18 Burst results for "Dr Xu"

"dr xu" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

08:19 min | 11 months ago

"dr xu" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"That affected at all by db s. Well so Executive functioning is unfortunately a common feature of arkan's disease. And it's not necessarily something that we looked to be improved necessarily with deep brain stimulation. Oftentimes maybe there are some features of that executive dysfunctioning that can improve with to delve into the extent that those happen. Perhaps there's also a some improvement not with a deep brain stimulation as well but generally speaking. That's not something we expect to change when you think about the long-term profile of patients who have undergone a deep brain stimulation and what they're called Can what can happen to their mission over time. you know. There's there's a small proportion of patients who can have greater difficulties in certain areas in association with the surgery generally speaking over time seeing What we may see parkinson's advance But we're not necessarily seeing advancing as a cause of of doing the deep brain stimulation as far as access to db s is Like most things that i find with parkinson's i'm guessing there's inequities of of access to db s united states and around the world. Yeah so deep brain stimulation first and foremost. I think it's important for everybody understand. It is approved by insurance. It is a well-worked ignites treatment and so It it is something that people who have access to care for their parkinson's and have insurance and things like that. Those those these can should not be barriers for patients to get it. I think what we see are reflective of certain hair patterns in incense disease so we know that places that have large hospital systems or have been disorders clinics or or neurology kerr grams where they see. Large numbers of patients with parkinson's diseases replaces where we're also seeing more deep brain stimulation happening. Now it's going and it's changing and so there are centers or new smaller programs around the country. But i think one of the challenges that i've seen is that if there isn't a place close by that a patient can go issue to get pat db s care becomes harder for them to commit to it and so That sort of the center the whether or not. They're being managed in place that has a regular consolidated care for patients. Those are probably more the factors that we're seeing in terms of patients access to deep brain stimulation now. Some of the studies do show. That patients a certain demographics are less likely to receive that. But i do think that it has a lot to do with how he's a care. Patterns for the underlying parkinson's disease are are situated around the country. Grew dr xu Win we should talk about insurance. What you don't have insurance. Are there other places you can go to help get finance for this imagined brain surgeries not achieve a yeah. That's a really good question. I don't think there are other options out. There insurance doesn't cover it. It's really i think Some some health systems. You might be able to call and kind of talk with them and negotiate. They may have a certain certain assistance program. Said that maybe may be able to help with it but yeah unfortunately. I don't think there's much if you don't really have insurance. Are there other obstacles beyond the financial. People need to consider to getting deep brain stimulation. Activates more like dr shahad said it's the distance from the center. I think is is one of the major obstacles and trying to find a team that can do it for you. That's that's more convenience. What are the do you want to be closed because you still need to get the valid ends the there after you have the surgery. You still have to see that. The technician to adjusted. Eps that has lots of just after the surgery. They are probably they're fairly frequent. Visits where you need to kind of tweak and adjust the stimulation in order to make it better for you and that can take a fair amount of time. After the surgery so frequent visits is important. But also i think As doctor chad mansion a lotta times These tertiary academic medical centers. The university centers tend to have a lot more of the people who are experts in in managing partner disease so they are going to be the places that tend to have a lot more The defense english type programs has been trained. They see parkinson's disease and don't do this whole life It's hard to maintain a program With with good garin holiday quality Surgeons and people helping to manage it If if somebody's considering db s you won't you have to recommend them for that. They're they're movement disorder specialist has to recommend them for the surgery. What how important is the relationship that you have with the patient and how honest they're being with you weigh into that decision lash. I think if if your patience Being honest with your neurologist about your symptoms. I think is very helpful. I guess the example i can think of is i may have patients who come in and i think they they come in and they want to try and present the their best self rights so they may say i may ask how how are they doing. Are they having any problems and they say no things are going really well. And and then i would spouse and they're shaking their head now and then they start talking and then then when you find out. Oh maybe when medication wears off. It can't move a whole lot or they're having problems or more problems than than maybe a patient is leading on And i think that's actually very important just for your general care and parkinson's disease because You know from physicians. If you come in saying things are great. I might just say okay. Well things are great. We're not going to change anything. And then so nothing's actually going to improve for you on. If you lay out your problems that we can at least try and come up with a plan to try and make those those veteran. I think the same thing with the deep brain stimulation after you have it if we're tweaking and you want certain symptoms to be better if we can make better. I can only make a plan if if it's brought up but if you say things are great i'm going to say okay good. We don't need to change anything. Donny jerry ever catch jim great. When you know he's not on. It was always had to go to the doctor with him. Because i knew he wouldn't be honest. About how bad symptoms. If i wasn't there and that that that affects me to we know when the symptoms were worse. So i wanted him to take better care of himself for him and also for me and part of me wonders looking back if none of his neurologists remit recommended deep brain stimulation surgery price precisely. He said you know. I'm doing fine. Everything's fine it was actually a other care partners. Who asked you about why. Didn't hadn't gotten db s already. That triggered the discussion between us and jim looking back. Do you wish you would have been more forthright. Well yeah i mean i know. There's a piece about parkinson's that's no fun to manage. Which is you know you. Can you know there is no cure right. And so part of the defense mechanisms. I bring to that. Problem is to try to put a positive spin. On how i'm feeling or how i'm doing battling the disease so my my optimism wants to carry me across food the finish line but i do think donny's right that overtired. He looked at eye doctor's appointments. I was saying all the good things in holding back or been quicker about the bad things. And so in. That may have lived led them to think i was lu- less symptomatic than i might have otherwise really actually been delayed a recommendation about.

Donny jerry jim one english united states dr shahad dr xu Win parkinson
"dr xu" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"dr xu" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Our next topic gets to the heart of what conservatism is really all about, because there is room And health care for capitalism. It's better for the patient is better for the doctors. Joining me now is a doctor. Dr. John Shewfelt, an emergency physician and the author of the Entrepreneur Rx The Physician's Guide to Starting a business, Doctor Shuffle. Welcome to Alabama's Morning news. Pleasure to be here. Thank you for having me, John. So, Doctor Shewfelt. Why do you say that? Being an entrepreneur has actually made you a better physician? Well, you know, I've been an entrepreneur, most of my most of my adult life and actually, really since my teens, But as far as being a position goes being an entrepreneur, and the physician really has made me a better physician because it directs some of my creative energies. Outside of medicine. When I get back to emergency department, for example, I'm excited to be back there. I don't feel any sense of burnout. I'm looking forward to taking care of patients and then same energies applied to what I'm starting a business. I guess excited about of them energized and pumped up in the chance to and make a difference in this world. Not one patient at a time really excites me. Now, what kind of business are you involved in? Or do you recommend doctors be involved in something that is in the medical field or something That's actually completely separate, so you can kind of kind of space out and do something with your mind. That's not that's not medicine. Well, I've actually done both. I mean, I've done thing from as the verses opening a bunch of hot dog stands quite a while ago to have an opening large healthcare enemies. One was a large urgent care group. I've got 160 urgent cares now. Another one was a virtual medicine company. Um, called me and D, and so I've kind of done both. But I think physicians are uniquely poised. To really make a difference in health care, because they know the inside tract of what's needed to affect better patient care and a better and better population care, so it's kind of follow their passion. However, they seem to have a leg up on dealing with healthcare innovation. And if you think about it, really, If we were to connect the patients directly with the cost of health care we might see not only would cost go down, but also the quality of care would go up. Thank you so much for joining us today on Alabama's warring news, Dr Xu felled and, oh, a reminder again. Check out our Web sites. If you would like to possibly win those tickets to the beach boys. They go on sale on Friday, but you can register right now. At W E r c f m dot com. Here's David Snell with Meade's heating and air. Some years ago, I met with the family in Northern Virginia who needed to replace their H V. A C system when we had narrowed down the right Lennox system for their home, Mr looked at Mrs and asked What what should we do? Mrs. Smiled, looked at me and said,.

