24 Burst results for "Dr. Greg"

"dr. greg" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

Wardrobe Crisis

04:47 min | 3 weeks ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on Wardrobe Crisis

"And people do, they'll just walk up and they'll sit on wherever they like. And it's terrific. And this will be here for decades. And then it will start to decay. And run away as it should. And actually, Greg, it made me think, and I'm sure that's what they thought. When trees fall in the forest or in the bush, that's what people do with them, don't they? They use them and sit on them and recycle them, yeah. And so it's just part of the natural cycle of things. And look, the other good thing about the current system is that quite often if an unusual tree falls, then the timber will be salvaged. And they'll make some terrific furniture out of it. And then the story continues. I find it really sad though when I see when I first heard of this tree dying, I felt it was devastating, but actually now when I see it, I think it's kind of beautiful. It is beautiful. And I think this is, again, is to remind people what you've got to really valuable. Everything comes to an end. It trees can live for centuries, some for millennia, but eventually they will meet their demise. But you've got to make sure that the conditions are right for a replacement. And one of the things that we've noticed as we've come through the gardens today is that there are lots of young trees. Now, what happens in lots of Botanic gardens is that they were established in Australia anyway..

Greg bush Botanic gardens Australia
"dr. greg" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

01:55 min | 5 months ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"Each EAT dot com slash wellness mama and the code wellness mama. This podcast is sponsored by wellness that's wellness with an E on the end. The brand I cofounded when I realized there just weren't truly natural alternatives to some personal care products that performed as well as many conventional brands. We've been sharing our popular toothpaste and hair care for almost two years. But today, I'm excited to tell you about a new star in our lineup. The charcoal toothpaste that provides the same mineral rich benefits is our original whitening formula with a boost of charcoal for extra whitening and mouth supporting benefits. It's made without glycerin. Using oral microbiome friendly ingredients to help your body create stronger, healthier, whiter teeth while you sleep. I love to use charcoal and whitening toothpaste on alternating days to keep my teeth looking and feeling their best. You can check out our toothpaste and all of our products at wellness dot com. That's W E L L.

"dr. greg" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

08:01 min | 5 months ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"About the extent of my understanding. So can you give us a little primer? Yeah. So the beta amyloid plaques are around their misfolded proteins that get tangled up. They're called neurofibrillary tangles. They'll get in there and the technical term is they're going to muck up your brain. So they get in there and they cause mayhem and they start other cells to misfold. So different protein structures will misfold and they kind of spread and I'm doing big quotation marks with that in that they're signaling other cells to misfold. So then that's what stops the transmission of the neurons and leads into Alzheimer dementia, symptoms or Alzheimer's, the biggest form of dementia. Lewy body dementia, those all go into the memory loss, et cetera. So those are related to in Parkinson's disease. It's called alpha synuclein is the misfolded protein. So you hit it spot on with your understanding there. Okay, and as you mentioned, hopefully most people listening are not dealing with Alzheimer's dementia or Parkinson's. But it does seem like these conditions are all on the rise and potentially happening at earlier ages. So conceivably, people listening could have some of either risk factors or early stages and not know it. Why do you think we're seeing a rise in these conditions right now? I think it's multi fold. I mean, there is one component on levels of toxicity in our world. So you may see some ads out there around up glyphosate, certain pesticides associated with triggering Parkinson's. There are heavy metal, heavy metals in our environment that get lodged into our brain that can be at cause. On the memory loss, it's an interesting component that it's almost in the innate wisdom of the body. I'm seeing unresolved traumas at the root of a lot of that. It's almost as if the innate wisdom says you haven't dealt with that trauma, and we're going to protect you at this point. And there is a link and now this is a hypothesis working hypothesis on my point, part, but even on ancestral traumas, as we've been on the planet for longer and longer periods of time, we're carrying these genetic lineages of our families. And doing this piece that I went through with saraya, we really got into what could have caused this from to start in the first place, because that is the $1 trillion question. Why do proteins misfold? And ancestral trauma is actually come up on the list as far as creating epigenetic changes that then are rippling out in our generations now. So it's multifactorial. There's diet, there's nutrition, there's unresolved traumas. There's family lineage ancestral component to it. So it all adds up and then on your own genetic platform as well. So there's some nuances there as far as how do you unpack that for somebody in a logical fashion, how do you investigate that altogether and putting it into a plan that will get you traction and movement? That's so interesting. I was recently asked by a friend at a dinner party. What do you think is the greatest cause of human suffering? And my answer was unresolved trauma because of some of my own experience in the last few years and that kind of recurring theme that seems to be showing up in a lot of your point chronic health conditions. And especially the generational side, which is a new research pathway for me, I had Mark Roland on recently who authored it didn't start with you. And he explained what you talked about that epigenetic change. And I'm excited for the future of that research. I think it's great that we're seeing and starting to understand that it's more than just the sum of the physical inputs going in the body. And I think that seems like especially with the brain going to be a very, very important pathway to go down and continued research. So I feel like we well established why these are problems and kind of what the extreme versions of them look like. I've also seen you write and say that you plan to live to be a 150 years old, which would require a pretty healthy brain in a pretty healthy body. So I'm curious to build that bridge now and talk about the positive side of all this, which is what can we do to improve our brain health? Yeah, for sure. So what has given me some hotspots, so to speak is seeing some of these chronic neurodegenerative conditions reverse to the point of no evidence of disease. And it's miraculous to say the least because it's not supposed to happen. You're not supposed to get your brain back after it's been damaged. And in seeing that and having the privilege to sit with 90 year old patients saying a lot of the theme with the 90 year olds is if I've known I was going to live this long, I would have taken better care of myself. And so, you know, it was like, well, so I took it the heart. I was like, okay, well, I'm listening to that. And if I want to be a 150, that means, you know, it just things start to change when you start to project out there. But we are also living at an amazing time. We have technology now that is showing age reversal. So there's a way to measure the age of your cells, not just the chronological age of like, okay, I'm 51 years on the planet, but how old do myself think they are? And you've seen this with friends or somebody's the same age as you and either they look really way younger than you and you're like, how are you doing that? Or they look really older, you know, tend to 12, 15 years older of like, maybe they were a smoker. Maybe they had a lot of unresolved trauma or you know, who knows what their situation was, but they aged quicker. And so we are showing on biologic age about 2.6 years age reversal. So my cells are telling me that they're 12 and a half years younger. And that feels really good. I also feel that young as well. So, you know, when people come in and say, oh, I'm just getting old. It's just normal aging. I'm like, no, I call hogwash on that statement. The aging that we are promoting in our community is with our brains and with our bronze and with community and a very like we're going to not Benjamin button it like age backwards together. But we are. I want to be better this year than I was last year. You know, my 40s were a pretty good decade. I got better, healthier from 30 to 40 and now from 40 to 50. And now 50 to 60, I want to be even better than I was in my 50s. So, you know, why not? Why not age like that? And it seems like we're starting to understand more and more about this being possible and probably in a unique way, especially in the brain from my understanding in that the brain is capable of almost like regeneration and neuroplasticity and things that are at least slower in other areas of the body. I think we actually have technologies emerging that we'll let that happen in a lot of ways that I sell your own level throughout the body. But can you talk a little bit about some of these new modalities that are kind of improving the body's capacity for healing? Sure. The biggest lever that I have discovered is around these cells. So they're called very small embryonic like stem cell procedures. And these V cells, when I graduated medical school in 2001, we did not learn about these cells. And they were discovered in 2005 by doctor raditch at University of Kentucky. And they were basically considered detriment waste because there was no active biologic activity in these cells that were found in the serum of the blood. Until we found a way to activate them. So these are cells that.

Alzheimer's dementia Parkinson's dementia saraya Mark Roland Lewy symptoms Benjamin University of Kentucky
"dr. greg" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

The Wellness Mama Podcast

08:13 min | 5 months ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on The Wellness Mama Podcast

"With grace and a lot of prayer kind of not throw the talon but change your outlook and expectations. And so I switched from searching for solutions to just surrounding her with love. And you know when she passed our nurse midwife kind of death doula said it was the most beautiful death she had ever attended. You don't really hear that so frequently when you talk about loss or somebody's death, but it also, you know, I didn't want my suffering to be for nought. And so I, you know, kind of bushwhacked and made it up as I went because there really weren't there were no solutions for neurodegeneration. So I have a road map. I invite folks to say you don't have to go it alone. And we have a lot of options for you. So I quickly became a brain regenerative specialist in that process. And even through my grief, the loss and that whole process, you know, I came out whole with an open heart and just a zest for the preciousness of life. And a fire and a passion to help as many people as I can with neurodegeneration and their brain health and then even on a longevity front. So, you know, I guess I arrived in brain regeneration in the school of hard knocks there and really went for it and really I'm kind of call them psoriasis gifts as what we use. Wow, what a powerful story, and I'm sorry she's not with us anymore, but it sounds like you've truly found the gifts and the gratitude in that and using it to help so many other people, which I'm sure she would be so happy to see. Yeah, you know, it's interesting while she's not in her body. She really is here with us. And in such a beautiful way, that's the piece that for me that I have this zest for. We don't know how long we're on the planet and how long we get to actually feel and taste and touch and look in people's eyes and so it just gives such this richness to what we're doing here. You know, so while there's a law in physics that energy can't be destroyed or created, it only changes form. So I like to say she just she left her body, maybe way too soon, but she's still present in so so many ways and just the lives that we're helping here and the conversations we get into people. It's really quite extraordinary. Wow, it reminds me of the stoic quote, your words, memento mori, remember your death, which I actually have tattooed on my wrist as a reminder of that very same thing if we don't know how long we're here and how do we make the best of it and help the most people in the time that we have. And I know that this, for my research, at least, led to your very unique approach that also can involve helping people with Parkinson's, which will not be the entire focus of this podcast. We'll definitely go broad into more general brain health. But I would love to just hear a little bit of high level about that as well. Yeah, so this component. So I said, sarai was one in a million and this diagnosis of Kurtz Phil Jacob disease is about 300 cases a year in North America. So I didn't want to specialize in CJD. But I got in on the pre textbook. So prions are misfolded proteins that don't have any genetic material in them. They're very odd and oftentimes when you see them in the literature they're called infectious agents. And in there, Parkinson's is in there. Beta amyloid plaque for Alzheimer's and dementia. There are tau proteins, Lewy body proteins of dementia. So there's all of these misfolded protein diseases, which is neurodegeneration. So I picked Parkinson's because I've been in practice at that point, 17 years. I'm now 21 years in practice. And I had a lot of folks with that diagnosis. And it's like, wow, well, I'm uncovering these therapies that can really help with this. And so we put them together in what I call my fancy approach to Parkinson's disease. So I wrote a book called shake it off and integrate approach to Parkinson's solutions. Now, there are other book titles coming around all of the facets of brain health. So if you're listeners and viewers are watching, they're like, well, I don't have Parkinson's disease. Hang in there because this applies to really our brain health is the discussion. But I wanted to really niche out and focus on these folks with this one diagnosis of Parkinson's. And so I wrote a book on it. I have a summit on the same title. And we're really, and then I've got a bigger, broader brain regeneration summit. But on the process, that's how I picked Parkinson's. It was a big portion of my practice at the time. And the remedies basically the psoriasis gifts that I found really was applicable and I put that into my framework, which I call my fancy approach to brain health. And I would guess from I haven't studied brain health nearly as in depth, obviously as you have, but in studying other areas of health, it seems like often extreme instances of disease can give us a really interesting insight into what early stages look like and or on the flip side what optimal looks like and kind of that progression. And it seems like we can take the extreme and then learn how we can all improve from those cases. That is it. That's so true. And so, you know, what we're seeing in clinic. So I'm not saying I'm curing disease by any means. But we are seeing stage two Alzheimer's reverse. We're seeing Parkinson's disease. People have no evidence of disease anymore. One patient in particular that I'll share a story with Cindy came in, she was really debilitated with a tremor, couldn't get dressed anymore. And basically was stuck on her couch because she was falling over even with a three sided walker with a walking support. She was so injuring herself quite a bit. And pretty, pretty depressed at that because, you know, basically debilitated on the couch with Parkinson's. She found us and came out to the clinic for what I call camp nature cures, as the experience, a brain regeneration here. And we treated her in that process. And I got a call from her about a year later. And she said, doctor eckel, you'll never guess what? I said, you're right, Sydney. I will never guess what. What's up? She said, my husband just told me to slow down walking in the park. I said, wow, when is the last time he said that to you? She said, it has been over a decade. So you had the diagnosis for ten years and basically just was quickly going into full on disability, not able to move off the couch. She really got her life back. Now, while I can't claim that for everybody that we treat, we have about a 95% success rate of improving their quality of life here with our fancy approach. And that is we leave the door open for that to occur. And we're iterating all the time. I'm in the research and learning more and more about how do we help people's brains regenerate and on that even goes to the point of brain health and longevity. So on from treating exactly what you said, treating the disease process and repairing there, well then you can get into prevention. And then we can get into the longevity discussion, which those are all so fun to get into. But, you know, we're seeing things that are not happening other places around the globe with these patients. That's incredible. And you mentioned the term beta amyloid plaques. And I'd love for you to define this a little bit more because I don't know it in a very nuanced brain health way, but I definitely come across this word often in a lot of my reading and in research and how this seems to be a key in a lot of these things that are going on. My basic understanding is that these things can build up in the brain and for instance, like deep sleep is the time when our body flushes cerebral spinal fluid and helps break those down, but that's.

