7 Burst results for "Dr Trm Howard"

"dr trm howard" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

14:27 min | 2 years ago

"dr trm howard" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Free enterprise, please put your hands together for our folks from the independent institute. Right. Thank you for coming everyone. My name is Ben wiltered Inc. I'm research fellow and the editor in chief of the catalyst website at the independent institute. And I'm going to be introducing are are wonderful speaker today. Dr David beta was a research fellow at the independent institute and a professor of history at the university of Alabama. He received his PHD at the university of Wisconsin, and is the recipient of the Holly prize, professor Vado along with his wife. Linda, Linda, Royster Vado co authored the book TRM Howard, which we have a copy of up here. And we've got many more copies at the exhibit booth at the independent institute is well, doctor entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer. Dr betas also the author of taxpayers in revolt tax resistance during the great depression, and the author of from mutual aid to the welfare state fraternal societies and social services from eighteen ninety to nineteen sixty seven so just to get things kicked off. Thanks for being with us here. Dr beta so the title of the session sort of gives away what we're going to be talking about a lot. But can you just let laying the groundwork? And describe how entrepreneurs and particularly black entre preneurs helped move forward in the civil rights movement was an element of civil rights history. That doesn't get a lot of coverage for reasons you might expect a key figure here is not the only key figure, but a key figures Booker T, Washington. And if any of you familiar with the debate between Washington do boys and Alex Todd forget it. There's a very good book that's been written on that by Jeff morale. It looks at that Washington is the enabler of the modern civil rights movement is not often depicted in that way. And that was precisely as plan the turn of the century. Washington said someday, we're probably going to have a black president. He said that one thousand nine hundred what is one of the worst times in American history for African Americans. So Washington's idea is he's fighting Jim crow. He is fighting. Disfranchised he's bringing multiple court suits secretly. But at the same time very publicly he is pushing for self-help property rights entrepreneurship, and it is in great part because Washington that we are able to build up a black middle class black business class, and they are able to provide a foundation for civil rights. We also coming out of that middle class. We have all these mutual aid organizations, they provide leadership skills to act later activists. So without Washington building that economic structure that ultimately, really. Manifests itself in a civil rights movement in the fifties and sixties and even earlier, I don't think we would have had a modern civil rights movement. And Keith figuring that movement or key example of this of somebody that was an enabler of civil rights, but a very successful entrepreneur was AG Gaston from Alabama born in poverty, he was very resourceful. Man, he worked in a coal. Mine was really at the bottom of the ladder economically. And he's able to come up with ways to sell lunches to people there who need lunches they need. Good lunches. He loans the is fellow miners money, and he saves something like two-thirds of his income during the great depression. He's doing this. He starts using this money to invest in. Funeral homes and banks. He eventually becomes one of the wealthiest black men in the country in the nineteen fifties. And one of his prize investments is a hotel called the AG Gaston hotel in Birmingham, which provides first class service to African American travelers you'd have people like Little Richard entertaining, their future secretary State, Colin Powell stays there is this sort of the high class place, but he also has a room there called the war room. And this is in Birmingham, Alabama. This is used by civil rights activists like Martin Luther King. He is crucial in helping the first black student at the university of Alabama authoring Lucy. This is in the nineteen fifties. A lot of people don't know about her. He provides her all sorts of financial support. But anyway, his hotel the facade is blown off his hotel nearly sixty because racist whites are so upset. Set about what he is doing when he is a follower of Booker T, Washington. He has a philosophy called green power. He carries around Washington's books with him. So we see examples like that. And again, the main focus of my recent work has been Dr TRM Howard. He comes out of the larger context. Well, that leads nicely into my next question. I think that the next slide here. Got a few pictures on there. So Tarum Howard is one that you've spent a long time researching and putting together for the book. So I'll just ask why why have what what drew you to to write the book on Dr Howard while I was writing about mutual aid, an African Americans, and I found this amazing hospital in all black town of Mumbai you call the in hospital, and they were providing through mutual aid thirty days of hospital care in the nineteen forties for seven dollars and fifty cents a year, which