35 Burst results for "Dr. Anthony"

Fauci: Uptick in Covid, Biden is protected

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Fauci: Uptick in Covid, Biden is protected

"Because because because because the the the the cases cases cases cases are are are are rising rising rising rising across across across across the the the the country country country country with with with with nearly nearly nearly nearly half half half half the the the the states states states states reporting reporting reporting reporting an an an an increase increase increase increase but but but but the the the the severity severity severity severity is is is is not not not not rising rising rising rising Dr Dr Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci Fauci Fauci says says says says an an an an uptick uptick uptick uptick was was was was expected expected expected expected after after after after mitigation mitigation mitigation mitigation policies policies policies policies like like like like mask mask mask mask wearing wearing wearing wearing were were were were lifted lifted lifted lifted each each each each individual individual individual individual is is is is going going going going to to to to have have have have to to to to make make make make their their their their calculation calculation calculation calculation of of of of the the the the amount amount amount amount of of of of risk risk risk risk that that that that they they they they want want want want to to to to take take take take in in in in going going going going to to to to indoor indoor indoor indoor Dan Dan Dan Dan isn't isn't isn't isn't going going going going to to to to functions functions functions functions president president president president Biden Biden Biden Biden who who who who was was was was vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated and and and and EE EE EE EE boosted boosted boosted boosted has has has has not not not not been been been been wearing wearing wearing wearing masks masks masks masks all all all all the the the the time time time time and and and and just just just just days days days days after after after after the the the the event event event event with with with with him him him him more more more more than than than than a a a a dozen dozen dozen dozen DC DC DC DC officials officials officials officials have have have have tested tested tested tested positive positive positive positive for for for for cove cove cove cove it it it it yes yes yes yes he's he's he's he's mingling mingling mingling mingling there there there there but but but but we we we we feel feel feel feel that that that that the the the the protocols protocols protocols protocols around around around around the the the the president president president president are are are are sufficient sufficient sufficient sufficient to to to to protect protect protect protect it it it it that that that that you you you you made made made made his his his his comments comments comments comments on on on on ABC's ABC's ABC's ABC's this this this this week week week week with with with with George George George George Stephanopoulos Stephanopoulos Stephanopoulos Stephanopoulos I'm I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker

Dr Dr Dr Dr Anthony Anthony An Dan Dan Dan Dan President President President Dc Dc Dc Cove Cove Cove Cove ABC George George George George Stephanopoulos Stephanopoulos Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker
Where Is Dr. Anthony Fauci? Senator Rand Paul Gives Us His Thoughts

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:18 min | 2 months ago

Where Is Dr. Anthony Fauci? Senator Rand Paul Gives Us His Thoughts

"It. So senator, I got to ask you an unrelated question, but you're more qualified than anyone else to answer it. Where is Doctor Fauci? He seems as if he's just kind of vanished and disappeared. You know, he still for the mandates, he still for centralized planning. He still is a menace to the country. And I can promise you one thing. If we take over in November, I'm going to investigate every piece of paper he's laid his hands on. We're going to find out about the gain of function research and the Wuhan lab in China. We're going to also investigate the cover up of Fauci and doctor Collins to try to make sure nobody knew what was going on in that lab. And we're going to get to the bottom of this, not because I have any sort of dislike for him. I have a dislike for what he stands for, but I want to make sure that we never have this happen again. I think they could create a virus in a lab that could destroy our country. They could destroy the world. I mean, could destroy civilization as we know it. And I'm not alone in saying this. Other scientists who are not politicians who are not partisan are saying the same thing. So I can promise you this. We are going to get to the bottom of it, but I don't have the power to investigate unless we were to take over the Senate, so it is incredibly important. I think that we get people in position of power. Mike Lee, myself, we will be chairman of committee if we can win in November. And we will. And I think it's going to be large in part thanks

Doctor Fauci Wuhan Lab Fauci Collins China Mike Lee Senate
Will virus be 'over'? Most Americans think not: AP-NORC poll

AP News Radio

01:03 min | 3 months ago

Will virus be 'over'? Most Americans think not: AP-NORC poll

"A a a a new new new new poll poll poll poll finds finds finds finds many many many many Americans Americans Americans Americans think think think think we'll we'll we'll we'll be be be be stuck stuck stuck stuck with with with with a a a a coded coded coded coded pandemic pandemic pandemic pandemic for for for for a a a a long long long long time time time time to to to to come come come come part part part part of of of of the the the the new new new new Associated Associated Associated Associated Press Press Press Press norc norc norc norc poll poll poll poll was was was was to to to to define define define define what what what what respondents respondents respondents respondents think think think think will will will will mean mean mean mean the the the the end end end end of of of of the the the the pandemic pandemic pandemic pandemic a a a a whopping whopping whopping whopping eighty eighty eighty eighty three three three three percent percent percent percent say say say say they they they they think think think think it'll it'll it'll it'll be be be be over over over over when when when when cold cold cold cold is is is is a a a a mild mild mild mild illness illness illness illness like like like like this this this this seasonal seasonal seasonal seasonal flu flu flu flu just just just just fifteen fifteen fifteen fifteen percent percent percent percent say say say say they'd they'd they'd they'd consider consider consider consider the the the the pandemic pandemic pandemic pandemic to to to to be be be be over over over over only only only only when when when when coated coated coated coated nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen is is is is largely largely largely largely eliminated eliminated eliminated eliminated here's here's here's here's the the the the definition definition definition definition from from from from infectious infectious infectious infectious disease disease disease disease expert expert expert expert Dr Dr Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci Fauci Fauci we we we we no no no no longer longer longer longer are are are are in in in in a a a a situation situation situation situation of of of of threat threat threat threat threat threat threat threat to to to to our our our our equanimity equanimity equanimity equanimity threat threat threat threat to to to to our our our our economy economy economy economy the the the the threat threat threat threat to to to to allow allow allow allow us us us us to to to to live live live live a a a a normal normal normal normal life life life life he he he he says says says says we're we're we're we're not not not not there there there there yet yet yet yet with with with with more more more more than than than than two two two two thousand thousand thousand thousand people people people people still still still still dying dying dying dying a a a a day day day day the the the the latest latest latest latest poll poll poll poll also also also also finds finds finds finds fifty fifty fifty fifty nine nine nine nine percent percent percent percent of of of of Americans Americans Americans Americans think think think think it's it's it's it's essential essential essential essential they they they they be be be be vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated against against against against the the the the virus virus virus virus but but but but only only only only thirty thirty thirty thirty seven seven seven seven percent percent percent percent of of of of parents parents parents parents think think think think it's it's it's it's essential essential essential essential for for for for their their their their children children children children underscoring underscoring underscoring underscoring the the the the low low low low pediatric pediatric pediatric pediatric vaccination vaccination vaccination vaccination rates rates rates rates online online online online Jackie Jackie Jackie Jackie Quinn Quinn Quinn Quinn

FLU Associated Associated Associat Cold Cold Infectious Infectious Infectio Dr Dr Dr Dr Anthony Anthony An United States Jackie Jackie Jackie Jackie Qu
Gov. Ron DeSantis Goes After Dr. Anthony Fauci in New Campaign Ad

Mark Levin

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Gov. Ron DeSantis Goes After Dr. Anthony Fauci in New Campaign Ad

"Some major flip flopping people should not be walking around with masks Masks work Fully vaccinated You are protected and you do not need to wear a mask If you are vaccinated you should still wear a mask You really better be very careful before you bring the children back The default position should be to try as best as possible to keep the children in school Right now at this moment there is no need to change anything if you're doing on a day by day basis I would like to see a dramatic diminution of the personal interaction that we see So let me clarify that because there was a little bit of a misunderstanding That is a great ad It's been put out by Ron

RON
Soaring COVID-19 cases renew US debate over mask mandates

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Soaring COVID-19 cases renew US debate over mask mandates

"The the the the nation's nation's nation's nation's top top top top infectious infectious infectious infectious disease disease disease disease specialist specialist specialist specialist Dr Dr Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci Fauci Fauci says says says says he he he he is is is is as as as as confident confident confident confident as as as as you you you you can can can can be be be be the the the the most most most most states states states states will will will will reach reach reach reach a a a a peak peak peak peak of of of of Omicron Omicron Omicron Omicron cases cases cases cases by by by by mid mid mid mid February February February February the the the the highly highly highly highly infectious infectious infectious infectious Omicron Omicron Omicron Omicron variant variant variant variant is is is is passing passing passing passing it it it it speak speak speak speak in in in in many many many many states states states states in in in in the the the the northeast northeast northeast northeast and and and and upper upper upper upper Midwest Midwest Midwest Midwest while while while while still still still still increasing increasing increasing increasing in in in in other other other other southern southern southern southern and and and and western western western western states states states states according according according according to to to to Dr Dr Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci Fauci Fauci but but but but he he he he says says says says of of of of the the the the pattern pattern pattern pattern follows follows follows follows the the the the trend trend trend trend and and and and people people people people get get get get vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated vaccinated and and and and boosted boosted boosted boosted that that that that will will will will turn turn turn turn around around around around things things things things are are are are looking looking looking looking good good good good we we we we don't don't don't don't want want want want to to to to get get get get over over over over confident confident confident confident but but but but they they they they look look look look like like like like they're they're they're they're going going going going in in in in the the the the right right right right direction direction direction direction out out out out she she she she says says says says the the the the long long long long term term term term strategy strategy strategy strategy is is is is still still still still control control control control where where where where we we we we learn learn learn learn to to to to live live live live with with with with cove cove cove cove it it it it we'd we'd we'd we'd like like like like you you you you to to to to get get get get down down down down to to to to that that that that level level level level for for for for it it it it doesn't doesn't doesn't doesn't disrupt disrupt disrupt disrupt us us us us in in in in the the the the sense sense sense sense of of of of getting getting getting getting back back back back to to to to a a a a degree degree degree degree of of of of normality normality normality normality thought thought thought thought she she she she made made made made his his his his comments comments comments comments on on on on ABC's ABC's ABC's ABC's this this this this week week week week with with with with George George George George Stephanopoulos Stephanopoulos Stephanopoulos Stephanopoulos I'm I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker

Dr Dr Dr Dr Anthony Anthony An Infectious Infectious Infectio Midwest Midwest Midwest Cove Cove Cove Cove ABC George George George George Stephanopoulos Stephanopoulos Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker
Dr. Anthony Fauci Says Joe Biden Is Doing 'A Very Good Job' Addressing COVID

