35 Burst results for "Dr William"

Ohio doctor found not guilty in 14 hospital patient deaths

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 3 weeks ago

Ohio doctor found not guilty in 14 hospital patient deaths

"A a a a jury jury jury jury acquits acquits acquits acquits in in in in Ohio Ohio Ohio Ohio doctor doctor doctor doctor Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday of of of of murder murder murder murder charges charges charges charges in in in in multiple multiple multiple multiple hospital hospital hospital hospital patient patient patient patient deaths deaths deaths deaths Dr Dr Dr Dr Williams Williams Williams Williams useful useful useful useful was was was was accused accused accused accused of of of of ordering ordering ordering ordering excessive excessive excessive excessive amounts amounts amounts amounts of of of of the the the the pain pain pain pain killer killer killer killer fentanyl fentanyl fentanyl fentanyl for for for for fourteen fourteen fourteen fourteen patients patients patients patients in in in in the the the the Columbus Columbus Columbus Columbus area area area area Mount Mount Mount Mount Carmel Carmel Carmel Carmel health health health health system system system system prosecutors prosecutors prosecutors prosecutors said said said said ordering ordering ordering ordering such such such such dosages dosages dosages dosages for for for for a a a a non non non non surgical surgical surgical surgical situation situation situation situation indicated indicated indicated indicated an an an an intent intent intent intent to to to to end end end end the the the the lives lives lives lives doctor doctor doctor doctor Hughes's Hughes's Hughes's Hughes's lawyer lawyer lawyer lawyer said said said said he he he he was was was was providing providing providing providing comfort comfort comfort comfort for for for for dying dying dying dying patients patients patients patients not not not not trying trying trying trying to to to to kill kill kill kill them them them them and and and and called called called called a a a a single single single single witness witness witness witness an an an an anesthesiologist anesthesiologist anesthesiologist anesthesiologist to to to to testify testify testify testify that that that that Hughes Hughes Hughes Hughes those those those those patients patients patients patients died died died died from from from from their their their their medical medical medical medical conditions conditions conditions conditions and and and and not not not not his his his his actions actions actions actions I'm I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker

Ohio Multiple Hospital Hospital Hos Patient Patient Patient Deaths Dr Dr Dr Dr Williams Williams Columbus Columbus Columbus Mount Mount Mount Mount Carmel Hughes's Hughes Hughes Hughes Hughes Hughes Hughes Julie Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker Walker
"dr william" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:51 min | Last month

"dr william" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Two fold increase of cardiac arrest, one year later. And lots of atrial fibrillation and ventricular rhythm problems that were in the 70s and 80% higher in 11.5 million people. And so it's driving cardiologists crazy because they're suddenly seeing patients that shouldn't have these problems. Suddenly come up with these problems, post COVID. And so one explanation and we're not a 100% sure of this, but I'm pretty sure is it's vascular damage. Damage to the blood vessels, feeding the heart in the heart, feeding the nerves to the heart that are in the brain that are causing all these kinds of problems. And so what can you do to repair blood vessels? And this is where going back into the food research, we knew that dark chocolate cacao actually is endothelial repair. We know the Mediterranean got diet can actually do it. We talked a little bit about spinach and bok choy is actually ways of actually introducing nitric oxide. But let's go back to that Cleveland clinic study. You got sildenafil Viagra that can be given at low doses. And so this is when I went back in my research and I'm still doing it right now. So this is not medical advice, but it's medical research. And you and I are having a conversation about how researchers who are doctors think about this in pediatrics, there are conditions involving high blood pressure and damage to the blood vessels in the lung. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in pediatric patients, they are using Viagra. To treat kids to heal up their blood vessels. So an interesting research question that's easy to put into practice is to say, well, can that actually be one of the ways to repair blood vessels as well? Yeah. Again, you know, I think this whole conversation we've been having is really about how important it is to activate the potential of the body for healing. Yeah, it's so important, William. And I think the era we're going to be emerging in two is really a deep understanding of health. You and I went to medical school and learned about disease. We learned about zero when it came to health. And even less when it came to nutrition. And what we're now entering is an era where we're really discovering the underlying biological systems that drive both disease and health and how to work with those systems and the biggest thing that drives transformation in those systems, something that we do every day if we're lucky, most of us on the planet anyway is eat. And if food is the biggest signal transduction system, cell messenger system that we interact with, literally, we're eating thousands and thousands of foreign compounds that are all somehow intelligently floating around in our blood doing exactly what they were supposed to do, keeping us alive, optimizing our immune system fixing our microbiome,.

atrial fibrillation cardiac arrest Cleveland clinic Pulmonary arterial hypertensio Mediterranean William
"dr william" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

07:22 min | Last month

"dr william" Discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"Very good. And then they measured that they swabbed their nose to measure the number of bacteria or viruses that were present flu viruses. And then they did a blood test. So this is just like you would do in a pharmaceutical trial. They took out blood and they measured their natural killer T cells, which is what your vaccines would do. And here's what they found. They found that people who had the flu vaccine plus the shake had 22 times more of the natural killer T cells. That's 22,000% more. That's an insane result. Because we get excited in medicine when we see a 28% improvement or a 30% improvement, we're talking about a 22,000% improvement. There's no drugs into that. Right. And we think about like how to make the medicine do its job better, right? Well, look, here's the difference between foods and medicines. And we're talking about making them work together. Medicines don't give you joy. They give you some effect that you hope to have. Foods give you that can give you that effect and the joy as well. And then when you put them together, you're getting more effect and you also get a little bit of the joy of life as well. And so that's one of the studies that I always refer to to say, you know, like we can't ignore food as medicine. And the other thing that I think that is, you know, I'm a cancer researcher. I've done a lot of cancer research over my career. And I've had cancer in my family. I talk about my mother who actually had all of our cancer successfully eliminated by immunotherapy using her own immune system to get rid of it. And we had given her pomegranate juice, we'd given her other foods that actually helped to grow good bacteria. Well, the latest study that I think is a jaw dropper was published in nature medicine. It was done by the MD Anderson cancer center, one of the top cancer centers in the world. Jim Ellison, who actually Allison, who's actually one of the researchers. For his work in immunotherapy, that group is studying immuno immune system, the microbiome, what you eat and cancer. Like it's sort of like the holy quadrant of what we want to actually start to do in cancer research. They took 200 patients who had malignant melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer. And these patients were getting immunotherapy, kind of infusing a therapy that actually works when it works. It works great. The problem only about 20% of people respond to this type of immunotherapy. So they wanted to find out what the difference between responders and non responders were. And this is starting to be the pattern of the kind of research done in this field. They found the responders who benefited from an immune therapy that Jack up your own immune system to go after the cancer. And therefore, you do better. You can start to go away and you live. Had one bacteria that the ones who didn't respond didn't happen. That bacteria is a room in a caucus. Now, on a past podcast, I talked about ackermann Sia. Well, Ruben a caucus is starting to pop up as another significant player in the microbiome space. Now, I started to take note of ruminococcus about a year and a half ago during the pandemic, people were studying, why did some people have more antiviral cytokines in their bloodstream? If they weren't getting COVID, and it turned out that those people had more room in a caucus. In their stool as well. Wow. So cancer, but also COVID. Yeah. And so what was interesting is that in the study in China that found this during early days of COVID, also asked what were these people eating? And in China, the study for the COVID study showed that the people with more ruminococcus and more interferon gamma, the natural virus killer, they were drinking more green and black tea, not just green tea, but black tea. And they were having more omega three fatty acids, both from plant based foods, as well as seafood. Now, flip back over to the Japanese food with sushi and green tea is a good thing. Exactly. That's the carry out. The cancer study is much more sober because now we're talking about a different kind of life or death. And the surprise with this room in a caucus bacteria, now what they did is actually ask the people what they were eating. And because the microbiome, of course, is strongly influenced by the food weed. Turns out that they were that these people were eating many different, mostly plant based foods with tons of dietary fiber if they were getting room at a caucus if they were responding. And so then they began to calculate how much dietary fiber you would need to get an effect. And what they found is that for every 5 grams per day of dietary fiber you ate. How much is 5 grams of dietary fiber? That's the average amount you'd get in a medium sized pair. A pair a day would give you 5 grams. Lower by the way, the average American eats about 8 grams a day, which is terrible. But even 5 grams in this setting would actually lower the risk of tumor progression and lower mortality by 30%. So now they calculated it out. If you actually had a 20 gram, up to 20 grams of fiber, you really maxed out your ability to actually respond to a metastatic cancer medicine. And so every cancer patient always asks their oncologist, hey Doc, what should I eat? And oftentimes, they're saying just eat anything. Go to Mickey D's or whatever. Or they say ice cream and milkshakes and it's like terrible. This is where science is. Science is giving us the answer to those questions that patients want to have. And I think that this is what responsible doctors who are on who are current and who are forward going. This is where our society has to go. Is beginning to get those answers to be able to tell patients how they can help themselves. Well, it's interesting. Well, you know, we talk about dietary fiber, but that's a very big bucket. There's soluble fiber insoluble fiber prebiotic fibers. Did it matter? And how do they figure that out? You know, they were looking at mostly fruits and vegetables. And I think these are mostly insoluble fibers or sorry, sorry about fibers that were in this study. And so this is now the next layer. So real scientific research doesn't deliver all the answers and one fell so you kind of go back and you get back into the batter's box and you hit another one out in terms of research and so that's really I think a place to watch MD Anderson looking at this work that they're doing on the microbiome and diet and looking at the response to cancer therapy. So I mean, look, these kinds of efforts are going on all around the world, but they underscored this idea that the food that we eat does matter. And it can matter a lot to help the medicines that have been the product of all this research to help get the result that we want to patient. So first, deliver benefit. And I think that that's something that I was really important for doctors to hear. So I think if this is true and I clearly believe it is, and you believe it is, and I don't even know what to believe because it's scientifically proven. I can believe in God or not, but that's hard to prove scientifically or how many angels dance on the head of a pin. We can argue that all day. But this is science..

cancer MD Anderson cancer center flu ackermann Sia COVID Jim Ellison malignant melanoma skin cancer Allison China Ruben metastatic cancer
US virus cases, hospitalizations continue steady decline

AP News Radio

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

US virus cases, hospitalizations continue steady decline

"There are new signs that the Omicron surge is weakening across the country U. S. health officials say the total number of daily cases confirm this weekend just over one hundred thousand is a major improvement from mid January when Johns Hopkins University recorded more than eight hundred thousand cases each day and hospitalizations are down sharply eighty thousand on average in mid February nearly half of January's numbers one virus expert Dr Thomas Russo at the university of buffalo says he thinks Omicron is starting to run out of people to infect but there are still concerns with tens of millions of Americans still unvaccinated lifting virus restrictions is going to spark new cases Vanderbilt university's Dr William Schaffner says he's not comfortable taking masks off yet warning it's much too early to raise the banner of mission accomplished I'm Jackie Quinn

Dr Thomas Russo University Of Buffalo Johns Hopkins University Omicron Dr William Schaffner Vanderbilt University Jackie Quinn
"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:41 min | 5 months ago

