenty books. You spoken on the stages around the world, you engage with people throughout your organization of BNI. Do you also call yourself a storyteller on everything that you do? Absolutely. No, no question about it. I liked consider myself a bit of a reckon tour. Someone who tells stories in a in a skillful or amusing way, I particularly like I like the amusement. I like I like to have some fun with my presentations, and storytelling is an absolute critical element of communication. I think and what do you think that is what makes it so vital to what we do because stories are sticky. When I tell a story the message sticks better with a story than it does strictly with facts, data or information, and do you tell those stories? In order, you tell the stories with the business goal in mind, or do you also do we all use stories when we're even networking? I story has to have a point the story doesn't have a point. It's called a joke. Stories point. It's got to be a lesson there somewhere. And so I tell I tell my stories to to drive home some kind of point whether it's business or personal. I mean, you know, you tell me he talked to my kids. Dad's going on one of his stories again. Usually, there's some points on the lessons. Something to be learned up either for me or for them for someone else. I use stories mostly for education for teaching you know, like a way to communicate effectively people in an entertaining way. Su-casa like you consider yourself a teacher to them question about me. Yeah. I miss I missed. I miss teaching university. I talked for close to twenty years state university part time, I was adjunct faculty I missed that. But I still teach. You know, I think I think my role for the company is to is to be a teacher to to to pass on the lessons you see education as a leaky bucket process. When I teach something to someone. Some of the information leaks out it's got holes in the bucket. And when they teach someone else more information lakeside when someone else more information leaks out so by the time, you're at the third of which generation you have a half a bucket of information. When that happens people are putting their own stuff in it may not be good stuff. So the better you can be at being consistent in your education out the with systems and processes stories manuals the more likely to have a less of a leaky bucket. That's a great way to put it. I hadn't heard of put that way. So thanks for that. It is kind of like get. Yeah. Gosh. That's really good. So I haven't does that start for you. As a storyteller does that go back to when you're teaching that go back even further? How does that? How does it look for you? Well for me it started in high school. I had an amazing high school teacher speech speech class. Mr. tab ner was his name passed away many years ago, but Mr. tavern great speech teacher. He really watered me in the sense of he saw talent. And he he poured into me. Ideas and support to make better speaker and in so I attributed a lot of my my skill and training having had speech class in high school. And does that translate over into the writing to then I mean is being a presenter is being a writer as well. Yeah. I think you know, the better you are at being able to tell stories in your writing the more again, it's sticky. The most stickier you can make it the better. Now, I think there's a little bit of a formula for telling a good story. Would you like to hear my? Not mine, I you know, should gotten this for many different people. But I think there's four elements to tell a great story. A story has to be a fact. Wrapped in an emotion that compels people to take action the transforms them in some way. Let me repeat that. Stories. A fact you're trying to get trying to gain formation across which got a rapid in some kind of a motion even want to pull on somebody's heart strings where you wanna make him laugh, humorous, particularly sticky. I think so it's a fact wrapped in a motion that compels people to take action that's critical if they don't take action. What's the point of the story, and that action has to transform them in some way, if you can do that with a story, you have you have hit on every single cylinder and you make a difference in people's lives. Absolutely. So when when you described your your teacher kinda makes me think that you know, we can all use mentors. Do you? Now do that for others on his well, I tried to. Yep. -solutely? You know, we all have somebody in our story. I could tell you stories about me about how a mentor changed my life in some way. They did some small thing that made a huge difference. Mr. tab, nervous, certainly one. He did a lot of things that made a difference in my life. We all have people in our life. We all have people in our story. I think the older you get the more gray hair. You have like I do. The more important is for you to come to the realization that it's no longer who's in my story. I mean, that's still important to me. But what's even more important who story win? Repeat that it's not who's in your story who story are you in whose life? Are you changing what difference are you making for someone else? And

Dr Ivan Meisner Spotify Dan Legris school teacher Connecticut apple Melissa Spotify Mr. tab New York Times gray station Dad Google CNN founder Mr. tavern Wall Street Journal writer NBC LA times