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 4 months ago

Dr. Anthony Fauci Says Joe Biden Is Doing 'A Very Good Job' Addressing COVID

"And so when you have a senator whose effective and aggressive trying to get the information out to personal attacks really personal attacks those two words are the definition of the Democrat party in the media in this country personal attacks He doesn't know what personal attacks are Okay let's do one more Cut 20 go Has he done a good job You know I think given the circumstances that we're in right now I believe he's done a very good job He's talking about Biden He's been a very good job This is an extraordinary virus The likes of which we have not seen even close to and well over 100 years it is a very widely virus It is fooled everybody all the time from the time it first came in to Delta to now a very unpredictable and we're doing the best we possibly can Well you're very forgiving of Joe Biden who came into office with vaccines and Therapeutics not developed under his presidency And developed in spite of Fauci because Trump had a push hard particularly at the FDA And I don't remember all of this This kind of love talk when it came to Trump and all the things he was doing and trying to do and this disaster came out of China Of course and it hit it hit during the Trump administration first and there's Biden going on that every death Trump's responsible for and he didn't respond properly and he politicized this did Biden and in many respects so did Fauci And of course the

Democrat Party Biden Fauci Joe Biden Donald Trump Trump Administration FDA China
Senate hearing on pandemic gets testy: 'What a moron'

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Senate hearing on pandemic gets testy: 'What a moron'

"A a Senate Senate hearing hearing on on the the corona corona virus virus pandemic pandemic got got testy testy Kentucky Kentucky Republican Republican rand rand Paul Paul again again accused accused Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci of of trying trying to to take take down down some some scientists scientists with with differing differing opinions opinions do do you you really really think think it's it's appropriate appropriate to to use use your your four four hundred hundred and and twenty twenty thousand thousand dollar dollar salary salary to to attack attack scientists scientists to to disagree disagree with with you you about about she she says says accusations accusations like like that that are are leading leading to to threats threats against against him him that that candles candles the the crazies crazies out out there there a a man man was was arrested arrested in in Iowa Iowa police police asked asked him him what what was was going going and and it it was was going going to to Washington Washington DC DC to to kill kill doctor doctor found found she she found found she she also also accused accused Paul Paul of of playing playing politics politics with with the the virus virus he he went went to to a a rand rand Paul Paul website website and and you you see see fire fire doctor doctor felt felt she she was was a a little little box box that that says says contribute contribute here here out out he he lost lost his his temper temper when when Kansas Kansas Republican Republican Roger Roger Marshall Marshall accused accused him him of of hiding hiding financial financial disclosure disclosure forms forms he he was was heard heard saying saying on on an an open open Mike Mike at at Donahue Donahue Washington Washington

Rand Rand Paul Paul Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fa Kentucky Senate Paul Paul Iowa Washington Roger Roger Marshall Marshall Kansas Mike Mike Donahue Donahue Washington Was
Dr. Anthony Fauci's Giant Golden Parachute

The Trish Regan Show

01:57 min | 4 months ago

Dr. Anthony Fauci's Giant Golden Parachute

"All right, I want to turn to another big story right now that we've been following on Trish Intel dot com, my website, and that is doctor Anthony Fauci's giant golden parachute. I mean, it's like the biggest ever. The largest golden parachute, the largest retirement in U.S. federal government history. In fact, Anthony Fauci is going to get more than $350,000. For his annual retirement, think about that. I mean, the guy never needs to work. He's had 55 years of service as a federal employee. He could retire today. Maybe he said, maybe that's the answer. Maybe we should say, hey, go take your $350,000 pension and go have a good day. Because you're kind of messing everything up. Constantly. I mean, one day it's this one day it's that one day it's this one day it's that and he's created tremendous confusion for which he really should be held responsible, but it's not just that what bugs me more than anything is the lying, the lying about what we did in terms of funding the Wuhan institute of virology in China. There are records of the U.S. taxpayer dollars about 600,000 of them and I don't care if it's just ten cents. I know some people are 600,000. No big deal. Well, you know what? It is a big deal, because it means that we played a role in the funding of this risky research, not only did we play a role, we tried to then say, oh, we didn't. And that's not we, that's Anthony Fauci, doctor Anthony Fauci, trying to cover up effectively. The role that the U.S. taxpayer had in funding the virology institute in Wuhan, that's not okay. It's not acceptable. But you know what? He's going to be sitting pretty, really, really pretty because he has, as I said, nearly $400,000 in his pension. You know, so he can retire and do nothing. 340,000 to 350,000 each year in federal retirement payments. That's according to Forbes dot com, which crunched some of these numbers. I mean,

Anthony Fauci U.S. Federal Government Wuhan Institute Of Virology Intel Confusion Virology Institute U.S. China Wuhan Forbes
Fauci: CDC mulling COVID test requirement for asymptomatic

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 4 months ago

Fauci: CDC mulling COVID test requirement for asymptomatic

"I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker the the white white house's house's top top medical medical adviser adviser said said Sunday Sunday the the CDC CDC is is considering considering changing changing its its code code guidance guidance again again Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci says says the the CDC CDC is is now now considering considering adding adding testing testing to to their their new new guidance guidance on on isolation isolation for for positive positive code code cases cases which which got got a a lot lot of of push push back back after after the the agency agency recommended recommended a a symptomatic symptomatic people people could could go go back back to to work work after after five five days days with with out out a a test test looking looking at at it it again again there there may may be be an an option option in in that that that that testing testing could could be be a a part part of of that that and and I I think think we're we're gonna gonna be be hearing hearing more more about about that that in in the the next next day day or or so so from from the the CDC CDC he he also also tells tells George George Stephanopoulos Stephanopoulos on on ABC's ABC's this this week week even even though though I'm I'm a a cron cron is is less less severe severe it's it's more more contagious contagious which which means means more more people people will will contracted contracted and and that that could could lead lead to to more more hospitalizations hospitalizations that's that's the the reason reason why why we're we're concerned concerned about about stressing stressing and and straining straining the the hospital hospital system system and and he he says says it's it's the the unvaccinated unvaccinated that that make make up up the the majority majority I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker

CDC Julie Julie Walker Walker White White House Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fa George George Stephanopoulos S ABC House
Dr. Anthony Fauci on Omicron Threat: 'If You Want to Be Fully Protected, Get Boosted'

The Larry Elder Show

02:17 min | 4 months ago

Dr. Anthony Fauci on Omicron Threat: 'If You Want to Be Fully Protected, Get Boosted'

"Doctor Fauci says that people who are vaccinated, but not boost it, have the same degree of risk. As the unvaccinated. Yeah, if you are infected, you're infected. Whether or not you have vaccinated or not vaccinated, you're infected. When you talk about exposure and quarantine, if you are a person who is vaccinated but not boosted versus a person who is not vaccinated, because of the graded degree of protection that you would have gotten from being boosted, they're treating people who are vaccinated, but not boosted as the same risk of those who are not vaccinated at all. And that's because they're right now with a great deal of difference in the level of protection that you get from being boosted following vaccination versus following vaccination alone. Now regarding the CDC suddenly reducing the number of days for you to be quarantined after testing positive from COVID from ten days to 5 days, a biology professor went on CNN, and said it looks like they made the decision, not because of science. When we look at this, there is absolutely no data that I am aware about with the armor. It's people coming out of isolation 5 days after they were first diagnosed with the virus. My own work shows that when we look at people 5, 7, 8 days after they were first tested positive or first symptoms, they still have enough virus in their nose in the back of their throat to be able to come up positive on these antigen tests and antigen tests are a very good proxy for live virus and the ability to be able to infect others. So it seems that they've made a decision without the data to actually support this change. Now, if you're not confused enough, Doctor Fauci also said that many of the cases are interestingly either without symptoms or minimal symptoms. And many of the cases interestingly are either without symptoms or minimally symptomatic, particularly the breakthrough infections that you get when people have been

Fauci Covid CDC CNN
Fauci: US should consider vaccine mandate for US air travel

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 5 months ago

Fauci: US should consider vaccine mandate for US air travel

"Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci says says the the nation nation should should seriously seriously consider consider an an idea idea of of the the Biden Biden administration's administration's been been resisting resisting passcode passcode nineteen nineteen cases cases spike spike felt felt she she yesterday yesterday said said the the country country should should consider consider requiring requiring vaccination vaccination for for domestic domestic air air travel travel president president Biden Biden did did not not respond respond when when asked asked if if he's he's considering considering that that but but says says he he did did come come up up on on a a call call with with the the governor's governor's office office of of workforce workforce is is about about seventy seventy the the move move to to the the home home for for the the White White House House did did explored explored the the mastic mastic flight flight vaccination vaccination mandate mandate earlier earlier this this year year but but officials officials have have not not been been eager eager to to order order one one assuming assuming it it would would face face immediate immediate legal legal challenges challenges Sager Sager bag bag ani ani Washington Washington

Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fa Biden Biden Administration Biden Biden White White House House Sager Sager Washington
Omicron spreads global gloom over New Year's celebrations

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

Omicron spreads global gloom over New Year's celebrations

"Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci says says the the US US should should consider consider raising raising activation activation mandate mandate for for domestic domestic air air travel travel the the top top US US infectious infectious disease disease expert expert told told MSNBC MSNBC when when you you make make vaccination vaccination a a requirement requirement that's that's another another incentive incentive to to get get more more people people vaccinated vaccinated and and he he added added if if you you want want to to do do that that with with domestic domestic flights flights I I think think that's that's something something that that seriously seriously should should be be considered considered the the US US currently currently mandates mandates that that most most foreign foreign nationals nationals traveling traveling to to the the U. U. S. S. B. B. fully fully vaccinated vaccinated although although citizens citizens and and permanent permanent residents residents only only need need to to show show proof proof of of a a negative negative test test taken taken within within the the day day of of boarding boarding I'm I'm Shelley Shelley Adler Adler

Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fa Infectious Disease Disease United States Msnbc S. S. B. B. U. Shelley Shelley Adler Adler
Omicron sweeps across nation, now 73% of new US COVID cases

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

Omicron sweeps across nation, now 73% of new US COVID cases

"I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker the the Omicron Omicron variant variant is is sweeping sweeping across across the the nation nation now now accounted accounted for for seventy seventy three three percent percent of of all all new new code code cases cases it's it's now now the the dominant dominant version version of of the the corona corona virus virus in in the the U. U. S. S. according according to to the the CDC CDC last last week week it it accounted accounted for for about about thirteen thirteen percent percent of of cases cases after after data data was was revised revised Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci was was asked asked about about it it by by the the national national Press Press Club Club the the world world has has been been shocked shocked by by the the appearance appearance of of the the very very end end that that is is even even more more transmissible transmissible then then the the very very troublesome troublesome delta delta very very the the CDC CDC says says it it doesn't doesn't yet yet have have estimates estimates of of how how many many hospitalizations hospitalizations or or deaths deaths are are due due to to Omicron Omicron meanwhile meanwhile mode mode during during a a end end Fizer Fizer say say their their boosters boosters produce produce antibody antibody affects affects against against the the variant variant and and both both are are working working on on Omicron Omicron specific specific shots shots I'm I'm Julie Julie Walker Walker