"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"You are just sharing the details of, I mean, it's fascinating to learn about this for me to learn about this. So this idea that progesterone does two things. You said it's helping feed the baby and it's helping prevent contractions so that the baby doesn't leave the mother's womb too early. So you said that if somebody takes this abortion pill, are you four 86? After that, at some point, they take another pill to induce contractions so that the baby which has ostensibly been killed can now be expelled. Is the baby always dead by the point of taking the second pill? No, because we know that if people just take that medication, the cytotec, it will cause contractions. And they can abort without the baby actually being dead. And the baby is very tiny, but the baby is still creating the image of God and had a heartbeat. When they take that second medication and it causes the contractions, we really can not reverse that effect. So everything that's good about the pregnancy as far as supporting it is because of progesterone. When a medication is taken that lowers the level of progesterone, that's when all the bad stuff happens. But the other reason that this is not healthcare is that the number one pregnancy related killer of pregnant women in the first trimester of pregnancy is still a ruptured ectopic or tubal pregnancy. How do you know when a woman is pregnant if the pregnancy is in the uterus or if it's maybe in the tube? The only way is with an ultrasound. When a federal judge says, you know what? Going to the abortion clinic is an undue burden. Women are being denied an ultrasound. They don't know where the pregnancy is. One in a hundred pregnancies are going to be an ectopic a tubal pregnancy. So if a woman takes the abortion pill and she gets it mail order and she never had an ultrasound, she is told she's going to have bleeding, cramping, and pain, and that's going to be aborting the baby. As opposed to if it happens to me that one in a hundred words and ectopic or tubal pregnancy, those symptoms are so different, they are bleeding cramping and pain. How is a woman supposed to know the difference between the bleeding cramping and pain of a tubal pregnancy or the bleeding cramping and pain of the abortion pill? She can't. So this is not about healthcare. This is about killing the baby in the womb. The baby that we treat as patients and a patient is a person no matter how small. It's also about telling the mother one in a hundred, I mean, that's pretty dramatic that they're willing to say, well, yeah, we're going to lose some mothers, but this is such a political hot potato. So what if we lose some mothers? We'll sweep it under the rug because we have to have this. Evidently, that's their thinking. That's their logic. Yeah, the mothers can definitely be harmed with this procedure of doing this in before the abortion pills available whenever somebody presented with a positive pregnancy test. That was your first goal. Where is the pregnancy? We want a healthy mom, and we want a healthy baby. It's amazing that we will have more emphasis on defending wildlife than we do the baby on the end. I mean, even here at Pensacola beach, spring we have the turtle turtle's that come and they lay their eggs. And every time a turtle nest is laid, they put three fences around this turtle nest. And then they put up these big yellow signs. And they say, do not disturb sea turtles. And if you just disturb these pre born sea turtles, you can face a $100,000 fine or spend one year in jail. Yet you can drive three miles over the bridge to Pensacola, and now we have an abortion clinic which will bore a baby up to 24 weeks gestation. So how is it that we're protecting the a pre born turtles over on the beach, but we're not protecting the pre warm babies that we treat as patients. The irony is where does all this protection for these turtle eggs come from? It's actually state law and it's the U.S. endangered species act. Federal law, the irony, though, is when was the U.S. endangered species act passed. 1973. So on one side of D.C., you've got Congress passed in the U.S. endangered species act saying, we're going to protect sea turtles that haven't been born yet. Yet over on the other side of D.C. at the U.S. Supreme Court, we're not given that same level of protection to the pre born babies. And why do I use pre born? I use pre born rather than unborn because words matter. You're an author. Words matter. Use the term preborn. Why? Because before you send your child to school, where do you send them before they go to school? You send them to preschool. Why? Because the normal expectation from preschool is that they go to school. Before you watch the ball game, you watch the pregame show because the normal expectation is next comes the game. We don't send our kids to. We don't watch the game show. The normal expectation is you go to preschool, then you go to school. Normal expectation is pre born and then the normal process is to be born. So words matter, we use the term pre born, unborn just means at that moment in time they're not born, but it doesn't give any indication of what the normal expectation is for this baby in the womb. I've talked many times about how the more in my new book I talk about how science points more and more to God. There's no question about it. But it's also true with medical science in this specifically that it is helping us more and more to see the humanity of the preborn child. I mean, when you talk about some of this stuff, it's one of the reasons I wanted to do you on here is that it just makes it so clear to, you know, there's all kinds of people listening to this program. They're not sure what they think. And I just want to say, hey, folks. Make your own decision. Listen to what we're talking about, and you tell me, does it seem like a nothing or does it seem like I was once that kind of a nothing? And every single one of my genes, the DNA, it's all set, the color of my eyes, look at everything. And we act like, well, I'm not really not really science says yes, really, really, really, and we're getting from folks like you and more and more information, folks so we'll be right back talking to.

Pensacola beach U.S. D.C. Pensacola U.S. Supreme Court Congress
"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:02 min | 5 months ago

"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"One of them because we understand that this is a scourge. This is an abomination. This is a terrible thing. And that abortion is the enemy of women. It's not their friend. They're enemy. It hurts them, but we hear these lies over and over and over again. And it's one of the reasons I wanted to do one, just so people can hear the human side of this. You're treating people who happen not yet to be born. I don't know, what do you, as the head of pro life Doc dot org? What else is it that you guys do? Because obviously you're a doctor doctor. That's the main thing you do, but what do you do with the organization? Well, we're also very active in abortion pill reversal. Before the pandemic, though, about 39% of all of the abortions in the United States were performed with the abortion pill. Now we have evidence that it's over 50%. And why is there such growth? Well, number one, we've had a federal judge said that it's an undue burden for a woman to have to go to a medical practice in order to get access to the abortion pill. So it's available with a telemedicine visit shipped to your home. But the real key is, do we have antidotes when people make a wrong decision? Sure. We look at narcotics. We had over 92,000 people die of overdoses just last year. And we have an amazing medication called Narcan, where if somebody has made a bad decision, we can safely reverse we're going to leave this as a cliffhanger folks. I know you're not going any place. We'll be right back with doctor Lyle. Do not go away. This is vital stuff. Desperado why hey, folks, aircraft taxes here. Joe Biden and the Democrats have laid out the most socialist agenda, our country has ever seen. Instead of following president Trump's blueprint that had the economy booming, the Dems are going to raise taxes increased regulations and skyrocket and.

United States Lyle Joe Biden Trump Dems
"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:49 min | 6 months ago

"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Either folks, I'm talking to doctor William Lyle. He's the head of pro life, Doc dot org. You are just sharing the details of, I mean, it's fascinating to learn about this for me to learn about this. So this idea that progesterone does two things. You said it's helping feed the baby and it's helping prevent contractions so that the baby doesn't leave the mother's womb too early. So you said that if somebody takes this abortion pill, are you four 86? After that, at some point, they take another pill to induce contractions so that the baby which has ostensibly been killed can now be expelled. Is the baby always dead by the point of taking the second pill? No, because we know that if people just take that medication, the side attack, it will cause contractions. And they can abort without the baby actually being dead. And the baby is very tiny, but the baby is still creating the image of God and had a heartbeat. When they take that second medication, and it causes the contractions, we really can not reverse that effect. So everything that's good about the pregnancy as far as supporting it is because of progesterone. When a medication is taken that lowers the level of progesterone, that's all the bad stuff happens. But the other reason that this is not healthcare is that the number one pregnancy related killer of pregnant women in the first trimester of pregnancy is still a ruptured ectopic or tubal pregnancy. How do you know when a woman is pregnant if the pregnancy is in the uterus or if it's maybe in the tube? The only way is with an ultrasound. When a federal judge says, you know what? Going to the abortion clinic is an undue burden. Women are being denied an ultrasound. They don't know where the pregnancy is. One in a hundred pregnancies are going to be an ectopic a tubal pregnancy. So if a woman takes the abortion pill and she gets it mail order and she never had an ultrasound, she is told, she's going to have bleeding, cramping, and pain. And that's going to be a boarding the baby. As opposed to if it happens to me that one in a hundred words and ectopic or tubal pregnancy, those symptoms are so different, they are bleeding cramping and pain. How is a woman supposed to know the difference between the bleeding cramping and pain of a tubal pregnancy or the bleeding cramping and pain of the abortion pill? She can't. So this is not about healthcare. This is about killing the baby in the womb. The baby that we treat as patients and a patient is a person no matter how small. It's also about telling the mother one in a hundred I mean, that's pretty dramatic that they're willing to say, well, yeah, we're going to lose some mothers, but this is such a political, hot potato. So what if we lose some mothers? We'll sweep it under the rug because we have to have this evidently that's where they're thinking. That's their logic. Yeah, the mothers can definitely be harmed with this procedure of doing this in before the abortion pill is available whenever somebody presented with a positive pregnancy test. That was your first goal. Where is the pregnancy? We want a healthy mom, and we want a healthy baby. It's amazing that we will have more emphasis on defending wildlife than we do the baby on the end. I mean, even here at Pensacola beach, spring we have the turtles that come and they lay their eggs. And every time a turtle nest is laid, they put three fences around this turtle nest. And then they put up these big yellow signs, and they say, do not disturb sea turtles. And you can if you just disturb these pre born sea turtles, you can face a $100,000 fine or spend one year in jail. Yet you can drive three miles over the bridge to Pensacola, and now we have an abortion clinic which will bore a baby up the 24 weeks gestation. So how is it that we're protecting the a pre born turtles over on the beach, but we're not protecting the pre born babies that we treat as patients. The irony is where does all this protection for these turtle eggs come from? It's actually state law and it's the U.S. endangered species act. Federal law. The irony, though, is when was the U.S. endangered species act passed? 1973. So on one side of D.C., you've got Congress passed in the U.S. endangered species act saying, we're going to protect sea turtles that haven't been born yet. Yet over on the other side of D.C. at the U.S. Supreme Court, we're not given that same level of protection to the preborn babies. And why do I use pre born? I use preborn rather than unborn because words matter. You're an author, words, matter. Use the term preborn. Why? Because before you send your child to school, where do you send them before they go to school? You send them to preschool. Why? Because the normal expectation from preschool is that they go to school. Before you watch the ball game, you watch the pregame show because the normal expectation is next comes the game. We don't send our kids to. We don't watch the game show. The normal expectation is you want to go to preschool then you go to school. Normal expectation is pre born and then the normal process is to be born. So words matter, we use the term pre born, unborn just means at that moment in time they're not born, but it doesn't give any indication of what the normal expectation is for this baby in the womb. We were all pre born. Every single one of us. And, you know, to act as though that's not true. It's funny because really what we're asking people to do oftentimes is simply to be logical simply to follow the actual science and they have reasons they don't want to. And it's fascinating how people choose when they want to be logical and rational. And when they want to follow what science says. And when they say, I don't want to do that. So this is exactly that kind of an issue. I've talked many times about how the more in my new book I talk about how science points more and more to God. There's no question about it. But it's also true with medical science in this specifically that it is helping us more and more to see the humanity of the pre born child. I mean, when you talk about some of this stuff, it's one of the reasons I wanted to do on here is that it just makes it so clear, you know, there's all kinds of people listening to this program. They're not sure what they think, and I just want to say, hey, folks. Make your own decision. Listen to what we're talking about and you tell me does it seem like nothing or does it seem like, you know, I was once that kind of a nothing. And every single one of my genes, the DNA, it's all set, the color of my eyes. Look at everything. And we act like, well, I'm not really not really science says yes, really, really, really, and we're getting from folks like you and more and more information, folks so we'll be right back talking to doctor Lyle, William Lyle, he's with pro life, Doc dot org..