would be about one hundred dollars in today's money, and they were providing a full menu of services. This is a very successful hospital. Not a not a dime of government aid went to it. Most of the members of the fraternal organization, the mutual aid organization that runs this hospital are under the poverty line, by any standards, sharecroppers, etc. Yet they're able to provide hospital care at these low prices. Membership in this group gets up to fifty thousand in Mississippi. Anyway Howard is their chief surgeon bring him in. And I guide Mumbai all black down. He says you got to write about Dr Howard. He did all this interesting stuff. I looked him up. I said this guy's amazing now for libertarians. What doesn't he have to offer? Really? I mean, the guy is born in poverty. He's gets a medical degree at Loma Linda university through various examples of kind of luck and pluck, I guess you could say and he becomes chief surgeon of this hospital. But then he becomes a very successful entrepreneur, Dr Howard establishes, a home construction company. He has an insurance company he has a thousand acre plantation in Mississippi the races hunting dogs and quail. He. Builds a small zoo. He's like, I call them the Pt Barnum of the civil rights movement. He's a snappy dresser. But then what he does in. You can see sort of people waiting in the middle there that top pitcher. That's a pitcher of people wavy patients to wait and see doctors at the debris in hospital in the middle down. There. You see where mound bayou is located. It is really in the heart of the Mississippi delta, and if any of, you know, anything about civil rights history. This is a battleground this is the belly of the beast of Jim crow. This is most hostile place, you can go if you're pressing for civil rights. Well, once Howard is a business success. He branches out starts his own civil rights movement. There you see him sitting in the middle bottom right of a board meeting of the regional council of negro leadership. And this group is pushing a message of self help self reliance savings thrift, but. But it's also pushing voting rights they're going out and registering people often forgotten very few people can blacks can vote Mississippi. You have an amazing increase from the very low level to still very low level in the early fifties that's largely because of Dr Howard, Dr Howard forms, this mass movement one of the people that he gives his start in civil rights to the people mega Evers gets his start working for Dr Howard selling insurance. Very successful becomes a key civil rights figure. Fannie Lou Hamer. Another key civil rights figure. It really comes is Howard is their mentor. Well, he warns us organization one of the first things they do. This is one thousand nine hundred fifty one is organize. A boycott of service stations that refuse to provide restrooms for African Americans. Very common Mississippi. Yeah, they'll let you buy gas. But you. They're not gonna let us the restroom. So they start putting these bumper stickers. They have fifty thousand of them. Howard distributes is organization. Don't buy gas where you can't use the restroom, and I people and they said, yeah, I used to go the have that bumper sticker. I'd go there to the service station, and they'd say to me I'd say I want to use the restroom here. He said, we don't have restroom for colored people. And I said just take that pomp right out. And I'm dry any drove they drove off. Well, it was a successful. Boycott by the time. It was over few months. Most service stations have are providing restrooms for African Americans. A lot of that has to do with the major suppliers started to put pressure. This is before Rosa Parks. A successful boycott in the worst place to run a boycott a violent place if you're an African American and I go on and on. But maybe more questions, I think clearly this is a good example of ways that that private organizations were able to come together in effect social change in in their individual in the community without without necessarily getting too involved in the political sphere there. But they Howard. Dr Howard was involved with some of the other civil rights leaders at the time as you mentioned a few of them. But we don't. There's not a lot of civil rights leaders that we had heard of that were more on the side. So can you talk a little bit about Dr house relationship with Rosa Parks, and how that sort of evolved? Very good question. I could do a whole whole talk on that. If you ain't heard of the Emmett till case, Dr Howard was a central player in this case of these young African American teenager who was brutally murdered when he was visiting the Mississippi delta stained with his uncle became a big national case. Dr Howard said there'll be hell to pay Mississippi unless Justice is done in this case, he saying this in the mid nineteen fifties he's saying inflammatory things. He's not afraid to do it. And he is crucial and finding witnesses and evidence in the Emmett till case at them shopping around a movie script at focuses on this. Anyway. Opportunities, and he is Emma Till's mother stays with Dr Howard when she comes to testify at the trial. So he's a very important figure in that case after Emmett till killers are acquitted Howard goes on a national speaking tour Baltimore, Pittsburgh is getting crowds. Like ten thousand people at these places one of the smaller. Stop was Montgomery, Alabama. November twenty seven thousand nine hundred fifty five his host was then nationally unknown minister named Martin Luther King. Junior's father was far better now. And in the audience was Rosa Parks. They got a sellout crowd at the Dexter avenue. Baptist church, or at least an overflow crowd and parks was in the audience listening to Howard park said this was the first event that they had had in Montgomery about the Emmett till case three days later, it was it four days later three or four days later. Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on among Mery bus. When the story was very much, fresh stolen the local newspapers. And she said she was thinking of Emmett till when she refused to give up her seat. So why can't one hundred percent prove that Howard was the guy? But she was there. This was the big the big speech on Emmett till and he also did also. Sorts of other things like criticize strongly Jaeger Hoover head of the FBI which in the mid nineteen fifties. You didn't do if you wanted to stay out of trouble. Actually. Yeah. That's that's something that a lot of people. Don't know. Can you talk a little bit about the way that J? Edgar Hoover was involved in putting pressure on some of these leaders at the time and specifically Dr Howard well J. Edgar Hoover Howard's complaint was that there was a conspiracy. And it really was one in the Emmett till case that more than two people were involved, including some black employees of the two whites that were put on trial, and otherwise any press this, and he said, look, we have evidence to the sheriff is hiding witnesses hiding crucial witnesses we have all this evidence here, and he's going to the FBI. This is after the trial is over with and say you need to reopen. This case federal government needs to get involved in this case is more going on here. And he really makes a pest of himself and people with supporters like buttonholing Hoover and say, why aren't you taking action on this Hoover? So upset that he writes a letter to Howard. He dignifies him who didn't like doing that dignifying. Some critic that he releases to the press it is universally praised and white newspapers the who was letter and criticized in black newspapers, and he's saying Howard is responsible. You know, he's making things up. The FBI is doing this. Great job. Why is he criticizing us and Howard fires back again?.

J. Edgar Hoover Howard Mississippi Dr Howard Washington Alabama Tarum Howard Emmett Booker T university of Alabama Rosa Parks Dr David beta Martin Luther King Jim crow Mississippi delta AG Gaston
"dr trm howard" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

09:13 min | 2 years ago

"dr trm howard" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Marathon fueling the American spirit Welcome back to Jim, Bohannon show with our guest David veto a research fellow at the independent institute and professor of history. At, the university, of Alabama Tuscaloosa Abby co, author, of TRM Howard. Doctor. Entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of the Emmett till murder case yes of the sixty three years ago now Clearly as you note witnesses potential, defendants in, the like in many cases, dead, this is a. Test. Of the Justice department charge of investigating long ago burgers that are thought to have been racially motivated. And The. Justice department in, the, last ten, years it's efforts led to five, successful prosecutions glue that of, Edgar Ray Killen involved in the murders of the three. Civil rights workers in the Mississippi who died in prison this past year, that. Of course was the subject of the movie Mississippi burning starring Gene Hackman which some of you may have seen over the years So the last. Successful prosecution came eight years ago when a former Alabama, state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the killing of one Jimmy Lee Jackson or protesters debt led to the Selma to Montgomery March again to the extent that that. That the law, still applies that's fine and good in the case, of murder I don't suppose, that there is ever a statute of limitations is there Now I'm not a lawyer but no I don't I don't believe there then again there's also the the other. Notion that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that. In fact it would be quite possible to be tried twice in one of these cases once for the state law of committing murder and once, for the federal law involving the violation of someone's civil rights. And, I believe the courts have held that such trials are. For two different crimes. And therefore do not constitute. Double jeopardy that's as I recall my memory of the reading. Of this So in other words it's not an academic exercise, our actor things that presumably. Can be done in the in these cases there would potentially be a, lot of cases out there of course we're talking like, you said, about a sixty, three year, old case in in that particular case only know, one person that could, be prosecuted, all the. Law enforcement people are. Gone and, again there was a cover up you know there were there were employees black employees of milem and, Brian who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate my wife and I interviewed one of them before he died but they're all gone now and you know the people. That