Julie Julie Walker Walker CDC U. U. Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fa National National Press Press Fizer Fizer
Dr. Anthony Fauci Can't Let Go of His Power Grip

Mark Levin

01:34 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Anthony Fauci Can't Let Go of His Power Grip

"He told recently over the weekend he was talking I think it was the Jake tapper And seen in State of the Union And he said he said tapper asked him because do you expect record new high numbers for cases And what about hospitalizations and deaths And he said well yes unfortunately Jake I think that is going to happen We're going to see a significant stress in some regions of the country I'm a hospital system particularly in those areas where you have low level of vaccination which is one of the reasons why we continue to stress the importance of getting those unvaccinated people vaccinated The automotive variant all right In South Africa where I mentioned where it's post their post peak on omicron deaths were 25 times lower than with Delta So you have this very contagious variant that's much more mild and much less dangerous And that's a good thing because then it could become the dominant strain which is our way out of this whole thing But do they want to let it go I mean they're grip of control Do they want to let that go No no no no no no no No look you have to understand the mindset here You have to understand They love power I mean it is so so so wonderful and warm and fuzzy And what happens if we just learn to live with this thing We just live with it You know what happens They gotta go back to their offices They got to go back to their bureaucratic offices and they're not going to be on TV every day They're not going to be on the cover of magazines and books and newspapers Brad Pitt won't be playing them on Saturday Night Live

Jake Tapper Tapper Jake South Africa Brad Pitt Saturday Night Live
Fauci says omicron variant is `just raging around the world'

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Fauci says omicron variant is `just raging around the world'

"President president Joe Joe Biden Biden is is planning planning to to give give quote quote a a stark stark warning warning of of what what the the winter winter will will look look like like for for unvaccinated unvaccinated Americans Americans it it is is just just you you know know raging raging through through the the through through the the world world Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci the the country's country's leading leading infectious infectious disease disease expert expert on on the the Omicron Omicron variant variant we we have have so so many many people people in in this this country country who who are are eligible eligible to to be be vaccinated vaccinated we we have have not not yet yet been been vaccinated vaccinated and and that's that's going going to to be be a a real real problem problem for for a a stress stress on on the the hospital hospital system system found found she she spoke spoke on on NBC's NBC's meet meet the the press press in in the the meantime meantime president president Biden Biden plans plans to to speak speak about about the the status status of of the the fight fight against against covert covert nineteen nineteen tomorrow tomorrow and and discuss discuss government government help help for for communities communities in in need need of of assistance assistance White White House House press press secretary secretary Jen Jen Psaki Psaki ads ads the the president president will will also also warned warned about about the the risks risks for for those those Americans Americans who who choose choose to to remain remain unvaccinated unvaccinated I'm I'm Shelley Shelley Adler Adler

President President Joe Joe Bi Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fa Infectious Infectious Disease Biden Biden NBC White White House Jen Jen Psaki Psaki Shelley Shelley Adler Adler
Omicron may sideline two leading drugs against COVID-19

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 5 months ago

Omicron may sideline two leading drugs against COVID-19

"For for more more than than a a year year and and a a body body drugs drugs from from Regeneron Regeneron and and Eli Eli Lilly Lilly have have been been the the go go to to treatment treatment for for early early covered covered nineteen nineteen but but both both drugmakers drugmakers recently recently warned warned that that lab lab testing testing suggests suggests their their therapies therapies will will be be much much less less potent potent against against Omicron Omicron and and while while the the company company say say they they can can quickly quickly develop develop new new Omicron Omicron targeting targeting antibodies antibodies those those aren't aren't expected expected to to launch launch at at least least for for several several months months that's that's what what Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fauci said said on on ABC ABC this this week week with with George George Stephanopoulos Stephanopoulos it's it's a a very very complicated complicated synthetic synthetic process process to to make make the the drug drug it it is is not not something something that that simple simple so so the the company company is is revving revving up up and and getting getting more more and and more more but but we're we're not not gonna gonna see see widely widely available available for for at at least least a a few few months months the the CDC CDC says says the the delta delta variants variants still still accounts accounts for for more more than than ninety ninety five five percent percent of of the the estimated estimated US US cases cases but but agency agency leaders leaders say say Omicron Omicron is is spreading spreading faster faster than than any any past past variants variants and and will will become become the the dominant dominant strain strain nationwide nationwide within within weeks weeks I'm I'm Shelley Shelley Adler Adler

Regeneron Regeneron Eli Eli Lilly Lilly Omicron Omicron Dr Dr Anthony Anthony Fauci Fa George George Stephanopoulos S ABC CDC United States Shelley Shelley Adler Adler
The Question Journalists Fail to Ask Dr. Anthony Fauci

Mark Levin

01:32 min | 5 months ago

The Question Journalists Fail to Ask Dr. Anthony Fauci

"Go ahead It'll be measured by the level of antibodies that you might have a maturation of the immune system that would prolong the durability You don't know that George until you just follow it over a period of months If it becomes necessary to get another boost then we'll just have to deal with it when that occurs So a rational human being would ask him are you working on more advanced and cutting edge vaccines I mean we got these vaccines under operation warp speed I mean we've never seen anything like this domestic Manhattan Project against the pandemic the war on the pandemic but you're using vaccines Now don't you think that you should be involved in funding promoting You know not a gain of whatever it is research No no no no Not bats and monkeys and how to spread the virus But how to kill the virus Do you know that never asked this question Ever What do you guys working on that might actually be even more advanced Still with masks I got a way to manage you know he had to stay inside when you're inside where a mask went outside put a bag over your head Yeah yeah Yes you know Georgia I'm not sure but this is what I recommend How many doctors talk like that Real doctors

George Manhattan Georgia
Will Dr. Anthony Fauci Just Admit When He Doesn't Know Something?

Mark Levin

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

Will Dr. Anthony Fauci Just Admit When He Doesn't Know Something?

"So here's Fauci on ABC's this week with the I can't even stand this level shrimp This George Stephanopoulos because I remember when he showed his true colors he was a character assassin against women but they always resuscitate these people They always give them mouth to mouth It's a little hitman going after George Going after women the Bill Clinton's Victims Many is a respected journalist on ABC He's not respected The Democrat hack in a short one at that Cut 9 go Should we be expecting yearly boosters You know judge is tough to tell because how about that I don't know Is that a tough answer mister Medusa I don't

Fauci George Stephanopoulos ABC George Going Bill Clinton
"dr. anthony" Discussed on The "What's Your Revolution?" Show with Dr. Charles Corprew"

The "What's Your Revolution?" Show with Dr. Charles Corprew"

04:03 min | 8 months ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on The "What's Your Revolution?" Show with Dr. Charles Corprew"

"That's amazing brother like you said joy and we're not always going to be joyful. We're not but if we can find. If i can be joyful seventy percent of the time and i can have those strategies right i think about louis kosta and the smile that he had on his face when all of those people came as he supported the organization that he so loves rate was joyful it was joyful for the people to be around to support him but he was walking in his purpose. And when you do that when you walk into your purpose and you are emotionally intelligent and thinking about the right thing. That's hand in hand walking in your purpose and walking in your emotional intelligence rate will lead to a greater walking of your revolution yes. We'll we'll we'll figure that out right impact on the world go ahead. I'm sorry. I'm certified emotional geologist coach. I actually administered emotional intelligence assessment. You mentioned assessments earlier so if anyone wants to know about their emotional intelligence in brought to you have high emotional intelligence. Don't sit there and try to act like you. You know you need to work on that. But most most men men people in especially leaders should know their emotional intelligence in nba able to assess themselves to know where they need to grow in that in those areas so Wanted to that out there. Definitely and make sure let. Let's put this out now. How can people find you right to make sure that he conduct if they wanna have this emotional intelligence test to work with you. How can they find you on either. Go to lincoln dot lincoln. Dr anthony purdue is probably going to come up on google search page. Go to my website and contact me. I'm a leadership dot com anthony. Purdue dot com p..

louis kosta nba Dr anthony purdue lincoln google anthony Purdue
"dr. anthony" Discussed on The "What's Your Revolution?" Show with Dr. Charles Corprew"

The "What's Your Revolution?" Show with Dr. Charles Corprew"

04:52 min | 8 months ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on The "What's Your Revolution?" Show with Dr. Charles Corprew"

"This is the third time if you can see him And those who listening on the podcast. Please google dr. Anthony purdue right and i could go into all of the accolades all other thing but i want you to go and do your homework is a good friend. We've been friends for thirty thirty. Plus years he is ten ten years ten twelve thirty thirty years older than me but somehow the cryotherapy that he's been using his at his working. It's working well dear brother Time author purpose and power. Cowan your purpose. He can excuse me going to talk about a second book. We're not talk about a host of things but good brother my friend my dear friend and my brother. Dr anthony purdue. Welcome back to the what's the revolution. So how are you. How are you. I'm great and dr Thank you for having me once again. My brother i really appreciate. I'm doing very well. I just published my second book. Man husband and father in got kids in football gymnastics and enacting. You know so just having a having a ball man and just living life to the fullest excited for you and your new show man and and different things that you're doing and also just wanted to say i'll send my you know. My heart goes out to those in new orleans and wish the city a speedy recovery. Back to to how things were even better. And i and i know that's going to happen. So thank you for having me on the show brother no whereas there's two minutes leadership down in new orleans interesting and we'll get it. We'll get a chance to talk about leadership here today but no leadership chops were really honed in grown down in new orleans being a part of the leadership fellowship in the family and the ability of a foundation one of the largest foundations the country. To actually say that we're going to support of color And leaders across the city to see how we can how we could Bill and proliferate a community of people who want to bring equitable outcomes to a city that had been ravaged post katrina and wanting to make sure that laws and policies in different things were had the ability to ensure that every new orleans had the ability to thrive it torture tortured city but people love the city. Because you know that you could walk down the street and say hello to your folks say hello. Community is so big. I talked to our ceo camelback benches yesterday as we were trying to put together some strategies for our founders of dr purdue and we just talked about how he was even though he is you know in texas he was talking about. I need to check on my elderly community members..