William Lyle U.S. Pensacola beach D.C. Pensacola U.S. Supreme Court Congress Lyle
"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:48 min | 6 months ago

"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"I'm talking to doctor William Lyle. He's the head of pro life, Doc dot org. You are just sharing the details of, I mean, it's fascinating to learn about this for me to learn about this. So this idea that progesterone does two things. You said it's helping feed the baby and it's helping prevent contractions so that the baby doesn't leave the mother's womb too early. So you said that if somebody takes this abortion pill, are you four 86? After that, at some point, they take another pill to induce contractions so that the baby which has ostensibly been killed can now be expelled. Is the baby always dead by the point of taking the second pill? No, because we know that if people just take that medication, the side attack, it will cause contractions. And they can abort without the baby actually being dead. And the baby is very tiny, but the baby is still creating the image of God and had a heartbeat. When they take that second medication, and it causes the contractions, we really can not reverse that effect. So everything that's good about the pregnancy as far as supporting it is because of progesterone. When a medication is taken that lowers the level of progesterone, that's all the bad stuff happens. But the other reason that this is not healthcare is that the number one pregnancy related killer of pregnant women in the first trimester of pregnancy is still a ruptured ectopic or tubal pregnancy. How do you know when a woman is pregnant if the pregnancy is in the uterus or if it's maybe in the tube? The only way is with an ultrasound. When a federal judge says, you know what? Going to the abortion clinic is an undue burden. Women are being denied an ultrasound. They don't know where the pregnancy is. One in a hundred pregnancies are going to be an ectopic a tubal pregnancy. So if a woman takes the abortion pill and she gets it mail order and she never had an ultrasound, she is told, she's going to have bleeding, cramping, and pain. And that's going to be a boarding the baby. As opposed to if it happens to me that one in a hundred words and ectopic or tubal pregnancy, those symptoms are so different, they are bleeding cramping and pain. How is a woman supposed to know the difference between the bleeding cramping and pain of a tubal pregnancy or the bleeding cramping and pain of the abortion pill? She can't. So this is not about healthcare. This is about killing the baby in the womb. The baby that we treat as patients and a patient is a person no matter how

Lyle Shep Lyle LE
Dr. William Lile: 'A Patient Is a Person, No Matter How Small'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:48 min | 6 months ago

Dr. William Lile: 'A Patient Is a Person, No Matter How Small'

"I'm talking to doctor William Lyle. He's the head of pro life, Doc dot org. You are just sharing the details of, I mean, it's fascinating to learn about this for me to learn about this. So this idea that progesterone does two things. You said it's helping feed the baby and it's helping prevent contractions so that the baby doesn't leave the mother's womb too early. So you said that if somebody takes this abortion pill, are you four 86? After that, at some point, they take another pill to induce contractions so that the baby which has ostensibly been killed can now be expelled. Is the baby always dead by the point of taking the second pill? No, because we know that if people just take that medication, the side attack, it will cause contractions. And they can abort without the baby actually being dead. And the baby is very tiny, but the baby is still creating the image of God and had a heartbeat. When they take that second medication, and it causes the contractions, we really can not reverse that effect. So everything that's good about the pregnancy as far as supporting it is because of progesterone. When a medication is taken that lowers the level of progesterone, that's all the bad stuff happens. But the other reason that this is not healthcare is that the number one pregnancy related killer of pregnant women in the first trimester of pregnancy is still a ruptured ectopic or tubal pregnancy. How do you know when a woman is pregnant if the pregnancy is in the uterus or if it's maybe in the tube? The only way is with an ultrasound. When a federal judge says, you know what? Going to the abortion clinic is an undue burden. Women are being denied an ultrasound. They don't know where the pregnancy is. One in a hundred pregnancies are going to be an ectopic a tubal pregnancy. So if a woman takes the abortion pill and she gets it mail order and she never had an ultrasound, she is told, she's going to have bleeding, cramping, and pain. And that's going to be a boarding the baby. As opposed to if it happens to me that one in a hundred words and ectopic or tubal pregnancy, those symptoms are so different, they are bleeding cramping and pain. How is a woman supposed to know the difference between the bleeding cramping and pain of a tubal pregnancy or the bleeding cramping and pain of the abortion pill? She can't. So this is not about healthcare. This is about killing the baby in the womb. The baby that we treat as patients and a patient is a person no matter how

William Lyle
"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:41 min | 6 months ago

"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Doctor Lyle spells his name differently. It's L ile. He is the head of pro life Doc dot org and we're having a really important conversation. You were just saying doctor Lyle, you were just saying that if somebody makes a bad decision, we have medical options to help them. And you're saying that there are women who, in a moment of panic, they have easy access to an abortive patient, I guess. Is that what it's called? Sure. I mean, and first we have to define things. Words matter. Let's talk about the morning after pill which is indicated for 72 hours after somebody has had intercourse, which is wrong, but let's talk about the abortion pill, which is indicated for up to 70 days after the first day of the night. See, I didn't know this. It's one of the reasons I wanted you on because a lot of this stuff gets so what is the first one called the morning after pill? Morning after pill. Okay. So somebody has sex. I'm gonna go whoops, maybe I got pregnant, let's take care of it and they take a pill. But the other pill and what does this other pill called? It's called a mip of stone, also known as RU four 86. Okay. How do you remember that number? Did you ever work in a restaurant? Yeah. All right. So when the Shep says, hey, 86 the meatloaf. What does that mean? It means kill the meatball kill it, meatloaf. Are you forbidding? Are you four 86? They didn't plan that, did they? They didn't. But that's planning. Are you four 86? So you have been pro killing. Okay, so the RU four 86 pill. You said it's up to 70 days after conception. After the first day of the last menstrual period. So that would be ten weeks gestation. Most of the ultrasounds for our new OB patients where we can see the baby moving, heartbeat, listen to the heartbeat. Are usually between 6 and 8, 8 weeks along. This pill has 98% chance of killing a baby up to ten weeks gestation. So but how does it work? It works by blocking a very important hormone called progesterone. And when you have big words, you break them down. You're an author. You break down big words so you can understand them. Progesterone. It stands for pro gestational steroid hormone. This is the hormone that says, congratulations were pregnant. We got a new full-time job. We're going to send nutrition debt and we're going to increase blood supply. We're going to stop contractions and we're going to allow the uterus. Miracle of evolution folks. Isn't it amazing how random processes it's kind of, yeah, okay, go ahead. So this hormone blocks this hormone called progesterone. When somebody takes the RU 46 with which essentially starves the pregnancy, it withdraws all the support and it's withdrawal support for the pregnancy. And then a day, two days later, you take another medication called side attack, which causes contractions. And that expels the pregnancy. Well, just like we have Narcan, which can reverse the effect safely for somebody whose overdose on narcotic. In fact, our cops carry Narcan. Airlines carry Narcan. Arcana cops carrying Narcan because if their dog is sniffing luggage and it has fentanyl in it, the dogs can overdose on the Narcan on the fentanyl. So we have Narcan it's available all over the place. It's safely reverses the effect of a narcotic. If a patient shows up in our emergency room, we have a moral and legal obligation. They made a bad decision. We don't just say, hey, you made a bad decision. You're gonna die. No, we give them Narcan. When we have a patient who takes the abortion pill and I've had lots of patients who have had regrets, sometimes immediately, I've received calls from the parking lot of the abortion clinic said I'd made a bad call. I did the wrong thing. Is there anything that I can do to reverse the effect? It's like, yes. You took a medication which blocks the hormone progesterone. Progesterone levels were going up. Now they're going down. What do we do? We just supplement the progesterone. In fact, this is not a medication that's on the shelf in the pharmacy that nobody ever uses. We use this in all routine obstetrics. We use this every day. We use this to prevent preterm labor. I just had a patient that delivered triplets. The only medication she took to prevent preterm labor was this progesterone. She took it every day. She got far enough along babies are doing great. We also use this when moms have recurrent miscarriages where she got pregnant. She had a miscarriage. She got pregnant. She had a miscarriage. We supplement with progesterone. In vitro fertilization, when they're transferring these babies to the womb of the mother, mom's body wasn't expecting to have a pregnancy transferred. So it doesn't have progesterone. So until the placenta starts to produce progesterone, we give these moms the exact same medication. So if you were to ask any doctor, I have these progesterone levels on this mom. It was going up and now it's going down. How do I keep her from miscarrying? They would say, well, give her prometrium, give her micronized progesterone. Doesn't matter if her body isn't producing enough progesterone or if she took a medication, which is lowering the progesterone levels. So we supplement them with progesterone. So how long if somebody takes this are you four 86 pill, how long after taking that could reversing it still happen? Sure. Sooner is better than later. Within the first 24 hours, very successful. We're really not successful once we get to about 72 hours after they take the medication. And we're really not successful if they've taken the second round of medications which caused the contractions. The medication that causes a contraction is called side attack. If I'm inducing a term mom who has an 8 pound baby, I give her 25 micrograms of this medication called cytotec to get her to contract. How much medication is given to abort the baby on the inside, not 25 micrograms, 800 micrograms. We're gonna hold it there forgive me. This is heavy stuff, folks. I'm talking to doctor Lyle LE pro life Doc dot org will be right back..

Lyle Shep Lyle LE
"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:17 min | 6 months ago

"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Folks, I'm talking to doctor Lyle. You remember I wrote a veggie tale episode lyla kindly Viking. I only wrote half of it. But doctor Lyle spells his name differently. It's L ile. He is the head of pro life Doc dot org and we're having a really important conversation. You were just saying doctor Lyle, you were just saying that if somebody makes a bad decision, we have medical options to help them. And you're saying that there are women who, in a moment of panic, they have easy access to an abortive patient, I guess. Is that what it's called? Sure. I mean, and first we have to define things. Words matter. Let's talk about the morning after pill which is indicated for 72 hours after somebody has had intercourse, which is wrong, but let's talk about the abortion pill, which is indicated for up to 70 days after the first day of the night. See, I didn't know this. It's one of the reasons I wanted you on because a lot of this stuff gets so what is the first one called the morning after pill? Morning after pill. Okay. So somebody has sex. I'm gonna go whoops, maybe I got pregnant, let's take care of it and they take a pill. But the other pill and what does this other pill called? It's called a mip of stone, also known as RU four 86. Okay. How do you remember that number? Did you ever work in a restaurant? Yeah. All right. So when the Shep says, hey, 86 the meatloaf. What does that mean? It means kill the meatball kill it, meatloaf. Are you forbidding? Are you four 86? They didn't plan that, did they? They didn't. But that's planning. Are you four 86? So you have been pro killing. Okay, so the RU four 86 pill. You said it's up to 70 days after conception. After the first day of the last menstrual period. So that would be ten weeks gestation. Most of the ultrasounds for our new OB patients where we can see the baby moving, heartbeat, listen to the heartbeat. Are usually between 6 and 8, 8 weeks along. This pill has 98% chance of killing a baby up to ten weeks

William Lyle Colorado Springs Eric metaxas Florida Panhandle James Dobson Panhandle Pensacola Christian college Wichita Eric Sweden Florida Pensacola
The Truth About the Abortion Pill With Dr. William Lile