Parkinson's Kurtz Phil Jacob Alzheimer's Parkinson doula dementia memento mori sarai CJD Alzheimer's reverse North America eckel Cindy walker Sydney
Alabama Requests FEMA Staff, Resource Aid Amid 'Devastating' COVID-19 Wave

Glenn Beck

00:45 sec | 9 months ago

Alabama Requests FEMA Staff, Resource Aid Amid 'Devastating' COVID-19 Wave

"And hospitalizations, the Department of Public Health requesting FEMA assistance this week for intravenous therapy teams and resources eight hospital statewide looking for comprehensive medical field units to help take care of extra patients. Covid hospitalizations are over 2700 throughout Alabama freestanding emergency rooms, though helping to ease the strain on the hospital's Dr Greg Ledbetter's with Brookwood free stand. The ER in Shelby County Ledbetter, saying that his covid patients have symptoms ranging from minor to severe. Fortunately, we all right well to send most patients back home. But with that increased volume obviously is a very sick patients are coming in that had to be admitted to the floor and some admitted to the intensive care unit. A man is charged with making a threat against Hueytown High School, the sheriff's office saying.

Department Of Public Health Dr Greg Ledbetter Fema Brookwood Shelby County Ledbetter Alabama Hueytown High School
FAA Reaches $44 Million Settlement in Age Discrimination Case

Aviation News Talk podcast

02:04 min | 1 year ago

FAA Reaches $44 Million Settlement in Age Discrimination Case

"From the washington. Post dot com f. a. agrees to pay four million to resolve long-running age discrimination lawsuit about seven hundred former as employees. Whose jobs were outsourced. Two thousand five will share in the settlement. The faa has agreed to pay forty four million to resolve a long-standing lawsuit brought by former employees who alleged that their jobs were outsourced because of their ages. The case was filed in two thousand five when the faa decided to hand over the work of about two thousand employees notice flight services specialists to a private company faa officials including the head of the agency at the time were open about the aging specialised workforce being a factor in the outsourcing deal. According to evidence presented in the lawsuit but the case languished in the courts for years as one judge retired in the law firm that originally represented the employees was closed with the former employees reaching retirement age. A new team of lawyers began hashing out a settlement with the government last year. The faa did not admit wrongdoing and said in a statement that the settlement speaks for itself. The lawsuit initially sought to stop the privatization plan which involves giving a one point eight billion dollar contract to lockheed martin government services firm and weapons maker when that effort failed the specialist and support staff became lockheed employees their pay remained roughly the same but they lost out on lucrative air traffic control. Pensions joseph sellers a partner at law. Firm cohen milstein which joined the case in two thousand sixteen. Describe the financial harm faced by the former employees as brutal. Suddenly their pension investment was ripped away from them. He said recouping that retirement pay became the focus the lawsuit the forty four million dollars summit fund will be shared by six hundred and forty six former employees or their estates sellers acknowledged. The payouts won't cover everything that former employees lost police said. The case was unusual because it was not pursued as a class action that meant that they won. Each of the six hundred seventy one plaintiffs would have had to have a separate trial to determine what they were owed potentially extending the case several more years

FAA Martin Government Joseph Sellers Cohen Milstein Washington Government
Living an Interference Free Life with Essential Oils

The Essential Oil Revolution

04:06 min | 1 year ago

Living an Interference Free Life with Essential Oils

"I'm here with dr greg barnes. He's a chiropractor. A doctor of natural medicine functional medicine practitioner and has his doctor of pastoral science. He loved helping patients. Get to the root cause of their health problems even more. He loves helping. Families prevent illness symptoms and disease so greg to the show. It's great to have you here. Thanks so much for having me. You have such an interesting background with so many different experiences. So i'd love if you could give the cliff notes version of your story and how you've got to where you are today. Yeah absolutely Well i was helped by a chiropractor at a pretty young age and That's sort of what set me on my journey. I think probably from your experience to you. Know that's one of the best ways to get into something especially the natural. Health world is by personal experience. And when i got to school i just really became obsessed with all things natural health and living in the lifestyle and You know upon graduating and moving to raleigh and open up my own clinic. I mean i really just feel like I i love learning so one of the easiest ways to kind of have a structured Way of doing that as just keep going for more degree degrees and certifications no That's kind of you know how that goes in and really to. I mean my in my practice I never i take you know learning very seriously in from the standpoint of i can't tell you how many times i've i've watched an hour to hour lecture and You know spending. That won that time helped me figure. This is exactly what this person's name little pop into my head and like this. I needed to listen to this for this patient right here so it just became obsessed with you know that and and you know. I'm grateful that we live in a world where we can access information so easily so so much information and it can be a little overwhelming to them via. And that's why it's so wonderful to have healing practitioners like you out there who can work with patients on one and sort of be that buffer between all the information in the world and that patient right. 'cause you that's your job you get to take it all in consume all that information and then you know help help. Your patients find the right path for them. Just based on all that knowledge base so yeah so glad you do what you do You said that you you had an experience as a younger child. Was it that you were the middle school. Yeah i injured my neck Playing basketball and After failed attempts from you know muscle relaxants and ib pro finn and you know stretching. An ice didn't really work. Finally my parents survey well. We've tried everything else i. We'll go to a chiropractor. And i literally not even heard of one at that point and you know i it you know he was able to help my neck You know which. I thought was cool but the cooler part for me was as i was. I was under care longer I suffered from debilitating allergies. I mean we're talking. Ib shooting naser. Next all day every day. Carry a bottle in my pocket. I'd be slamming allegra claritin throughout the day. You know on top of all that. And i vividly remember waking up one morning And i like reached over from my nightstand. Grab my nays next. Because i would always do that right before i got a bed and i could breathe and also i'm like what the heck is going on here and over time. I was able to really link that with chiropractic. And and i you know i was like well if it can help neck pain and allergies. There's like people that suffer from those so That that seems like a good business to get into. And then it really. Does you know evolved into this much more comprehensive understanding of the body and health and all that

Dr Greg Barnes Greg Raleigh Naser Allegra Claritin Basketball Allergies
"dr. greg" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"A medical center Dr. Greg Moran says that the covert spike is not reversed. Medical system could be, in essence overwhelmed. What we really don't want is for people to die for it lack of capacity for lack of our ability to take care of them. We could get at that point at some point and the head of the Los Angeles County Medical Association understands that public health new targeted safer at home water. His controversial to some, but she supports it and thinks it's necessary. Phil shielded of Fox 11 in Los Angeles reports almost all gatherings public and private or band, church services and protests exempted essential retail allowed, but only a 35% capacity. Ah panel of advisors will meet next week to recommend who in the U. S. Could be first in line for the Corona virus Vaccine. Health experts have proposed that health care workers should be at the front of the line, followed by workers in essential industries. People with certain medical conditions and those age 65 older The Trump campaign's legal team, admonished by a federal appeals court in Philadelphia as it throws out the campaign's appeal of election results in the ruling, the third Circuit Court of Appeals is calling an election unfair does not make it so charges require specific allegations and then proof we have neither here. Opinion is written by a judge nominated by President Trump Boxes. Jared Helper and reports a campaign attorney posting on social media says they'll files to the Supreme Court. Milwaukee County, Wisconsin is finished. It's recounts, no changing the outcome and no sign of fraud, according to the elections director. We have once again demonstrated good government in Wisconsin. Milwaukee County.

Los Angeles County Medical Ass Milwaukee County Circuit Court of Appeals Wisconsin Dr. Greg Moran Los Angeles Supreme Court Jared Helper fraud Philadelphia Phil President director Fox attorney
"dr. greg" Discussed on RevTalks

RevTalks

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on RevTalks

"So it could be if Congress passes a law, all your marketing that you're doing a great job with on Facebook will go away a week from now. It could be that you'll have you'll have another problem with a different type of work and need to use. So again, we need to have enough marketing things happening. And we tend to have people that just focus on one side of this pyramid. You need to have activities going on in both. So this helps you, this helps you determine all the different things that you need to have in your marketing Parthenon. So we'll talk about a few for the time today. We can't design your whole marketing plan. But if you think about this idea, you can help get to 20 or 30 things in your overall marketing plan. And make sure you don't leave anything out. If it's all online, or if it's all offline or you're just living off your website, that's not going to be a very healthy strategy. Okay. This looks like I'm sharing some lungs. So we're going to fix that. With our screen share here. So again, building your Parthenon. So what do we have to do is we just mentioned is number one, make sure that your website's fixed. We have a whole podcast about that that you can look at. And on this page, there's a link you can click so we can do an evaluation of your website and your overall online marketing plan. We can also help you with the next things here..

Congress Facebook
Dr. Floyd's Dark And Stormy Night

The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

06:01 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Floyd's Dark And Stormy Night

"Begins. On a dog and stormy night on a remote mountainside, legally no Japan beer is sixteen fifty. We are currently a couple of hundred yards from the back. The eager Inoke Castle for brilliant flashing light illuminates the countryside and they're and Dr. Greg two dimensional black time and space. The ramp slowly lows. Dr. Paul Figures strives to the bottom of this is evil mastermind Dr Steve Cold. Cool. Calculate surveys the surrounding terrain with an Eagle smirk turns and yells back up the ramp fidget I've going to need by Galoshes I don't WanNa get my piggies went. We here because I have just come up with the most brilliant plan ever Oh wait to get rid of duct Lloyd once and for all. Video what is the scariest thing you can think of? David Hasselhoff singing how dare you insult my favorite singer fidget? No I'm talking about subsidies. They are terrifying even just thinking about them gives me the willies. When now tell me this? who were the greatest fighters that history has ever seen? Hulk Hogan and Andre the giant. Lease be serious for a minute Ninjas. That's what I'm talking about fidget and that's why we're here in Japan. This territory was home to the Ninja I work hurriedly standing in the middle of an actual Ninja graveyard. What Get off my head calm down we've got work to. Go, get my combination reanimation and brain control device from the cargo. Tonight, we're going to defeat Dr. Lloyd with our very own army, of Ninja zombies. As relieved Dr Steven fidget to press with their sinister plans let's hope that our hero Dr Floyd his young protege Dr Grant and the faithful robot companion chips can provide us with a little sunshine in this darkest of dark episodes are you ready to go trick or treating chips? You? Like those big ears in the plastic teeth I'm just not sure where you're carrying around a big wooden club. Patrol. But what are you carrying around that laptop computer in your other hand? Oh that's fantastic. Very nice chips make people work to figure out what you are. Okay. Are you ready to grand almost Dr Foy give me one second here. Go we're never going to go trick or treating all the good candy will be gone. By the front door of, the lab. Timothy. You guys ready Yes for crying out. Loud Dr, grant chips and I are ready to see her Halloween costume we. There she already know what you're just come out and show US I just wanted to be perfect when you see it. Okay I come. To the. Waco Waco where am I shakes alive to grade you can't just pop out a chilling wearing 'cause humidity idiots looking what donation you're supposed to be anyway imagine scientist forgotten lab experiment no I finishing creature from the depths of the ocean come to walk the land looking for helpless victims. No, I'm ogre stocking the village for fair maidens spirit away back to your cave. No. Well, then what named Peter Jackson? Are you supposed to be you Dr Floyd? I have the lab coat the bow tie the small head everything. Oh. Well. Going Fine Lookin' costume there. Dr Grant. We go trick or treating no, let's go. What's wrong chips? Okamoto no chips. There's no reason to be afraid of Halloween. It's good fun. Daughter Stephen have made a time trump. Figures where did they jump to go Japan in? Sixteen. I guess puts the cable on the trick or treating. Let's go to the ship. Dash off to their time and space ship and mere moments. Later, they are standing in a seemingly empty feed behind the council on the same dark and stormy night or began this episode. Chips do skin and see if you can find Dr Steve. There is a sudden brilliant flashing lights followed by a deafening of Sun. There before our heroes stand Dr Steve and frigid both sporting bright yellow galoshes to keep their piggy strike. No need to search foamy floyd. I'm right here. What are you doing here Steve What are your plotting to steel nothing? Always plotting your demise Dr Lloyd and I'm happy to say that I've done it this time get whatever you and featured posed no threat to us. Perhaps we don't, but it's not us. You should be worried about. What should concern you is one hundred percent authentic army of. ZOMBIES. Another flash of lightning reveals that our heroes are now surrounded by an army of Ninjas Zombie. Active your main activities. Those deeds chewing command, the whole reanimated reprobates starts chuckling their way toward Dr floored. Dr Grant and chips is this the end to Dr Lloyd's? To Stop Dr, Steve Dr Steve's perilous plan b the frightful finale of our heroes, and just how does the bone chilling band of Ninjas zombies few being unceremoniously uprooted from their gruesome graves have to so many years the ground. Find out next time on the creepy adventures of Dr Floor.