Anthony purdue Dr anthony purdue new orleans Cowan gymnastics google football katrina Bill dr purdue texas
"dr. anthony" Discussed on The "What's Your Revolution?" Show with Dr. Charles Corprew"

The "What's Your Revolution?" Show with Dr. Charles Corprew"

03:31 min | 8 months ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on The "What's Your Revolution?" Show with Dr. Charles Corprew"

"Dr anthony voodoo renown zip codes to time author. What's your revolution. My revolution dr cope man is is is really to help others to find their purpose to find revolution end to be the best leaders in it. It's one thing to know about your revolution know about your purpose. You're calling whatever you wanna call it but it's another thing entirely actually walk it out to live it out to you. Know to breathe it to to think about it to make it come to reality. So that's what i do men. And that's what my my revolution is is helping others to walk in there revolution attention for a moment. Welcome to the show so for men and the people love them where we discuss. How men can embrace the revolution within And your host. dr charles. Corporal was good revolutionaries. Hope all is well. And i'm i'm gonna go down for a minute. You know and i need to give a shout out to my my beloved new orleans and folks down there to the good brothers over. Make us out. I kellogg family my family now now. That took care of me for fifteen years heart. My heart goes out to my heart. Goes out to your people to communities to everyone there that had our beloved tortured city is now again under seen by hurricane that sixteen years to the date you know to hurricane katrina devastated our beloved city and so i send i send everything to you. I send everything to know that we have what's revolution i'm thinking about. You want to make sure that we have the ability to support you. So i know there are a number of organizations that are helping. Our new willians do work. The mutual aid society down. There there are a number of organizations asked that you google To see what's going on grade in new orleans foundation son of a saint civil society all those wonderful organizations that a supporting families and students kids all of them Make sure that you look looking. Find ways to support in cash. We camelback benches who are based in new orleans as well or thinking about you and we thinking about our founders who we support seemingly in new orleans we love you and i want you to know that we are therefore you and we are developing strategies to make sure that we can assist you but please no. What's the revolution new orleans in our hearts. It is in my blood. I haven't new orleanians transplant. You know and so. I consider myself on new orleans. I love my city my beloved city sense to so much low to you all and i hope that the recovery is quick and speedy that we can get back to being the place that everyone loves to come to that we can rebel and party and love to show the world what community looks like. Because that's what new orleans it is. It is a place of community with the people on the streets and the people in the mayor's office dance together and love together and sing together and party together and mati jazz fest together and all things together so we look forward to supporting getting back to you. I love doing this show. And i love the people that i get to interview and it is not often that you know i. I get to see This brother in person. But fortunately i've been able to interview him now..

new orleans Dr anthony voodoo dr cope dr charles willians mutual aid society kellogg hurricane katrina hurricane google
"dr. anthony" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

NBC Meet the Press

04:26 min | 8 months ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

"Will be weeks and not months. And i don't think it's going to be days but it's going to be weeks. I believe and the pfizer rollout should be this week. Do we expect that the fda. Here's from the advisory panel. You expect that decision this coming week in that role. The role outs could begin as early as thursday or friday. Yeah i believe that's quite possible. A chuck as you know. The fda will will come out with their decision and then immediately after that you will see the advisory committee on immunization practices advising the cdc so it should be within the timeframe that was first mentioned. You've said And certainly there's there's medical in proof some scientific proof that if you've gotten covert you get natural immunities. Do we have a good. Do we have some good studies that indicate how long those natural immunities last not yet chuck we. Don't we're following that. But not yet we do know that when you do get infected you get strong immunity. There's no doubt about that. The durability is unclear. there's another fact we know that if you do get infected and recover and get vaccinated the level of your immunity is extraordinarily high surpassing any of the other two dose. Vaccines that you get so there are certain things we do know the two things. I just mentioned the thing that still unclear is what the durability of natural infection induced immunity is and what is the scope of its protection against different variants. Is this a case. Where do you think we'll be able to get data to find out for instance if you've had covert maybe only one shot of pfizer and that's going to be sufficient. Is that the kind of research that you think. We're going to be able to have in hand soon. Yeah i believe so. I'm not so sure how soon. But certainly that's an important question is being asked continually particularly since we know when you get shot following natural infection and recovery. You get a very good immune response so that is a question of interest and hopefully we'll be able to answer it in an expeditious man. All right play forecaster here. This is our fourth surge How close are we to being through it. And what do you expect the next three months to look like well. The next three months chuck is up to us and getting back to what i say all the time. We still have approximately seventy million people who are eligible to be vaccinated for not yet gotten vaccinated. If we get the overwhelming majority of those people vaccinated as we get into the mid to late fall and winter we would get through the winter. Well you know we always have to worry about the other respiratory infections particularly influenza so. We strongly encourage people to also get the influenza vaccine. I believe if we get that overwhelming majority of the people vaccinated as we enter into the full and win to. We can have good control over this and not have a really bad winter at all. One final thing you had indicated. Personally you would be supportive of a vaccine mandate for domestic flyers Is that something. That's under consideration by the biden. Cova team well. The team has a lot of things on the table. Nothing has been taken off the table. That decision has not been made. You know the president made the decision when it comes to flying if he if a person does not want to wear a mask with doesn't wear a mask they double the finding on that. We have not yet gotten to the point of requiring vaccinations on domestic flights. But everything is on the table. We consider these things literally on a daily basis. So all right but is that is that main. It's something that could happen or is it really just based on how long this fourth surge less. Well i think obviously the the degree of dynamics of infection influences a lot of decision so suffice it to say it's still on the table right now all right. Dr anthony has always appreciate you coming on and explaining the administration's perspective as biting your own expertise and i. I guess we will see you soon. Thank you when we come back. One of the ten republican.

chuck pfizer fda advisory committee on immuniza cdc influenza Cova biden Dr anthony
"dr. anthony" Discussed on 70 Over 70

70 Over 70

05:01 min | 9 months ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on 70 Over 70

"dr. anthony" Discussed on 70 Over 70

70 Over 70

04:41 min | 9 months ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on 70 Over 70

"Thing that i kept in the back of my mind..

"dr. anthony" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

08:21 min | 9 months ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"One step further when you have a virus that's able to mutate and get a new variant measles doesn't change it all and yet you need ninety. Plus percent of the population vaccinated to get really good herd immunity. So when you have a vaccine new virus that not only has high transmissibility. You need to get the overwhelming proportion of the population vaccinated if you wanna do it and that's what we're trying to do you know it's really frustrating. Do we have the solution to the problem. If everyone who's eligible to get vaccinated get vaccinated. You would not be having this conversation and the same distrust. The same disinformation that is preventing people from getting vaccinated. That's really come out you and really harsh way Somebody i listen to lecture and medical school and you've long been a household name in medical households but this pandemic obviously put you in a a spotlight in in a way that that is really sort of open up to politicization and the things that you say get parched and taken out of context on ask you just as as someone who trained to be a doctor who's fulfilled your responsibilities to the public in your public service now for much longer than i've been alive. How have you dealt with this politicization in this this attack on your name. How's it been and What would you recommend the rest of us who are not not nearly as exposed as you are. But but finding ourselves caught up in conversations where were debating something that really ought to be based in evidence and data but ultimately becomes extremely ideological and emotionally fraught. What's your what's your advice. The advice is to stick with your fundamental principles. The things you've learned medical school the importance of evidence the importance of truth. Importance of transparency. Will i have become obviously so the boogeyman for the far extreme crazy theories that people have a you know i don't like it At particularly don't like it affects my family. They didn't ask for this but they got it. Great thank goodness. I have a phenomenal. We supported family. But my job and your job you know. We went to medical school my job. Same thing you know. We're we're in our job. Is su su preserved the health and the safety of the people that we devoted our careers. So and once i keep my eye on that ball abu the other stuff is a bunch of junk nonsense. You know they throw all the swing they want you stick with the truth you stick with your integrity is sick with your honesty and all that other stuff sooner or later is going to go away. It's painful while they're painting these terrible pictures of you but at the end of the day the truth prevail though. I just focused on my job. My job is public health and science and medicine. And that's what i do. I really appreciate that. You've had now a couple of very public conversations written into the the senatorial record with somebody else went to med school and that senator rand paul and i want to ask you. What's it like debating. Someone who you know knows better but chooses to politicize to a particular base on purpose. i mean. obviously we've seen your frustration but what's that like firsthand and how does it make you feel about the future. Well i know. I worry less about myself do when i do about the country when run can at so many different levels even the level of the senate of the united states to propagate nonsense it is it is feigned for i have a phenomenal degree of respect for the united states government all the elements including the augusta body of the senate. I don't take any great pleasure. In having that kind of a conversation with senator ball but there's no way i'm gonna let him get away with that in the sense of just propagating nonsense out there you know in in you know. I don't like that. Because i don't i'm a person who's very respectful of institutions. And it hurts me more to have to do that when the fact that he's doing it you know. I wish i didn't have pushed back like that but have we appreciate you for doing it. We appreciate you for sticking with your principles and the truth and the science grateful that we have public servants. Like you out there fighting this pandemic on our behalf that dr anti-fouling man who needs no introduction but really grateful for having you on the pot thank you again thanks again. Thank you for having me take care as usual. Here's what i'm watching right now. This is a guy who ran for president saying he was going to quote. Shut down the virus. And what does he done. He's imported more virus from around the world by having a wide open southern border. His solution is he wants to have. The government forced kindergarteners to wear masks in school. That was florida governor. Run to santa's throwing red meat to is based and putting the lives of florida's children on the line at issue here is get this a ban on school mask mandates in violation of cdc guidelines. Right as millions of children go back to school. This is particularly galling. Because of this right now the us is averaging more than one hundred nine thousand new cases each day nearly one in five of those infected is a child in some places. I see us our full even pediatric covert beds children. Many of whom simply can't be vaccinated now account for nearly twenty percent of all new cases of covert nineteen as children. Go back to school. They're facing the perfect storm with delta and crowding banning from requiring masks is simply inviting serious outbreaks the other group of folks at particular risk with delta or the immuno-compromised last week the fda announced this the fda is expected to authorize a third booster shot for immuno-compromised people. It's critical that we offer more protection for people who are immuno-compromised. Those eligible for these boosters comprise only a small fraction of the population. Those who need the most for the rest those with functioning immune systems. I really don't believe there's a need for a booster that and it's still far more important to get unvaccinated people in the rest of the world vaccinated before we offer doses to people who are vaccinated here at home given new data that shows that three doses may offer protection for folks who are immuno-compromised. I think this is an important step now if the fda could get full authorization for these vaccines we'd be in really good shape. Finally in addition to passing the bipartisan infrastructure. Package the senate approved the framework for a three point. Five trillion dollar budget reconciliation package. That package could fundamentally change medicare as we know it. Including lowering the medicare age. This is a big deal like a very big deal. Most obviously it would guarantee healthcare for twenty million americans. It's also good politics. Two in three americans agree with lowering the medicare age. That said it's important to understand why the majority of democrats support lowering the medicare age. Even if they don't support medicare for all as medicare stance. Today seniors cannot for one of two medicare options standard medicare or what they call medicare quote unquote advantage. Advantage is a privately managed version of medicare that pays insurance companies to manage medicare patients usually cherry pick the healthiest patients. Whom they offer a few extra perks. But every dollar those healthier patients don't spend in healthcare. The insurance companies get to keep in profit. The health insurance lobby is extremely powerful. In fact they spent one hundred fifty million dollars lobbying last year alone in the middle of a pandemic and the realizing that including people between sixty and sixty four means more and healthier people that they can offer medicare advantage products to and more money in the bank. Look i deeply support. Lowering the medicare age. But i want us all to be clear eyed about. What's at play here. That's it for today on our way. I'll i want to hear from you. I hear a lot from the anti-science trolls who like to troll our podcast. So do me a favor and respond rate in review our show. Let us know what you think about our podcast. It goes a long way to getting it to other folks who believe in science and if you really like us going over to the crooked media storm and pick up some research we've got a new logo. Tees and mugs are safe and effective shirts and are.