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:17 min | 6 months ago

The Truth About the Abortion Pill With Dr. William Lile

"Folks, I'm talking to doctor Lyle. You remember I wrote a veggie tale episode lyla kindly Viking. I only wrote half of it. But doctor Lyle spells his name differently. It's L ile. He is the head of pro life Doc dot org and we're having a really important conversation. You were just saying doctor Lyle, you were just saying that if somebody makes a bad decision, we have medical options to help them. And you're saying that there are women who, in a moment of panic, they have easy access to an abortive patient, I guess. Is that what it's called? Sure. I mean, and first we have to define things. Words matter. Let's talk about the morning after pill which is indicated for 72 hours after somebody has had intercourse, which is wrong, but let's talk about the abortion pill, which is indicated for up to 70 days after the first day of the night. See, I didn't know this. It's one of the reasons I wanted you on because a lot of this stuff gets so what is the first one called the morning after pill? Morning after pill. Okay. So somebody has sex. I'm gonna go whoops, maybe I got pregnant, let's take care of it and they take a pill. But the other pill and what does this other pill called? It's called a mip of stone, also known as RU four 86. Okay. How do you remember that number? Did you ever work in a restaurant? Yeah. All right. So when the Shep says, hey, 86 the meatloaf. What does that mean? It means kill the meatball kill it, meatloaf. Are you forbidding? Are you four 86? They didn't plan that, did they? They didn't. But that's planning. Are you four 86? So you have been pro killing. Okay, so the RU four 86 pill. You said it's up to 70 days after conception. After the first day of the last menstrual period. So that would be ten weeks gestation. Most of the ultrasounds for our new OB patients where we can see the baby moving, heartbeat, listen to the heartbeat. Are usually between 6 and 8, 8 weeks along. This pill has 98% chance of killing a baby up to ten weeks

Lyle Shep
"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:14 min | 6 months ago

"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Doctor Lyle, I knew when we met that I wanted my audience to hear you because it's so rare that we hear from a Doctor Who works in this world. You know this world. You know that these are children. And they're not something else. I know that there's a lot going on right now with heartbeat laws. I was just in Texas and I met the state senator who wrote the heartbeat law and very clever from a legal point of view. Their heroes. And it's like we've got a thousand Wilbur forces working and you're one of them, he's one of them, because we understand that this is a scourge. This is an abomination. This is a terrible thing. And that abortion is the enemy of women. It's not their friend. They're going to me. It hurts them, but we hear these lies over and over and over again. And it's one of the reasons I wanted to do one just so people can hear the human side of this. You're treating people who happen not yet to be born. You know, I don't know, what do you, as the head of pro life Doc dot org? What else is it that you guys do? Because obviously, you know, you're a doctor doctor. That's the main thing you do, but what do you do with the organization? Well, we're also very active in abortion pill reversal. Before the pandemic, though, about 39% of all of the abortions in the United States were performed with the abortion pill. Now we have evidence that it's over 50%. And why is there such growth? Well, number one, we've had a federal judge said that it's an undue burden for a woman to have to go to a medical practice in order to get access to the abortion pill. So it's available with a telemedicine visit shipped to your home. But the real key is, do we have antidotes when people make a wrong decision? Sure. We look at narcotics. We had over 92,000 people die of overdoses just last year. And we have an amazing medication called Narcan, where if somebody has made a bad decision, we can safely reverse. This is we're going to leave this as a cliffhanger folks. I know you're not going anyplace. We'll be right back with.

Lyle Wilbur Texas United States
"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

08:01 min | 6 months ago

"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"I mean, it really affected me because I just thought you're in this world. You're in these trenches. So you take over this practice, you decide to end abortions in that area. I mean, has anyone ever thought of that before to go into an area and take over a place that does something like this? I've never heard of this as it seems like a brilliant strategy. Yeah, I mean, money, money has power money talks. I mean, there have been abortion clinics, which have actually been purchased by pregnancy resource centers there. You know, it's an active movement where you can just go in and take control. And that's what we do as far as education, as far as how we treat the pre born as patients. I mean, a lot of people don't realize that the mom even though she's an amazing life support system. Babies not part of her body. It's not her body. One of the things that we do, which is absolutely amazing is we can actually do blood transfusions directly to the baby. And we've done this at our hospital as early as 18 weeks gestation. It's like, well, why would you need to give a baby a blood transfusion? Because the mom sees the baby as a different person. And mom will actually send antibodies across the placenta attack the baby's blood because it's a different blood type and the baby's blood count will start to drop. And it can drop to the point where the baby will die on the inside unless we give the baby a blood transfusion. It's like, well, where do you get special baby blood? It's not special baby blood. That's just donating. Yeah. It's just donated at the Red Cross or one blood and we can take an ultrasound guy to go through the skin of the mom's belly through the wall of the uterus directly to the umbilical cord and just give the baby a lifesaving blood transfusion at 18 some weeks, you said? 18 weeks. When we've done that here at my hospital, but it's not just blood transfusions. We are now doing heart surgery at centers around the country at 22 weeks gestation. All right, this is where I mean, really, this is why I wanted you want to hear. This is unbelievable. That science has gotten to a level medical science where you can do heart surgery on a 22 year old 22 week old child in its mother's womb. At what point do we say a baby is viable? What week do we say a baby's viable? All right. We just had in the news today is a new Guinness record. There was a baby that was 21 weeks and one day that was born up at University of Bama Birmingham, weighed 15 ounces, less than a pound at birth and the baby is now home and doing well. That was 21 weeks and one day. So at 22 weeks, I mean, there's a condition called aortic stenosis, where the aortic valve is too close and instead of the baby's blood coming out and going, which it goes out is going, there's just not enough blood flow. So this was an adult, we'd either replace the valve of the adult's heart, or we do a valvuloplasty where we stretch the valve. Well, at 22 weeks gestation, we can now guide the needle. Again, through the skin of the mom, through the wall of the uterus, go right up to the baby's chest wall, flow the catheter through the baby's heart, and don't forget the baby's heart is the size of a grape at this point. It's beating a 140 150 beats a minute. We're guiding this catheter with a balloon into the left ventricle through the aortic valve and then blowing the valve up a little bit within 60 seconds, you see a dramatic improvement of blood flow to the baby. So if we're doing heart surgery on these babies at 22 weeks, then they are a patient. And if they are a patient, the patient is a person, no matter how small and patients have rights. But it's not just heart surgery. It's now spina bifida. Remember that it was over 20 years ago. And remember the picture that was taken of the baby's hand coming out of the uterus was taken by a friend of mine named Michael clancy. Well, that was 1999 when he was born. You know, and now we have enough babies who have had these types of surgeries done in the womb. And it's not just that we can do this procedure, but should we do this procedure? Is it better for the babies? We got our first real evidence in January of this year where we have more than a decade of following babies that had the corrective surgery done in the womb as opposed to wait until after they were born and then doing the corrective surgery. What did we find out? We found that when we did the corrective surgery in the womb, the babies could when they grew up could go upstairs faster downstairs faster. They had better control their bladders and their bowels. We have improved the quality of life for these babies for the rest of their lives by taking the initiative to treat them as a patient, a surgical patient in the womb. Okay, it seems to me my brain is spinning to figure this out. But it's almost like a math problem. If you can show that operating on a 22 week old baby or whatever, at any time after that, that you can improve their lives. Yeah. It seems to me that on some level that proves this is a human being whom no one has the right to kill. In other words, I don't know how else you process the logic. If you're able to operate on someone and improve their life in the long term, it seems at that point at least killing them can not be illegal option, but in many states in America, it is illegal option. Correct. I grew up in Jersey. And in New Jersey, just like in New York, you can abort a baby at any gestational age for any reason. One of the techniques that I'll teach our students and our attendees to our conference is, is that when you have the opportunity to speak with an elective official. Ask them this question. Are you an advocate for patients rights? Well, what elected official is going to say, no, I'm not an advocate for patients, rights. And you ask them that question. And then you say, well, then help me defend my patients that are still in the womb. I was at the university of Florida college of medicine speaking to the medical students. And I said, if I have a patient in my office that needs a lifesaving blood transfusion. But they were not born in the United States, or say I have a patient that needs heart surgery or spina bifida surgery or laser vascular surgery. But again, they were not born in the United States. Do I have a legal and moral obligation to find them access to care? Even though this patient of mine was not born in the United States. And universally, the kids were all like absolutely. It doesn't matter if they were born in the United States or not. Right. Now you've got them right where you want them. And then you say, okay, these patients were not born in United States. They need these corrective therapies. But the reason they haven't been born in the United States is they have not been born yet, but they are my patients in the womb. And there's really no comeback for that. You know, we are treating them as patients. We're improving their quality of lives for the rest of their lives, which is good for healthcare. It's good for the individual. It's good for society to improve the quality. Medicine can't fix everything. We can't cure anything. But our goal is always improve the quality of life for the patient and for the family of that patient. This is amazing stuff..

University of Bama Birmingham Michael clancy aortic stenosis Red Cross United States university of Florida college New Jersey Jersey spina bifida New York
Dr. William Lile Uses Modern Obstetrics to Support the Personhood of Pre-Born Babies

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:29 min | 6 months ago

Dr. William Lile Uses Modern Obstetrics to Support the Personhood of Pre-Born Babies

"Doctor Lyle, your organization and meeting you. I mean, it really affected me because I just thought you're in this world. You're in these trenches. So you take over this practice, you decide to end abortions in that area. I mean, has anyone ever thought of that before to go into an area and take over a place that does something like this? I've never heard of this as it seems like a brilliant strategy. Yeah, I mean, money, money has power money talks. I mean, there have been abortion clinics, which have actually been purchased by pregnancy resource centers there. You know, it's an active movement where you can just go in and take control. And that's what we do as far as education, as far as how we treat the pre born as patients. I mean, a lot of people don't realize that the mom even though she's an amazing life support system. Babies not part of her body. It's not her body. One of the things that we do, which is absolutely amazing is we can actually do blood transfusions directly to the baby. And we've done this at our hospital as early as 18 weeks gestation. It's like, well, why would you need to give a baby a blood transfusion? Because the mom sees the baby as a different person. And mom will actually send antibodies across the placenta attack the baby's blood because it's a different blood type and the baby's blood count will start to drop. And it can drop to the point where the baby will die on the inside unless we give the baby a blood transfusion. It's like, well, where do you get special baby blood? It's not special baby blood. That's just donating. Yeah. It's just donated at the Red Cross or one blood and we can take an ultrasound guy to go through the skin of the mom's belly through the wall of the uterus directly to the umbilical cord and just give the baby a lifesaving blood transfusion at 18 some weeks, you said? 18 weeks. When we've done that here at my hospital, but it's not just blood transfusions. We are now doing heart surgery at centers around the country at 22 weeks gestation. All right, this is where I mean, really, this is why I wanted you want to hear. This is unbelievable. That science has gotten to a level medical science where you can do heart surgery on a 22 year old 22 week old child in its mother's