David Snell John Northern Virginia Friday today John Shewfelt Xu Smiled both Shewfelt Shuffle 160 urgent cares one patient One Entrepreneur Rx The Physician' Meade Some years ago W E r c f m dot com Alabama Lennox
"dr xu" Discussed on WazaMedia Podcast

WazaMedia Podcast

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"dr xu" Discussed on WazaMedia Podcast

"Welcome back to another episode of the wasn media podcast. My name is jr. I am the ceo of this awesome company. And i'm here today. excited to talk with jean laborde. Gina thank you for being on the show today. Jr thank you and we have a former guest of the show. Daisy daisy shoe To thank for connecting us together. So thank you dr xu thank you daisy For bringing us together. Thank you days so gina for our audience. That doesn't know you We want to with all of our guests. We like to ask our audience To tell a little bit of the story. Because i was immediately we believe in the power of storytelling. Everyone has a great story to tell. And i'm sure you have a great story to tell and also about your organization which will get back We'll get to a little bit later. But i can. We hear a little bit about your story. Sure i'm jean laborde. And i'm originally from louisiana where i happened to be right now and i have a background in design. Did some teaching of design and also worked for lsu medical school where did all the graphics for the whole university in Done some different marketing. Things did a. I worked for a marketing company. That promoted coca cola music festivals things like that grassroots marketing And then lsu moved to the department of biochemistry and former where. I helped develop in photoshop for scientists empowered winter side powerpoint scientists class. Then we had a little hurricane katrina than i was the director in baton rouge Exile baton rouge for low law for two publications two to five magazine which is a lifestyle magazine in the batteries business report so i was in new orleans. I did some work for spotify doing being campus ambassador and influence and also for a restaurant group. That susan spikes earned. We did some social media for food. And she's actually been character. Those based on the hbo series tra may she's the main shaft was based on so then We decided my husband. And i decided to move to washington. Dc after all this time and we move jobs. There absolutely loved the area. And i right now. I m the marketing and communications manager for the american society for investigative at all. You have quite the history gina from from being out in in the area dealing with hurricane. So you probably have a taste in crisis. Communication does marketing. And now you're working out in the dc area here so quite a large range of experience and I am interested about how you enjoyed your time with spotify. That's that's pretty neat. Well it.

Gina washington jean laborde jr. new orleans spotify daisy Jr today two coca cola louisiana gina five katrina two publications Daisy daisy law baton rouge Exile
Bridging the communication gap with Gina LaBorde

WazaMedia Podcast

02:16 min | 1 year ago

Bridging the communication gap with Gina LaBorde

"Welcome back to another episode of the wasn media podcast. My name is jr. I am the ceo of this awesome company. And i'm here today. excited to talk with jean laborde. Gina thank you for being on the show today. Jr thank you and we have a former guest of the show. Daisy daisy shoe To thank for connecting us together. So thank you dr xu thank you daisy For bringing us together. Thank you days so gina for our audience. That doesn't know you We want to with all of our guests. We like to ask our audience To tell a little bit of the story. Because i was immediately we believe in the power of storytelling. Everyone has a great story to tell. And i'm sure you have a great story to tell and also about your organization which will get back We'll get to a little bit later. But i can. We hear a little bit about your story. Sure i'm jean laborde. And i'm originally from louisiana where i happened to be right now and i have a background in design. Did some teaching of design and also worked for lsu medical school where did all the graphics for the whole university in Done some different marketing. Things did a. I worked for a marketing company. That promoted coca cola music festivals things like that grassroots marketing And then lsu moved to the department of biochemistry and former where. I helped develop in photoshop for scientists empowered winter side powerpoint scientists class. Then we had a little hurricane katrina than i was the director in baton rouge Exile baton rouge for low law for two publications two to five magazine which is a lifestyle magazine in the batteries business report so i was in new orleans. I did some work for spotify doing being campus ambassador and influence and also for a restaurant group. That susan spikes earned. We did some social media for food. And she's actually been character. Those based on the hbo series tra may she's the main shaft was based on

Jean Laborde Daisy Daisy Dr Xu Lsu Medical School Gina Baton Rouge Louisiana Department Of Biochemistry Coca LSU Hurricane Katrina Lifestyle Magazine Susan Spikes New Orleans HBO
"dr xu" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"dr xu" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Thank you. Um, my balance is shot him falling all over the place. And, um, had tons of tests. MRI's head. Uh, ears eyes. Ah, Heart. Uh, do you have any idea where I can go next? Uh, have you seen any more neurologists here then, will you I haven't been to lately, but I was a few years ago to a new neurologist in Summit Medical, and he looked at my head. He couldn't find anything there. Sometimes a new fresh look is worth it, Nancy, you know Where do you live? Plainfield, New Jersey. Well, I think it be worthwhile. Teach. Check out our We have outstanding neurologist. Uh, you to take six weeks to get an appointment. So I you know the way I'm falling. I don't know if I'll make it. No, it doesn't sound that way. Well, this should give them a call telling me we were discussing it with me and that you need to be seen sooner. How long would it take to get an appointment? Doctor? I don't know. I don't know what you know, but call them telling you spoke with me. Was the chairman of urology out here and then I want you to be seen as soon as possible. Because I think you need a fresh look, Nancy, and if someone will go over your case, and yeah, I'm biased because I do work it and why you But I'll tell you Anyway, Neurology is right tops in the countries where they are. I need some heavy guns. Got it for you, right? Thanks, Dr Katz. A couple of minutes or maybe a minute left. We got melon New City. Who? Ah, New city is a town where I grew up in Rockland County. Good morning, Melvin. How are you? Good morning. One of your patients. The circus fare from news. Oh, I know you very well. Another voice. He didn't have to tell me the circus. I knew the voice right away. Go ahead. You know what? I want to thank you for two things number one person whenever I come to see you. I'm extremely anxious, and your demeanor puts me these. The second point is whenever you do the a hands on examination when you finish I say to myself, you did already so compass. Folks moved and easy for me, Holly feel anything. I want to thank you for that. Sure. Yeah, I hope you're well. I haven't seen you in a while and I don't think it's been a while. Yes, but the union this year I'm wearing toe. It's safer to come back into man happens. You have to have to come back to see where. Manhattan Okay, Okay. I understand. Yes, I I always love seeing you and you're always there And they're in the exam room reading your books on the on the circus. Which is something that we don't see much of anymore. But hopefully in 20 your true hopefully in 2021 things will change. So thank you all for your fear for your for your comments this morning. I greatly appreciate that. You do. Thank you. Sure. Well, I think we probably have a minute left and again. This was a beautiful show from me. It was Really reminds me of why I would get up at six o'clock in the morning. Every Sunday for the past. I don't know how many years I've been inspired by all of you. I've been inspired by my colleagues here. My colleagues who will have on the show next week, Dr Jonathan Haas, who's the chairman of radiation Oncology, who's a wonderful physician and friend and Dr Jim Compose e, who is the chair of orthopedics who's taken the helm here, as well as Dr Xu backed out the Scotch you back who's been the head of cardiac surgery here who's been a wonderful friend and excellent colleague and is taking the helm. To Colin Brathwaite, who's the head of surgery and bariatric surgery here. My late friend eyes. Well, dr dot not doctor, but well, he thought he was adopted. Don Imus, who inspired me to continue working on the radio, who was And outstanding man and did wonderful things for the radio and allowed me the privilege to take care of him. And for so many of you I wish you all the wonderful day. Stay healthy, Be safe and tune.