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"dr. anthony" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

08:13 min | 9 months ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"So we always start by asking our guest introduce themselves. I obviously production but for the type. If you could introduce yourself out my name is tony vouch. E and on the director of the national institute of allergy and infectious diseases at nih. And i'm the chief medical advisor to president. By even before the pandemic doctor was the face of infectious disease science and medicine dating back all the way to the first outbreak of hiv aids in the eighties throughout the pandemic his honesty candor and stubborn insistence on science have been a source of confidence and comfort for many of us. Even if it's meant that he's become a lightning rod patrols on the right. Our conversation marks one year since our last check on how far we've come since the earliest days of the pandemic and how much further we have to go over very excited to have you on the show. I'm really grateful that you you do our show for a second time. Folks really really appreciated the first time. I really want to go a bit deeper. Because this is a bit of a confusing moment. I think in the pandemic for a lot of people simply because i think so many people follow the momentum of this thing and it feels like certainly two steps forward but but definitely one step back. I want to start by just taking a long view. The last time we had you on the pod it was july of twenty twenty and now it's been more than a whole year if you could talk to your previous self right go back to july twenty twenty and say dr anthony ouchi. Here's what you can expect. Do you think your previous self would have been surprised. Or the display on how you expected it No on a number of accounts of do first of all. We are very very fortunate in that. We had a highly highly effective vaccines. I knew that vaccines a good chance of being affected. I didn't realize or think that they were going to be this affected so it was the combination of the investment in biomedical research. Which really paid off the fact that we use new technologies like m. invective born platforms that the type that forms. The union edging design. That i might say my team here at nih developed. The vaccine research center really turned out even better than we Thing also the other side of the coin is the incredible ability of this virus to adapt you know. We thought that once you get the vaccine that we would be good in that would be you know able to if we did get a good vaccine which fortunately we did did know that at the time last july incredible ability of the vaccine to mutate in informed variants for example. We are now you know eating this far into would see that is delta vary just came in and just swept through the world i mean the world got hit badly by the original and then all of a sudden the delta varian comes in and fortunately for us vaccines that we made do relegates variant in protecting you from series disease leading the hospitalizations and death but it's multiple times more transmissible so for the unvaccinated. It makes things really really bad because you can really get into trouble. Hence to cases that are skyrocketing not only in our own country a but in the rest of the world. The thing that i'm well i wouldn't say surprise because we're we're dealing were living through such difficult times of a great deal of divisiveness that we knew the last time you and i ask interview but the idea that we have still a year later. He's ideological differences. Where you have people who politicize things like vaccines masks worry. It's just almost annette. Explicable that you have a virus. That's killing over. Six hundred and fifteen thousand americans and you still have people who reasons that in mind. I just can't figure out why other than just not wanting to be told or even suggested to do they're not getting vaccinated which is very bad for themselves. Their own health. The health of their families in their community. But it also allows this very wily virus if you give it the opportunity to continue to freely circulate in society which you will do. If you don't get vaccinated. We have ninety three million people in this country who are eligible to be vaccinated. Who have not yet been vaccinated if we got the overrunning majority than vaccinated. We wouldn't be in the difficult situation. We're in right now. So it's you know when you ask me complicated. Would i predicted that. It was as complicated on the good side in his complicated on the bedside. I would've said. I don't think i would have done that. I would've known that. Back in july of twenty twenty. You spoke to the confluence of a couple of pieces. This pandemic that have really really mutually intertwined one is the adaptiveness of this virus and delta varian in particular and then the other is the polarization around very basic public health recommendations that have been norm in this country. Frankly for nearly half a century. If not more. And i i wanna ask you about the the most recent cdc recommendations around masking for vaccinated people in communities with substantial or high transmission in some respects. This is based on evidence that shows that transmission is possible from vaccinated people. Although i think in some respect to the the media's portrayal of it and people's understanding of it is that possible means probable. Can you speak to what this recommendation says to folks who are looking at the vaccine. And saying i don't know if this thing works the way that they told me it would and folks who are now vaccinated. Who are worried about whether or not you know. The impact of their vaccination is going to buy them the freedoms that they were promised. You know u. s multiple questions. No that's good abdul because what it does is it reflects. The incredible dynamic nature of what's going on and it is entirely understandable. That people expect clarity in immutability. You say something it's done you never can change the recommendation. That would work. Well if you're dealing with a virus that doesn't change and so the virus was changing and when you talk about that sometimes as it's changing you can't quantity eight the degree of change so we did not appreciate that weren't and understandably because we had no way of appreciating that if you get a really really good vaccine that when you're dealing with the alpha very if you get vaccinated chances of getting a breakthrough infection a very low. And if you do the chances of your transmitting it to somebody of very low then you get this delta variant which has characteristics that are very different from the alpha verion. It spreads dramatically more readily when it gets into the days of firings. It's a thousand times ruled concentrated which means that even though the vaccines are still really good in detecting you from getting severe disease and death. What's changed is that even if you're vaccinated and.

tony vouch nih dr anthony ouchi vaccine research center national institute of allergy hiv aids infectious disease annette cdc
"dr. anthony" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

07:12 min | 9 months ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on America Dissected with Abdul El-Sayed

"This was dr anthony vouching in a conversation with. We'll call him another doctor. Senator paul you do not know what you're talking about. Quite frankly and i wanna say that officially you do not know what you talking about little k- you get into the nhl tonight. Unfortunately for all of us. That doctor is senator rand paul though he should know. Better doctor senator. Paul has chosen feeding red meat to his political base over following the science that he trained on. We're fortunate that dr anthony xiaojie was there to check him every single time. That said though many of us could see it coming few of us understood. Just how politicized this cove nineteen pandemic everything for masks vaccines to contact. Tracing could become but here. We are a year in the country's top infectious disease. Expert has to routinely spar with another doctor in the senate over basic science around getting vaccinated or wearing a mask in the pandemic people like rand. Paul in the legions of vaccine resistors. They inspire have exploited a peculiar aspect of this pandemic the fact that all of us are trying to interpret changing in real time in the earliest days of the pandemic. not even weeks in people like rand. paul exploited the seeming contradiction involving mass guidelines. Because we didn't know yet that a symptomatic people could pass along cove it. Public health officials recommended against masking. When they realized that in fact a symptomatic people could pass along the virus the reverse course but people like rand. Paul were right there to call this a contradiction most of us instead called this evolving public policy to meet changing science now exploiting the vaccine hesitant. They asked questions designed to inspire fear mistrust for example if the vaccines are so good wire vaccinated people being recommended to wear masks again that was easy because delta is a new variant of the virus and spending wildfire among people who are not vaccinated. Don't believe me look at where covert is spreading fast in the least vaccinated parts of the country. Anyway as a result eight months after safe ineffective vaccines become available to the public. Nearly half of americans remain unvaccinated. People like rand. Paul have a lot to do with that. But as we say on our show science always wins our failure to get vaccinated has left us vulnerable to delta and whatever could be behind it but should we choose to finally learn our lesson we could indeed move past this panic entirely which is exactly what my guest today has been saying all along in july two thousand twenty i got this with dr anthony voucher in the middle of those first frantic few months of the pandemic your later. I wanted to check in with him to get his perspective on how it's evolved where we stand now as we battled the delta varian and just what it's like to stand up to anti-science trolls in the senate and otherwise my second conversation with dr anthony fao cheap after the break. America's act is brought to you by the new york times. The new york times is committed to seeking the truth and helping people understand the world always black history. Month may only be one month of the year but the times believes exploring the past present and future of black. America is a continual project so the times has launched a new series. Black history continued that features a wide range of reporting unpacking the past present and future of black america. One story focuses on the rise of black superheroes and comic books. Tv and beyond editor. Veronica chambers dives deep into how black raiders are reinventing superhero with algae's and breathing new life into the format others examined the promise of black architecture and the illusion of black hair. Plus you can now experience these stories. In a whole new way with black history continued. Virtual events or black artists thinkers and celebrities explore themes like black joy and black creativity. My first stop shop in the morning. Every morning is the new york times and i find it a critical resource to dig deeper into some of the most important issues of our time understanding the way that racism has reshaped our narrative reshape the way that we think about the world we live in and how we need to deconstruct that to build a more just equitable world. That's exactly what black history continued is all about. That kind of journalism is what we need right now and they'll continue to publish it throughout the year. You can find it all and more at ny times dot com slash. Black history continued. America dissected is brought to you by marguerite casey foundation which launched the freedom scholars award last fall in partnership with group foundation. The program invests in bold. Economic and social justice scholarships that will help shift bounces of power in our society. One of the twenty twenty. Freedom scholars is dr elites area a black feminist philosopher assistant professor in the department of ethnic studies at uc riverside and co-founder of survived and punished a national organization. That challenges criminalization of survivors of domestic and sexual violence. Here she shares how the pandemic revealed the power of coalitions to combat structural violence. Our engagement with the pandemic reveal the power of unexpected coalitions and how structural violence actively prevents potential alliances between people because collective power for critical. Change is much harder to overcome my work demonstrates how prisons institutionalize and reinforced domestic and sexual violence. And this insight has spurred thank more expansively about. The potential of coalitions of survivors of violence inside and outside of prisons mico organizers. And i have been asking. How can coalitions of survivors across prison malls catalyzed more powerful strategies for freedom to learn more about dr alicia vieria and the twenty twenty freedom scholars visit the marguerite casey foundation website at www dot dot org slash freedom dash scholars. Follow the foundation on lincoln and on twitter at casey grants. America dissected is brought to you by that's s. e. s. h. Traditional therapy can be expensive and too many of us midst inaccessible. Hundreds of dollars a month to text with the counselor. No thanks such offers. A safe space for group support where you can connect with other people. In similar situations. I'll led by experts therapists. Sess- is the leading mental health app. For accessible group support facilitated by divers licensed therapists who are experts in their field session. Makes it easy to find your community. There are sessions for people of all different backgrounds on topics like living with anxiety or depression building healthy habits coping with covert managing stress parenting relationships body image low self esteem postpartum and much more. Each session is a sixty minute. Online group support session led by an experienced therapist with a specific specialty and each session has a maximum of fourteen participants. Such also offers community specific support for black latino. Lgbtq i plus the pi community and more sashes only sixty dollars per month for unlimited group sessions with licensed therapists sessions recommended by top psychologists therapists and mental health experts. And it offers a cost effective way to meet your mental health goals oprah magazine sash atop virtual mental health resource. It was the most affordable option on the list. Each new user receives a free two week. 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dr anthony vouching Paul Senator paul senator rand paul dr anthony xiaojie the new york times dr anthony America marguerite casey foundation dr anthony fao Veronica chambers senate infectious disease the times nhl group foundation dr elites department of ethnic studies uc riverside and co paul
"dr. anthony" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