Doctor Lyle Red Cross
"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

06:23 min | 6 months ago

"dr william" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Eric metaxas. Hey there folks. I don't even remember where I was. My guest maybe will tell me. But I was at an event recently, and I met doctor William Lyle. And he spoke a little bit. I think I was the main speaker, but I heard him talk, and then we spoke at our table. And I said, I've got to have you on my program. People need to know you and what you're doing. He's the head of pro life Doc dot org pro life Doc dot org. He's an obstetrician, sharing the truth about abortion and he's my guest, doctor William Lyle, welcome to the program. Thank you very much, Eric. It's great to be here. When we spoke, I don't remember half of what we spoke about exactly, but I just, I wanted you to tell my audience who you are, what you do because we need to hear it. So first of all, tell us who you are. I can read the list of your accomplishments and things. But you're obviously the founder of pro life Doc dot org and that's what 1999. Okay. But so tell us who you are, where you grew up and how you came to be somebody so passionate about the children that are still in their mother's wombs. Sure. Well, first we got together for the first time over at the gathering, doctor James Dobson event. Colorado Springs. I've been traveling so much that I literally couldn't remember. I said, was it Wichita or Colorado Springs? Colorado Springs. Thank you. Correct. So I practice obstetrics and gynecology I've been in practice privately since 1999 delivered over 4000 babies. And the practice that we actually took over in 1999 at that time was the largest provider of abortions here in the Florida Panhandle. We took over the practice and then we stopped all abortions and we stopped all referrals for abortion. This is amazing. I don't remember you talking about this. You took over a practice, an obstetrics, o-b-gyn practice. And when you took it over, you're telling me it was an abortion provider. It was the largest provider of abortions and had been for decades in the Florida Panhandle. So when we negotiated the contract with the physician that owned the practice, one of the stipulations was we had him sign a restrictive covenant to non compete where he couldn't practice any type of medicine for the next 24 months. So it really forced him into retirement and he moved back to Sweden. And we pretty much thought, well, that's the end of our job. That was the end of our duty and it wasn't until a Sunday after church that I went back to that practice. Hadn't really toured the practice, but I had a key. So I toured the practice we'd seen the downstairs exam rooms, ultrasound waiting room offices, but I had never been upstairs where all the abortions had been performed. And I know you do a lot of travel and there are certain places in the world where you travel and you can just feel the coldness. You can feel that something bad, something evil has happened here. And when I walked up the stairs to the second floor, I couldn't help but think about how many thousands of women with a baby on the inside had walked up these very stairs, spent a half hour upstairs in the surgical suite, and then walked back down the stairs without that baby on the inside. And when I walked around the corner up on the second floor at the surgical suite, you could see the abortion machine. You could see all the instruments you could see the exam table and the stirrups. I'm like, how has this been going on for decades when you've got Pensacola Christian college on the same road? You've got big Catholic churches baptist churches. How is this happening in conservative Pensacola? So that's what I really felt the calling that this information on how this has been going on in our town needs to become public. People need to be aware of it. Because I had just finished four years of residency where we have spent four years in college four years in medical school, four years in residency with two goals. We want to have healthy moms and healthy babies. And I saw how we treated the babies in the womb, the pre born as patients, and it really comes down to patients rights. And that's what we're here to show that we're creating the image of God at that moment of conception. This is a battle to defend patients rights because we do treat the preborn as patients. Yes, because they're human beings and we have to remind ourselves over and over that just because some people say that they are something other than human beings, people in history have said that Jews were not human beings that blacks were not human beings or that they were lesser than some other human beings. And to be consistent, we have to say, sorry, a human being is a human being, as a human being, as a human being, and that's the end of that. So when you went in there, did you know that this place was the largest provider of abortions in the you said in the area in what in the Florida Panhandle and so in the whole Panhandle this place that you took over was the number one provider of abortions and you were aware of this when you took it over. Oh, sure. That was part of the reason why we targeted and chose this practice. I mean, there were business aspects, of course. And the short term goal was to go in, have a productive practice that's in a great location, and of course we would shut down all abortions on day one, but then God always has a plan. And God's plan went way beyond our simple little short term plan and that's when the ministry of pro life Doc really developed where not only do we defend God's pre born, but we also share the forgiveness that occurs with the gift of Salvation. I mean, everybody wants healing. But he true healing only comes through true forgiveness and true forgiveness is all available through the blood of Christ..

William Lyle Colorado Springs Eric metaxas Florida Panhandle James Dobson Panhandle Pensacola Christian college Wichita Eric Sweden Florida Pensacola
Merck says COVID-19 pill cuts risk of death, hospitalization

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 8 months ago

Merck says COVID-19 pill cuts risk of death, hospitalization

"Two leading infectious disease experts say it's encouraging news that Merck has gotten good results from its experimental drug to treat to cope with nineteen patients White House Kobe advisor Dr Anthony Fauci says the report from work gives hope of a life saving treatment that people could take as a pill of importance is that in the placebo group there were eight deaths and in the treatment group there were no deaths Merck says it will soon be asking the U. S. food and drug administration to approve the drug's use Vanderbilt university's Dr William Schaffner says it works like Tama flew stopping the virus from replicating ended something patients could get from a drug store at the moment people who are newly infected have to come to special treatment centers to receive their intravenous infusions an independent group of advisors monitoring Merck's trial recommended stopping it early because the results were so strong I'm Jackie Quinn

Dr Anthony Fauci Merck Infectious Disease U. S. Food And Drug Administra Dr William Schaffner White House Vanderbilt University Tama Jackie Quinn
U.S. Prepares for COVID Booster Shots

Bloomberg Businessweek

01:36 min | 9 months ago

U.S. Prepares for COVID Booster Shots

"Expected the need for Covid vaccine booster shots, despite their high rate of effectiveness against the virus, will now his prediction It's going through with the pandemic. Still raging Tim. We know that and variants putting more lives at risk, even those who have been inoculated this week, the Biden administration unveiled its plan for vaccine boosters starting in September for eligible recipients eight months clear of their second dose of the Moderna or fighter vaccines. My administration of planning for this possibility in this scenario for months We purchased enough vaccine and vaccine supplies. So that when you're eight month mark comes up Will be ready to get your vaccination free at booster shot free. We have it available now, Dr. William Haseltine is back with us to tell us what's next. When it comes to fight against Covid 19. He also lays out a plan to deal with the trauma that we've experienced throughout the pandemic. He's got another book out Carol, and it focuses on the effects of what he calls CV PTSD. I think it's very clear now, and that's why the government has moved to the way it is. It's very clear now. That to protect against serious illness where most people are going to need a booster they've pegged at about eight months. It's probably about right for most people. For people who are older, It's probably a little shorter than that. Six months will do. And so I would stand by my statement that six months from my last vaccine, I'm certainly planning to get it out of booster and and I think the government official recommendation now is every adult Get a booster beginning eight months from the last vaccination. This isn't magic. This is

Biden Administration Dr. William Haseltine Covid TIM Ptsd Carol
Pfizer to Seek OK for 3rd Vaccine Dose; Shots Still Protect

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 11 months ago

Pfizer to Seek OK for 3rd Vaccine Dose; Shots Still Protect

"An official with drug maker Pfizer says the company will ask federal regulators next month to approve the administration of a third dose of its covert vaccine Fizer says early data suggests that if people receive a third dose of its vaccination there antibody levels will jump five to ten times higher than what they had with the second dose chief scientific officer Dr Mikhail Dalston says that could also help neutralize the delta variant but even if the FDA approves of third Kobe does that doesn't mean people will get boosters a vaccine expert at Vanderbilt University Dr William Schaffner says public health officials might prioritize getting protection to those who haven't gotten any shots he says the current two duo system has been effective for keeping people out of the hospital and tamping down on the variance I'm Jackie Quinn

Fizer Dr Mikhail Dalston Pfizer Dr William Schaffner Vanderbilt University FDA Jackie Quinn
The Story of the Bloody Benders: America's First Serial Killer Family

Ghost Town

02:25 min | 11 months ago

The Story of the Bloody Benders: America's First Serial Killer Family

"Eighteen seventy one. The family built a small one room. Cabin a barn corral. Doug well inside the cabin. The area was partitioned with a large canvas. Creating living quarters in the back and a small in store in the front accrued sign was hung above the front door that advertised groceries supplies like gunpowder food liquor and tobacco. It also sold hot meals and provided rooms for the night to transient strangers but again not for shadow. This too hard the transients were not the ones to be afraid of the people that stayed at the in on their way to start a new life. Move by land. Whatever we're usually carrying you know some cash on them. Maybe their life savings and they began to go missing. When friends and family started looking for them they could trace them as far as the big hill country of southeast kansas before the trail went cold. These first few missing travelers. Were like you know no big deal. This is the wild west people. Go missing all the time. Travel at your own risk but as more time pass. The disappearances became more frequent by eighteen. Seventy three rumor had it that you did not want to travel the south kansas trails when rumors got even bigger about seventy five people from the community gathered to see what can be done about their bad reputation. Both bender men were in attendance. The meeting began by talking through the people that were reported missing including a well known. Doctor named william york. The group decided to search every farmstead in the area. Most the ten days really involved really wanted to get to the bottom of it and volunteer to have their farm searched. The benders kept quiet sometime later. A neighbor of the vendors notice that the bender in was abandoned and their farm animals. Were dying a search party was soon formed which included the missing. Doctor york's brother when the men arrived at the property. They found the cabin pretty empty. The also noticed a terrible smell but the most concerning thing. The men noticed was adore nailed completely. Shut on the floor of the cabin. The men of the community pride the door open and found a six foot deep bloody hole the source of the odour. There was nothing else in the whole though then. The search party decided to physically move the entire cabin to do a more thorough search underneath but they found nothing. They kept digging around the cabin especially in the nearby vegetable garden the orchard. It was there that they found the first body buried face down. Its feet barely covered in. Its shallow grave. It was dr william york. His skull crushed throat cut.

South Kansas William York Doug Doctor York Kansas Bender Travel Dr William York
The Mind-Blowing Science of Starving Cancer With Food

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

02:16 min | 1 year ago

The Mind-Blowing Science of Starving Cancer With Food

"When it comes to nutrition science and trying to figure out what foods are best for you or what foods could potentially harm you one example where there tends to be a lot of confusion as if today you go on web md and you look up cancer and you look up articles that are on there that you know does sugar fuel cancer and there's well meaning articles from very respectable individuals that are out there to say there's no evidence that's out there that sugar encourages cancer. And yes. there may not be these big double blind placebo controlled trials which have their own challenges. They're difficult to fund. who's gonna go and pursue them. How are we going to make sure that we have the resources to explore it. But this highlights so sort of the fact that there still may be a lot of evidence showing that for example in the case of cancer. That sugar could be very problematic. You may not have that full trial. So this is where a little bit of nutrition. Science becomes partly an art of piecing the story together. And saying what's the best evidence that we have so talk about sugar and cancer for a moment if you could yeah great great topic and you know by the way you know. Cancer like sharks. When they're on the cover of a magazine it sells. They fly off the shelves because people are interested in this topic and and just like sharks. There's a lot of fear and and and in reaction to the topic of cancer. And i think this is also true even in a medical community so First of all let me kinda. Give my response to what we do. Now about the evidence of sugar in cancer because I do cancer research. I've been involved with cancer Been involved with helping to develop over a dozen cancer drugs that are. Fda approved in part of my street cred drew. When i speak about food as medicine that i've actually helped to develop medicines. I'm one of the guys who actually. I'm not just sort of like waving leaf. Kale saying never mind all the prescription stuff. Like i'm actually helping to develop those things so for me. It's really food is really an additional tool in the toolbox but we can understand nutrition with the same rigor with the same standards of evidence that we apply for drugs.