Steve Dr Steve Dr Grant Dr Floyd Dr Steve Cold Dr Steven Fidget Dr Foy Japan Dr Floor Duct Lloyd David Hasselhoff Inoke Castle Dr. Paul Figures Dr. Lloyd Hulk Hogan Waco Dr. Greg Stephen Timothy
Todd White on Biohacking for Longevity and Disease Prevention

The Keto Answers Podcast

06:31 min | 1 year ago

Todd White on Biohacking for Longevity and Disease Prevention

"Today on the show I, welcome my friend Todd White, who is the founder and CEO of dry farm. Wise if you drink alcohol. This is a tricky thing. I mean we we talk a lot about why he may dry farm. He does she like alcohol he thinks it's a narrow talks should be drinking it and but he has this company that. He loves one he wanted people to access it and have the healthiest possible. Imaginable and so if you're a wine drinker and your Kito or trying to be healthy removed out, there's a lot of Stephens episode that frequent blew my mind when we do have into it and I've been drinking his death and dry wines. Very often, but a couple of times a year special occasions I pops dry farm. Wise. It happened last five years but I had no idea about the ridiculous nature and how process and how much garbage is traditional winds. Tons of Info there which wines you choose and why if you want to be as healthy as possible. We him and I both sentiment that alcohol. There's nothing positive about it. But you know sometimes you want to enjoy life and have some why not a big deal? No judgment there and also todd is just a really really interesting guy when it comes to his intention digging a little bit about how he sort of crafted his business in life. Overall, he said interesting background I've known for a while and a great conversation. So tune in and I hope you guys enjoy. This episode is brought to you by neuro collective. I've been using their products on and off last few years in a huge fan of how they form the products their dosing in dumbest around. So Dr Greg Kelly. Their lead product formulator is actually on the podcast previously upset out but you can trust that knocker collective is always doing one hundred percent dosing backed up by research, a lot of companies where they do. They sprinkling amounts of ingredients. So that way you're not actually getting the full amount that is required to have physiological effect. He just get a little sprinkling and dosing and their their practice. So expected that Dr Kelly actually recommends taking two days a week and they're servings is is seven really huge capsules which just shows how much active ingredient actually put in their product I am personally a huge fan of the caffeine. Free. Version of their product quality mind and I take it on an empty stomach with exogenous ketones in the morning when I know that really want to get a bunch of an interrupted deep work hours done I feel in his own literally hours and the best part is there's no crazy crash afterwards if you're not a neutral person, sales have an amazing product called attorneys that contains all the precursors to d which is. Far More effective than taking direct d supplements to reduce oxidative damage to yourself. Again, love the formulation and how they went about making this. If you want to try out any neuro hacker collective products had two neuro hacker dot com and use the code aged one five for fifteen percent of all the products. That's any you are O. Hacker Dot Com Code Eight, G one, five for fifteen percent off all of their products. This episode is brought to you by Paleo Valley. I've been a huge fan of this company for years ever since I met the founders at a conference, I'd say four years ago plus in have been eating their hundred percent grass-fed grass finished beef sticks ever since then the because reading the recently, why asked them to come on the show's sponsor? Is that? They do a lot of support in regenerative farming. They actually continue to reinvest into helping small farmer scale in really building on an amazing supply chain to help regenerative agriculture scale. The only that they're beef sticks aren't dry bone and leave that weird slim Jim style waxy coating, your mouth, they are plump in. In in a weird way, we gobble these guys up at the perfect offices when we don't have time to get a full meal in perfect real food snack if you're looking for one of the best beef sticks around, that are not only great tasting but responsibly sourced checkout Paleo Valley and great news is listeners of the podcast get fifteen percent off. So just go to Paleo Valley dot com slash one five or use code ag one five at checkout epithelial Valley Dot Com fifteen percent off that's p. E. L.. V. A. L. L. E. Y., DOT COM SLASH E G, one, five talk. Thank you for joining me today. Hey, I'm looking forward to it. It's going to be a great discussion. You're one of the first people that I met. That were sort of early Keitel Angeles. Before this whole boom happened years. It started with Christmas, you guys three or four years ago when you first were up. It's been almost odd years but yeah, we were or I should say many people on the team as well. But. We We were super early adapters before it became a thing. Kid Genyk Guy. It was starting to circulate in the biohacking community about five years ago. Maybe five miss closest six years ago when I started and and you know it was it was getting around biohacking community had not yet gone mainstream. But. Yeah, we were there early and still still big believers. Yeah I mean what was it? That got you into everything being was just the sort of request to optimize your personal health. It was an actually that would be a little bit more glamorous but it was really about vanity I had I had reached a weight loss plateau. It wasn't really overweight and in any way because I've been biohacking and sort of. been. In, and out Akita Genyk. Diet. Really since the eighties with the Atkins Diet but I had been eating a lower car diet for quite some many years. So it wasn't really overweight but I really wanted to lean out. And I I was at a weight loss plateau and low carb just wasn't doing it, and so that's I experimented with Kito that way and then the weight loss went away pretty quickly as it tends to do for most people in fact, lost a lot more weight than I had anticipated. And then sort of what I thought was a set point and a place I wanted to be but I continued the Ketogenic Diet in fact. Double down on it and really became therapeutically Ketogenic, which is different than Akita. Diet. or a modified Keto Diet, which is the way I would describe my diet today but. But I experimented with really therapeutic Ketogenic, which is super high fat and and and a lot of blood testing and a lot of kind of quantification and. You know the cognitive benefits for me. became. So extraordinary that I just stayed on the Diet, even though I didn't have any plans of further white. House.

Paleo Valley Todd White Valley Dot Com Biohacking Founder And Ceo Dr Greg Kelly Dr Kelly Stephens Kito Akita Genyk Genyk Guy Caffeine Keitel Angeles JIM A. L. L. E. Y.
"dr. greg" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"For Kobe. I read this somewhere and I'm wondering. Yeah, it's funny that you asked me that question. Well. You know there's an interesting report in one of the dermatology journals. It came out late last week showing that in fact male pattern baldness. was in in their various small series, a risk factor for more severe disease. Now I suspect that this has to do more with being male or male hormones, because the interesting thing is that they also found this true for older women that we're experiencing more of a male pattern, baldness baldness, because of elevated Andrew Janik Hormone, so there is something to this simile with blood type. For example we've heard about group aid being higher risk than than Grupo. These are lots of individually small factors, including jeans in Baseline State of health, etc.. Even age that together determine and I wish we had an equation, but we don't yet that determine. What is your risk for having severe disease? If you were to get infected, and even having said that as as we all know, and it's it's. It's very unfortunate. You know we see young healthy kids in young healthy adults I'm getting very complicated, even fatal disease, so the what we know about the risk factors we know about don't explain all of it so that's why I still tell people you know. Universal precautions are still in order here this is. Is a serious disease and one thing we can talk about. Maybe at another time is emerging evidence that even people that have mild disease may still have evidences of some permanent damage to their body organs, so I think we have to take this and we are very very seriously. Oh, that's interesting. We'll put that on the docket for the next visit that we have well. It has been a real delight today to have infectious disease and biologist.

Kobe Andrew Janik Grupo
"Play It Again Sam!"

The Radio Adventures of Dr. Floyd

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"Play It Again Sam!"

"Drug became famous giving away free ice water but now that we work here. We can put by plan into action to make a fortune. It's very simple. We just have to take these cups and just then Dr. Steve was interrupted by the owner of Waldrop himself. Tad Houston all right. Y'All sit here. Yes Sir Mr used it. What did you say your name was again? Billy Bob Mr. Houston I'm Sally. May's older brother. She was awfully sorry she got all tied up and couldn't make shift but I told her I'd feeling for a while. I appreciate that kind of spirit boy. I'm just wondering why you had to wear her dress will. This is the store. Uniform is not it is but owner. Mind look we're about to open. There's already a line of people outside eager to get in your man in the Cup station. Right yes sir. All set excellent now went. Wait a minute what is that. What's what that thing standing next to you there. Yes you whatever you are sir. Why that's a that's a Jack local. Of course they thrive pretty well around these here. Power Jag. A that gives me an idea. I wonder if I could make a big statue of a to oops are the doors are open gets in with those cup has a throng of thirsty tourists. Pours in through the front door of wall. Drug are here on void prototype Dr Graham their fateful roebuck opinion. Ships land that time and space ship near the store. Remember Dr Grant. We don't want to go to seen. Dr Steve is apparently secured some form of employment at Wall Drug and we much foil his plot without letting anyone know from the future. I got Dr Floyd good thing. We have these period costumes. Yes poses a typical American family of the time stopping by to get your water. I'll be the doctor. Ub The sun and guess chips. You have to be the mom because the week in the dress will cover your more robotic. Tapert good now. Let's go stop. Dr Steve. Heroes Enter Wall drug amid a sea of tourists lined up to get their free ice water us by Dr Steve at the Cup station and hide behind a pickle barrel to watch what he's doing or four cups blue. Go Surf Floor Cups. They are tan sands apiece. So that'll be forty cents. But I thought the water was free. Oh the ice water is free. Yes Sir cups at ten cents apiece. Oh I see well all right. Here's forty cents. Thank you sir. The ice water whale is right over there fidget. Put these in your coin purse cheaper. Dr Floyd you see what he's doing. I sure do grant that no good. Laos is charging for the cups. That was never part of Ted. Ted's vision. What are we going to do when one thing we can do? What does me? I didn't shave. It was coming from this barrel. Our hero spoil the LID and spy a young girl bound and gagged in the barrel. Golly Tucker Floyd who is this is supposed to be employees. Dr Steve Ambush to get that ridiculous dress. He's wearing here. Let me take the bag off. Are you okay fan? But when I get my hands on the guy who did this to me isn't going to be fine. You said it sister. Just sit tight here for a second. I've got a plan. We'll get him for sure. You've got it Dr Greg. Follow my lead. Sure thing Dr Floyd Sallie Mae Swings back down into the barrel s Dr Floyd Dr Grant and Chips Approach Cup station. Good name my good man. I would like to have three cups for myself my wife and my son certainly sir. That'll be thirty cents. Thirty percent is water was calm down. Please there's no reason to get upset up shut. You promised me free. Ice Water remains free willy. But the cups of ten cents apiece most underhanded Dang I've heard of a bait and switch techniques. This one takes the cake taking advantage of poor. Tour's surreally really. We can settle this problem without shouting. What exactly is going on over here? Billy Bob you see Mr Houston this gentleman. Ralph what's going on over here? You're advertising free ice water yet. You're charging ten cents a cup Sir. You must be mistaken. We do not charge for cups. Everything about the US. Water IS FREE. The asked the water the cups. It's all free. Employees tried to charge me ten cents for each. Billy Bob is his true will sir. I thought that was the kind of thing. That capitalist like yourself would won't see we've already made over five dollars. Let's get something straight. I am not a capitalist. I'm trying to give people something they need. And if they buy something in addition to that well then that's fine. I truly believe anyone can succeed if you reach out to people in need. Now give me that money now. I'm terribly sorry sir. Here are your free cups. Is there anything else I can get you on the house? Of course my son would like a pickle of course have him go. Pick one out. Golly THANKS MR HOUSTON. I'll get one from this barrel right here. Not to grant goes over and lifts the top of the barrel and out pop sally. May's tapped me up. Stir address and Miss Beryl. Is this true? Will you see that? Would you do that to your poor sister? Not My sister I mean I mean. Well she is. How's your sister? A I have a feeling I'm being hoodwinked ear. Oh Sam just then from behind the panels steps like huge gorilla. Who STUMPS OVER TO MR HOUSTON? Sam I would like you to relieve this charlatan of Sally's dress and throw him and his Jack Elope out into the street. All those in the store singing samna piano blamed guerrilla grabs Dr Steven one swift motion removes him from selling as dress. Leaving is underwear. Nice boxers there billy Bob or should I say doctor Steve Louis. I should've known grant opens the door for Sam as he hurls Dr Steven Vigil after Landing Dr Steven. Hi Taylor back to their time and space ship. I'm terribly sorry for all the trouble. Sir. Don't mention it. You've got a great place here and I see a big future in appreciate dad yeah. Someday I'd like to expand it a bit. I've always wanted a big backyard. Someday Mr Houston Some Day. Come on grant son. Let's get back on the road. Sure thing dad come on mom. Can I borrow the car Friday night? Dad Get on the ship. Can I borrow ten dollars? Go get on. The ship are heroes returned to their ship and blast back off into the time and space. Trim has Dr. Steve learned his lesson. We'll have to continue chasing him throughout time. And just what did you think about having to wear a wig?