covered up are pretty much all gone but there are many sort of read more recent cases you know in the. Sixties for example where a lot of people still are around So the so this evidence continuing and again the the pickings, as you might expect are so much slim but nonetheless, have been, some cases Mitch, factor there, have been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first reported by the Associated. Press last began a significant rule of the review of the till case fourteen years ago prosecutors audibly determined, that the statute of limitations let, them without. Any charges they could pursue in, a federal court Be FBI still conducted an inquiry which included an exclamation, of the emit immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two years to settle whether there were any state crimes that could still. Be prosecuted I I'm, not sure other than than murder I'm not sure what crimes we could be talking about. Here and it was interesting that prosecutors determined that. The statute of limitations had left without any charges they could pursue in a federal court if I'm not mistaken anybody involved in this had. Already been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course any retrial would be double jeopardy If there's no federal Charge that that is, still around since obviously then statutes of limitations apply to the the civil rights laws that that we discussed a second ago while I find. This of academic interest I'm not quite sure where the FBI is looking. Into this at all, you do have, Caroline like, I said Brian Dunham and. She. Was never tried okay so that would be a? Case you, could bring I I unless we get a confession from her. Or something like that I think, that that extremely unlikely but I suppose it's a possibility and it's probably the main reason they reopened, this investigation I would I would guess, in, that particular case again this is a case of of Justice delayed beyond the point of of of reasonably getting, anything done and well I suppose it makes. Us all feel better the. Something is being, investigated, I must say frankly given the, circumstances we've discussed tonight I'm not sure that I find this to be Particularly efficient use of limited federal resources your thoughts I, tend to agree with you I think there are a lot of cases that are you know where you do have some you know you, you do have some potential I just don't see it here I think. It may be was, a spur of, the moment, decision maybe somebody read Timothy. Tyson's. Which again now questions have been called about what? He but, he found in that book and said oh okay we have. A confession here let's go after, this case well turns out they really did so I think somebody maybe didn't think to think this, through I understand why they're doing it, I, just think that that's the target is not the best target it this late day are there any state investigations, that that go back this far in any. Any part of the country. That that try, to, look at at circumstances that were, improperly handled at the time or is this strictly As far as you? Know a federal effort I. Don't know then he stayed investigations going on, certainly there, are cases going back even further but, you you, have to look at examples, like you, know holocaust guy now that's being you know ninety five year old that's. Being sent back, to Germany to, be tried so you know it does happen. But I can't think of any state investigations go to go, back that far The the circumstances of course of the. The, till, case I suppose we're we're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of course I I don't recall if this was before or after the. Montgomery Alabama bus boycott which really vaulted, Dr Martin Luther King junior to national prominence. Do you recall there two are linked together, Dr TRM Howard, we talked about last, time was a prominent civil rights bigger in Mississippi well anyway he went on. A national speaking tour only. Three days after the jury's acquittal he predicted. That, it, was going to. Be an acquittal in ROY Wilkins. The n. w. c. p. basically said I, want you, to go around the country he was, getting crowds, and cities like Baltimore Madison, Square Garden, ten twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent. Memory for a, civil rights 'cause, it was building up a lot of pressure. Was attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was. In November twenty, seventh nineteen fifty five in Montgomery Alabama, and his host, was Martin Luther King then unknown nationally Rosa Parks. Was in the, audience, and three days later Rosa Parks refused to her seat she, made quite clear, that the reason she refused to give up her seat was. She was thinking of? Emmett till well Howard speech. Only three days before that had been the focus that had been the first event. Montgomerie, to, really focus on that issue so they the the issues you know the till case I think you can find it pretty clear link to the Montgomery. Bus boycott and of course then the, decision was to organize a movement around Rosa. Parks action and king was chosen to head, that we're going, to come back and, talk more about that with our guest David Beethoven again he's the author of. TRM Howard will reintroduce you. To him as well and be back in a, moment If you have freedom of speech My concern is sucker minnows talks.