Cancer Confusion FDA Kale
"dr william" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"dr william" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"This is something that if putin in fact feels that he could be pushed out of power and member it's less than thirty percent of the russians that actually support putin right now especially the the younger population of that. This could is something that could spin out of control with taiwan. i think it's a different issue yes. I think that Ah paying is under some pressure internally. But i think this at least the exercises around your massing large Amounts of ships and an aircraft carrier ending incursions into the eight is is sending the message of if we decide to take taiwan. We the chinese. We're gonna take it and there's nothing you can do about it. I think that would be major strategic blunder on the part of the chinese. But i do think it's something that at least they want to point out that they have the capability if they want to do that to say in the way i'm going to say the dr parker Suppose the russians and the chinese and everybody talks to each other and say it's time to all of us move that same time. Well i think that's one of the concerns that this is Really the first time. We've seen it when the russian and chinese have a coordinated effort together ear and the clearly We're talking to each other. The russians and the chinese and they had simultaneous action happen if that happens that is a problem for us Not one that the us couldn't Deal with especially alongside our friends and allies. But i don't think. Russia china or the united states. Want to end up in a in a war with each other so i do believe at the end of the day so long will be smart about it. unless like i said you have the situation we talked about four and i think no vol name. In russia in particular could be that tinderbox they could end up pushing russia Now you were very very high levels In the maybe the fact is Admiral stavridis has written a book. And it's supposed to be a fiction book that we're gonna make into a confrontation with the chinese by twenty thirty four. But i think there's a lot of americans worried that it could happen before that. What well admiral stavridis wrote the foreword for my last book. And we've known each other for a long time smart man And i think when you read through that book there's a lot in there although it is it is fiction. There's a lot in there that could certainly happen Do i think it could Spin out of control earlier. yes i do think that's possible. I think that we have to have I call it strength through firepower. We need to have enough forces and we need to show that we have the intent to to execute article five agreements. In other words that we would Support any of our allies. That are in fact check. I mean that's really the the basis behind Mehta So so at the end of the day. I think that there is that possibility. I don't think that's a high probability right now but certainly It's concerning when you have. Two major countries rushing china Acting simultaneously in these kind of efforts now in the last day. or so. you seem the russians. Kinda back off the coast a little bit. And you're seeing the last Air-defense identification zone incursions by the by the chinese. So part of this also might've been a first stage test to see what the united states would it. There's also been some allegations from a lot of people in washington That some of the people appointed under the latest administration have been out to push out. Some people were appointed roasted levels in high levels in the military under the trump administration. Have you heard that at all. I heard lots of rumors about that..

washington less than thirty percent one first stage first time Admiral Two major countries russia admiral twenty thirty four trump eight russian four stavridis americans china united states russians each
What You Need To Know About COVID-19 Vaccines and Blood Clots

the NewsWorthy

01:36 min | 1 year ago

What You Need To Know About COVID-19 Vaccines and Blood Clots

"Dr william moss thank you for coming on the newsworthy. Thank you for having me. It's my pleasure. So i just give us a brief overview about what's going on with these blood clots that have been seen so far connected to the johnson and johnson. Vaccine the united states Through the centers for disease control and prevention sets up a vaccine safety surveillance and this is happening with all axons all covid vaccines but all other vaccines that are in use in the united states. And what happened. Is that through that surveillance system. They heard reports of a six women between the ages of eighteen and forty eight who had developed a severe blood clots in the brain of six days to about fourteen days after receiving the vaccine. And this is exactly what this surveillance system is meant to detect. Now people need to know that just because something is occurring after vaccination an adverse event like this. It doesn't necessarily mean it's being caused by the vaccine and so what's happening right now. Is that the advisory committee on immunization practices met to discuss these six cases we subsequently learned about two additional people one woman and one man who had a similar types of blood clots and the trick is to try to understand what's happening it requires careful investigation of these individual cases to try to see if they're really linked to the vaccine or not

Dr William Moss Centers For Disease Control An Johnson United States Advisory Committee On Immuniza
"dr william" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

06:03 min | 1 year ago

"dr william" Discussed on Dead America

"Missing in at least missing something for me. I think risk other people as well one is. They have a clear. Meditation took the i think that's great. But they're missing. A couple of other things that i think psychotherapy actually can help people with so one motivation to practice so a lot of people will learn a technique and then they kind of lose the motivation to keep practicing one thing that i found really helpful to keep that going is player. Your picture while wellbeing. So why are you meditating. What are you trying to move towards in your life. What is the motivator for you so in my couple means skillful means programme. I have people identify domains of their life. That are really important to them. That will help. Bring them closer to wellbeing so for somebody might be physical health. Somebody might wanna lose weight. Somebody trying to exercise more to feel stronger. Another person might want to develop relationships with their family. Another person might be working on career and in all of these as we were talking about. They all involve behavior. They all involve letting go of some bad habits in accepting and building some new new positive habits so in this. Meditation course is not just sitting on a cushion where identifying domains of wellbeing helping to move towards those. We're helping you to develop a systematic patient practice to build those muscles to make that adoption of new behavior easier quicker and more sustainable in the meditation. You're also managing anxiety depressive feelings all of those benefits that you get from meditation better concentration memory sleep all that stuff and then we help you actually integrate it and i think this was another thing that was missing in a lot of meditation programs. Is they teach you to the technique and is a bye bye so in my program. We also take you through step by step in. Have you apply these meditation techniques in the domains of wellbeing the areas of your life that are important to you and there's partners. Accountability partners is a group on that. You meet with every week where people are supporting you in sharing insights about how they've applied meditation life and this is over twelve weeks and then at the end of the twelve weeks. We have people who go on to do it for a year so meeting weekly with that same group that they started with and It's really supportive. This way that people can continue practicing and applying it because it's a long term skill so when you decide you're going to act a new way in whatever domain of your life. It's a choice to start but then maintenance phase that continuing to make that choice again and again and again in your day to day the tech support. The digs long-term sort of commitment. It's not a one time sort of sort of choice. So the last part is really cultivating a community for yourself. We do that intentionally. Who are the people in your life. Who really love your picture of wellbeing in support you Who aren't gonna make fun of you for love to do some quirky thing but rather they they are your biggest cheerleaders. And how do we spend more time with these people in. How do we create comment habits hobbies in that sort of thing which we can interact with them. More and more these are the four pieces Divining your picture of wellbeing developing systematic. Meditation practice integrating the insight from that practice into your life and then creating a community of support on immediate is with online courses in meditation recordings in all of that sort of business. So people can do it from from anywhere in the world while you've got a lot of good insight and your experience level is astronomical. You don't find a lot of buddhist monks that come back and help the western culture overcome their mind. You know because here in the united states especially we can really start churning our mind especially right now during our covid period. Were all going to get through this but what you do can help people through this time period. How can people get a hold of you in connect with you. sure so. I think the best way is going to my website so we have a new website actually going up this week at the end of january sort of recording this right now but it should be up in a week or so where you can see. We have a couple of course the big twelve week program if some smaller courses if you want to just get a taste like one week or four recourse. They'll be going up. We'll have meditation challenges. When i try to meditate for seven days straight or a big one. Where you're meditating thirty days in a row for our day on that maybe a lot of people. But it's exciting for others and then not just with meditation specifically but insight just developing insight. In your life we also have programs that are coming out for developing nutrition. A picture of your your well being in terms of what you digest me talk about the science microbiome and not prescribing. Somebody a diet so to speak but letting them organically find that in terms of what they want out of their life energy and and understanding the science behind what types of food bring you what type of wellbeing both physiologically in mentally as well and then we all will also have some yoga courses for emotional health and wellbeing that are based on the same concept of helping you define your picture. Welby not assert telling you what that is in being part of a community where people really respect your own unique picture wellbeing so going through the website um scovell.

thirty days one week seven days twelve weeks united states this week end of january four over twelve weeks four pieces one thing both one time twelve week couple one a year buddhist a yoga
"dr william" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"dr william" Discussed on Dead America

"Dr jackson. Could you please introduce yourself and let the audience know just a little bit more about you and how you got to where you are today. Sure my name is william jackson. I i'm a health psychologist and a former buddhist monk in with that sort of means is health psychologists. I help often. People who have both a chronic illness and something that they're dealing better. Psychologically an i found that sort of niche for myself after being a buddhist monk in deciding gonna take the robes off. I wanted to find a way that i could utilize what i learned in meditation to help people and It just so happens that mindfulness has found a niche in the chronic pain community and then sort of expanded into the rest of the medical community from there. That's what sort of brought me into doing the work that i'm doing now and i'm sure we'll get into it a little bit later. But there's certain types of practices and certain structures of courses learning meditation that are more helpful than others nabbed sort of geared in the direction of these more Comprehensive meditation programs. Right off when i saw you on pot it. I saw that you were a former buddhist monk yes that just fascinates me. How could you walk us through. What made you become a buddhist monk and then why would you decide to walk away from that lifestyle giora. yeah So before i became a monk i was actually an actor so i started in my junior year of high school acting because i wasn't doing so good academically in my public high school. And you know getting into a little bit of trouble here and there. But i had one teacher who asami do a bunch of impressions and characters and he really encouraged me so i went with a friend to this performing arts. High school audition. They give me a little bit of a scholarship. In things went from there and then in college i was studying shakespeare in england and i was in a christian missionary so that they had just opened space that they rented out the these acting groups and i found a book by the dalai lama and the book was called how to practice the way to a meaningful in. I had a lot of time on my hands by started reading book and it said you know enlightenment is when what is good for you and other people happens to be what you want to be doing day in day out about okay. That's not too to believe. In or i don't have to believe in too much. It's pretty evident can take that at face value. And then he said to develop meditation practice. You should start by meditating. Thirty to forty five minutes a day for three months so i had a lot of time. And he had these cool names for what you could develop Develop calm abiding. I thought well that sounds cool. When i try it so i started practicing thirty minutes a day and within a month or so. I really started to develop a comfortable space in meditation. All these sort of magical things started to happen but what was most important for me. Is i started to understand on my feelings and my mind a little bit more deeply. I started becoming familiar with The arc that feelings had anger frustration. Anxiety was able to watch it. Come and watch go. And i remember one specific moment sitting across from one of the actresses in choose talking to her friend she said. Oh i'm so jealous of the. And when she said that i thought that's not what she actually means her words. Don't match up. She's not actually jealous of her friend. Actually she's really happy for and wonder why people do that. We actually share our feeling. We don't we're not vulnerable with each other in some way Part of that is because often we don't feel safe to do so or self conscious or whatever it is. And i started talking to her about this out loud and just pondering out loud and but i noticed is that the whole table had gotten quiet and they started listening and they wanted in on the conversation they found it to be valuable and for somebody who got a lot of trouble when they're younger at the sort of bad perception of themselves to be offering something to a table full of christian missionaries who are listening and feel that there's value in what i'm saying that came from a meditation experience of vine that was really meaningful to me. Answer started to change. My perception myself deserted. Meditating more that be hooked and then among came to our to our college When i was back in the us one thing led to another. I asked him if i could come in. Do a meditation retreat. his monastery. He said through a translator. Oh you can't become a monk. That easy and i said none. I don't wanna be a monk. And then he said okay. You can come in three months. Meditation retreat from the five in after six months shaved head wearing a row. The first couple of years was really difficult. Because if the let go of all your coping mechanisms and finding new ways to deal with stress which had all sorts of bad habits that were sort of propping up. When i go those. I was anxious and stressed and everything the first couple of years. But as my meditation developed found new ways to cope and more healthy ways to relate to myself and the world. I continue my meditation Got deeper and deeper into studying the terada tradition going into the forest. Burma and there is a meditation in burma after couple months in meditation retreat. Our you're meditating. Ten fourteen hours a day in a hut in the woods and i was In in one of those meditations. And i had this realization that my mind was changing. I was becoming a different person in meditation. I was really crafting my mind day in day out Four wellbeing and i thought about my family and friends. What are they crafting their mind for like you know. Just everybody in the world. What are you doing with your mind every day because we do changes your mind in are you using your mind and away. That's going to lead to more well and it was just this sort of deep. You know you can understand it. Intellectually experience of it was profound thing. And i realized in that moment that i wanted to come back to the united states. I wanted to share. When i learned that meditation with other people in to do that i really needed to develop the language to express what i had learned. Couldn't just share somebody. They had to go through the experience themselves. Learn it so. That was ten years ago where i had that realization twelve years ago. Now it's taken me a good. It took me about ten years to develop system. Meditation practice that i feel like was in like a common language that people could understand.