New City Nancy Melvin Don Imus Dr Katz Dr Jonathan Haas Summit Medical Dr Jim Compose e Plainfield New Jersey Dr Xu chairman Colin Brathwaite chairman of radiation Oncology Rockland County Holly Manhattan
"dr xu" Discussed on Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

04:51 min | 1 year ago

"dr xu" Discussed on Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

"And our breast cancer patients is cardio vascular disease that is leading cause of death in women in general by large and so. I don't want to necessarily leave this for last. But i do just want to make sure that we all remind ourselves that cardiovascular health is so important what can you do for that of course. Exercise maintain a healthy lifestyle. That's easy to say to sit in my room here and talk into a microphone and say diet and exercise but i also want you to keep track of certain numbers you're onc- value if that is creeping up. That could be worrisome for you. Developing prediabetes or diabetes. Which is a hit to your cardiovascular system your cholesterol profile Your triglycerides your. Ldl on your hdl. You really wanna watch those as well. You also want to think your blood pressure is a really important number because you want to keep your blood pressure in the most normal of range that you can't those are other things that can harm your heart. Of course you want to avoid smoking. And you want to maintain some cardiovascular exercise it could be as simple as walking and getting ten thousand steps a day or if you're a ultra biker. Do those things to be a cardiovascular. Health can simply not be forgotten about a lot of our breast cancer. patients and survivors also will get routine. Echo is the look at to see if they have any type of heart failure or if their heart is ejecting the right amount of blood in each heart stroke and those are sometimes really good markers but be sure. Be sure to talk to your primary care. Doctors in urine colleges are ever developing any kind of chest pain. i am not a bona fide. Oncologist or cardiologists. I'm a board certified. Internist who did a fellowship in women's health and specializes in midlife and menopause. But i see these as well so often in my clinic because again chronic diseases do ten develop at the same time as we lose our estrogen. Same time as we go through menopause. So you want to think about your heart health. I have also some great episodes even just to back. I did want on a heart palpitations. Doctor daryl lotion you can listen to that episode in also did one a few back with dr xu felt on not just these risk factors but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease which include things like connective tissue disorders stationer complications like station diabetes to station hypertension and so many other things that just knowledge is power so i really want to hide my podcast and it has an amazing guests on here to really inundate. Y'all with so much. Good information are guys. This has been one of the longest podcasts. I have recorded. i am talking. And it's getting into the thirty eight minute mark here..

cardio vascular disease breast cancer heart stroke diabetes daryl lotion dr xu heart palpitations cardiovascular disease hypertension
"dr xu" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"dr xu" Discussed on PT Pintcast - Physical Therapy

"Or watched or listened to move against could value from. Yeah something. Learn from. I would have to say. It's early I mean. Do you read any other stories leading up to two writing kind of model this after any any stories or any movies like that. That told similar stories. So. If you WANNA see the most realistic. Afghanistan documentary I've ever seen before. That would be Bravo. Two Kilo. and. And from the physical therapy standpoint, you could see lives changed by. It's a, it's a British infantry unit in they get they get stuck in a d A minefield in multiple guys step on I, eighty through there in. So I would say that that in I mean that's probably. That is probably molded me the most when it comes to my line of work. I mean. Other than you know. I guess the the inspiration as far as. Writing is. This not not become a victim of your of life circumstances as. Life can be hard. Now that's Yeah no circumstances and you don't don't let it on you. You'd be fine. Yeah great insight. I mean if you're saying that that particular movie is realistic, we'll take that as somebody who's been there can net. So third question is who should who is someone the audience should know more about. Who Someone? Who does great work but maybe flies under the radar. So There's actually there's actually quite a few people in my life that I could point out for that. One of them is you know obviously Johnny Owens. Ryan Blahnik he mean, he created the ideal brace the whole whole reason why I had another six deployment Afghanistan since getting blown up. Dr Xu. Orthopedic Surgeon just. Yeah I mean I Still hear. About. In the book. But then I think a lot of people that fly underneath the radar are the physical therapists in the occupational therapist and the athletic trainers that we have like. Dana at seventh group in Paul at Seventh Group in Tamra as seventh group. Their entire job with the store three program is get you guys back to the fight. That's that that's their life revolves around that and it's it's It's amazing. I mean I don't WanNa give out last names. These guys are. Been Well I. Mean Guys is in guys and girls, but they're they're amazing. They're amazing in in day are like they definitely changed lives. So lumping on physical therapy occupational therapy. All all of that to get people back to the fight whatever your fight is perfect well set. Yeah and you go into, you go into detail on that that Thorpe program talk about that in the book tip of the Spear So can learn a little bit more about that Rilot we do is the parting shot. Parting shot is brought to you by the Academy of Orthopedic Physical Therapy find them online at Ortho PT Dot. Org if you're looking to enhance your your orthopedic skills, the physical.

Academy of Orthopedic Physical Afghanistan Seventh Group Kilo. Ryan Blahnik Ortho PT Dot Johnny Owens Dr Xu Thorpe Rilot Dana Tamra Paul
"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

"Two weeks. Multiple agencies have been searching for any sign of the fifth year old mother last seen dropping her children off at school on may twenty four new Canaan police now sending out this robo-call asking residents for their help in the search. If you have a Valence video system at your residence or business, and it captures activity, we request that you save. The video is still behind bars. He has not posted on the prosecutor in court saying, they intimidate more charges are coming. A published paper to different headlines for unique research team here in the northwest. Komo's Brian Calvert explains the recent distinction for Oregon Health and science university. Getting your work published in a medical journal. It's one of the highlights in the life of a researcher. So it's fairly easy to understand why Dr Xu crop. Metallica is on one of lives. Highs this week. His job was to offer some perspective on the process of editing genes as a way to prevent disease and that perspective was published this week in nature medicine. But some people think that we shouldn't be dealing genetic diseases. You think genetic tool that we use today? Revelations of the world's first gene edited babies in China last year led to calls for a moratorium on all research along these lines. He says the research can help though it can lead to the prevention of inherited disease. We have thirty dated, but the complete denting is that needs therapy will be what do you mean? Delivered the debate quite some time yet as proud as he is of the perspective, he's trying to offer the researcher is beaming for a second reason, not only did he get published? But this work was completed with the help of his seventeen year old son. Paul, It definitely. was definitely learning curve, China understand all this complex scientific terminologies e Paul was interning for his dad this year, and actually helped write this paper he decided to, to give him a qua- cheap, because he contributed so much in the writing. So at age seventeen he's published in a medical journal, has part of a dad and son research team. In case you're wondering Paul is headed off to Stanford to study medicine next year. Point the things I'd be like. Oh, wow. Like I made this announce this paper. Brian Calvert, KOMO news. Your money at twenty and fifty past the hour on KOMO news. Here's your KOMO propel insurance money update brought in sharp rally on Wall Street today fueled by signals that the Federal Reserve would cut interest rates..