murder Justice department Montgomery Alabama Dr TRM Howard Alabama FBI TRM Howard Mississippi Emmett David Beethoven Martin Luther King Brian Dunham professor of history Edgar Ray Killen Be FBI Rosa Parks Gene Hackman Jimmy Lee Jackson
"dr trm howard" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

09:15 min | 2 years ago

"dr trm howard" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Welcome back to Jim, Bohannon show with our guest David veto a research fellow at the independent institute and a professor of history. At, the university, of Alabama Tuscaloosa Abby co, author, of TRM Howard. Doctor. Entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of. The Emmett till murder case yes of the sixty three years ago Now Clearly as you note witnesses potential defendants in the like in many, cases, dead this is a test of the Justice department charge of investigating long ago burgers that are thought to have been racially motivated and the Justice. Department in the last ten, years it's efforts that led to five successful prosecutions glue that of Edgar Ray killing involved in the murders of the three civil rights workers in Mississippi who died in. Prison this past, year, that of, course was the subject of the, movie Mississippi burning starring Gene, Hackman which some of you may have seen over the. Years so the last successful prosecution came eight years ago when a former Alabama state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the killing of one Jimmy, Lee Jackson protesters debt led to the Selma to Montgomery March again to the Extent that that that the, law. Still applies that's fine and good in the case of murder I don't suppose that there is ever a statute of limitations is there now I'm. Not a lawyer but no, I don't I don't believe there is then again there's also the the other notion that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that in fact it would be. Quite possible to, be, tried twice, in one of these cases once, for the state law of, committing murder and once for the federal law involving the. Violation of someone's civil rights and I believe the courts have held that such trials are for two different crimes and therefore do not constitute double, jeopardy that's as I recall my my memory of the reading of this So in other words it's not an academic, exercise are, accurate things that presumably can be done in the Emmys case and there would potentially be. A lot of cases. Out there of course we're, talking like you said about a sixty three year old case and in that particular case I only, know one, person that. Could be prosecuted all the. Law enforcement, people are gone and again there was a cover up you know there were there were employees black, employees of milem and Brian who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate my wife and I interviewed wanted them before he died but they're all gone now and you. Know the people that covered up are pretty much all gone but there are many read more recent cases you know in. The sixties for example where a lot of people still are around So this evidence continuing and again the the pickings as, you might expect so much slim but nonetheless have been some cases which, in fact, there've been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first. Reported by the Associated Press last began, a significant rule of the review of the till case forty years ago prosecutors audibly determined that the statute of limitations let them, with Emily charges they could pursue in a federal court be. FBI, conducted an inquiry which included an exclamation. Of the immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two, years to settle whether there were any state crimes that could still be prosecuted I I'm not. Sure other than than murder I'm. Not sure what crimes we could be talking about here and it was interesting that prosecutors, determined that the statute of limitations had left without, any charges they could pursue a federal court If I'm not mistaken anybody involved, in this had already been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course. Any retrial would be double jeopardy If there's no federal Charge that that is, still around since obviously then statutes of limitations apply to the the civil rights laws that we discussed a second ago while I five. This of academic interest I'm not quite sure where the FBI is looking. Into this at all Well you do have Caroline like I said Brian Dunham and she was never tried, that would be a case you could, bring, high I unless we get a confession from her or something like that I think that that extremely unlikely, but I suppose there's a possibility and it's probably the main reason they. Reopened this investigation, I, would I would guess in that, particular case again this is a case of of Justice delayed beyond the point of of reasonably, getting anything done and well I suppose it. Makes us all feel better that something is being investigated I must say frankly given the circumstances we've, discussed tonight, I'm not sure that I find this to be a particularly efficient use, of limited federal resources your thoughts I tend to agree with you I think there are a lot of cases that are that you, know where you do have some you know you do have some potential I just. Don't see it here I think it may be was a spur. Of the moment decision maybe somebody, read Timothy Tyson sports which again now questions have been called about what he but he found in. That book and said oh okay we, have, a confession here let's go after this case well turns out they really did so I think somebody maybe, didn't think to think this through I understand why they're doing it I. Just think that, that's, the target is not the best, target at this late day are there any state investigations that that go back this far in, any any part of the country that that. Try to look at at circumstances that were improperly handled at the time or is this strictly as, far as, you know a federal effort I don't know of any? State investigations going on certainly there are cases going, back even further But you have to look at examples like know holocaust. Guy now that's, being ninety five, year old that's being sent back to Germany. To be tried so you. Know it does happen but I can't think of. Any state investigations go go back that far The the circumstances of. Course of the the? Till case I suppose we're. We're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of course I don't recall. If, this was before or after the Montgomery Alabama bus boycott which really vaulted Dr. Martin Luther King junior to national prominence do you recall there two are. Linked together Dr TRM, Howard we talked about last time was a. Prominent civil rights bigger in Mississippi anyway he, went on a, national speaking, tour only three days after the jury's acquittal he predicted that it was going to be an acquittal. In ROY Wilkins the NWC. Basically said I want you to go around the, country, he was getting crowds in cities like Baltimore Madison, Square Garden. You know ten twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent memory. For a civil rights 'cause it, was building up a lot of pressure was. Attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was in November twenty. Seven nineteen fifty, five in Montgomery Alabama and his host, was Martin Luther, King then unknown nationally Rosa Parks was in the. Audience and three, days later Rosa Parks refused to grow up her seat she, made quite clear, that the reason she refused to give up her seat was. She was thinking of? Emmett till well Howard speech. Only. Three days before that had been the focus bad had been the first event. Montgomerie, to really focus on that issue so they the issues you know the till. Case I think you can find a pretty clear link to the Montgomery. Bus boycott and of, course then the decision was to organize a. Movement around Rosa Parks action and king was, chosen to head, that we're, gonna come back and talk more about that with our guest David beta again he's the author of. TRM Howard will reintroduce you. To him as well and be back in a, moment Your place to talk you have freedom of speech My concern is Sacremento Chechen talk, six, fifty higher, like say open. Ideas Sacramento's talk station Looking for a, Bank that.