NBC Meet the Press

02:24 min | 10 months ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

"We could use those daily briefings these last two weeks. I will say this those things that we all mocked about a year and a half ago. Those might have been helpful all right. Let's turn to the dominant political story right now. The summer And that's andrew cuomo. Here's letitia james. The attorney general new york laying out the allegations against the governor. The investigation found that governor andrew cuomo sexually harass current and former new york state employees by engaging an unwelcome and nonconsensual touching and making numerous offensive comments of us suggestive sexual nature that created a hostile work environment for women as a colleague said on the air to me. I said he's a man island and this person said yeah and high tides coming off right so so i mean it's not a matter of if but when i guess it was just going to say how how does this do you want to be impeached and become the second governor in the history of ever again in new york a cuomo. Not being able to run for office. Think about okay right. So do you do that or do you want to say. I'm not running for reelection. But i'm not going to resign little lake. Do you wanna say on going to resign. Once you see the the numbers you know other politicians have been able to survive with the bill clinton we think about donald trump in part because they had the base with them. You know don't Both of those still had core support from their base. You go back and look at the polling even a month ago. Chuck fifty something percent democrat. Said he shouldn't. He shouldn't be impeached today. Fifty something percent of democrats say cuomo should be impeached. I how does the legislature does not here. There's no incentive for them not to impeach him right his over whether whether he resigns whether he doesn't run again his fears over new coming back from this for him. Bill debit if you're the democratic party new york that's right that's when you need them out. You need them out when the calendar says twenty one. That's counter says twenty two while i mean democrats don't need this to be an ongoing story and it's not just a new york story. It's a national story. And so i think that's why you see that mario cuomo has not one single democrat. Andrew.

letitia james governor andrew cuomo new york andrew cuomo cuomo donald trump bill clinton Chuck legislature democratic party mario cuomo Andrew
"dr. anthony" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

NBC Meet the Press

01:44 min | 10 months ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

"This sunday the fourth wave the rate of increase that we've seen over the last two weeks and staggering covert racing through the country at rates not seen since mid winter not vaccinated will get coded at some point in time and the only question will be city. Become president biden calls out texas and florida's governor for opposing measures like mass mandates was. You're going to help. At least get. The people are trying to do. The right thing prompting pushback. Why don't you get this order secure until you do that. I don't wanna hear lip about kobe. From plus as schools reopen. I did not want to go to school with the debate. Grows over masking. Children are children and over possible vaccine mandates for teachers guests. This morning dr anthony ouchi and the head of the country's most powerful teachers union randi weingarten also andrew cuomo facing impeachment governor cuomo's sexually harassed multiple women by engaging an unwanted groping kisses hugging and by making inappropriate comments. The governor denies the allegations but his fellow democrats say it's time for him to go now calling on him to resign joining me for inside analysis. Are amy walter editor in chief and publisher of the cook political report. Jake sherman co-founder of the punchbowl news website for her maryland congresswoman donna edwards and former white house political director for george w bush. Sarah fagin welcome to sunday. It's meet the press from nbc news in washington the longest running.

dr anthony ouchi governor cuomo biden randi weingarten kobe andrew cuomo texas florida amy walter Jake sherman punchbowl news donna edwards Sarah fagin maryland george w bush white house nbc news washington
"dr. anthony" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

02:11 min | 10 months ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"I'm the host michael ideas and if you're a longtime listener welcome back guys. I truly appreciate you tuning in and in this episode. I'm speaking with dr anthony win and man. It feels like i could. Have you know how when you compensate with someone and it's like have we ever met before like did we just become best friends this is. He's a really really cool guy. And he just opened up his practice at the moment of this recording He opened it four weeks ago. So it's been a month and he lets us into all the details of how everything turned out right. From the moment he decided to sign the lease. Take out a loan all that stuff. He discusses about his loan process. How bank of america puertas loan right before he was signing his lease and this caused him to stress out. And so what happened after that. We talk about that. We'll talk about his background. A little bit how he worked at a dsl and chico and what he gained from working st and also what he learned that he didn't like at the dsl. And then we'll talk about dental photography. How he's getting into it. And how it changes the game in a macro and a micro scale and he lets his more details on that. We also discussed how he struggled to find an acquisition and something like there during this conversation process about working in the dsl. Actually if we were winding bit he talks about how his assistant was older than him and how he had to build that rapport for mutual respect. Right and that's something that i think. Some of us can't struggle with right. Maybe you are in an acquisition and then your your team is older than you and then they feel like well. What is his young coming in here doing right so he talks about that. He talks to us how he found his location to build his start up he lets us know his design and construction process. How he got ahead of the construction process and then we discuss the business side of everything. How much is he's doing a production and collection. How many new patients. He's had so far what he's doing from marketing and advertising. How he's about to be breaking. Even i think he's beyond that point already and we discussed this and so much more guys without further delay..

dr anthony bank of america michael
"dr. anthony" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"You mentioned earlier that you've been under quite a bit of personal attack for talking about things that should be. I would argue like fairly noncontroversial like the importance of vaccines vaccinations. And we know that. So many of our public health officials have been under inordinate stress working day after day without rest. Try to help protect public health over the last year and a half and we know that many public health officials have also received new horrific abuse in the mental health. Toll has been really immense. What do you think we need to do to try to help support. Everyone who's really been on the front lines to recover from this horrifically stressful time is. Hopefully we recover as a country. Yeah well you appointing out something that i think everyone hopefully will ultimately recognizes the extraordinary courage an effort that has been put in by frontline healthcare workers. I mean they truly are and heroines of this. The physical risk that they took are taking to take care of people the physical and mental strain of seeing people every single day. Dying right in front of you with very little that you can do particularly when you're dealing with people who have underlying conditions in which when they get hospitalized they're very very difficult straits. It's a reality. We've lost close to five hundred and ninety thousand people in this country. That's terrible for the losses of those people in their families. But what people. Don't appreciate. Because i've been there i've been there and i know it would. It means the terrible strain stress. When you try your best to save someone's life and they just lose you lose them person. If the person who the person we've got to pay attention to the stress and probably a good degree of post traumatic stress that those people laugh. So i think attention to mental health issues is something we absolutely have a responsibility to do for people who've given it everything and yet have exhausted themselves in the process dr fauci. I wanna be respectful of your time. I also want to end on a optimistic note. We spoke earlier about how the cove nineteen vaccines were accelerated through. Just extraordinary amounts of attention and investment and collaboration really across the globe in so i just am curious. What else that is being worked on currently at the nih do you think is close to a breakthrough in that could similarly really help save and protect a lot of lives soon. Yeah and it's in multiple fields of medicine not just infectious disease. But one of the things that we're having a lot of optimism now you know we've done spectacularly well into development of life-saving drugs for persons living with hiv to the point. Now if you're infected you get put on one pill that contains three drugs and you can go. Essentially lead up almost a normal lifespan. So we've done well there. The thing that has been the challenge is a vaccine for hiv. But i believe some of the technologies that have been developed and shown to be highly successful like the are a vaccine platform technology for covid nineteen is now being actively pursued in the field of hiv and in other areas of medicine including cancer and other infectious diseases. That's what i think is perched for breakthroughs also when the field of immunotherapy for cancer i mean the more we learn about how we can control regulation of the immune system. They're going to be kansas. That have been beyond the reach of cures. That likely will now for the first time. See that you can actually marshall the immune system's response cancer immunotherapy has been in some areas quite successful but in some areas still very frustrating. I think you're gonna see a lot of that. Frustration turn to good results within a reasonable period of time. So there's never been a time more exciting in the field by medical research than now and that's the reason why we are so grateful for the support that we continue to get from the congress and from multiple administrations because it certainly has given us an extraordinary tool for covid nineteen if it were not for that we would be in much much more dire straits than we are right now with regard to this pandemic thank you so much for your leadership and for your time today for giving me thinks to be optimistic about but also of course thanks to still worry about and work on so thank you so very much. Thank you very much chelsea appreciate you happen to be on your show. Thank you dr anthony. Fauci is the director of the national institute of allergy and infectious diseases at the us national institutes of health or the nih. if you're not yet vaccinated go to vaccines dot gov to find a vaccine site near you and anyone can visit. We can do this. Dot h s dot gov to join in a month of action. Help get as many people. Max needed as possible in volunteers. Even if you're vaccinated who take at least five. Actions may be invited to the white house in july and as we reflect on what our country's been through what keep listening to scientists and experts like dr genus team. Let's keep asking hard important questions so that we can learn from what's worked. And what has it so. We are better prepared for the inevitable next time and to any of our listeners. Who have been on the front lines of this crisis as a nurse doctor researcher or anyone else in the world of public health. Thank you our country owes you a huge debt of gratitude. And i hope that you are taking care of your own health to is it. And mentally.

anthony congress three drugs july Fauci one pill today nineteen last year and a half Max fauci nineteen vaccines one five hundred and ninety thousa first time institutes of health cove single day national institute of allergy at least five
"dr. anthony" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