Mr Houston Dr Grant Tucker Floyd Steve Louis Billy Bob Billy Bob Mr. Houston Sir Mr Cup Station Dr Steve Ambush Dr Steve Dr Floyd Sallie Mae Dr Steven Dr Greg Dr Graham SAM Wall Drug Dr. Steve Tad Houston TED Waldrop
"dr. greg" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Count twists interviews since this. This is all begun and even in the last couple of months. I I'm sure you've lost count now but I'm wondering what is the most common question that you get asked in interviews? Probably the first one I did. His and people can hang their head and say. When is this going to all be over? And I don't know the answer to that question if I'm honest about my my guesstimate. And it's just that a guest in that no earlier than the winter of twenty twenty one and then people will tell me about symptoms. They've had and will ask me. Do you think I had Kobe? And you know the answer to that is evolving. Because what we're learning. Is that a lot of people have been infected in. Don't know it or had very minimal symptoms that they didn't attribute odd to Cogan. What's the evidence for me saying? That will just recently in. L. A. In California. They've done widerspread testing. I think that's about seven hundred thousand people something like that. Lo and behold about four plus percent of them are testing positive so by antibody tests meaning that they had been infected and as we talked about the numbers are probably even higher than that because the serology tests are not quite where they need to be and I think in in various locations in the US. We're GONNA find out that a lot of us probably were infected and really didn't know or attributed to you know a flu or something like that that would be very valuable to know it would be very reassuring and it would be he piece of how we in. A careful staged way as back into normal operations. Some sobering information actually. Is there anything else that you'd like to share with us before we go today? Greg you know I think the one thing we've touched on it. Sometimes that would courage all of our listeners. To as we all are learned from this and that is we are a bit cavalier in our culture about respiratory diseases. It's just the flu or well. Just have a little cough and people go to work. Go to school sick. They visit people in nursing homes in the hospitals. When they're ill. I think one of the things that I'm hoping will come out of this is that people will take respiratory diseases end of vaccines that we have available for them much more seriously and will be a more zealous in in guarding one another against the widespread transmission of these diseases. These masks might be here to stay for a while. Well thank you very much Dr Greg Poland virologist an infectious disease expert from Mayo Clinic. We've been visiting with today and thank you all for joining us on Mayoclinic Cuny.

Dr Greg Poland flu Cogan Mayoclinic Cuny Mayo Clinic Lo cough Kobe US California L. A.
"dr. greg" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

14:12 min | 2 years ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome to the Mayo Clinic. Dr Holy Magazine Guy. We're recording this episode on April the Twenty Second Twenty twenty and half with me again today Dr Greg Poland. Who's an infectious disease by polity expert from the Mayo Clinic? Thanks for being here Dr Poland. Whose ENJOY IT? I wonder if you'd start out today by just sharing as the latest numbers that you're hearing what's going on with the pander well worldwide word about point six million cases on Monday when we spoke just a couple of days ago it was about two point four so this is still a rapidly moving a pandemic in the US were it at just about eight hundred twenty thousand cases we were at seven hundred sixty five thousand on Monday. We have about a little over forty five thousand deaths on Monday. Were we were at about forty thousand deaths so while those numbers are still high one is beginning to sense that they're plateauing and as we talked about this lag period between when you get exposed than when you get sick enough to be counted can be fourteen to twenty eight days or so so we're just starting to see that plateau in the hard part will be the patience to continue this for perhaps another month or so. You talked a little bit about the numbers and it's the still were still seen infections. Does living in households convey any risk for transmission. What do we know about that since? We've all been social distancing concentrating infocomm that somebody there was a study just released from from China. That was a household transmission. Study they And I'll just look at the numbers here they had One hundred five people that were infected three hundred ninety two household members. All who were tested with. Are you look at the secondary attack? It's it was seventeen percent adult so in other words. If I'm sick what's the risks that my wife or another adult in the household would get infected? It was about seventeen percent about four percent for kids. If that index case quarantine themselves with all the measures we talked about household. Transmission was zero so it really works the court. The other side of that coin was well. What about the spouse where there'd be you the most intimate contact that attack rate was about twenty eight percent it? These measures are important. I know sometimes I get questions from people saying well. If somebody in my household has it is. Isn't it inevitable? As a matter of fact you can drive that two zero and that's a remarkable things speaking to the power of hand washing respiratory etiquette an appropriate isolation warranty. Well that is really amazing. Because if you think about all the surfaces that are shared in a household etc maybe it gives us hope for going back to work in doing other activities proper precautions. At some point there is such a dizzying array of Tessa for Cobra. Nineteen being discussed in the media and otherwise both tests for. I haven't now and serology tests for did I ever have it. There's talk about household kind of tests that can be done at home. Is this likely to become a reality and would help with the testing numbers that were seen? Were whether it's just not enough capability to test. Will you know you've you've put your finger on a an absolutely key issue in terms of how do we intelligently reopen and how would we intelligently reclosed this fall which many of us think is is like and a key to that is going to be testing? Otherwise we have no real idea of the amount of community transmission. That's occurring. The problem is in the rush to get these tests. Out The FDA has issued emergency use authorizations and what that means is that they haven't gone through the usual very careful clinical testing that we would normally put a test. That's going to be used in humans through so Some studies have suggested that the sensitivity and what that means is if I actually am in fact a new. Do this test army. What's the chance that it will be positive? Might only be about fifty percent five. Oh a flip of a coin and so I think before. We really have widespread testing. We're going to need assays that have been validated. And where we know Are they going to be appropriate and give us a good intelligence? The other tests that that was just released which is an interesting. One is the idea of allowing people to have it home. A Swab test so this is not have been infected. It's M. I. Infected now. I'm in what they're proposing lease. This company that's released it is to put. What looks like a q tip gist into the first half inch or inch of the of bananas and doing that on both sides. We have no idea how good dad ask say. Is We know that. In general you have to do a nasal torrential swab which goes up quite a bit into the nose in nasal passages It's uncomfortable. Somebody's unlikely to do that to themselves. On on their own and they're gonNA start with using it in healthcare workers first responders. So it's it's something that holds promise but I think we need to see the data a little while ago. We were hearing an awful lot about hydroxy Clark wine. And his sister Maya San in even president trump was talking about it on some of his Daily updates So much so that here mail. We had to put limits on how people prescribe those medications when a to preserve the supply. What do we know at this point about whether those are effective for treating who've nineteen but let me make a comment because I think it it pertains to so much surrounding this pandemic there is of course immense pressure and desire to get things out quickly whether it's a drug cast of vaccine and one understands that in has great empathy for People? Healthcare workers etc. Who who need to know. Want to know but there is no substitute for careful patients of scientific work. Let's just take this example of hydroxy chloroquine and reminds me a lot of pressure public and otherwise as you said to do something in us this. We now have to create good studies. That are showing one study done in in the Va that there was no benefit to this. Another study from France showing there was no benefit to either one or combination of those in fact evidence of harm in it as you and I know some of those drugs can do things to the heart rhythm like prolonged some of the electrical activity and actually cause harm. If they're not monitor Again I think this is really important because it says now when we actually done. The clinical trials is all this enthusiasm warranted and more and more data is accumulating to say no and in fact there might be Har- now other anti-viral drugs like rim. This aveer which we talked about it is a is a different story. We have some encouraging news. There look forward to hearing Morris Develops WE'VE HEARD ABOUT RISKS FOR PATIENTS? And what makes covert worse for? Some patients perhaps male different age groups that Cetera. Are there other risk factors that are becoming known that affect Either the development of Cova nineteen or how the the vitalize progresses illness for those patients that scenario where inside fourteen fifteen weeks. We've developed a lot of knowledge so I think everybody's familiar with the fact that older age heart disease lung disease diabetes things like that are risk. Factors We have not seen pregnancy. Be A risk factor for complicated disease. I have to say that's a surprise. Given how pregnancy is very much a risk factor for influenza. Smoking is turning out. Of course no surprise there to be a risk factor but a couple of things that are a little bit interesting here and that we don't have an answer for one is that males of any age seemed to have more severe disease than female so I mentioned of any age because it's not simply hormonally driven. There's something else happening there. In our our host genes. The other thing is that obesity. Now we did know that from from flu. So it's not that much of a surprise but obesity is turning out to be a risk factor that may increase your risk of severe disease by as much as two fold so we're beginning to get a more and more complete picture the other thing that has just recently has been reported is about five cases of Gaon Beret. This isn't a sending paralysis. This can happen with a variety of viral and parasitic infections. It can happen from influenza. And now we're starting to see some cases as a result of Kobe. Nineteen not very many but nonetheless case reports here and there there's a report that came out of South Korea about one hundred and forty patients. I believe who had been tested positive with Cova. Nineteen men seem to recover and now again tested positive. What did you make of that? You can imagine the the concern that this is raced in. It's a very complicated issue. I think probably one of two things is happening. One is maybe just very ability in testing. I do not believe that these people have recovered. And then that quickly been reinfected that would not be consistent with everything we know about the human immune system so it's either variability in testing or one part of that can be remembered that the RTP CRI say the diagnostic essay is just detecting pieces of the virus. It doesn't mean that there is virus in there that's so to speak live and capable of infecting somebody else it could be residual pieces of the virus that are there as part of your recovery on so what they're doing and it's an appropriate step though as you might imagine has some risk associated with a is there actually culturing that virus in human cells in a test tube to see are we actually seeing live virus or just these pieces. The same thing has happened in regard to checking stool specimens. Some people are shedding virus for as long as thirty days. Does that mean they're infectious? We don't know and in fact. Some countries some locales in the US. The country of France and others are actually going to waste water and sewage treatment plants and looking for evidence of the virus. And what I've noticed. Is that this is the other side of the disease is before people have actual symptoms. They can detect at the population level virus in the wastewater in the sewage. And they know that in five days they're gonNA start seeing cases so we're learning a tremendous amount here the the trick will be putting it into the proper context and understanding. You talked a little bit earlier about how it may be necessary to be reactive. So in other words that as we begin to open we may see changes in in the incidents Or even the second wave of infections that I've been hearing about what does that mean and when might have happened as somebody who studies these viruses in his EVAC sinologist. I have. I'll say grave concern when you think about this. Kobe outbreak in the US. It started in mid to late February so we were in fact past are influenza epidemic. It's unlikely that will happen. This fall rather we will have in a perfect overlapping fashion influenza epidemics and CO VID recurrence occurring. The problem is that the symptoms overlap nearly exactly particularly initially the second is the tremendous surge demand on the medical system and the third will be the anxiety around that and do we really close everything down again and do what we've just been through for the last Several months at this remains to be seen. I think what's going to be really key. We have difficulties with getting people to take flu vaccine. What's really going to be key to encourage everybody six months of age in older. Which is the recommendation to get a flu van scene and in this case to get it as early as it's available now wait until December January. Oh you have done..

influenza US Cova Mayo Clinic Dr Greg Poland France Twenty Second Twenty obesity Dr Holy Magazine China Va flu vaccine FDA Tessa South Korea chloroquine Har Morris Maya San
"dr. greg" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