murder Montgomery Alabama FBI Mississippi Alabama Howard Justice department professor of history TRM Howard David Brian Dunham Rosa Parks Edgar Ray Timothy Tyson Associated Press Dr. Martin Luther King
"dr trm howard" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:44 min | 2 years ago

"dr trm howard" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Welcome back to Jim Bohannon, show with our guest David veto a research fellow at the dependent institute and professor of history at. The, university of, Alabama Tuscaloosa Abby co author, of, TRM Howard doctor. Entrepreneur. And civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of the Emmett till murder case yes of, sixty three years ago Now Clearly as you note witnesses potential defendants in the like in many, cases dead this is A test of the Justice department charge of. Investigating long ago murders that, are thought to have been racially motivated and the Justice department in the last ten years it's efforts have led to five successful prosecutions glue that of Edgar Ray killing. Involved in the, murders of the, three civil rights workers Nimitz sippy, who died in prison this, past year that of course was the subject of the. Movie Mississippi burning starring Gene Hackman which some of you may have seen over the years so the last successful prosecution came eight years ago when, a former Alabama state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the. Killing, of one Jimmy Lee Jackson or protesters debt led to. The Selma to Montgomery. March again to the extent, that that that the law still applies that's fine and good in the case of murder I don't suppose that there is ever a statute of, limitations. Is there Now I'm not a lawyer. But no I, don't I don't, believe there is then again there's, also the the other notion, that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that. In fact it would be quite possible to be tried twice in one of these cases once for the state law of committing murder and once, for the federal law involving the violation of someone's civil rights. And, I believe the courts have held that such trials are. For two different crimes. And therefore do not constitute. Double jeopardy that's as I recall my memory of the reading. Of this So in other words it's not an academic exercise our act, your things that presumably can. Be done in the in these cases there would potentially be a lot, of cases out there of course we're talking like you said about a, sixty three, year old case and in that particular case I, only know one person, that could, be prosecuted. All the law enforcement people. Are gone, and again there was a cover up you know there were there were employees black employees of milem, and Brian who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate and my wife and I interviewed one of them before he died but they're all gone now and you know. The people that covered up are pretty much all gone but there are many read more recent cases you know in the. Sixties for example where a lot of people still are around So this this evidence continuing and again the the pickings as you, might expect are so much slim but nonetheless been some cases which in, fact there, have been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first reported by the Associated Press. Last began a significant rule of the review of the till case fourteen years ago prosecutors ultimately determined, that the statute of limitations let them without, any charges they could pursue in a federal court The FBI still conducted an inquiry which included an, exclamation of the immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two years to settle whether there. Were any state crimes that could. Still be prosecuted I. I'm not sure other than than murder I'm not sure what crimes we could be talking about here and it was. Interesting that prosecutors determined that the statute of limitations had left without any charges they could pursue a federal court If I'm not mistaken anybody involved in this had already, been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course any retrial would be. Double jeopardy if there's no federal Charge that that's still around since obviously then statutes of limitations apply. To the the civil, rights laws that that we discussed a second ago while I find this of academic interest. I'm not quite sure whether the FBI is looking. Into this at all Well you do have Caroline like I said Brian Dunham and she was never tried, that would be a case you could, bring, high I unless we get a confession from her or something like that I think that that extremely. Unlikely but I suppose it's a possibility and it's probably, the main reason they. Reopened this investigation, I, would I would guess in that, particular case again this is a case of of Justice delayed beyond the point of of of, reasonably getting anything done and while I suppose. It makes us all feel better something is being investigated I must say frankly given the circumstances we've, discussed tonight I'm not sure that I find this to be a, particularly efficient use of limited federal resources your thoughts I tend to agree with you I think there are a lot of