william jackson Thirty england jackson three months Burma twelve years ago ten years ago dalai lama united states first couple both today burma first couple of years one teacher christian thirty minutes a day one forty five minutes a day
"dr william" Discussed on Dead America

Dead America

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"dr william" Discussed on Dead America

"Understanding the world that we live in can be very exhausting. It can make our mind do unthinkable. Things today's guest. Dr william jackson incorporate psychotherapy positive psychology and the most accessible core methods of meditation into his practices with seven thousand plus hours of total time in retreat a monk. He practiced with an organized retreat of buddhist teachers around the world including his holiness. The dalai lama. He's here today to help us. Understand his contemporary evidence based meditation practices. Let's not waste any more time and get into today's exciting up so logan evening. Good morning good afternoon wherever you may be around this wild wacky and sometimes disturbing world of ours. Yes that's the intro to the mindset. Podcast a weekly attempt to open eyes and shedding light on. What's really going on in the world. All done by ripping apart the media madness. That masquerades as news join me. Gareth davis every sunday on the mindset. Podcast you can find the show. On major podcasting services such as i tunes stitcher and so on or you can go directly to the main mindset website that's www dot mindset central dot com. Check out the podcast. Bring your curiosity your opinions and a sense of humor and.

How To Boost Your Kids Gut Health with Dr William Lee

Food Issues

02:11 min | 1 year ago

How To Boost Your Kids Gut Health with Dr William Lee

"In recent years. There's been a ton of research about the microbiome and gut health and a growing interest in probiotics for kids yet. What our kids eat is really the foundation of a strong immune system. They really need to start right away by making sure that their gut bacteria and gut health and diet as healthy as possible. That's dr william lee. Scientists and author of the new york times bestseller. Eat to beat. Disease will talk about how. The habits of covid may affect our kids. Immune systems ways to boost your kids gut health the best foods to focus on and if probiotics are good idea there so much advice an easy realistic tips in this episode. And i know you're gonna love this interview with dr li will. Dr lee is so great to have you on the food issues podcast. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you julie. It's a pleasure. Great so we hear a lot about gut healthy seas and for listeners. Who don't know. can you explain. What exactly the microbiome is. And why it's important for all of us and our children right. Well we've always known that our gut has to be healthy because you no matter who you are and where you live. You've always had that kind of uncomfortable. Gut the kind of tummy feeling. And now we have an explanation for what it is because we think us gas or you know maybe have a little stomach bug but we now know that in fact you don't have justice stomach bug. We've got thirty nine trillion stomach bugs and these stomach. Bugs are actually mostly healthy And that's what we call the gut microbiome. it's a it's an ecosystem that actually lives inside our body and in fact there's just about the same number of bacteria as there are human cells so We as humans are not actually quite human. Were about fifty percent. Bacteria healthy bacteria and fifty percent Humans and most of the healthy bacteria actually Live inside our gut has also On our skin in our mucous membranes. As well

Dr William Lee Dr Li Dr Lee The New York Times Julie
Atlanta-based CDC chief warns U.S. headed for ‘impending doom’ as Covid cases surge

Atlanta's Morning News

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Atlanta-based CDC chief warns U.S. headed for ‘impending doom’ as Covid cases surge

"Here's Marcie Williams and John Take Above of Rising Covert cases have the head of the Atlanta based CDC worried about impending doom. DOUBLE DSPs Bill Kaya Geo reports live. Recent trends suggest there may be another surge of the U. S death toll now tops 550,000 and President Biden says it appears people are letting down. Their guard is not the time to celebrate Spring. Coming next week in Georgia. More than a million passengers have been screened US airports for 17 straight days, infectious disease expert Dr William Shafter says With more people out and about it's critical to increase vaccinations. More likely it is that we can blunt any surge that's already starting up. The president says 90% of all Americans will be

Marcie Williams John Take President Biden CDC Atlanta Dr William Shafter Infectious Disease Georgia United States
Quantum Physics And Global Consciousness In Relation To Trauma

The Healing Place Podcast

02:57 min | 1 year ago

Quantum Physics And Global Consciousness In Relation To Trauma

"Welcome everybody to the hill in place podcast. I'm your host terry while rocking very excited. Have with me today. Dr william t. Kenny and he is a radiologist but also author of the conscious whole which is an award winning book a novel. And we're going to dive into that and talk about What it's about and other wonderful subjects Quantum physics and the conscious whole global consciousness Yeah so welcome. Thank you very much for having me. I really appreciate it apso Summer radiologists the area. Tending william t. Kenny a real name is william t. randazzo and So as radiologist. What i'd do his i Some adopted to medical school and did six years of basically advanced training after medical school and will be radiologist lee read xrays. See ts. mri's ultrasounds we also do minimally invasive procedures with x ray guidance and training I learned about physics. Also had an interest in physics before pursuing radiology and when i was in medical school Learning about dna and the nucleotides in dna is they'll tie small molecules and with mike and of interest in physics. I was thinking about how physicists study. The small particles the the subatomic particles atoms in protons and electrons and the laws of physics. Those following Generally speaking kind of you know. Put those into the category of following quantum physics and a lot of people probably heard about quantum physics in. it's essentially the study and the science of the very small things in nature. So you're talking adams. Small molecules protons in the parts of those Adams as well in the laws of physics day obeyed are very strange when you put them in the context of our everyday lives and they don't really make sense and their couple reasons might not make sense. They might not make sense. Because we don't understand that world completely which is probably the most state and you can make. We don't really understand it. We don't know what it's doing but those particles do very strange things and so when i'm sitting my medical school class was than ten years ago learning about dna and they're talking about the nuclear tides. Dna is little tiny parts of dna that basically determined the code and that code determines what our bodies look like and how they function disease in health and everything that we kind of know about the body and describe the medicine as being permanent pieces of matter that inside of our dna in but when you read the quantum physics literature they described little tiny particles as being not fixed as being a potential and being things that could be both. They're not they're things can exist many states

William T Dr William T Randazzo Kenny Terry LEE Mike Adams
Biden mourns 500,000 U.S. COVID-19 deaths, balancing nation's grief and hope

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Biden mourns 500,000 U.S. COVID-19 deaths, balancing nation's grief and hope

"Bells at the National Cathedral in the nation's capital tolling 500 times this evening in memory of the more than 500,000 Americans who have died of covert 19 since the start of the pandemic. CBS News Special Report President Biden has addressed the nation as the U. S. Covert 19 death toll tops 500,000 here. People described his ordinary Americans. There's no such thing. Nothing ordinary about him. People we lost were extraordinary. They spanned generations. Mr. Biden, taking on the role of consoler in chief asked the nation to remember those who have fallen victim of covert 19. We have to resist becoming numb to the sorrow. Have to resist doing each life is this just as a statistic? Vanderbilt University Dr William Schaffner think. Indeed, a majority of the deaths could have been prevented if we had had he sustained science and public health based National policy. At the end of his speech, Mr Biden said, this nation will smile again. There will be sunny days and he said there will be joy

U. S. Covert National Cathedral Mr. Biden Cbs News Biden Dr William Schaffner Vanderbilt University Mr Biden
Guiding Principles of Secure-Functioning Couples

LifePix Relationships With ST

02:42 min | 1 year ago

Guiding Principles of Secure-Functioning Couples

"One of the principles of secure functioning couples is that we don't Is that we repair injuries. Quickly very important to repair injuries. Quickly right unrepaired. Injuries going to long term memory right and then they often come up four fights later or six later. You right so repair injuries quickly. What were they go into long term. Memory that's great bet. You don't shy away from disagreements. you're you know you both make your your individual selves in explicit. I think it's important that that nobody folds that we each stand on our own two feet. We each have a good strong spying Spineless it it holds our head up. We see out of out of our eyes and out of our mouth comes our perspective and hopefully our partner can take it. Hey i'm not standing over there. That's why i don't see things that way so you know. I think that's great. I think. I think i think die. You're sort of suggesting that christie christie broad on a better die and ultimately gave you the courage to to be fully engaged in these disagreements and not not hide or runoff to to be fully known to christie which is which is phenomenal. Somehow she created that safety in your couple you know and then christie talked about this thing. You know that that that you know. I think i think you both recognize that. If you're to activated. I mean one of the things out when people are are are two activated. Is that the error rate increases tremendously so green vines or green garden. Hose look like green snakes. And we're just like you know we we misperceived and it just it just amps up the activation so the fact that you guys can wait until you deactivated is fantastic. I think one of the other things you can. Do you know one of the things i recommend is that couples couples become excellent That christie becomes an excellent di- handler and that die becomes an excellent christie handler. We we learn how to reach in ensued so that if die is to activated you might also say die. I do that thing. you know. it's wrong of me. I know. I know it it. It triggers you. I'm so sorry you look you know. Come on what. Can i do to bring you back in faster than salt. You

Christie Christie Christie
A Third COVID Vaccine is Poised to Enter the U.S. Market

Business Wars Daily

03:14 min | 1 year ago

A Third COVID Vaccine is Poised to Enter the U.S. Market

"From wondering. I'm david brown. And this is business. Wars daily on this tuesday february night twenty. Three million americans have already rolled up their sleeves to receive at least the initial dose of either the pfizer vaccine or the moderna vaccine designed to prevent covid nineteen. Well now a third vaccine is on track to enter the us market. Johnson and johnson's corona virus vaccine just wrapped up a long-awaited trial and hopes to clear. Fda authorization by the middle of this month. The lure of johnson and johnson's vaccine is that unlike modera advisor it can be delivered in one shot that make distribution simpler with no need to follow up with a second dose. It's also relatively inexpensive compared to the others and while moderna advisors vaccines have to be stored at just the right temperature. Well below freezing. Johnson and johnson's doesn't have those stringent requirements for storage. It can stay viable in just a refrigerator for around three months. That means the vaccine will play a big role globally because it's easier to distribute to low and middle income countries. According to the new york times but the results of johnson and johnson's trial were a bit disappointing. At least at first glance trial results indicated that it was seventy two percent effective at preventing moderate to severe symptoms of covid in the us. That number is sufficiently lower than modern and pfizer's overall efficiency rates of around ninety four percent and johnson and johnson's rate drops to sixty six percent in latin american countries and to fifty seven percent in south africa which is dealing with a variant strain of the virus. But don't let those lower numbers food you scientists and immunologists say that johnson and johnson's vaccine is still extremely effective and researchers have warned that you shouldn't compare the effectiveness of the three vaccines because they were all developed and tested at different periods of kovic evolution. Dr william shafter an infectious disease expert at vanderbilt told the new york times that pfizer and moderna had an advantage because those companies did their clinical trials before the variant strains emerged. He said quote. Johnson and johnson was testing. Its vaccine not only against the standard strain but they had the variants now in a perfect world. Consumers might get a choice of which of these vaccines they'd like to receive but that would only be possible if there were enough doses of all three and right now. That's just not the case in early january. The new york times reported that the us only had one hundred eighty five million doses of pfizer and moderna vaccines to cover americans through june and at the same time doses that were produced quickly now risk expiring before they can get into the arms of those who need them. Johnson and johnson says that if they're vaccine is approved they can produce around one hundred million doses of their