10:18 min | 2 years ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"Blowing an amazing or able to do through technology to share all of this information to with people so pretty grateful and happy right now. Do you still keep in touch with With athletes You know top athletes. Because the reason I'm asking is the you know they just cancel the Summer Olympics or they've postponed them sorry until twenty twenty one. I'm curious your thoughts on that and if you've I know you're busy better if you've got a chance to speak to any any athletes about that you know for sure. I've still got a few athletes and coaches that. I work with not had a few athletes on this podcast and I think that every single one of them universally be it You know Tommy fleetwood. Who's a goal leak Golfer Kylie masses world champion swimmer? Both have been on the show on my podcast There have both indicated that this is the right thing to do. It's hard but it's understandable. Everyone's echoing the fact that health comes first global pandemic that transcends sports. Obviously it's very difficult because in the Olympic Year. You decrease your training. You don't actually do as much training as you normally would do. You're sharpening refining. You're speeding up. You've actually artwork in the two to three years before and so the Olympic year is about peak performance basically from September almost for eleven months into the Olympic. So they're going to have to get back into really hard training really quickly to get back as much fitness as possible. So that once you enter into training again in October to prep for twenty twenty one. You're going to be able to get back into that sharpening as again. So it's hard. It's going to require some changes to the plan because actually rate now they would have all been starting to taper into the Olympics. Back off their training. They'll get rid of fatigue Aches and pain stress. You know really sharpened and refined technique. Actually that's all out the window. It's back to basics. End Up leveling fitness. So I gotta get back into as soon as possible. Back into the gyms back into the pools back onto the tracks I know Kyle has been broadcasting. Her dry-land workouts skipping in pushups. In you know all the stuff. She's in her backyard so they I think they recognize that. It's the right thing to do. It's very hard. Yeah obviously some athletes are gonNA miss out. This was their chance of the year. Now that might be too old. They might be injured. So that's tragic but I think everyone's on board with it being the right thing to do. Yeah it must be a huge mental reset as well. You can just imagine sort of operating your entire life. You know ten twenty years in some cases for this one moment everything defined in timed down to a specific day set. You know at a specific data. Certain time of day you are going to be at your absolute best Physiologically mentally emotionally and all of a sudden that gets thrown out. So and you don't know if you're going to get that chance or not their stories going all over the place. You've dedicated your life to something at a specific time in. It's suddenly taken away in then. There's waffling in you know the. Ioc about isn't going to happen. Is it not going to happen? Everyone knows it's not going to happen. And they're being stubborn about it for whatever reason and then. Eventually you learn that it's been canceled. No you're you're basically three months from the finish line something that you've been working for for your tire life and that disappears and then gets pushed out and so you have to reevaluate reset refocus a launch rate back into it with no looking backwards whatsoever. You can't have what if thoughts you simply have to have. Okay what now thoughts so you. You accept what has happened. You launch right into it and you have to move forwards which is not too different from what all of us need to do right now as well in the world. It is what it is. It's out of our control to some extent although we do need to obviously follow the guidelines that are being released and suggested by the World Health Organizations and professionals who are very clear about what we need to do to minimize this pandemic and get through it as quickly as possible but Yeah it's interesting to watch how the athletes are responding and what we can learn from it. I've got to ask you this because your father. I know you've got your your daughter is is is seems to be fully engaged with with her schooling What can parents do to To help keep their kids focus at this time you know during this pandemic so what we have done is pretty impressed. Let me back. Judas has done has done is she rocks and I have no idea give do one hundred percent. I am watching her absolutely dominate. This situation and like just do incredible. Things are houses actually better now than it was before and ceased doing a bunch of different stuff. The first thing is there's a defined structure we launched into that a week ago. Once we realized that we were going to be in this for the long haul. This is not going to be over anytime soon. So we sort of mentally set ourselves for the fact that she was probably not going to happen for the rest of the year. I would be shocked if it did if it did. My kids aren't going back. We're GONNA bunker down for a little while. Yeah and so. She built a structure for the kids. Get up at a certain time and really interesting. Actually as they have started to sleep a lot more. They're starting to wake up earlier on their own. So it's not like we're fighting to get out of bed to go to school anymore. Like they're both up and added at around seven. Am which is Kinda cool. They're getting rested so anyway. They're up super healthy breakfast. One goes outside for a walk. The dog out for Walks. Kids go for walks. We all go outside. Then they come in. They got an hour of schoolwork that they do. They're doing duo lingo Adam. My five year olds learning French in grades. Nine she's learning Norwegian. They'd get to choose what language they learn They both got math books. They launch into math for a little while. Not Very Long like thirty minutes. Each like we're keeping it pretty tight and pretty short. Then you need something a bit. More active Selangor goes in the back room and plays piano for a little while. Adam we've set what we do. Is We set up pillows. He sits in the living room. We put pillows all around him. We put the IPAD in front of him and he takes drumming lessons. He's got drumsticks smashes the pillows all around him with head with headphones connected into the heat has drumming and he goes mental for half an hour step burdensome that burn some energy that brings us to in around lunch eat some food go outside play a little bit burn. Some energy come back in repeat. The cycle was different topics than it gets about. Two thirty three o'clock they're done right now. They're doing video. Call check INS with their teacher to explain what they've done every day. They also do something artistic. So there's like drawing dares Creating of different things. They've done a couple of web project so they're pretty engaged with a lot of stuff and then from about four till six. Just unleash them and make them as tired as possible. So we do like psych claiming Gosh what scoring we do running. We do Liming. We do like climbing trees last night. Because we're still outdoors. We're obviously not touching the equipment at the at the moment since we're staying away even from park benches and stuff like that but we just unleash them on on that on nature per couple hours come in six o'clock baths bed read. And they're all out cold by like seven thirty eight o'clock GonNa get twelve hour so that is what we're setting up using techniques like the ipods. We've got set up got dueling go. We've got YouTube kids video less drumming lessons in math. La Mass lessons in piano lessons rewarded a whole bunch of math books. The kids are doing math at home. And Yeah we've got like crayons and markers and pens like just going all in on creating an environment where they're basically you know at school in the House and because there's a structure and the kids know what they're doing out what time they don't argue or fight or negotiate it just is. This is math thirty minutes. They sit down and do it. Okay cool music time on our thing that we've got up on the wall okay. Let's go into music. So there's no negotiating. There's no discussion like it's just like school right. They're not negotiate. Class STARTS OR STOPS YOU. Just lean into it and you go and so we've just tried to replicate that scenario here as much as possible. Wow you after. All this is done can be sending kids to your house. That's not gonNA happen. I will be sending well. You know what that's actually funny. I'm happy at this is all over top. Other kids come in as long as I can get rid of mine down totally down. I'M GONNA be so sick of my kids by just kidding. Actually really loving being at home with them a little bit at the moment given how much I normally travel. So it's pretty cool. Red Sauce of Dr Greg Wells. Thank you so much for joining me today. you've got a fascinating book that just released Your your you've got an active blog. Obviously the the weekly Podcast newsletter If people want to sort of consumer find out more information about what you're doing and all these amazing tips that you share. Where can they go? Thanks very much so the new book is rest. Refocus recharged if anyone wants to pick it up. Now's your chance to read a book without being interrupted. I'd be honored and privileged if you did so if you want to connect with me on social there they are all at Dr Greg Wells. Dr Greg Wells and my website. Is Dr Greg Wells and my consulting company as wells performance dot com. You can check out everything all over that but if you just search Dr Greg Wells on Google. You'll find me and super thrilled answer. Everyone's questions a lot more a lot more time now than normally have so. I flipped a message to my website. And they'd be happy to get back to you and thanks for having me on the show. I really appreciate it. Keep up all the great work that you're doing as well. I'm super honored privileged to be connected and looking forward to you know carrying on the conversation in the future when things are a little bit less intense and We can dig into the stuff a little bit more. Absolutely thank you so much really appreciate it pleasure..

Dr Greg Wells Olympics Tommy fleetwood Adam Kyle YouTube Ioc Google World Health Organizations Judas
"dr. greg" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

Welcome with Karim Kanji

11:13 min | 2 years ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on Welcome with Karim Kanji

"Tryout like right now I'm spare minting with Coffee and coconut milk or coconut oil and cinnamon and bunch of other stuff trying to figure out a concoction that I like. That fuels me for all. These podcasts interviews. Doing at the moment. And so. It's it's our time maybe take up meditation. Take up photography. 'cause you can photograph all sorts of stuff in your in your like. Now's the time rebuild from scratch. You know take this opportunity and obviously I believe that if we do all of those things that actually improves our health and strengthens our immune system. Which is even more important in this time. So yeah that's what we're doing. Now you're a big proponent of of sleep I remember where I heard you speak. Oh my goodness months. Maybe a month ago and and you talk to you talked about Kawhi Leonard. And or you started off with Kawhi Leonard and sort of The the regiment at the Toronto Raptors had him on. And then you tie that into everyone in the audience and an and sleep in the importance of that I'm wondering if you could talk a little bit about that. Especially you know the situation where you're right. We're all at home were commuting less We've got more time theoretically to do different things. What's what's the real important Important about sleep that you find well. I think it's about recovery and regeneration so the story that I told US based about Kawhi Leonard when he was playing for the Toronto Raptors playoffs a year ago. Now might can't believe how fast time has gone but the year before Leonard joined the Toronto Raptors in the NBA. The basketball now for anyone. Who's not familiar with that? And when he was with San Antonio the Spurs the year before he was injured wasn't getting along with the medical staff sort of withdrew into his own world Ultimately got traded so he was run down He was not recovering from his injuries. And as a result he wasn't able to perform to his potential as an athlete when he got to Toronto. The first person that he began to work with was Alex mckechnie the Director of Sports Science for the Toronto Raptors physiotherapist and Alex began to work with Kawhi on what's called Load Management Strategies. Which meant over you know. First of all they began to do lots of Rehab. They began to strengthen Back to base training a rebuilt his fitness dealt with the injury the best that they could and to ensure that he would not get broken down during the course of the season as he played himself into game shape. They made sure that he didn't do any back to back games. They made sure that They tracked his minutes and kept his minutes low so that by the time he got to the playoffs he was healthy and fit and energized which is a slightly different approach than is normal. In Pro sports we push push push. Go go go. And if get injured you get injured into sort of attrition and so this is something that I think is relevant for all of us in the world in general and especially right now when we need to be recovering and regenerating recharging even more and so I think we can all apply this concept of load management to our lives which means we work. We work really hard. That's totally fine. We're on a project. We're all in on the project we get it done. We do our very very very best when we're trading. We're in the gym. We're working hard or in your home. Gym Now are running or playing in the park. Whatever happens to be at the moment to stay fit? But then when it's time to recover and to regenerate that is the most important thing that you can do that turns us all into twenty four hour quotes athletes where we perform to our potential but then we eat super healthy foods. We have nutrients that we need to rebuild ourselves in an sleeps that we can rebuild our tissues during the course of the night. Clean our brains out. Heal the body activate the immune system. And it's a slightly different approach than people may be used to thinking about but sort of like go all out and then recovered regenerate so instead of being seventy percent function all the time. We're going for one hundred ten percent function and that thirty percent function. It's kind of wild it in this this moments of the corona virus that everyone's being forced to take that time to decompress to relax a little bit at home to slow the pace of life down. We even see the planet healing as we as we do that as well which is almost like the entire planet is doing this together. So it's a it's a very very interesting time to watch is wild. I you mentioned earlier about how you and your wife had to figure out or rejig your your last hour or protect that that last hour I remember you talking about the last hour. Sort of you know before you go to bed is the time where you just want to relax. Can't remember if you said like read a book read some fiction or whatever talked to me about the importance of that. Yeah I think that it's so powerful when we control our lives a lot more than maybe used to doing. We understand that we are actually in control of how we sleep. We are actually in control of our energy levels. We are in control of our fitness. Were in control of our performance in one of the ways. I think that we can control. Our quality of our sleep is by thinking about that last hour as an opportunity to decompress to slow down to unplug to calm ourselves down. I've got two little. Kids are five and nine and you know over dinner last night. Judith was literally whispering over dinner and I was like what are you doing? She's like trying to calm the kids down like Oh and so yeah we can do. Things like read fiction. I think that when you read a great story at activates the same regions of the brain that you use to dream and so it sets us up for getting into a place where we can visualize imagine and drift off into a really great sleep rather than reading prince between reading the latest headlines. Scrolling through your newsfeed on all of the stuff that's going on right now and then putting your ipad down and trying to fall asleep versus reading a great book hardcopy with a little night light till you get fatigued until you got a little bit drowsy. Put The book down. Flip off late and go to sleep like just imagine the difference in your mindset at that particular moment as you drop off to sleep either prompted with frings diety versus calm and restful and sort of daydreaming or straight night dreaming almost as you drop into into sleep so when we defend out last hours huge. I've also been doing little tricks like really if I've had a good workout during the day or do a hot bath at night. Some salts the the research on epsom salts is sketchy but I like them in stand up and then just cool off in a shower. And that way. You're you're relaxed. You'RE COM. You've absorbs him magnesium possibly through the skin not hundred percent. Sure vote that according to the research. But I L- I I personally greg enjoy it. So it's like an end of one on my own personal experiment. Standup cool shower when you decrease body temperature. That triggers the release of Melatonin which makes a big difference in terms of your ability to fall asleep quickly installed blackout blinds and all of the rooms in our house to make sure that when we are sleeping the rooms are pitch black. We're trying to be really consistent with what time we go to sleep. That also helps because with the body learns went to release Melatonin so if you are consistent with your bad time. It's going to know when it's supposed to release those hormones into your system to help you to fall asleep at the right times. There's lots of things that we can be doing in that last hour to create a barrier between the day and when we fall asleep to enable us to sleep well in the first half of sleep with that does is. There's the emphatic system activates which washes out the brain. We encode All of the things that we've learned during the course of the day into long term memory. Second-half sleep when physiologically recover a little bit better and also when we have creative and we problem solve so all these amazing things happen when we sleep and we might think of ourselves being sort of immobile and sleep is a a time when the body shuts down. It's actually very active. Lots of things are happening. Lots of things are rebuilding themselves. Lots of things are being cleaned out. And so it's a very very active time in the last hours. The key I believe setting you up to getting a great sleep as often as possible. You're you're you're speaking and thinking my brain on my goodness. I want to be an Olympic athlete. I think it's like your your your training. How how did you did you fall into this? Did you was passion as you were a kid? How did you get so curious and interested in in in in how to maximize the potential of your body Yeah I did sort of fall into it in a weird way. I kind of fell out of a wave so when I was young I was a competitive swimmer and a reasonably good. I was on the Canadian youth to youth team. And as part of that on March break in when I was fifteen years old went down to Florida on a training camp and got caught in a great big wave and bodysurfing which we shouldn't have been doing but anyway Wave dropped me on. My head broke my neck and a whole bunch of places and that sort of sparked my interest in the human body as I went through traction neuro surgery and then back into swimming again and ultimately was able to swim through university and then go commentating Olympics in Barcelona. Which was the coolest thing I've ever done in my life Superfund at twenty one years old but So you can sort of do the math figure out how old I am. And so yeah. That was really interesting. They did a kinesiology degree. Came out of my kin. Degree STARTED TO DO CONSULTING BUSINESSES. That was awesome. Rapidly hit a ceiling discovered needed. More education went back into the master's PhD in the first one was in exercise science. Which was what I was interested in that morphed over and drifted into respiratory physiology breathing that was the PhD that launched me into respiratory medicine at tickets hospital with cystic fibrosis. And and that led me into oncology and working with kids with leukemia because some of them develop lung problems as they're going through chemotherapy that lead into biomedical engineering at Toronto General. So like that was the cadence and pathway for everything and then ultimately ended up commentating another couple of Olympics. That's re sparked. My speaking which I was doing twenty years earlier consulting for businesses and that's the Ark of of everything. That's sort of been happening since I was you know got hit by that way when I was fifteen all the way up to this particular instant when we're talking about human physiology at scale through your podcast. It's it's you imagine you'd never in a million years could have probably predicted what we could do right now and It's just it's so mind blowing an amazing or able to do through technology to share all of this information to with people so pretty grateful and happy right now. Do you still keep in touch with.