22:57 min | 1 year ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"I was honored to welcome to the podcast. Dr fauci it's become almost a cliche to say this is an unprecedented time. And i'm just curious given that you have lived through other pandemics worked in other pandemics. How much of. This feels unprecedented. And how much of. It feels eerily familiar. Well chelsea the only eerily familiar thing about it is the unpredictable nature of outbreaks. Where you just going along. And then all of a sudden something comes up it could be subtle the way. Hiv this month. In the next few days where commemorating the fortieth anniversary of the realization that we were dealing with a new syndrome. We didn't know what the microbe the pathogen was. We didn't even have a name for it back in june and july of nineteen eighty one having had. I guess i would call it the privilege in some respects but also the painfully experience of being involved in that from the very first day. That's sort of snuck up on you. It was low level below the radar screen. Then as we learn more about it we found out dealing with just the tip of the iceberg when we saw people who were very very sick not knowing until we had a test that we're dealing with something where they were literally millions of people infected so the fact that outbreaks are unpredictable. They come in strange ways. That's the common denominator. The difference with this that validates the statement. it's unprecedented. is that when you're dealing with something as explosive as this which has a couple of characteristics that. I have often referred to almost ironically years ago. What is your worst nightmare. Dr fauci people would ask me that five years ago. Ten years ago fifteen years ago. And longer i would always say it was. The emergence of a new virus generally jumping species from an animal host to a human that had two characteristics one that is extraordinarily efficient in spreading from human to human and two that it has the capability of a great degree of morbidity mortality. When you put those two things together. That's when you get my worst nightmare and that's exactly what we're experienced because we have not had anything like this in well over one hundred years since the historic influenza pandemic of nineteen eighteen so there is a very strong true element of this being unprecedented. At least in over one hundred years and dr fauci there's an adage in public health that are notable epidemics aren't now with the benefit of both hindsight and your decades of experience in pandemics. What do you think we could have done differently in january or february to help save american lives and save lives across the globe in some respects. It is not answerable because you could certainly have done things differently. If you new things differently so you can say to yourself in this country. What could we have done if we knew back in january what we know right now is the characteristics that i'm telling me would ability to efficiently spread from human to human the fact that fifty to sixty percent of the transmissions occur from someone who is infected but has no symptoms at all. We know anywhere from a third to forty percent of the people who get infected never develop any significant symptoms at all that would bring attention to any medical intervention so back then if we knew that we were dealing with in this country something as extraordinary as this in its ability to spread. We would have done something. That likely would have not been acceptable to the american public. Like when we had the first case in. i think it was january. Twenty first to say okay. It's here and then a few days later a week or two later it became clear that there was community. Spread it just air which means someone infected someone and you don't have the chain of transmission locked in. You don't know where the person got it from that. Being the case that means it's spreading in society beneath the radar screen if we had known its capability of spreading. We could have said. Let's shut the country down right now to prevent it. I think there would have been such extraordinary pushback to say. Well wait a minute what are you talking about. We have one or two cases you want to shut the country down. That's crazy so when you ask me a question what could we have done differently. Well now that we have five hundred ninety thousand deaths you go back and say well look what this has done. We may be could have prevented some of those really shutdown early and prevented the spread. But you know if you look. Throughout the world chelsea even countries that appear to have done well early on every country has gotten hit really badly even some of the asian countries now that we pointed to as models of their response are now starting to get into trouble including places like taiwan and singapore and yet nam and places like that who seemed to have done very well in the first waves. You made a comment that resonates with me is. How do you prevent an outbreak from becoming a pandemic. so. I don't think we're necessarily going to be able to prevent the emergence of new microbes. They've occurred historically for as long as before history even recorded it. History is full of them. But in answer to your question how do you prevent that from becoming a pandemic. and that's what we talk about lessons learned. What can we learn having gone through this. Where the united states was ranked by public health agencies as being the best prepared country in the world for pandemic and we got hit among the top three with brazil and india as the three worst in the sense of numbers of cases. And and dr batniji think that that is because we were prepared for previous pandemics in not future wanting. Where are we ready to fight the last war. Not the next war. I think it's partially that not completely. I think it was. There were things that went wrong early on in. That was the issue with the testing that we didn't have a testing system for a considerable period of time. And we were testing only symptomatic people. Because we're not fully aware that a symptomatic spread was really really very important so those are the things that i think could have been done differently. And then don't want to relitigate what went on last year but there are things that i think could have been done better. Although i live in new york now i grew up in arkansas and then moved when i was twelve to dc and it is heartbreaking to me. Dr fauci that arkansas louisiana tennessee mississippi so much of the south have vaccination rates. That are half of what we see in the northeast since you've had to communicate now over so many decades so many different public health challenges and also imperatives. How do you think we rebuild trust in science and especially trust in in vaccines vaccinations. That is something that is not going to happen easily chelsea. I think that we may have to find ways. And that's a complicated issue as you will know probably better than i do. It's a complicated issue of how you heal the differences and end the hostility. I mean i've been the object myself of a phenomenal amount of hostility. Merely because i'm promoting. What really fundamental simple public health principles that seems astounding that that would generate a considerable degree of hostility. But it is it is so. I don't think the answer is intensifying the hostility and pointing figures. I think the approaches to outreach to try and understand each other better and realized that we have differences but those differences should be the source of strength in some respects and not the source of chaos. So i don. I don't know the answer to your question is if it's a seemingly simple question with a complicated answer we've got to reach out to people and get them to understand that this is for their own safety their own health and also what i referred to as communal responsibility your responsibility to society because there is a thing called the chain of transmission of an outbreak and one of the very interesting and i must say quite unique aspects of sauce covy to in covid nineteen. Is that the same virus that has killed. Almost six hundred thousand americans makes many. Many people have no symptoms at all. Just doesn't bother them. I mean there's thirty forty percent of the people get no symptoms at all so that is in many respects on unprecedented to have that situation usually when you have something as potentially deadly as this it makes just about everybody a little bit sick. This is something where there are people who are saying why should i get vaccinated the chances of my getting into trouble of very very low. And they're correct if you look at the rate of hospitalizations of young people. It's zero it's small compared to the rate among elderly people and among people with underlying conditions. But there are a couple of things there that people don't fully understand you're not completely exempt because a lot of young people wind up getting into trouble statistically not nearly as many as the elderly and those with the line conditions but there's another aspect of it let's say you get infected and you don't get any symptoms at all and you say see. I got infected big deal. What's the difference the differences that it is conceivable and maybe likely that even though you got no symptoms that you would inadvertently an innocent. I'll use that word. pass it on to someone else. Who would then pass it on to someone else who would then get a serious consequence so there is a degree that have to consider of. What is my societal responsibility of. Not being part of the chain of transmission as opposed to being a dead end for the virus. So do you wanna be a dead end for the virus or do you want to be a situation where you're part of the transmission chain which would get other people in trouble but that's tough to get that concept across dr fauci. I never thought. I would say i wanted to be a dead end but yes here. I am like very happy to be fully vaccinated in a in a dead end. We'll be right back. Stay with us at children's national hospital. Everything we do is just for kids are top. Rank specialists are here for kids of all ages from babies who need help before they're even born to teens and young adults are pediatric work to diagnose problems quickly and thoroughly and use treatments designed exclusively for growing children with convenient locations. All across the dc metro area. Find a specialist. Today at children's national dot org slash stronger. Any college can make you on paper at penn college. We're more into looking good on steel and looking good on x-rays with looking good and code building and rebuilding vision and revisions and when it's all said and done you'll look good to everyone because the past might be written on paper but the future will be made by hand. Learn more at p. c. t. dot edu. I do want to ask about preparedness. Because i think probably a lot of people are now as we are vaccinating the country. I know a lot of people wanna put cove in the rear view mirror. Leave it in twenty twenty one not worry about it again but we know that the virus is not done with us until we have everyone vaccinated and we know. We need to learn lessons from this to help. Better prepare us going forward. So what lessons do you think we need to learn. And how do you think your work. The nih has to adapt. How do you think the biden administration has to adapt what concrete things have to happen to ensure we are better prepared for the inevitable next time. Okay so two components to my answer chelsea. The first is that when you're dealing with a global pandemic you have to have a global response. We're not gonna be safe on this planet until the pandemic is controlled globally. So right away. It is not necessarily a lesson but almost a mandate that we really need to help the rest of the world as as a rich country. Get this under control because if there's still viral dynamics somewhere even if we get this on the very good control here there's always the danger of the generation variants which then would make our protection somewhat tenuous even with the vaccines. That's the first thing when you look at the future. What lessons learned for the future. We need to also prepare in a global way. There was a thing called the global health security network of the global health security agenda. Will you have into connectivity. Among countries of the world good modern up-to-date communications sharing reagents sharing of of specimens continued good collaboration and communication building up in the local areas. The public health infrastructure. That would allow them to respond in quench when it breaks out in any given country because it's generally don't start spontaneously in twenty-five countries they generally start as a jumping of species usually not always from an animal reservoir to a human and then it spreads to the rest of the world. That doesn't mean that you gotta blame the country where it happens. It just so happens but you've got to have those countries prepared to be able to contain it. So that's the thing with preparedness. The other thing from a scientific standpoint is that we are very fortunate that we have made decades and decades of investment in basic and clinical biomedical research. Which has allowed us to do something. That's unprecedented to get a vaccine in. Which a virus was first identified in january of twenty twenty and then in december of that same year. Eleven months later to be putting vaccine into people's arms. That's ninety four to ninety five percent efficacious. If we were having this conversation ten years ago you would've told me. I was completely crazy thinking that that would happen. It usually takes us in years and the speed was not because we were reckless in doing things. In cutting corners the speed was related to the extraordinary amount of investment that was made of the previous decades in clinical and basic research so there another component of lessons learned we need to continue to make the investments in research that will allow us to have the scientific component of the response be optimal and fortunately for us. That's what happened with regard to the vaccines dr brought to you. You mentioned earlier. The global health security agenda which while it had antecedents for many years really got codified in the aftermath of a bola and of the united states saying what has happened in western africa is clearly a tragedy for people there but it is a danger to us here too and we do need to have more robust public health architecture and there and then that wasn't a priority for the trump administration but it wasn't really a priority for the world. I do admittedly have a little bit of a concern that once we are through covid nineteen. I worry we might lose. Focus on the need to build robust global architecture to help protect public health everywhere will chelsea. I definitely share your. And the reason i do is from my experience in that corporate memory for things that have been very very difficult in. The sense of responding in preparing is often short lived. And when you put this behind us we will be dealing with problems. That are real and present yet. It's difficult to get people to understand that the threat of an outbreak is perpetually a real and present danger so what we've gotta do as globe as as a planet as a community of nations is to just make sure we tell ourselves that when we get this under control that we've gotta say never again and mean it and never again means to really put the effort into the kind of preparation that will require considerable resources and even though it's tough to convince people to give resources to something that isn't happening now we've got a call back the memory of to nineteen twenty twenty and twenty twenty one because we started off in the beginning of this podcast. The fact is that this is really what happened to us. It just came out of nowhere and it just immobilized us for such an extraordinary period of time in a second year now. The economy has been wrecked by. This is sure not only here in the united states. Thank goodness where recovering now. But it's still a lot of people out of work. I think those kinds of memories should spur assan to make sure we are adequately prepared next time around one hopefully will spur us on returning to comment that you made earlier that i am vigorous agreement with it. We have responsibility to help. Vaccinate the world. And while i certainly appreciate president biden's commitment to donate seventy million doses by july fourth. We know we can't effectively donate our way out of this. So i am curious. Dr fauci think about the architecture that we really need to help protect public health globally while often. The focus is on surveillance and specimen collecting testing. What do you think it should be for vaccine research and development for example or the actual ability to manufacturer and to guarantee the quality of vaccines in the next generation. I'm with you one hundred percent on that. And that is referring to building up the capacity and the ability to do technology transfer. So that when you have an outbreak. It isn't only companies in switzerland. The united states in the uk but you have plants and companies and technology and the knowledge to do it in senegal and ethiopia and south africa and indonesia and brazil and chile. So that when you have an outbreak you do have the capability and that is building up. Not only the infrastructure of public health to do surveillance and monitoring but also the ability to respond at a global level to rely on. Donations is a quick immediate partial. Fix but the real durable sustainable fix now in the future is to allow other countries that generally don't have that capacity to be able to make vaccine in a timely fashion and not depend completely on donations from the rich country. The rich countries should donate if they have to but the real ultimate solution is to have a world where it's evenly distributed with his equity in opportunity to make your own countermeasures. 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"dr. anthony" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