KOMO Brian Calvert Komo researcher Paul China Valence video system Canaan nature medicine Oregon Health and science univ prosecutor Federal Reserve Metallica Stanford seventeen year Two weeks
"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

"Casher shirty, Toconas posting the five hundred thousand dollar bond that afternoon emerging from court with a sweater overhead. At a navy race. It. For nearly two weeks. Multiple agencies have been searching for any sign of the fifth year old mother last seen dropping her children off at school on may twenty fourth new Canaan police now sending out this robo-call asking residents for their help in the search. If you have a surveillance video system at your residence or business, and it captures activity, we request that you save. The video is still behind bars. He has not posted on the prosecutor in court saying they anticipate more charges are coming a published paper to different headlines for unique research team here in the northwest. Komo's Brian Calvert explains the recent distinction for Oregon Health and science university. Getting your work published in a medical journal. It's one of the highlights in the life of a researcher. So it's fairly easy to understand why Dr Xu crop. Metallica is on one of lives. Highs this week. His job was to offer some perspective on the process of editing genes as a way to prevent disease and that perspective was published this week in nature medicine. Lots of people think that we shouldn't be doing genetic diseases using genetic tool that we use today. Revelations of the world's first gene edited babies in China last year led to calls for a moratorium on all research along these lines. He says the research can help though it can lead to the prevention of inherited disease because we have thirty eight but complete dancing is fitness therapy, will be Woody mean you know on the delivered to Beijing. So quite some yet, as proud as he is of the perspective trying to offer the researcher is beaming for a second reason, not only did he get published. But this work was completed with the help of his seventeen year old son. Paul, definitely learning curve, China understand all this complex terminologies, e Paul was interning for his dad this year and actually helped write this paper he decided to, to give him a co-op because he can do it. So my shit in the writing. So at age seventeen he's published in. The medical journal, has part of a dad and son research team. In case you're wondering Paul is hit it off to Stanford to study medicine next year. Point, the things I'd be like oh, wow. I made this announce this paper. Brian Calvert, KOMO news. There's some buzz on the internet about a swarm of bees that delayed a baseball game for nearly a half hour this past weekend. ABC's Scott Goldberg reports the Padres were hosting the Marlins in San Diego..

Brian Calvert Woody researcher Paul China KOMO Komo nature medicine Casher shirty baseball Canaan Oregon Health and science univ prosecutor Metallica Toconas ABC Beijing Padres Scott Goldberg Marlins
"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

"The life of a researcher. So it's fairly easy to understand why Dr Xu crop. Metallica is on one of life's highs this week. His job was to offer some perspective on the process of editing genes, as a way to prevent disease and that perspective was published this week in nature medicine, people think that shouldn't be doing genetic diseases using genetic tools that we use today, revelations of the world's first gene, edited babies in China last year led to calls. For more. Story on all research along these lines. He says the research can help though it can lead to the prevention of inherited disease. They have thirty eight but the complete dancing is fitness therapy will be would mean to deliver divisions. Vo quite some time yet as proud as he is of the perspectives trying to offer the researcher is beaming for a second reason, not only did he get published. But this work was completed with the help of his seventeen year old son. Paul was definitely learning curve, China understand all this complex scientific terminology as Paul was interning for his dad this year, and actually helped write this paper he decided to, to give an mkx wa because he can it. So Mike in, in the writing. So at age seventeen he's published in a medical journal, has part of a dad and son research team. In case you're wondering policy hit it off to Stanford study medicine next year. Point, the things allow like I made this announce this paper. Brian Calvert, KOMO news. Proud Papa old on the family, there, WalMart, speaking of education, hopes to make the grade with some of its youngest employee's, we have the story now from ABC's. Daria Albinger, WalMart's expanding its debt free college benefits to employees who are in high school. It's going to offer free college SAT and ACT prep courses as well as several free, general education courses through an educational startup. The retail giant says it's necessary as it competes with other major employers in a competitive job market, WalMart, estimates about twenty five thousand of its employees are under the age of eighteen. Daria Albinger, ABC news. If you're looking for quick at now, as we believe free-range living is good for hens and kids alike. Let's listen in tire floor is hot lava that will definitely catch on fire, the couch, save the beanbag..

WalMart Daria Albinger researcher China Mike nature medicine Paul Metallica ABC KOMO Papa old Brian Calvert seventeen year
"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

"To understand why Dr Xu crop metallic, hav is on one of lives. Highs this week. His job was to offer some perspective on the process of editing genes as a way to prevent disease and that perspective was published this week in nature medicine. People think that we shouldn't be doing genetic diseases genetic tool that we use today. Revelations of the world's first gene edited babies in China last year led to calls for a moratorium on all research. Along these lines. He says the research can help though it can lead to the prevention of inherited disease. We have thirty eight but complete denting, is that needs therapy will be I mean, you know. Delivered the debate of oakwood sometime yet as proud as he is of the perspective, he's trying to offer the researcher is beaming for a second reason, not only did he get published. But this work was completed with the help of his seventeen year old son. Paul. It was definitely learning curve, China understand all this complex terminology as he Paul was interning for his dad this year and actually helped write this paper, we decided to have you been the co-op cheap because he can do it so much in, in the writing. So at age seventeen he's published in a medical journal, has part of a dad and son research team. In case you're wondering Paul is headed off to Stanford to study medicine next year. Point the things I'd be like. Oh, wow. Like I made this announce this paper. Brian Calvert, KOMO news. Walmart hopes to make the grade with some of its youngest, employee's ABC's. Daria Albinger, has the story. Walmart's expanding its debt free college benefits to employees who are in high school. It's going to offer free college SAT and ACT prep courses as well as several free, general education courses through an educational startup. The retail giant says it's necessary as it competes with other major employers in a competitive job market, WalMart, estimates about twenty five thousand of its employees are under the age of eighteen. Daria Albinger, ABC news. A North Carolina man is celebrating his huge Powerball jackpot win. Yep. Somebody got at Charles Jackson junior claimed his three hundred forty four million dollar prize today after picking all six numbers in last weekend's drying. So he's gonna take that lump sum option means he's only going to take home, two hundred and twenty three million bucks. He's not even sure what he's going to do with most of the prize. So he. Does plan on giving some away to charity? He's retired says he just found out about his big win this morning, and he's still in shock and he got the numbers from a fortune cookie and has been playing them for about two years now. Our address is one forty four th avenue the charity care of Rick van Cise. Guys, we all this is Julie. Hey calendar. What's my morning like Julie's about to have a long day? Soccer carpool, purchase card five dry cleaning. Did you just go backwards? I'm sorry. I can't that question into your schedule fifteen four days that won't end let schwann's help with swans. He can get.