Kawhi Leonard Toronto Raptors Melatonin Olympics Toronto Toronto General Alex mckechnie US leukemia San Antonio Spurs Florida Director of Sports Science Judith NBA greg Wave
"dr. greg" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Nineteen researcher. Dr Greg Poland Answers Your Corona virus questions. I continue to believe 'cause we have not reached the peak of this yet. I think we are in for this over month not week. What should you disinfect? An how often should you do? You have a much easier job in your home with cleaning your hand after that. It is of course your telephone. Can you order? Take out food while you're sheltering in place takeout food and even ordering growth rates for Irish people is smart idea should we be reorganizing our summer schedules? Would I lie? Italy or China This summer no. What can we learn from? How other countries are combating the cove in nineteen outbreak? New Rochelle New York. They actually needed a containment area about one mile square and being a precipitous fall in case but it worked the answers to your corona virus questions my motto is. We really have to turn from a new culture to a leak culture next on Mayoclinic a welcome. Everyone I'm Dr. Tom. Shy and I'm Tracy. Mccray we are with Dr Greg Poland Infectious Disease Specialist Vaccine Expert at the Mayo Clinic for another update on the covert nineteen disease. Dr Poland good to talk to you again. Always happy to be here. Hopefully those. This won't last too long but we don't know how long do we know we built and You know as we've talked a bit Before there's this lag period between what we see and what happens two weeks from now so I continue to believe since we have not reached the peak of this yet nor have we seen the spread from the large EPI centers like New York and Washington happen with their full force to other area I think we're in for this month not week. We're recording this interview on March Twenty Fifth and the first question that we have is more a comment from a youtube viewer. Who said speaking of spread you in? Dr Sides are too close and so just so that you know Dr Poland. We are no longer close and he has tape measure. Why are you not practicing social distancing one recording and you know what that is a good question and we are we miss for not practicing what we preach even watched. You guys didn't enter my mind too that betting and Tracy sometimes forgets that. I'm at high risk for this. Covert nineteen. She stays over there. I stay over here good question. Thanks for alerting us to that. All Right Fifty. Five thousand cases so far twenty six thousand of those in New York eight hundred and nine deaths about what you expected yet. That's a case.

Dr Greg Poland New York Tracy Dr Sides researcher youtube Disease Specialist Vaccine Exp Mayoclinic Mayo Clinic Dr. Tom Mccray Italy China Washington
Why Does Hand Washing Beat Hand Sanitizer Hands Down?

BrainStuff

06:23 min | 2 years ago

Why Does Hand Washing Beat Hand Sanitizer Hands Down?

"This episode is part of the miniseries. We're doing on some health and safety topics surrounding the novel type of coronavirus identified in two thousand nineteen which causes what is therefore being called covert nineteen because everything is a little less scary when you understand it better so you're probably aware that with the novel. Virus outbreak hand sanitizer has gotten very hard to find however soap seems to still be in good supply. This is a little counter intuitive given that to keep yourself safe from this virus the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend handwashing. I and using hand sanitizer only as a backup. If you don't have access to running water we spoke with Dr Greg Poland a representative for the Infectious Diseases site of America and professor of Medicine and Infectious Diseases at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester Minnesota. He said proper hand washing is the safest most efficacious least expensive and readily available method to prevent disease. So why would plain old soap and water be more effective against germs than alcohol based hand sanitizer? Poland explained when you're physically washing your hands. You're doing three things. You're removing visible dirt and Mucus. You're using a soap that decreases surface tension. And you're physically by friction loosening removing and washing away. Whatever is on your hand. This includes germs that you can't see and is perhaps particularly effective at stopping the spread of some germs like Corona viruses because the outer casing of these germs is made up of Lipids. Which are fats just as soap can wedge itself down between particles of Greece on a dirty pan and help break it up? Molecules of soap can elbow into that lipid envelope around a microbe and break it apart. Thus rendering the microbe unable to attack and infect cells studies have shown that soap and water is more effective than hand sanitizer it removing certain viruses and bacteria that attack the intestines and respiratory tract corona viruses included and handwashing is especially effective for very dirty hands. Such as those. You get from gardening playing sports or wiping the runny nose with the back of your hand. Poland said if your hands are visibly soiled hand sanitizer can't get all the skins surfaces and if your hands have mucus on them hand sanitizer cannot penetrate remember. If you have the flu. For example influenza viruses will be present in your mucus. Several studies have shown that handwashing got rid of the flu virus from hands. Much faster than hand. Sanitizer did okay. So we've gone over why handwashing trump's hand sanitizing but in order for handwashing to work. You have to do it properly. You've probably seen a billion memes this week about how to do it but let's review the steps for everyone's sake. There are a whole bunch of times that people should be washing their hands but probably the most important are before you prepare or eat food after using the bathroom. And before you touch your face. Here's the protocol according to the CDC. I WHAT HANDS CLEAN RUNNING? Water warm or cold will do then turn off the tap and apply soap lather your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Any soap will work. It doesn't have to be antibacterial and remember antibacterial. Soap will help. Keep you safer from viruses than regular soap. Because they're different critters as you lather and rub make sure to get all the parts of your hands. The backs palms between the fingers and under fingernails. Start at your fingertips and work backward. Rub Your hands for at least twenty seconds. You Can Hummer Sing. Happy Birthday twice or some other diddy. If counting doesn't do it for you. The five seconds that most people take to wash their hands doesn't get as many microbes afterwards. Rinse your hands. Well under running water and dry them using a clean towel or with an air dryer. If you're in a public restroom it helps to use a paper towel to turn the faucet off and to open the bathroom door. A lot of publicity has gone into educating people that they're not washing for long enough but many are also missing the mark by not thoroughly rubbing all parts of the hand Polin said think of how we viruses bacteria etc into our body. It's with the area of the hand that nobody washes properly. That is the fingertips people. Wash the palm. They washed the back of their hands. They washed the bottom third of the fingers. But have you ever seen someone wash fingernails or tips so the next time you're washing up? Make a point to pay extra attention to these oft neglected appendages. There will be times though when hand? Sanitizer just makes more sense than handwashing. Let's say you were in the bathroom at your office. Followed all the steps outlined above. So now you have perfectly clean hands but wait. You need to open the door that leads from the hallway where the bathroom is back to your office. Dozens of people opening and closing that door all day. Applying dollop of hand sanitizer might be easier than washing your hands again. So here's the correct way to do that. I make sure you're applying enough about a quarter to a half dollar sized amount of him. Sanitizer is necessary. Rub It all the parts of your hand starting from the fingertips and working your way. Back to disinfect. And don't forget in between your fingers. Polin said keep doing that until it's dry that way you know you've had an exposure time for that disinfectant to kill resist the urge to wipe your hands on a paper towel or your pants to speed up the drying process since hand sanitizer and washing can be very drying. You might want to keep some hand lotion or cream nearby to apply once your hands are dry and just one more thing. Dr Poland has fielded questions from people who asked about using disinfecting wipes like those made by clorox or Lysol on their skin. As an added layer of protection he strongly advises people against this quote. Do not wipe your face clorox wipes do not clean your nose with it and do not suck on it. It DOES NOT HELP. It will harm you and it hurts. It offers no benefit

Dr Greg Poland CDC Poland Polin Clorox Professor Of Medicine And Infe FLU Rochester Minnesota Respiratory Tract Mayo Clinic America Representative Greece
"dr. greg" Discussed on PowerUp Your Presence

PowerUp Your Presence

08:06 min | 2 years ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on PowerUp Your Presence

"To Put all of this learning hanging in practice. It's a we can read. You know like I know some people. They have peach tea engulf literature. But then you gotta go out there and and the game so I'm so thank you so much I I'd like to wrap up with what we call our lightning acting in round and very quickly a recent book or author was impacted. How you see the world I have a stack of them any and looking and I'm going to get one hang on? It's really interesting. This is good way wait. Oh this is todd Herman e sorry the Alter Ego and Todd is incredible Psychologist and worked with some of the world's top athletes in what he teaches. People bowl is to have an alter ego in so Is the alter ego is the characterization of who you should be. Performance performance moments so Serena Williams for example when she plays tennis as a psychology of an ultra ego that she drops into when she steps onto the court. That could could be superman. could be bad girl could be iron and it could be the hulk like whatever so He'd Chris sort of build this persona you. I need in order to get into the state that you need to be to perform at your best moments that matter to you the most so an academia like the calm relaxed person. Listen if you're interfacing with your hits example it could be the energized. I if you're about to step on stage and speech or You know that the analytical calm person you might WanNa be if you're a teacher so all sorts of different states that you can get into a little mind hack that you can use to enter into that state a little bit more easily so that's the cruelest look. I've read recently. I think people could probably probably benefited from all right. Alter ego effect habit a skill most people don't know about you habit a bit or skill paddleboard a ton that's sort of my my passion. I love being out on the water. I was out this week. It was super cold. It definitely shouldn't have been out there. It was sort of. You know a little bit of risk which which I kind of liked so Yeah Paddle boarding is is my minute thing. I'm trying to learn how to paddle veterans trying to learn how to move around on the board. I'm trying to learn how to control the board in the waves a little bit. So yeah. That's my my new thing nice. They've placed on vacation. So a few years ago Judith and I were sitting down and we were it was early December and we were so tired because we are two little kids at the time. We still have super little but we were looking for vacation spots when you're scanning the European and we are looking at Bermuda. Where like Florida airing around the December holidays so expensive and so to get to go to like an all anyway? It's just crazy and so we couldn't really figure figure anything out. That was going to work for us so I was flipping through outside magazine. Which is my favorite magazine and assault of little tiny note on the bottom of one of the pages? Komo News Surf Camden Nicaragua. NCO Nicaragua's pretty hardcore it's under underdeveloped countries. So far it's radio. Costa Rica's beautiful folded Costa Rica thirty years ago in terms of its development. So I figured it was either going to be the greatest vacation we've ever had or a random. The airport can be an expensive flight but it turns out was the criminal spot. We found a beautiful surf camp Rate your five inches on the Pacific. It goes to pick rog. La La Inner. A bunch of times worse back Riding Mountain biking through the jungle is monkeys everywhere. Herbs Harris like snakes whenever we go there quite often were heading back there again in January hoping that the political situation in Nicaragua stabilizes we haven't been in eighteen months because of the political shoes down there at the moment hoping to stabilize a sweet girl back soon wonderful. What makes you the most hopeful about the Komo? thunder over the world. Thrilled with her. I love her and I love her. Jeff Resilience I love the way that she is a sort of putting people in their place when they go after her about you know her differences. And she's so strong Ron in confidence in well-spoken passionate and emotional on point and I love the fact that she's defending science in mobilising the in children of the world to do what we all need to do as fast as possible which is to address climate change as quickly as we possibly can so she's making hopeful and she's an incredible role model for my my daughter WHO's nine and my son is four Aladdin's young sorta get it at the moment but ingrid is latching onto that stuff and you know. I think that they can be a powerful forces versus changing. We need to support them as much as possible. 'cause we certainly blew it in our generation so now responsibility to help the young wines and for us to make those changes this quickly as possible because we're the ones can make it with them coming along quickly ensue. It's the world is she really stepped in and she truly is a role model and inspiration. Not only for young people for all of us would agree with that. Thank you so much Dr Wells for joining joining us this morning. It's been a pleasure speaking to you and I'm committing to getting more consistent before bed and always always learn so much from talking to you. Thank you so much for joining us this morning. Yeah my pleasure love chatting to us you thank you for all your support over the years and to take some time to have a one one on one shot which we don't often get a chance to those events so I'm honored and privileged ticket the time to be with us. It's been really really wonderful. Thank you and we look forward to your new book coming out right on me to. Can't we just get it. Oh all right. Thank you so much biking by we we invite everyone to subscribe to Dr Wells podcast and sign up for the ripple effect online course and make this the best year of your life. All the details can be found in the show notes for today's episode episode. If you enjoy today's episode we invite you to rate and review our podcast in the apple or Google. podcast store additionally we are excited to give you the chance to win a copy. Be of one of Dr Greg Wells books the ripple effect and the focus of fact. Here's how to enter head over to instagram page at corporate class follow us and like the ripple effect post comment on the post sharing a key insight. You took away from listening to our interview. Dr Wells One. Lucky winner will be chosen at random random from the comments below. Good luck on. The details can be found in the show notes. Very today's episode every morning. Set your intentions toward let your dreams. Some may refer to goals. We like the word dreams. It sounds more exciting and not so hard to think about. We hope to meet you in person one day. A one of our workshops or you may even decide that private coaching is more for you. winker jude to go to our website at Corporate Class Inc.. I N C DOT COM for additional additional resources blogs and videos that you may find to help enhance your confidence and your presence. If you enjoyed today's episode please subscribe to our podcast. It's complementary android review. Thank you for listening to power up your presence podcast. The Passion the presence the power until next time power rap step up lead up..