08:21 min | 1 year ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on In Fact with Chelsea Clinton

"Hiv aids pandemic. his research was crucial to understanding how the virus works and he was one of the leading architects of the president's. Emergency plan for aids relief or pet far. Which has helped saved millions of lives. Around the world. He's advised seven presidents on how to prevent diagnose and treat a long list of infectious diseases including hiv aids respiratory infections diarrheal diseases to bricusse malaria and zeka. He's been leading the government's efforts to combat. This pandemic working nonstop with his team and communicating consistently and honestly with americans every step of the way i was honored to welcome to the podcast. Dr fauci it's become almost a cliche to say this is an unprecedented time. And i'm just curious given that you have lived through other pandemics worked in other pandemics. How much of. This feels unprecedented. And how much of. It feels eerily familiar. Well chelsea the only eerily familiar thing about it is the unpredictable nature of outbreaks. Where you just going along. And then all of a sudden something comes up it could be subtle the way. Hiv this month. In the next few days where commemorating the fortieth anniversary of the realization that we were dealing with a new syndrome. We didn't know what the microbe the pathogen was. We didn't even have a name for it back in june and july of nineteen eighty one having had. I guess i would call it the privilege in some respects but also the painfully experience of being involved in that from the very first day. That's sort of snuck up on you. It was low level below the radar screen. Then as we learn more about it we found out dealing with just the tip of the iceberg when we saw people who were very very sick not knowing until we had a test that we're dealing with something where they were literally millions of people infected so the fact that outbreaks are unpredictable. They come in strange ways. That's the common denominator. The difference with this that validates the statement. it's unprecedented. is that when you're dealing with something as explosive as this which has a couple of characteristics that. I have often referred to almost ironically years ago. What is your worst nightmare. Dr fauci people would ask me that five years ago. Ten years ago fifteen years ago. And longer i would always say it was. The emergence of a new virus generally jumping species from an animal host to a human that had two characteristics one that is extraordinarily efficient in spreading from human to human and two that it has the capability of a great degree of morbidity mortality. When you put those two things together. That's when you get my worst nightmare and that's exactly what we're experienced because we have not had anything like this in well over one hundred years since the historic influenza pandemic of nineteen eighteen so there is a very strong true element of this being unprecedented. At least in over one hundred years and dr fauci there's an adage in public health that are notable epidemics aren't now with the benefit of both hindsight and your decades of experience in pandemics. What do you think we could have done differently in january or february to help save american lives and save lives across the globe in some respects. It is not answerable because you could certainly have done things differently. If you new things differently so you can say to yourself in this country. What could we have done if we knew back in january what we know right now is the characteristics that i'm telling me would ability to efficiently spread from human to human the fact that fifty to sixty percent of the transmissions occur from someone who is infected but has no symptoms at all. We know anywhere from a third to forty percent of the people who get infected never develop any significant symptoms at all that would bring attention to any medical intervention so back then if we knew that we were dealing with in this country something as extraordinary as this in its ability to spread. We would have done something. That likely would have not been acceptable to the american public. Like when we had the first case in. i think it was january. Twenty first to say okay. It's here and then a few days later a week or two later it became clear that there was community. Spread it just air which means someone infected someone and you don't have the chain of transmission locked in. You don't know where the person got it from that. Being the case that means it's spreading in society beneath the radar screen if we had known its capability of spreading. We could have said. Let's shut the country down right now to prevent it. I think there would have been such extraordinary pushback to say. Well wait a minute what are you talking about. We have one or two cases you want to shut the country down. That's crazy so when you ask me a question what could we have done differently. Well now that we have five hundred ninety thousand deaths you go back and say well look what this has done. We may be could have prevented some of those really shutdown early and prevented the spread. But you know if you look. Throughout the world chelsea even countries that appear to have done well early on every country has gotten hit really badly even some of the asian countries now that we pointed to as models of their response are now starting to get into trouble including places like taiwan and singapore and yet nam and places like that who seemed to have done very well in the first waves. You made a comment that resonates with me is. How do you prevent an outbreak from becoming a pandemic. so. I don't think we're necessarily going to be able to prevent the emergence of new microbes. They've occurred historically for as long as before history even recorded it. History is full of them. But in answer to your question how do you prevent that from becoming a pandemic. and that's what we talk about lessons learned. What can we learn having gone through this. Where the united states was ranked by public health agencies as being the best prepared country in the world for pandemic and we got hit among the top three with brazil and india as the three worst in the sense of numbers of cases. And and dr batniji think that that is because we were prepared for previous pandemics in not future wanting. Where are we ready to fight the last war. Not the next war. I think it's partially that not completely. I think it was. There were things that went wrong early on in. That was the issue with the testing that we didn't have a testing system for a considerable period of time. And we were testing only symptomatic people. Because we're not fully aware that a symptomatic spread was really really very important so those are the things that i think could have been done differently. And then don't want to relitigate what went on last year but there are things that i think could have been done better. Although i live in new york now i grew up in arkansas and then moved when i was twelve to dc and it is heartbreaking to me. Dr fauci that arkansas louisiana tennessee mississippi so much of the south have vaccination rates. That are half of what we see in the northeast since you've had to communicate now over so many decades so many different public health challenges and also imperatives. How do you think we rebuild trust in science and especially trust.

new york arkansas taiwan fifty singapore january february last year june forty percent Ten years ago fauci millions of people five years ago two cases bricusse malaria five hundred ninety thousand d one third fifteen years ago
"dr. anthony" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"Says points out that the kind of mask you. Buying a drugstore quote is not really effective in keeping out virus which is small enough to pass through the material end quote so his original judgement and the reason he said. Don't wear masks is. That's what the science showed and then somewhere along the line Some scientists suggest this would help and it became this. You know symbol of whether or not you were helping with the virus effort and he got on board And even today we don't have really any good scientific evidence that it really helps especially with an arrow sliced Virus but he kind of went along with that and we can see here as you said that. He was changing his position to make himself look better and try to to to justify some decisions. That really couldn't be justified development on this front. This week has been this this vanity fair story which is a long investigation into the lab hypothesis. And really why it took the government so long to acknowledge it and a few points. I would draw out here. One is it cites. A memo written by a former acting assistant secretary of the state department Who wrote that. His team was warned not to pursue investigation of the origin of covid nineteen. Because it would quote open a can of worms if continued There's also a at some some quotes from matthew pottinger. The former deputy national security adviser who says to interesting things that i that i found interesting at least one of them is that pottenger sort of blames trump for some of this in that trump was publicly saying that he had seen evidence before seen evidence that the virus came out of the lab Before apparently reportedly that evidence was really there and so pottenger says that that seemed to cause a quote antibody response unquote within the government. And then the second thing is he. He says that so many of the experts in this field have ties of some kind to this gain of function research That those conflicts quote play a profound role in muddying the waters in contaminating the shot at having an impartial inquiry unquote so bill. I mean it seems to me that these are questions that maybe we need congress and some sort of investigation to answer because It seems like there are a lot of conflicts and a lot of a lot of reasons. that the everybody was sort of hoping that the lab hypothesis was it what it would turn out to be. Yeah i think in the case of the vanity fair piece you mentioned. I too found that really fascinating. There were not only people hoping that they wouldn't find things but actively trying to shut down the investigation. I mean one of the other stories is that you know a secretary of state. Mike pompeo was pushing this investigation but he was fought by people in his own department about this and they some of them may have just believed. This's this is a cookie theory. There's nothing there but others that line. I think it was in the vanity fair about you. Know if we have investigation could open a can of worms suggested. Some people. don't have good answers for what we might find out. I think this is something for congress to look into the probably wait until they get the the the latest report from joe biden and i would add another thing to To judge the credibility of this new investigation will the biden team include members of the former team. That was investigating. I mean they've done some the legwork already or are they going to keep those people marginalize..

Mike pompeo congress joe biden today trump This week nineteen matthew pottinger One second thing least biden one lot them
"dr. anthony" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"dr. anthony" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"Where the infection rate at one point was very high, and is now coming down. Unfortunately there are also some areas. Where the infections continue to go up, I think when you look at all of the country as a whole mainly putting everything together and getting the averages of it, certainly, the deaths clearly coming down. Hospitalizations are coming down the cases. Coming down, but less steeply it. It's a slow decline of going in the right direction, but it is I'd like to see. It'd be a little bit more sharply declined, but in general in general job going in the right direction. Dr what question so many lives but Louis. Everybody was saying by more ventilators by more ventilators. The death rate in some places was high as eighty percent. Of people put on ventilators. What say you about this? Well when you're sick, enough John. This. Division. He's taking care of a lot of very sick patients in my career. When you when you have a very serious disease. That requires integration. And Ventilation. That, is already a very very serious. Certainly eighty percent mortality. In people that go on ventilators is severe and higher. I believe than the average of pull in general for all diseases to go onto ventilators but this. Infection is so severe that by the time. You get to go on a ventilator that you are already very seriously ill, and that's the reason why I believe you're seeing very high. Death rates have been some reevaluation of that. Apparently, that is in some hospitals, but in others. The death rate is considerably lower. Than that eighty percent, but it's still. Unacceptably high, but that's because of the seriousness of the disease. In addition I have heard from some of my Kochta's my friends at does a lot of doctors that did not know how to use to ventilators properly at that probably record seventy problems. Yeah we! We have a minute left anything else who want to tell people well. You know I do I. WanNa just continue to encourage that we'd been through a lot. This will end if not something that's going to go on forever. He will end by how we response to it. We need to be responsible. Obviously, we all want to open up the country again and bring back some some semblance of normality. Get the economy going. We've got to do that. Delicate balance between moving forward in a careful way. You know heating the guidelines. So that we don't do something precipitously. Continue to push your head to trying to get back to normal at the same time that put all our efforts into trying to contain it alternately. Bring this outbreak down to a negligible level. Hopefully we're in the right direction. I believe we are. We just need to keep pushing. Dr Anthony FAUCI director of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institute of Health. Thank you so much for calling into Sunday boarding? You're bringing the American people today. It could be with John Thank you for having me. This is the catch roundtable. We'll be right back..

John Dr Anthony FAUCI Allergy and Infectious Disease Louis National Institute of Health director