Walmart Daria Albinger Paul China Julie nature medicine schwann ABC Soccer oakwood Rick van Cise North Carolina KOMO Brian Calvert researcher Charles Jackson Stanford three hundred forty four milli
"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:12 min | 3 years ago

"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

"TCU's Brandon Williamson and Isaiah Campbell from Arkansas Lee. Highs Levi stout and Georgia. Bulldogs Tim, Elliott are the other forearms coming to the Mariners organization who will be the starting pitcher tonight against visiting Houston to be determined. The Astros won the opener of the series four to two. It's six oh, five first pitch at Cheney stadium in Tacoma tonight. The Rangers take on Memphis before it was voluntary today. The Seahawks have mandatory minicamp in Renton. Oh and quarterback. Russell Wilson tells NFL dot com. His goal is to play until he's forty five sports updates at ten and forty after the hour. Bill Swartz, on the home of the huskies, KOMO news. Komo news time to twelve a published paper earns two different headlines for unique research team here in the northwest. Komo's Brian Calvert explains. The recent distinction for this team at Oregon Health and science university. Getting your work published in a medical journal. It's one of the highlights in the life of a researcher. So it's fairly easy to understand why Dr Xu crop. Metallica is on one of lives. Highs this week. His job was to offer some perspective on the process of editing genes, as a way to prevent disease and that perspective was published this week in nature medicine, people think that shouldn't be doing this genetic diseases using genetic tool that we use today. Revelations of the world. I gene edited babies in China last year led to calls for a moratorium on all research along these lines. He says the research can help though it can lead to the prevention of inherited disease, because we have, but the complete data is that news therapy will be would mean you know, the delivered the debate spoke, quite some time yet as proud as he is of the perspective, he's trying to offer the researcher is beaming for a second reason, not only did he get published. But this work was completed with the help of his seventeen year old son. Paul, definitely learn incur trying to understand all this complex scientific terminology as Paul was interning for his dad this year, and actually helped write this paper he decided to, to give him a qua- because he contributed so much in, in the writing. So at age seventeen he's published in a medical journal as part of a dad and son research team in case you're wondering policy hit it off to Stanford to study medicine next. Here point the things like allow like I made this announce this paper. Brian Calvert, KOMO news. If you've thought about substituting white meat for red meat to lower your cholesterol. There's a new study that suggests that might be a futile effort. Maybe Scott Goldberg reports for two weeks. Researchers at the university of California San Francisco watched one hundred thirteen people who ate protein from three different sources white meat red meat and plants. They found concentrations of both total cholesterol, and the bad cholesterol known as LDL and non HDL were higher after people eight either of the meat diets that wasn't a surprise. What was is that it didn't matter if people ate the white meat or the red meats, both boosted cholesterol, as did saturated fatty acids? So you might as well. Get the steak actually what they said, was eat more vegetables, Scott Goldberg, ABC news. Komo news time.

KOMO Brian Calvert researcher Komo Metallica Scott Goldberg Cheney stadium Levi TCU Astros nature medicine Bulldogs Russell Wilson Oregon Health and science univ Seahawks Tim Rangers Bill Swartz Houston
"dr xu" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"dr xu" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"I believe it was September two thousand twelve featuring Dr drew where he and Adam breakdown several of their quote rape rock selections. It used to have it saved in my phone, but it disappeared when I updated, I've been bummed ever since GO. Can we help JP out real show? Eight ninety seven as Dr Xu bonus show up. So number six is from September twenty twelve and this'll be complex. So in April of twenty twelve tried to. Doing a solo, Dr drew format bonus episode and ended up airing it in the regular feed during the week and it's pretty good through salt, and they did it again. And in may and the air that one on the weekend. Also really good at those don't count in the official calendars as the drew bona shows, but they are so they have this one listed, as bonus show, four show six and they recorded this in August, and then they played it in September recorded like a Sunday afternoon. And it's the last recording of the day, and this is back, when the, the bonus shows are about our long adamant, drew really weird mood, and they cover some statutory rock, the radio friendly title songs from the seventies stuff they've never covered on together. So this making fun of this type of music all back the love line, but Gary Puckett, and he's certain songs were never covered cover in the morning show without drew, and that's coming, full circle, and Ataman discussing Chevy van. In theory, pocket and a little bit more. And it is amazing from two thousand twelve adamant Dr drew..

Dr Xu Gary Puckett rape Adam JP Chevy official Ataman
"dr xu" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