Nicaragua Dr Greg Wells todd Herman Dr Wells Serena Williams Chris sort Florida Costa Rica La La Inner NCO assault Corporate Class Inc Judith Bermuda instagram superman.
"dr. greg" Discussed on PowerUp Your Presence

PowerUp Your Presence

09:44 min | 2 years ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on PowerUp Your Presence

"The room even though you're not the one using justified that someone else's is enough to distract you serve central your son. No I was GONNA say I I love how you phrased. Attention is our most important currency. And remembering that as we're going through our day out of respect the others are interactively. One hundred percent agree with all of that end. I think was sort of two sides of that equation as a speaker. It is your responsibility to run a meeting doing this officiant effective on point similarly when you're doing presentations or responsibility to deliver a good enough presentation that you capture everybody's attention. I'm if I'm speaking in everyone's on their phone that I believe is on me because I'm not delivering a message. That's either powerful enough clear enough. I'm not convinced on. I'm not doing my job to capture capture. Everyone's attention and hold it. Whoever if you are in a meeting? I think that it is fair to ask you to put away their devices that you can all work together to get the job done as as fast as you possibly can so you can get out of that meeting and back in sue you know all of the the actual productive worked so it's two sides of the equation. But I couldn't agree with you the more on that particular issue now. I believe all of us have good intentions and want to live a healthier lifestyle mentally emotionally and physically basically however it can feel overwhelming when we think about where to start and for it to be sustainable. So what advice do you have for our listeners on ways to start living healthier if it's something that they want to work on so this is a really interesting idea. I believe that sometimes. Sometimes there's just Overwhelmed there's so much information there solve anything's coming at us. There is so nutritious studies that are in the news. There's products products that are being pushed out as their APPs. That are coming at you like. There's so much information almost paralyzing in so I would love to consider just being one percent better every single day. The one percent of your diet as twenty calories shift for most people. That's like half a pack of cigarettes. Almost nothing it's sort of like don't drink coffee in the morning. I use a little bit less serious a little bit less milk. Eventually you know Navy district black coffee with cream You're dying like you'd need your gain a fifteen minute walk is there's a little bit less than one percent of your day but can decrease the risk of cancer almost forty percent. We don't Three minutes a day of meditation has positive benefits. If you can get to twenty minutes you'll radically change. The White Matter Tracts inside your brain improved communication between networks inside the rains. There's so many little things we can do. There are very very simple and we might that they're not powerful enough because they're so small but in aggregate over time that's what can make a huge difference so team Sky Diane Cycling Team. They wanted to to France number of times in one of the things. What are the principles in which they work is to seek out multiple one percent gains so or they might choose the tires that are on the right to be one percent More a increased wives for example a little bit more power decrease suspect getting the the pressure in a tire absolutely perfect for every single race. It might put boots on the riders at a big the winds around the feet just a little bit less resistant. Love might change the position the elbows with your arms here. Your cycle with your arms here decrease the wind resistance just bet and when you add all of those up that's a three percent gain gene and suddenly no one can keep up to you so it's these little tiny wins that when you stack on top of each other you're consistent with them over a period of time it can make a massive the difference in your life and I also think makes eminently achievable because we all can meditate for three minutes a day. You can do that lying and battery falsely you can all go for fifteen minute walk at at lunch we can all do that. There's all sorts of little things we can do. You talked a vegetarian meal once a week. That's little a little tiny thing. We can all easily Salihi. Do that will add tons to our own lives in terms of our own physical and mental health in in many cases improve the lives of those around us as well for example one vegetarian meal a week would decrease global warming the greenhouse gas emissions enough to probably hit all of our emissions targets. So if by just thinking about things a little bit differently in micro things time consistently we ultimately changed yourself in our communities in the world and I love that show both about the ripple effect act and the focus effect throughout both books. You have the one percent tips in there that people can take away from so I always refer them because you're right. Those micro changes that we make make it feel more achievable. And we're able to sustain it over the long term. It adds up on Agra one hundred percent that's the whole idea just making cheerful and accessible and easy for people to do those little one percent wins. If you add them up huge difference in your life yes absolutely yeah and talking about making making it. Sustainable I signed up to lift checked online Dr Loving and yet then I must say so. There is a module for each of the core concept that we discussed today and discourses to help us perform better her and and I love how you said's books to make this the best year of your life. I am finding it. Really motivating auditing especially. When I'm on the treadmill I am on the treadmill? I watched one of your videos and I must say that it gives me that little. ooh that I need to go a little further and may be inclined little higher. Is that one percent say. Can you tell our listeners. What to expect from this comprehensive program because I'm loving it and and I think if we want something that's sustainable in understand the importance of our sleep and moving and eating well and all of that like so can you? You perhaps share with our listeners. Would how the program is built to and what they can expect from it. Sure so I do a ton of speaking. After all many of the speaking events people were asking me. You Know Greg. You don't have anything like a course if you do public workshops which I didn't So now I decided to take some stages done chop them all well. Up to create videos linked those podcasts on a ton of different topics and then write articles all of that. So what we did was we built the sixty hosts that contained video video audio and in articles plus workbooks and built that all into digital training that digital training is in the form of the ripple effect course rebuilding the focus effect as well which should be ready relatively soon and we found the Like the uptake has been crazy ending. Engagements awesome so. I'm pretty confident this helping people really proud of it. If you complete a section you also get some bonus videos from all the titans On sweeping included all of that stuff as well as keep people going and give them a bit of extra information to keep them engaged or a little bit Provide a little bit of a reward when you get through one of the modules avenue and wants to check that out go to my company website which is wells performance dot com. Click on digital training. And you'll find all that stuff there. Anyone wants to join in the honored and privileged in like super browbeat. They do and we'll support you on your jury as much as you can. We can't for me. I'm really really enjoying it. Then you are a very engaging being speakers all of us are really inspiring and motivating and and you also have a new book right. Yeah we just mentioned that it was jumping living on the call so thanks for mentioning it and took the summer of twenty nineteen and work like crazy because what I saw as I was traveling around the world in speaking and talking to people is that when I speak about the rebel. Everyone's excited it makes sense because it's simple sleep or eat better. You know just gets an Nejra. CISE focusing concentration mindset but the question that everyone was asking the afterwards Greg. I'm so busy. How do I do this? And just don't don't have time when matched that issue. I'm so busy I don't have time to do this with everyone was exhausted and once fatigue was hired we're all so burnt the stats on earn out her frightening. I realized I needed to do something to help people to actually implement the ideas in their life and so the new book is called recharge. And it's all about how you can take micro breaks to incorporate these ideas into your life. So how do you actually arrest. How have you actually relaxed? Actually recharge how do you take vacation. Where how and wins include a little bit of breathing deep breathing to take a break during the course of the day Mindfulness and so we've watched that up with the different brainwave states that you need to learn. They need to execute nor to be able to be created. Aided learn solve problems into ultimately get into flow states and really experienced life at the highest level. So this is all about about recovery and regeneration for all the weekend recharged bit Warfield little bit better and actually put all the principles from the ripple effect in the focus of back into practice. Despite how busy we are crazy. Lives of all living. And that's excellent because I think like knowing.

Greg France Agra titans Navy district Warfield Nejra
"dr. greg" Discussed on PowerUp Your Presence

PowerUp Your Presence

11:03 min | 2 years ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on PowerUp Your Presence

"Our overall health so we all know that exercise is good for us? We've we've heard that a million times. We know that it prevents cancer. We know that prevents cardiovascular disease. We know that it makes you fitter. We know that it earns percent body fat. We know oh all of those things. It's very very well established. The we don't often do the exercise because life gets in the way and it's not a priority and so I would love a short turn. Priority becomes a priority if we got sick of heart attack when all of a sudden it becomes a priority. These start exercising. I want people to a little bit earlier in the way that I found really helps people. We'll justify taking the time incorporated into your day is understanding. That exercise is not just about the body. It's also about the brain angelique exercise. We actually spark the brain. A great book is sparked by Dr John Radio who wrote all about the effective exercise on the brains incredible resource the people who want to check out more about but we're we're learning. That exercise improves creativity. Exercise improves problem. Solving exercise improves concentration. Focus this alert all the things we need to get through our day more effectively and more efficiently and we're also learning. That exercise is powerful in its ability to positively affect our mental health. We're learning the exercise decreases depression or symptoms of depression. Excuse me we know that exercise can be used. This is a treatment for anxiety. We know that exercise in nature amplifies acts of exercise for doing it outdoors in the park is something that can be even better good for you. So we're learning ex- exercise is really good for the body with no natural our continuing to learn more. The real advances over the last couple of years has been around the effective exercise on brain performance. And then also on our mental health so if you want to be healthy both physically mentally if dean to sixty minutes a day is gonNA rigged huge difference freer. Yeah and it's so true. I feel the difference. You feel that you're approaching the day not only with more energy but with more clarity and with more focus as as you're going from interaction or meetings that you're in or work that you're trying to get done you definitely feel that you have that focus. Now they say we need exercise is at a certain percentage of our peak heart rate to get some desired results. So two questions for you. How do I find out what my peak park rate is? And what do we accomplish with rigorous versus light cardio. Exercise got it completely door that it's like useless information for ninety nine point ninety nine percent of the population. If you are training for the Olympics you need to know that information if trainings to win something internationally. It's taught beyond stage of our life. Totally fine so eighty. Five percent of the population doesn't get enough. This activity activity to prevent a chronic disease. That's not even to be healthy. That's not get sick. So that percentage of Max Heart rate people measuring their heart rates in calculating fast they're gonNA nego- and pushing themselves is useless. Information for eighty five percent of the is who just need to go for a walk right and consider that if you walk for fifteen minutes a day you decrease your risk of breast cancer and colon cancer twenty four to forty percent. You need to do very much and it doesn't need to be very hard and you don't don't need to wear a heart rate monitor. You don't do any of that nonsense you just simply need to go for a walk or yoga fantastic if you want to go to the gym and lift weights. Brilliant if you want to go for a run fantastic gopher paddleboard ride your bike. Do some gardening do housework. Don't I do not care it. Just we have to just start moving in once. You're moving move a little more and a little bit more and then eventually you might get a little bit. You might register for a five K.. or or not doesn't matter. Steer Asli sold over complicated. It's make it so confusing for people and I just want people to be physically active and understand the different types of physical activity have different benefits for you we are. We are designed to walk long. Distances walking's amazing. We are also so we've evolved to take advantage of short bursts of high intensity exercise which is also incredible for us. We have evolved That our muscles respond to strength training to get stronger. Our when we stretch into flexibility and mobility work it improves. The function of our nervous system is all all sorts of different types of exercise have different effects on the human body. So I literally don't care what you do doesn't matter to me. I don't care how hard it is i. I really don't because ninety nine percent population doesn't need to go aren't they just need to get out there and do anything so enjoy collectively do it. With friends and family. I delete ideally Eh. Do it outside the as consistent as you possibly can build it into life make it easy. Make it inevitable end. You're gonna read all the benefits without worrying about her rate zones I don't track arrayed zones and I'm offering firemen so like it's irrelevant completely irrelevant. The vast majority of people. If I was trying to win the Olympics I would know my heart rates to the single beats but unfortunately this that basic my life so angered and upwards flip. Thank you think about just ed moving. You also talk about how nutrition can help us perform better and so we know that eating smart. This is a good idea and do you. Can you perhaps talk little bit about certain foods that are good before four or workout or after workout. We hear things so you know you. Should you know maybe after workouts like you need to eat within a certain period time after you exercise all of that could have mystified that a little bit for us Cher and it's very similar to my previous argument. If you're trying to win the Olympics Glenn Beck all of that stuff matters a lot if you're not trying to win the Olympics then there's only one thing that you need to worry about. Doing that is eat healthy food. Dr John Gherardi WHO started precision nutrition? which is one of the most successful nutrition coaching companies on the planet if not the most effective nutrition coaching company on the planet to especially at Western down in Texas? A brilliant gentlemen. Taty something and I just love this concept the concept is really. It's the myth of Game Day. Eighty tradition and that happens when people leverages so often people often ask me exactly what you said like wait before workout before a game and my response if like absolutely doesn't matter in casino talking to each marathon it's irrelevant because because here's the game the game what you eat on a consistent basis overtime we'd five times a day which we before and after workout Course it's GonNa make a difference but your overall healthy eating out is determine your success. I'll take someone who eats well for six months and it has a big Mac the morning of America versus some of it. It has a big knock every single day not to pick on McDonald's but I'll take on for you right so if you eat badly for six months and then eat welham element on the day of the event. You're going to do a certain performance. But if you take the same individ- will be well for six months but then don't necessarily eat perfectly on the day of the race they're gonNA by far. Do a person who you know doesn't eat well and tries to do everything on Game Day so I believe that we need to keep keep things super simple with nutrition as well eat real food that you recognize as food. Each a lot of plants eat the rainbow of plants more plants. We belong to that you live in not to mention its positive effect on our environment and climate change Johnny. Anything process that comes out of the box for example minimize. Is your sugar intake with family and friends. Make the food yourself and take it with you. So all of these factors contribute to our ability to eat the healthy food and what I discovered is that there's a huge trend amongst world class performing athletes to eat really really healthy unprocessed zest foods that you simply describe as healthy food. So what do you eat before regarding healthy food. Lots of plans. A little bit of protein super healthy fats largely anti inflammatory lansbury which is loss of amazing multicolored vegetables. You can use fruits you power your workouts in water hydrate during those workouts avoiding sports drinks avoiding all the packaged gels. And that's really the key to success long term as the healthier that you can eat overall health you you're going to be in your life and the healthier you are in your life the better. You're going to perform as an athlete so I think that's the approach that I've seen a lot of world a class athletes. Adopting and I think it's a huge improvement over the I would suggest probably misguided sports nutrition guidelines of that have been pushed Christoph elites years so again it's a you know simplify so it's not all my goodness to have protein and after any to have is like pineapple watermelon. No those long view there's certain blitz taking watermelon for example has situation and and we know that Decreases Post exercise muscle soreness. So there's always things that can tweet Benefit you but we just think about it like watermelons of fruit. Eating fruit around exercise is probably a good idea like we. This is not rocket science. Revelations anyone like you put kids out in the park and let them exercise. A couple of hours and Heathrow watermelon. Oh they're gonNA run over all of it because it like we instinctively know those sorts of things we also know. The protein is is used to build muscle tissues. So if you do a good workout Protein after your exercise is probably going to give you the tools that you need to rebuild your body. Fat Is used to build brain tissue end in all the nerve connections brains. Your body's that's wonderful. Carbohydrates are used to fuel your body like we know so much about these macromolecules acro molecules. That can be so good for us on Dr Dan more from the University of trial just research. That showed that it. Unless you're training twice a day you don't really need to worry about about that twenty minute window after your exercise if you had to work on the same day that yes the twenty minute window where you want eating right after work probably will help you with your only only training once a day. Then it doesn't really make that much of a difference. You don't need to worry about that one but honestly it's eat real food that you recognize eat mostly plants in his organic is you can afford eat. The rainbow don't eat processed foods. Make the food yourself family and friends and you win ninety nine.