cases that are. Where you do have some you know you you do have some potential I just don't see it. Here I think it may be was a spur of the moment. Decision maybe somebody read Timothy Tyson's, sport which again now questions have been called about what he but he found in that book and. Said oh okay we have a confession, here, let's go after this case well turns out they really did so I think somebody maybe didn't think. To think this through I understand why they're doing it, I just think that. That's the target, is, not the best target at this, late day are there any state investigations that they'd go back this far in any any part, of the country that that tried to look. At at circumstances that were improperly handled at the time or is this strictly as, far as you, know a a federal effort I don't know of any state. Investigations going on certainly there are cases going back even further but you you have to. Look at examples like you know holocaust guy now that's being you know ninety five year old that's being sent back to Germany to be tried so you know it does happen but? I can't think of any state investigations go to, go back that far The the circumstances of course of the the till case I suppose we're we're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of course I I don't recall if this was before or after. The Montgomery Alabama bus, boycott which really vaulted Dr Martin Luther King. Junior to national prominence do you recall there, are two are, linked together, Dr TRM Howard we talked about last time was a prominent civil rights figuring Mississippi way he went. On a national speaking tour only three days after. The jury's acquittal he predicted that, it, was going to be an acquittal in ROY Wilkins. The NWPP basically said I want you to, go around, the country he was getting crowds and, cities like, Baltimore Madison Square Garden you, know ten, twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent memory. For a civil, rights 'cause it, was building up a lot of pressure he. Was attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was in November twenty seventh, nineteen fifty five, in Montgomery Alabama and his host was. Martin Luther King, then unknown nationally Rosa Parks was in the audience. And three days, later, Rosa Parks refused to up her seat she made quite clear, that the reason, she refused to give up her seat was she was thinking. Of Emmett till well Howard speech only three days before. That had been the focus dad had been the first event Montgomerie to really focus on that issue so they the issues you know the till case I think. You can find it pretty clear link to the Montgomery bus boycott and. Of course then the, decision was to organize a movement around Rosa. Parks action and king was chosen to head, that we're going, to come, back and talk more about that with our guest David Beethoven again he's the author of TRM Howard. Will reintroduce you to him as.

murder FBI Justice department Alabama Montgomery Alabama Dr Martin Luther King Montgomery professor of history Howard Emmett David Beethoven Brian Dunham Rosa Parks Jim Bohannon Dr TRM Howard Mississippi Jimmy Lee Jackson TRM Howard Nimitz sippy
"dr trm howard" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

09:03 min | 2 years ago

"dr trm howard" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Welcome back to Jim Bohannon show with our guest David Beethoven research fellow at. The, dependent institute and a professor of history at the university of Alabama. Tuscaloosa Abby co author of TRM Howard doctor entrepreneur and civil rights pioneer we're talking about a reopening of, the Emmett. Till murder case. Yes, of, the, sixty three, years, ago Now Clearly as you note witnesses potential defendants in the like in many, cases dead this is A test of the Justice department charge of investigating long ago murders that are thought to have been, racially, motivated and The Justice department, in the last ten years it's efforts led to five successful prosecutions glued that. Of Edgar Ray, Killen involved in me murders of the three civil, rights workers in the Mississippi, who died in prison this past year that of course, was the subject of the movie Mississippi burning starring Gene Hackman, which some of you may have seen over the years So the last. Successful prosecution came eight years ago when a former Alabama, state trooper was convicted of manslaughter for the killing of one Jimmy Lee Jackson a protesters, death led to the Selma to Montgomery March again to the extent that that. That the law, still applies that's fine and good in the case, of murder I don't suppose, that there is ever a statute of limitations is there Now I'm not a lawyer but no I don't I don't believe there then again there's also the the other. Notion that there are federal civil rights laws involved here that in. Fact it would be quite possible to be tried twice in one of these cases once for the state law of committing murder and once for, the, federal law involving the violation of someone's civil rights and. I, believe the courts have held that such trials are for. Two different crimes and. Therefore do not constitute double. Jeopardy that's as