15:39 min | 3 years ago

"dr xu" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Host Carol marks talks with Dr Xu do send he's a medical doctor nationally and internationally recognized physician author speaker and a humanitarian his book is titled why Buddha never had Alzheimer's a holistic treatment approach through meditation yoga and the arts no way it comes to writing. What makes you say writing? Is it your Nettie compulsion? And can you tell a reason little bit about how the experience of your grandmother being all of a sudden be able to perform basic human functions? Got you interested in why bring of fits quality could downfield quickly amazing story. Yeah. I mean. Very jumbles on in books because I thought that you know, to my writing I could touch people in those areas of medicine would say. So I was I was my my desire to reach out to my community. And my relentless interesting disease actually started with my grandmother as mentioned in the book and all started about twenty five to thirty years back. I was obviously like I would say any grandson. I was a favourite and she. Building time to you know, it's not that also women in that part of the world and I'm coming from India. My grandmother actually is out. She was outs caller. But she wrote books was the author of many books. She'll put so it's tough me that someone of such comedy. I chewed would utterly vanish from our house home one night. And then we found, you know, about forty hours later, she was all by herself dependent tweet came back. She was a completely different woman. She had not collection of what happened. Recognition of myself north missiles. Me that you know, that how how can a brain completely flip to complete vegetate when that the brain was so active that was the question that they had about thirty is back. Then put he is down the road. I have that question. And soon enough, you know, it's a myth that we looked into now in greater detail many find that there's still many scientists and musicians in punishes Pesident moving with this disease. And how many times have you come across, you know, farmers or anybody else with probably opened in India, for instance, and they don't have so us we need to keep a brain active, but on his much more than, you know, keeping debate active just as mind is much more than the brain. I think part of the reason that we're seeing so much of an increase it. Outsiders fact that we're we're living longer. Now, you wrote in your book, and you made a very powerful statement. Because he said about the drugs that have introduced to treat this form of dementia, Alzheimer's. That really they are the ongoing tragedy. What did you mean by that? What was that? We do not have a complete comprehension about how these disease he's made brain. We do not have a foam hold on the pathology behind this these. So my point is as many other scientists also thinking that if you do not have a comprehension of how the disease made how can you have a drug, you know? I do not know how the brain remembers. I would I know how to. Okay. So similarly, yes, we have some drugs in the pipeline and a lot of experiments going on and I along with many will encourage them. And a couple of jokes out in the market video appropriately FDA food, but all those all those drugs, you know, they have not shown any term benefits, and and it is justified. But in a way because you know, to be compared as I'm as the diseases of of netted, let's say. Let's say by Poletti, let's gets Fania. We really know. What's happening? We know. It's kind of like a single hit hypothesis needle transmitter, Scott hit and place with Alzheimer's, these no rhyme and reason as now I'm sure the day will come light like the end of the tunnel. We will know exactly what's going on. But as of now, I think it's about formula aback concept to just visit with drugs really do not have a flu comprehension of what's happening. And you have a fight affects from drugs, which often require people to take more drugs to counter the side effects. You're absolutely correct. You know, one of the ways we say, meditation bucks. Is that it brings down the stress level and stress is considered more often than not as the point of entry for the big nickel, vantage know, somebody can always come to me and say, I know zanex now that's a that's a big drug that the old prescribed. I myself be prescribed, and it's almost like a brand name because he does take care of the problem is they're actually twofold. One is correct mention the tolerance. I mean, somebody starts with point five milligram of than than comes back to me after month. Doctors said I'm doing very well. But then five months down the road. He or she would say, I'm all right, but that edges gone. Can you double mine does? I'm here thoughts, the ongoing Kaci this as the fact that new drugs that exact angels at the sky, they had their own sweet side effects. And so does that. So we actually brings the necessity of this Listrik measures to the full. Now, let's go on to talk about the important subject of meditation and dementia in the you grew up around by this ancient practice, India become aware of it until a friend of yours again to suffer from Alzheimer's. Twenty years ago. And it was really a amazing. What happens can you tell us about your friend of the type of vegetation, he practiced? And how is he doing? Wonderful question. So yes, I think from a land where meditation practice, it's almost like a passion. It's talking schools. It's in call any of its disgust. And as I often joke, even the communist country, they made date out of default. So there is many patient all across that part of the world not just in India, but you know, in southeast Asia countries, but this link between meditation, and or loss of memory loss of concentration that is took place much later. We we looked upon many patients as a source of peace. Serenity on what you mean serious correlation between dating back to memory that knows positive it. With a couple of my patients have been this friend of mine, and he was talking and he was again, a very scholarly person. He was very aware the drugstore he had to read up disease. And and and he was he was panicking in the sense that you don't exactly gets on you. I'm sure that's when and that's when you know, we I suggested that no white try something as simple as many a it has no adverse thing be friendly. I mean, it's not that you have to sit in a Buddhist. I like notice physicians we can be just seated in a very comfortable position. Whatever you're doing. And it just pick up a comfortable Conan. You're not distracted by, you know, loud noises sector, and so he was a little, you know, maybe Manatt be and then he, you know, people meditation, and and he's doing so much better. He is in control of his own. And he obviously knows that he's to me. And he's not getting any adverse effects as you're not supposed to because it's only a simple procedure of you know, just being seated comfortably and then to which brings to your other question as to what type of meditation? Many branches many patients the one that has become very popular is what we call mindfulness meditation. In mindfulness meditation. We use the word phrase, we call it non judgmental awareness. In other words, you don't judge way? You are. You don't criticize back kind of that you sitting comfortable comfortably in your own signs. And you kind of let it kind of, you know, jelly side your system and you comfortably. So this is one way of maintaining the other one is the you know, what we call it the transcendental meditation, which is more of the concentrating topic concentrate on. I thought it would be a notice it could be attacked to light. It could be a painting. And you just you do just the opposite of mindfulness try to educate the other feelings that's coming to you. And you just concentrate on that route two ways both of them have been put to scientifically very beneficial that mindfulness because it's so user friendly kind of taking the center stage. So he's been being the mindfulness meditation. He's done very well. As are a lot of patience, and either type of education can be helpful. What I understand from from your reading. And you said that mindfulness meditation helps to bring in two primary ways. One is wrecked and one is secondary. So can you tell us what you meant when you wrote that. Right. So. It is true that do not have for Amanda standing of what's going on them. But we have some we know that there are certain risk factors, which accelerate promote this is topless establishment of this disease. One of them is stress. The other one or depression? You know, anxiety, high blood pressure high cholesterol, even diabetes have been implicated for the beginning of them as a matter of fact, all those risk factors. This is what the scientists announcing that all those respects for cardiac event all respect for them, including stress. So when I think indirectly I mean that meditation and yoga. They have been scientifically shown to have very beneficial effect on bringing down the stress bringing down the pressure getting depressed patient, better anything and hence in an indirect way. It would actually. Amnesties that day. Exactly. Yes. Now where it comes to the commission the. Studies have been done at various medical institutes. But but you say that we also need to have clinical lodge tests. And why do you say that's important? And why why don't we have them? So yes. So this is a discussion with having with John Dennen Jay chief of the mind bodies at Harvard, and they have been doing phenomenon work on the effects of mindfulness meditation. So what you're saying right now is that just to be aware of the tremendous effects of meditation. So it's in the pipeline. It's something we still do. All this practice is very engine for centuries, but what was sought hundreds and thousands of years ago now pursued and all these have taken up the right piece for the last decade or so so what we now need would be more trials involving more patients for a longer period of time. That's what they mean by long children study where we have a a set of individuals. Let's stressed out. And they're in the very early stage of and will give them whatever they have. They have let's say we give them the drugs, which are. The approved or will give them other relaxation tapes, and we compare with another group in the identical stage in the very early stage of members and be subject them to mindfulness meditation, and we continue the just like any other drug tried for about six months for about a year. And then we will see whether there is a significant difference between the two groups. So that's a long study that we we are in the process of doing which conclusively prove that meditation has a better animal profound effect on the brain as opposed to the present drugs. And that's why you writing your book it fill important for people to find out early. If they have the form of venture cold Alzheimer's, and I understand you're fan of participating in clinical trials using Monaco bodies target plaque deposits in brain fillers. Scam that can show if you have these plaques, and can you tell a little bit more about this clinical trials? I know they're they're promising, but they're still in for improved. But how can you get more information about any clinical trial? Right. So in terms of the tax. That's that has been Pettus discoveries of recent times that he found that certain structures in the brain. Specifically what we call them as Michael TV's? Same side does my TV's we have tangles of nerves and become useless. They are of no functions, and we get deposits and the positions of these plaques called the m I. But the challenge that he's facing. And I'm citing a very recent literature from NYU is that am I not plaques, which are definitely present in them disease. I'm not specific for them. I'm not blacks had been found in general with with with elderly patients. I'm class have been found in patients who are suffering from me to depression that Stockton Shubin do San in conversation with Carol. Mark says book, why Buddha never had Alzheimer's Listrik treatment approach through meditation yoga and the arts we'll have more of the conversation with Dr Shubin do San and Carol marks when it touch gray the talk show for grownups continues in a moment..