Olympics colon cancer Dr John Radio Cher Glenn Beck dean Dr John Gherardi Dr Dan America University of trial nego McDonald lansbury Texas Christoph
"dr. greg" Discussed on PowerUp Your Presence

PowerUp Your Presence

11:13 min | 2 years ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on PowerUp Your Presence

"A mix of stories tips insights and conversations trailblazers who speak candidly about their journey to leadership on today's episode we. We are thrilled to welcome Dr Greg Wells to discuss the ripple effect or epidemics that impact. Your performance Dr Greg Wells. CEO and founder of the Wells Group is is your guy too high performance life as a scientist and physiologist. His gift is to translate science into actionable effective life tips using the latest research on the brain and body Dr Wells and his team provides simple but transformative strategies to boost your mental and physical health. Advance your career and upgrade their life. Right Dr Welby has spoken to audiences all over the world at events such as tax and the titans summit where he shared the stage with. Richard Branson Steve Wozniak and Deepak Chopra. Dr Wells is author of three bestselling books super bodies the ripple effect and the focus effect Dr Twelve as a PhD in physiology served as associate professor of Kinesiology at the University of Toronto as an end is an exercise medicine researcher at the hospital for sick children in Toronto. Welcome Dr Wells. Thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited as the great. We're thrilled to have you on the show today and is a great way eight to kick off the week. I was excited all weekend. You know we -solutely speaking with you first thing on a Monday morning and I've had the opportunity to hear. You speak speak on numerous occasions as well I I've read both of your books. The ripple effect and the focus effect and every time I hear you speak or watch one of your videos or refer back back to your book. I always get a little more inspiration from you and learn something new so I know our listeners will definitely be inspired by. Oh you today in indefinitely take away something cool thanks start. Can you share with us. What brought you to where you are today? First of all speaking a ton of so voice shredded father nicknamed Humpback Voice. Sounds but it's been a long journey but it's been a lot a lot of fun it. I think it started when I was fifteen. I was competitive swimmer. And I was training camp in Florida and got injured in a way rope. Banak that sparked my interest in human performance in health. I went got back into swimming after neurosurgery in reconstruction of the knack in a lot of physio In my Undergrad and then started consulting. After my Undergrad is over rapidly encountered the fact that I didn't have enough Be doing the things that I was doing. So went back into the Nassar's PhD. That led to a post doc at Toronto General Kids. In alter that time I was consulting with the the Canadian Olympic Committee to help athletes perform better Travel the world that leads you a couple opportunities to to what they call Gosh commentate on the Olympics for Twenty eight hundred twenty twelve that led to the Super Bowl his book and the ripple effect Bug can speaking along the way he got married. Had Two kids seasons Your today wondered crazy just yet such a great story and and one of the stories that I love is one that I heard in one of your videos and it's an interesting story of two world. Champion kayakers Adam and anders. Can you recount that story for our listeners. Yeah for sure so As down again in Florida training with Adam beancurd one of Canada's top athletes historically four consecutive -secutive Olympic Games medals in three of them world record holder world champion and read before the London Olympics. He was in Florida training and I had a chance to do some. Is y'all work with him. On a very difficult set so he was training with undisclosed of semantic from Sweden Newark Number One and number two the world time in addition to doing all the blood work taking the heart rates dodging dolphins in the Zodiac which superfine I managed to snap pictures Meghan homemade. I was looking for my shots and bandsaw Beautiful Image of the two of them side by side and as soon as I saw images like I think Adams could lead us and the difference was all in the attention of the two athletes. They were going the exact same speed yet. Adam was going fast and hard so atoms faces relaxed times. Hang out of his mouth mouth is open breathing at. He's leaning forward and at that time was really tendency. scripting the paddle. Oh really hard face. Looks Super stressed and so it was a really interesting dichotomy between the two athletes given the going the exact same speed but doing it in two completely different ways. Ace Adam was fast and relaxed was just simply working really really hard. And I believe that that state predicts performance because when you're in the state that Adam was in that enables you to enter what's known as the zone or flow state and when you're stressed and anxious makes it really hard for you to reach your potential consistently over time and sure enough. A few months later. The Olympics item won a silver medal in honour scheme sadden so it was very predictive of their performance but a super interesting moments is from insight perspective about the fact that we can all probably do things better during the course of the day and just the more relaxed while doing Nazi actually the key to world class performance health that I I love that story as well and I and I think the even the pictures The picture to show Oh is very is very insightful. Can put ourselves back into a moment where we're relaxed and or for stress and how it does affect our performance and our ability to turning more clearly and you work and research you focus on what you call the four interrelated grand epidemics sleeping sleeplessness obesity in activity and Dan Mental illness and these are all elements that are causing people to struggle on a daily basis. You've develop the stem stamm pathway. which stands for sleep soundly? Think clearly eat smarter and move more. Let's start with the importance of sleep. Why is our sleep so important because I know you know getting the a seven or eight hours sleep better? Recommended is really difficult. You know we work hard we sometimes you know we work at home have dinner little bit family work some more Dr than before. You know it's one o'clock and then is supposed to get up early. And how so. Why is it so important that we do get that sleep? Well it's so important because sleep is the foundation for human health and performance. We know that when we sleep while the brain literally washes itself out that was research done by Jeff Iliffe if you want to check that out to search Jeff Elephant his Ted Talk. He's done some amazing work in that space to discover that at night when we sleep neurons. Shrinking begins cerebral spinal fluid wash through the brain tissue to clear out waste products like amyloid plaques that contribute to Alzheimer's disease so we know that sleep is essential for our brains recovered regenerate we also know that we learn when we sleep new neurons grow we create memories which connections between neurons inside inside the brain. All of that happens at night when we sleep. We also know that we released growth hormone when we sleep in growth hormone heels repairs tissues inside the body so if you want to be a healthier physically better and sleep is the mechanism through which you can actually train with your eyes closed which is Kinda cool and if you want to eat better the the hormones that control your appetite in society lesson in Greenland are regulated when we sleep so imagine. Probably recollect that when you had a bad night's sleep you're probably not eating all that well the next day versus if you've got a great night's sleep you feel clear. Sharp focus in you can make good decisions so for me. It all starts with sleep and I think that there's very clear. Data data that shows that there is a link between sleep depression sleeping anxiety sleep and cancer sleep at heart disease. So it's definitely something to take a little bit more seriously and for me it's really resonated. The Am sure that it will for anyone. Who Read Your Booker? You're listening to this podcast Many of US actually do have trouble sleeping soundly. It's one thing you could bad that then you you know you need to sleep. Soundly sometimes feels like our brain. Just won't stop break ticket to it just keeps on working and thinking. Can you give us some tips. Perhaps could help us get a better sleeper sounders sleep for sure and with deep love and respect back and I'm going to actually challenge on something that you said during the answer to this question you described your day which is like work regular work. Hasn't time with your family get things sorted and have dinner in a new set of work. More actually get to sleep right in. Its DOT works some more. That's the issue and the reason why is because when whatever whatever you do in the hour before you fall asleep night will program your self conscious your free and not as what you'll end up thinking about in replaying as your brain creates memories while you sleep doc. So I need everybody to defend their last hour. I really want us to think about doing things that allow us to downshift calm down and create barrier between the day when you actually fall asleep at night and that is why we don't defend our last hour. That is why we wake up in the middle of the night with our minds racing. Because you're trying to your brain trying to sort out all that information that you just put into. Its decide whether not get sorted memories when or whether or not to get rid of it and so if we can defend that last hour can take a hot bath that you can do some meditation if you read fiction. Anything that enables you to downshifting calm down. Ideally not looking at your devices that gives you the best chance of actually sleeping soundly and so that that concept of defending your last hour. I believe that's GonNa make the biggest difference for people in terms of their ability to actually get some decent sleep. I love the way you say the fans you last hour. I know I love it too and I am guilty of nine job. Aw defending my car. I am happy. I'm happy to say though I I have my morning ritual down packed it's consistent. It's my evening one that needs some work in defending that last ritual. I do know though for me that if I do get a good night's sleep I will be more likely to have the energy to exercise and as you said earlier make better choices throughout my day. What would you say is the most powerful thing we know about the impact of exercise on.

Dr Greg Wells Ace Adam Florida Olympics Dr Welby Wells Group titans University of Toronto Toronto growth hormone Richard Branson Steve Wozniak Deepak Chopra Canadian Olympic Committee associate professor of Kinesio Humpback Voice Toronto General Kids CEO
"dr. greg" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"dr. greg" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Bet like radio my guest today. Dr Greg ward, Nautilus expert, rain in indicator. Thanks for your time break. No problem. Thanks. Rodney, roy. So I've always been fascinated by the Nautilus likewise, when you ever since I was a youngster to really primarily kind of just by looking at the shells, but before we kind of a little bit more about the Nautilus itself. I want to get a little bit of history on you and your interests. How did you first get interested in marine aquatic life? What kind of influenced you? Yes, I, I grew up in Phoenix Arizona. You know. So. Right near the ocean. But the way my dad tells it is, you know, as a four or five year old I was watching a documentary about giant squid and you know, that just clicked in my mind, I wanted to study the ocean become a marine biologist, and I've been kind of trekking towards that ever since. So now did you had aquariums growing up at all? And so when did you first get one? And how did you get involved with all of that? Yeah. I figured it was about ten and my first aquarium was about a five gallon tank with couple zebra, Danny owes and all freshwater. Water and kind of grew from there to eventually getting a fifty gallon tank having some molly's in their Cubbies. Nothing really too crazy. Just having fish. And learn about feeding cleaning tanks just kinda watching fish up close and seeing how cold or behavior was, so let's, let's go to non. Listen. How did you become interested in Nautilus in Email conversation? I kind of asked you about the plural which, I guess you can say nod Aligarh Nautilus than you prefer Nautilus. Yeah. I think technically either one's correct. If you trace it back to the root of the Greek word Nautilus is more, correct? But you know it's, it's all good. So ironically, I didn't really know too much about the Nautilus until after I graduated college, I learned about him, I'd seen the shells, but I was still really focused on studying squid and doing something in that. And it wasn't until I attended a conference in Galveston, Texas, and two thousand six where Dr Bruce Carlson, who's one of the famous Nautilus researchers out there was just giving a talk and I don't even know what the talk was on. I just remember him saying that, you know, we don't know a lot about the Nautilus is this is a perfect area for some young folks to kind of get interested in an answer. Some really hard questions that we've been trying to answer for thirty years or so. And, you know, from the day after that, I said, on studying Nautilus in lab settings aquarium settings and the field trying to answer all those questions that Dr. Carlson, put forth in two thousand six going from undergrad, then what made you decide? And you know, this is always kind of interesting question, I think, for a lot of listeners, maybe some of the kids in grade school, high school. You know what makes you decide to go to graduate school to kind of study real specific area. Become a scientist. And so maybe talk a little bit about that. And also where you ended up attending in what you you're involved with. Yeah. So even as an undergrad, I still didn't really know what to be marine biologist or be a scientist. I kind of thought I knew I knew at least that I, I had to go to grad school, get a PHD, if I wanted to work at a research, or silly, or college and kind of do my own research answer my own questions. So that was my kind of trajectory all along. Ironically, I took a pit stop in between grad school, and undergrad and worked on fishing boats in Alaska. And I was on a fishing boat where I got a call from the City University of New York graduate center where they. Asked me if I wanted to accept a position into their grad school program, and I fortunately had service enough to answer the call. I said, yes and few months later, I was living in Brooklyn, New York, so kind of a world wind to to go from fishing boat hundred people on it to Brooklyn,.

Nautilus Dr Bruce Carlson Dr Greg ward Brooklyn City University of New York scientist Alaska Phoenix Arizona Galveston molly Danny Rodney Texas New York roy fifty gallon thirty years five gallon five year