Johnson Pfizer Moderna Advisors David Brown The New York Times Dr William Shafter FDA United States Moderna South Africa Infectious Disease Vanderbilt
Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

PODSHIP EARTH

09:33 min | 1 year ago

Birding with Dr Meredith Williams

"Berta. Volt from more than one. Hundred and fifty million years ago and then explosively diversified culminating in more than ten thousand species distributed worldwide. Today are human. Relationship to beds is complex to seen as spirit messengers of the gods and at the same time. We took the wild red jungle fowl. From india and selectively bred into domesticated chickens the now farmed in cages feathers have been used for thousands of years and indigenous headpieces and at the same time but has like parrots and parakeets a kept as pets bird poop called guana was used as the first fertilize of modern agriculture. And charles darwin study of galapagos finches was to the formulation of evolution. Buds are all around us. We are closer to bed than any other wild animals birds. I literally and figuratively are canaries in the coal mine. Their wellbeing is our wellbeing threats to buds range from habitat loss including logging climate change industrial farming with pesticides invasive species and even cats. These will had a devastating impact on the bird populations of the us and canada. Which in just the last fifty years have declined by. Three billion birds danton insane. Thirty percent of all birds gone. Three billion pez of wings have vanished ever across our continent from sea to shining sea. Luckily birds have strong allies in their corner. There an estimated sixty million active bird watches in the us alone and with the pandemic shutting down so much of our country. We have flocking to bird watching like never before everything from bird feeders. To binoculars have been in short supply and this year the birding app e bird collected more sightings in a single day the was admitted during the first two and a half years of the apps existence. I must admit coming late to the bird-watching pardee. But thanks to dr meredith williams. That's about to change. I'm lucky enough to work with meredith every day in her role. Running one of the most important and complex agencies in california governor. The department of toxic substance control. Dr williams received two undergraduate degree from yale and a doctorate in physics from north carolina. State university meredith then worked and silicon valley fortune. Five hundred companies in the technology consumer product and chemical sectors meredith left the private sector to follow her passion for wetlands and birds and led the san francisco estuary institute as we'll hear. Meredith journey is about so much more than her resume. Meredith nine meet apt get ready for my maiden watching invention merit so we're about to go hopefully bed watching what. What do we need to bring with us while like what. What's what's in the bird watching backpack almost nothing. Which is great binoculars. Of course are your starting point. So i hope you have some inaugurals. I know you were looking for some recently. You gave me some good advice. But i get any but we all kind of professional but what just like you would have an extra pair. Do thought so. It's in the office but we could stop on the way out of town. Not of that sound. No we should. We should yeah. You just kind of out now. Okay okay so you got the binoculars. How do you if you're starting out. It's surprising how good have gotten very affordable these days so i mean it's still a lot to invest but ask a bird watcher. They might have an extra pair. That's the first place you might wanna try like them. What do you well. first of. All there are lots of different kinds of birdwatchers in terms of some people. Want to count every burden get really long list. And they track every single birthday they see. It's about the numbers of the that very unique bird and they chase vagrant birds that fly in unusually and they're rushing off to see that bird so there those kind of bird watchers I'm a bird watcher. Just watch one bird for a long time. I liked bird behavior. just i'm just fascinated by them. And i think they're beautiful so i could just end up watching one bird for for quite a while you can just take it. In at whatever level you want in terms of the variety birds that you could see and how you would just experience them and enjoy them. So and i think the only way to find that out is to bert. Watch a little and see what grabs you What you do sounds really peaceful. The first thing that sounds the first thing sounds more. Like in england as a whole breed of people go train spotters and i always kind of identified them with bird watchers. Like it's really about. How many things. You've you've been able to capture and less about the bird the thing that you'll doing just sounds like being a peaceful will watching another animal even the people who are energized. That way unless they're doing a big day which would be a day when they map it out to see as many birds as they can. In a single day they're not necessarily rushing around even they are going to have moments of really enjoying a bird and even somebody like me chased around golden gate park looking for a rare warbler. That's very rarely in san francisco. There's an amiability amongst birdwatchers is really camaraderie. People are so nice. There's always somebody better in terms of being a better bird watcher. Meaning they either can identify birds better or you know they just have a lot of experience for the a little bit about. The ecology and people are so happy to share their information. That it's really wonderful. That's one of the things i like about it. And it tends to be every now and then you get into group and there'll be somebody who's a little loud but by and large the the folks are really kind of it's easy to get in a groove with with birdwatchers and settled and gopher along stroll and see some great birds. But what's there everywhere that it's a it's a big i mean like it huge movement and it's growing apparently it's one of the fastest growing outdoor activities. There is it's it is just kind of crazy places where i been going for ten years and cues to be just me and five or six friends maybe and now parking lot and i think the pandemic has made it even more so where a lot of people. That's how they wanna get outdoors or they've they've just kind of discovering it because they know it is one of the only ways to be outdoors so i think it's going to continue to grow which i think is great because then more people are connected to the natural world which obviously makes them care about it more. How did you get into meredith like what. What was your journey into bed watching. I mean i liked birds always in the yard growing up in ohio. You know the robbins and the blue jays. There was a hill in town. And i used to ride my bike up in the hill early in the morning and i would always see birdwatchers and i said when i'm old air quotes. I'm going to bird watch. And i kind of that seed was planted but i didn't really bird-watching until my three say in my thirties. I started volunteering for the san francisco. Bay national wildlife refuges. That you know are on the perimeter of the bay. You know them well getting restored a lot of them Back to title harsh. And i when i volunteered i would be doing everything from pulling out. Invasive plants to building shells but there are always birds around and i just became more and more and more fascinated with the birds invested in binoculars and just started creeping in. You join the audubon society and suddenly you're getting news about different outings and the next thing you know you're you're pretty far in foreign now. I'm foreign. I'm not pretty far and have taken a couple bird vacations. Which i think says that. I'm pretty far in. But what do those entail. The longest trip i took was to go to brazil to the pantanal. Which is a very large wetland like the mecca of bud watching their many mecca. It is a mecca over the course of two weeks. We just went out every morning. We get up before sunrise. Be moving by six o'clock at the latest. Usually more like five thirty and we went to a place that's called the parrot crater a giant sinkhole. And it's all a lot of parents live down in the sinkhole. And so you look down. A new parrots lying around in a simple it was tremendous and we ended up seen two hundred different species of birds there along with some giant giant eaters river otter is and it was quite a trip but the birds were spectacular.

Guana Meredith Dr Meredith Williams Department Of Toxic Substance Dr Williams San Francisco Estuary Institut Meredith Journey Berta Danton Charles Darwin Pardee United States India State University North Carolina Canada Bert Golden Gate Park
"dr william" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

CATS Roundtable

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"dr william" Discussed on CATS Roundtable

"Try and catch. Mckinney's here sunday morning. Looks like this is going to be a change of administrations. What's going on in the world. And how is our country going to deal with it with us this morning. Dr william j. tucker. He is longtime national security. Expert was in the navy for a long time and foreign policy expert. He's got one one knowledgeable guy Good morning. I'm dr parker. How are you good morning. I'm doing great and it's good to be back on your show again. What's going on in the well. What role do you want to start with. Well i think if it's okay with you i'd like to start with the us and work our way out today because we have some immediate challenges that i think we need to look at next administration but tell us well. I think Internationally you have The same actors that the last couple of administrations have had to deal with russia. China iran north korea. And i think we need to. We need to talk about those. Maybe a little more detail. In a moment here. I think domestically we need to continue to work this This cove issue a hard and then and then we also need to work to get america back to work as quickly as we can. And then finally there's the internal administrative a challenge if you will which is ensuring that we get political appointees or write political appointees in position in day one reminder to To your audience there are four thousand political up two positions out there of which seventeen hundred or senate confirmable so you have a lot of people that transition every administration. It's important to get them in earlier and not later and do you think look under the last four years under donald trump president trump. Do you think he made a lotta mistakes. Not transitioning some of the people that were in there from historically. I believe strongly that there needs to be a right and left seat Approach if you will in other words for pilots out there they have a love seat right seat to make sure that the the guy flying the plane has somebody next to him to ensure that he can take over at a moment's notice And so. I think it's important that the people that are in those positions now or not thrown out on day one that you have a turnover process in place. Something i've recommended to the last couple of administrations That they have that turnover process over love seat right seat process and i think it's important for this one as well. It seems like president-elect biden is choosing a lot of middle of the road people and he's got a left wing of the democratic party a little bit upset at him is his choices. Better than you expect i I would expect that That he will continue to adjust as he sees reactions from from the rest of the country On this. I think that you will see that. He's going to have to face certain Key issues i mean. At the end of the day he's going to have to deal with his. Jcp away with iran and by that..

Dr william j dr parker Mckinney donald trump president trump tucker navy north korea america iran russia China senate elect biden democratic party
"dr william" Discussed on The Dream Detective

The Dream Detective

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"dr william" Discussed on The Dream Detective

"Dr William Walsh nutrient power. Thank you for for everything to do and enjoy talking. Well, it's been an honor. I've really followed in studied your work a lot in. I've been really excited to talk to you. So Dr Walsh, thank you so much for joining me today. We're certainly will. If you enjoyed this interview with prolific scientists and master storyteller. Dr William Walsh, I truly hope that you will share it with anyone you think might take interest, especially people, you know, who are affected by any of the conditions. Dr Walsh treats, I also hope he will share this episode with any medical and mental health practitioners that you know, as the more doctors that have this information the better off we will all be for extended show notes of today's episode, including the lab tests for Alzheimer's that Dr Walsh described you can visit the dream detective dot com forward slash podcast. And check out the notes for episode number six if you like information on physician training, you can contact Dr Walsh is right arm. Assistant sue by emailing sue at Walsh institute dot or that's w. A L S H institute dot or you can also visit Walsh institute dot org to find a list of practitioners trained by Dr Walsh, many of them offering distance consultations if there's not one in your area. Dr Walsh is such a wealth of knowledge, I'm passionate about helping to spread the word of his work and people like him if you'd like to support this podcast and have access to bonus audio from various episodes. You can join my patriot page at patriot P A T R E O N dot com forward slash the dream detective. And if you really wanna make my day, you can give the dream detective podcast a review in apple podcasts. I tune spoil your favorite podcast platform. I'd love to hear from you to visit my website. You can go to the dream detective dot com where you. Will also find my social media links, including my intuition and inner guidance support group on Facebook and Instagram at the dream detective. Thanks for listening. And until next time. Remember dare to dream.

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