Alzheimer India Carol marks Buddha Nettie NYU Stockton Shubin Pesident Asia Poletti FDA flu Kaci Pettus Dr Xu Michael TV Scott Manatt Conan
"dr xu" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

06:04 min | 3 years ago

"dr xu" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"If okay. Yeah. I'm reading the ticket holder. What's the holdup? One six says Franny always said that Bryce loves the city of San Francisco and frankness. Okay. Let's get. Okay. Mark. Thanks very much enthusiasm. The great Mark. Carey wants him to go to LA not at all. Sure. Not at all. You can have anybody else. Take them not this guy. This guy changes the whole thing. In fact, keep keep Posey and him and the dodgers could have anybody dodgers five hours. I was drinking. So this the Bye-bye Salinas drop was the great Dr Xu interview that I don't who. Mike salinas. I don't remember that. I don't remember that one that said, hey. Pussycat? What was that about earth the kids something no earth the kid sag? I'm a little pussy cat. I may was doing earth a kid impressions. Thank you. You know? But it's it's a at the end of the day. We've had some fun with this. Supposedly gonna shake down this weekend. And you know, the giants are in the mix. So we'll see I mean to me. It's it's he's the he's the is much as it's like, okay. Still a guy with low average who strikes out and this and that leads the league in walks. He biggest threat. He's a twenty six year old former MVP that you may be able to add after the beginning of the cactus league for nothing. But cash. Yeah. I mean that right. There is a tremendous addition. And it will be interesting to see if if he does what kind of what kind of years through guys have around him, you know, a guy like longoria, Belton Posey and Crawford. These guys would now be more properly slotted in the lineup because it wouldn't you know, I think you'll probably go Duggar. Harper Posey bell, maybe longoria Crawford. And then, you know, the the mavens parllas and the rest of the thing down the lineup. You're telling his batting order town Boetsch you telling far Han. But anyway, I got a note from far on this lineup. Have you pretty funny opening day? We're on the field funny. If we wrote down the lineup and headed the boat and say, hey, by the way, far on tolls to give you this. I don't think he would laugh at that. You don't think? Have to sing that we think he laid that. Larry look look at me. You know what I'm proud. Gotta bear your maturation on this subject has come to the point where you finally agree with me that nobody in this day and age has three or four years of patience to watch you know, hopefully, a team that's slowly improving. You need this is right. This is what I'm looking people in engaged. Otherwise, hey, I'm gonna go watch the warriors. I'm going to save my money and do this or that you wake me up when you're relevant again. And that's the problem. The giants don't want to embrace the rebuilt. They don't. And if they did they probably would have pond Madison Bumgarner for three prospects, two months ago to the brewers Braves or whatever, right. So have made that move. So they're telling you they wanna win this year. Well, you know, they're the pitching depth looks. Okay. The outfield defense, which was a. Terrible terrible last year looks quite a bit improved. There's reasonable expectation. The infield could bounce back but the outfield power in the, you know, the big time dynamic piece in the outfit just doesn't exist. So Harper would provide that and then he would make them. I don't think he'd make them a playoff team. But I think he'd make them over a five hundred team and make them a lot more interesting to the to the casual fan and would give the give the whole thing a little shot of energy. That's the one thing when you look at the giants they don't just need a drawing card they need like somebody. Who's kind of like did you see what this guy did last night? They don't really have a guy on their team will use. I mean, Alan Hansen. I would say is the guy because he's electric fast and he's got some bat speed. That's once a week he might do some. But I mean, they don't have that guy. Who said did you see that home run last night? Did you see that double last night? Did you see that incredible play? Harper could provide some of that. And and help them transition from this group to the group that's gonna include Joey Bart. Maybe mark. Luciano? And some of the next crew that are coming up. You know, what they what he also gives you and I'm dead serious. You read social media not today. We're having a lot of fun as a lot of people just sit there and make Saturday. They can rip somebody. They need somebody that you can have a little passion with. We're paying thirty five million for this guy. He's one for his last ten, you know, you got somebody that you wanna boo some polarizing figure probably if you said if you say who is the most polarizing figure currently in baseball. It's probably Harper probably harp of the well-known guys. Yeah. I'm trying to think of somebody that you really trust the best player in the game. But he's not polarized. Mike trout. You know what? I mean. He's probably the most polarizing since Rodriguez left, right? I would say say rod left Harper's the kind of guy. It seems like he annoys you or or it's funny. I was watching some national show the other day, and and they showed the highlight of Harper going after stricklin, and they're like man if he goes there, they better. Do something about that. Dude Strickland hasn't been here. He's a Seattle mariner. They moved him on, you know. Stay little current. I mean, it didn't happen. Legitimate fight though, you know, that wasn't because there's always a hold me back element to this stuff. That was a real fight that that reminds me when I was in school. You know, where you really wanna fight you go knock somebody on their ass. That was a that was a really good one. Good fight the relay three one chiming in with when you guys go off topic and make jokes. It makes me cry and laughter and it makes my day for. Thank you, sir. One. That's the idea. But I'm telling you for.

Harper Posey bell giants Belton Posey Mark longoria Crawford Mike salinas San Francisco dodgers Carey Franny Madison Bumgarner MVP Seattle LA Alan Hansen Mike trout baseball Duggar Dr Xu Larry
"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:44 min | 3 years ago

"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

"With Dr Jim shoe and shadow Kelly continues right here on KOMO duct shoe again. Thank you for joining us here on health talk. And thank you for sharing your knowledge regarding internal range. We were talking about an internal range, but we would which can be a number of different things in the knee. Maybe you can define what internal derangement can be because it's a global termed kind in the knee. Right. So it usually refers to conditions that actually physically reside within the knee. Now. I I know that that sounds very simple, but it is actually sometimes harder to define because a lot of times we can feel pain in the knee. But it's because of other areas being not as strong like hip abductors are hamstrings or even sometimes sciatica from back. Conditions. So once there are enough hints, then often the orthopedic surgeon will determine that the most likely cause for knee paying is internal derangement, which can range from something benign like a temporary swelling of soft tissue maybe from overuse. But that just feels painful because usually everything fits very well within the knee and it gets caught or gets pinched. However, there are also other more concerning and sometimes physically irreversible conditions like meniscus tears or a C Altair's, and those can present with symptoms that your friend was mentioning such as swelling instability. Sudden buckling and catching and clicking. Well, that's what I that's what I told my friend. I said you probably need to get this looked at and get it looked at early in the season. If you wanna get to skin, and he needs to getting it that looked at because you are going to take a look at that knee make an assessment. How do you do that? When someone presents to your office. Usually it starts with a thorough history. I usually like to find out how the ping starts whether it starts suddenly unexpectedly or it kind of crept up on him hand, those can mean different things ranging from actual tears that are unstable predictable too. Sometimes it is a degenerative process that builds and sneaks up on him. And then physical exam is also very important where I check general conditions such as range motion strength alignment. Whether there is any fluid in the joint, and then also specific exams, depending on my suspicion, whether or not there's any sign from in this condition, and ligament, tears, and instability, and then of course, then we'll base our test further testing on those findings. You're going to get so much information for you just described in our world of medicine, it's called the history and physical. So then you have suspicion you might order test. But if you do have to scope this knee, let's say it's a meniscus. It's a pretty I don't wanna use the word simple. But it's a simpler or easier procedure in today's world than it was thirty years ago. Yes, it is previously. We used to make large incisions, and we're limited by what we can see even with the large incision. But these days with very small, stab incisions. We can see pretty much everything inside a knee will Dr Xu again, I'm sorry. But we're out of time and your information was was fantastic. And I'm going to tell my friend. There's hope right? Yes. Thank you so much for your time. My pleasure. Thank you. We've been talking with Dr James she orthopedic surgeon for the polyclinic. More information at polyclinic dot com slot of things that can go wrong with a knee. Absolutely. I mean, it's a fascinating joining.

Dr Jim shoe KOMO Dr Xu Dr James Kelly thirty years
"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:46 min | 3 years ago

"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

"This is I health talk to Tom hutler and Shannon, Kelley welcome back. Our first guest today, Dr Jim shoot orthopedic surgeon for the polyclinic. We're talking about internal knee derangement. Yeah. That's right. That's exactly right. An internal drainage -ment is a global term for situations inside the knee. All right. Here's Dr shoe and Shannon. Oh, Kelly with a conversation about the money, Dr shoe, welcome to help talk. How are you today? I'm doing great. Thank you. Well, thank you for joining us. We're gonna talk about insurance arrangement Kennedy's knee problems. But before we start talking about internal drainage of the problem in the tar listeners about your practice your area of interest. I mean, how you got started in orthopedics and takes back tickets in the day in the life of Dr Xu. Yeah, I belong to a specialty. Call orthopedic surgery, where we treat the moving parts of the body muscles, tendons bones cartilage. Ligaments, and I got interested in it. Because I've always wanted to be an athlete, but have not had the chance to because I studied the violin. And my parents did not want me out there, injuring myself. So However, I really took an interest to wanting to help people get better and get more active. And so during my residency in orthopedic surgery, I developed an interest in orthopaedic sports medicine, where we see a lot of injuries that come from sports, obviously. But also from people who have work injuries and bike accidents, and such so you can be when you talk about sports medicine. Sports medicine is encompasses a lot of different in our world. Sports medicine is people that work at work their athletes are at work athletes, and they can enter their shoulders and knees, and that's you focus in is a lot of interest in extremities and sports medicine problems. Exactly. Yes. So the the common injuries and sports medicine would be for example, ligament injuries. We've all heard of them such as ACL tears and also rotator cuff tears of the shoulder and meniscus tears and such. So those are the types of conditions that I typically treat. And also the sports medicine field is very much in the forefront of treating things through minimally invasive techniques like with an arthroscope, we can treat repair reconstruct, multiple soft tissue injuries through very very small incisions, and usually that leads to faster recovery. It's amazing. Some of the technology that I've seen over the last thirty years is is really impressive. When you talk about minimally invasive procedures to the scope and the talk about recovery from a physical therapy standpoint. It's phenomenal. I mean, there is a lot less tissue disruption a lot less disruption of the tissue during surgery, so recovery is faster, but it does take biological time to heal tissue or there's some restrictions just with body hilly. Right. I think you're exactly right. That the principles of healing of the things that you're repairing are still the same is still takes care and attention and precaut-. Russians, and I'm a big believer in physical therapy. So I usually will rely upon. Physical therapy colleagues to help guide a patient through the months of rehab that is sometimes necessary. However, the minimally invasive techniques does do allow the patients to overcome the initial pain and less incision and less exposure, usually means not just less pain. But also less risk for complications. And people usually get back on their feet for basic activities a lot faster, right? Let's talk about the knee. Let's talk about what we're here to talk about today's what we term, internal derangement. And I'm going to set this up with the conversation that he just had last week with a friend of mine who is an active skier and last year during skiing. He tweaked his knee. That's how he described you. Call me up today and said, you know last year, I was skiing. I tweaked my knee. And it just hasn't really been the same. I said what are your symptoms? What's going on? You know, he's got a little clicking and popping. He's gets little swelling. He kind of feels a little bit of an unstable or instability when he planned. It's and rotates on that kind of sensation of locking or buckling. So I said, oh, you know, you better. Look have that looked at you may have what we describe an internal derangement. So I'm gonna let you tell our listeners as we start here, and we have a little bit of time left, but let's start with internal derangement. What is it internal derangement of the refers to conditions that are abnormal within the knee joint. This.

Shannon Dr Jim Dr Xu rotator cuff Tom hutler Kelly Kennedy Kelley thirty years
"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:47 min | 3 years ago

"dr xu" Discussed on KOMO

"Welcome back. Our first guest today. Dr Jim shoot orthopedic surgeon for the polyclinic. We're talking about internal knee derangement. Yeah. Internally term. That's right. That's exactly right. An internal drainage is a global term for situations inside the knee. All right. Here's Dr shoe and shadow Kelly with a conversation about thirty Dr shoe, welcome to help talk. How are you today? I'm doing great. Thank you. Well, thank you for joining us. We're gonna talk about insurance arrangement got Kennedy's knee problems. But before we start talking about internal derangement of the problem in the tar listeners about your practice your area of interest. I mean, how you got started in orthopedics and takes back tickets in the day in the life of Dr Xu. Yes, I belong to a specialty. Call orthopedic surgery, where we treat the moving parts of the body muscles, tendons bones, cartilage, ligaments, and I got interested in it. Because I've always wanted to be an athlete but have not. Had the chance to because I studied the violin. And my parents didn't want me out there injury myself. So However, I really took an interest to wanting to help people get better and get more active. And so during my residency in orthopedic surgery, I developed an interest in orthopaedic sports medicine, where we see a lot of injuries that come from sports, obviously. But also from people who have regular injuries and such as work injuries. And. Bike accidents, and such so he can be when you talk about sports medicine. Sports medicine is encompasses a lot of different in our world. Sports medicine is people that work at work their athletes are at work athletes, and they can injure their shoulders and knees, and that's their you focus in is a lot of interest in extremities and sports medicine problems. Exactly. Yeah. So the the common injuries in sports medicine would be for example, ligament injuries. We've all heard of them such as ACL tears and also rotator cuff tears of the shoulder and meniscus tears and such. So those are the types of conditions that I typically treat. And also the sports medicine field is very much in the forefront of treating things through minimally invasive techniques like with an Arthur scope, we can treat repair reconstruct multiple soft tissue injuries through very very small incisions and usually at least two faster recovery. It's amazing. Some of the technology that I've seen over the last thirty years is is really impressive. When you talk about minimally invasive procedures to the scope, and then you talk about recovery from a physical therapy standpoint. It's phenomenal. I mean, there is a lot less tissue disruption a lot less disruption of the tissue during surgery, so recovery is faster, but it does take biological time to heal tissue. So there's some restrictions just with body healing, right? I think you're exactly right. That the principles of healing of the things that you're repairing are still the same is still takes care and attention and precaut-. Russians, and I'm a big believer in physical therapy. So I usually will rely upon. Physical therapy colleagues to help guide the patient through the months of rehab that is sometimes necessary. However, the minimally invasive techniques does do allow the patients to overcome the initial paying and less incision and less exposure, usually means not just less pain. But also less risk for complications. And people usually get back on their feet for basic activities a lot faster, right? Let's talk about the knee. Let's talk about what we're here to talk about today's what we term, internal derangement. And I'm going to set this up with the conversation that he just had last week with a friend of mine who is an active skier and last year during skiing. He tweaked his knee. That's how he described you. Call me up today and said, you know last year, I was skiing. I tweaked my knee. And it just hasn't really been the same. I said what are your symptoms? What's going on? You know, he's got a little cliquey and poppy, and he's gets a little swelling. He kind of feels a little bit of unstable or instability when he plants and rotates on that kind of sensation of law keener buckling. So I said, oh, you know, you better look have have that looked at you may have what we describe an internal derangement. So I'm gonna let you tell our listeners as we start here, and we have a little bit of time left, but let's start with internal derangement. What is it internal derangement of the knee refers to conditions that are abnormal within the knee joint. This is different from.

Dr Jim Dr Xu rotator cuff Kelly Kennedy Arthur thirty years