I recall my my memory of the reading. Of this So in other words it's, not an academic exercise our actor things that presumably can be done in the in these cases there would potentially be a lot of cases out there of course we're talking like you said about. A sixty three year old case and in that particular case I only know one person that potentially could be all the. Law enforcement people are gone and again there was a cover up You know there were. There were employees black, employees of milem and Brian. Who were involved in the crime they were pretty much compelled to participate, my wife and I interviewed one before he died but. They're all, gone now, and you know the people are covered up are pretty. Much all gone but there, are many sort of read more recent cases you know in the sixties for example where. A lot, of people still are around So the evidence continuing and again the the picking, as you might expect are somewhat slim but nonetheless have, been some, cases Mitch in, fact there, have been a successful reopening the Justice department Had this new inquiry first reported by the Associated Press last. Began a significant rule of the review of the till case forty years ago prosecutors ultimately, determined that the statute of limitations, let. Them with, any charges they could pursue in a federal court Be FBI conducted an inquiry which included an, exclamation of the immortals body from an Illinois cemetery for about two years to settle whether there were any state crimes that could still. Be prosecuted I I'm. Not sure other than than murder I'm not sure what crimes we could be talking about here and it was interesting. That prosecutors determined that the statute of limitations had left without any charges they could pursue in a federal court If I'm not mistaken anybody involved, in this had already been tried for murder in a state court and acquitted and of course in the retrial would be double jeopardy If there's no federal Charge that that is, still around since obviously the statute of limitations apply to the the civil rights laws that that we discussed second ago while I find, this of academic interest I'm not quite sure why the FBI is looking. Into this at all Well you do have Caroline like I said Brian Dunham and she was never, tried that would be case you could bring I I unless we get a confession, from her or something like that I think that that extremely unlikely but I suppose it's a possibility and it's probably the main reason, they reopened this investigation I would I would guess in that particular case Again this. Is a case of Justice delayed beyond the point of of of reasonably getting anything done and, while I suppose, it makes us all feel. Better that something is being investigated. I must say frankly given the circumstances we've discussed tonight I'm not. Sure that I find this to, be a, particularly efficient use of limited federal resources your thoughts I tend to agree with you I, think, there, are a lot of cases. That are. You know where you do have some you know. You you do have some potential I just don't see. It here I think it may. Be, was a spur of, the moment decision, maybe somebody, read Timothy Tyson sports which. Again now questions have been called about. What he, but he found in that book and said oh okay we. Have a confession here let's go, after this case Lau turns out they really did I think somebody maybe didn't think to think this, through I understand why they're doing it I just think. That that's the target is not, the best, target at this late day are there any state investigations that go back this far in, any, any, part of the country that. That tried. To look at at circumstances that were improperly handled. At the time or is this strictly as far as. You know a a federal effort I don't know of? Any state investigations going on certainly there are cases, going back even further You know but you you have to look at examples like you know holocaust. Guy now that's, being ninety five, year old that's being sent back to Germany. To be tried so you know. It does happen but I can't think of any. State investigations go to go back that far The the circumstances of course of the? Till. Case I suppose we're we're instrumental given that it was nineteen fifty five and of, course I I don't recall if this was before or after the Montgomery Alabama bus boycott which really vaulted Dr Martin Luther King junior to national prominence. Do you recall the two are linked, together Dr TRM Howard we talked about last. Time was a prominent civil rights figuring Mississippi, anyway he went, on a, national speaking tour only three days after the jury's acquittal he predicted that it was going to be. An acquittal in ROY Wilkins. The n. w. c. p. who said I want, you, to go, around the, country he was getting crowds and cities, like Baltimore, Madison Square Garden you know ten twenty thousand people bigger crowds than anyone really had gotten in recent. Memory for a civil rights 'cause, it was building up a lot of pressure. Was attacking the FBI well anyway A lesser known part of it tour was. In November twenty, seventh nineteen fifty five in Montgomery. Alabama and his, host was Martin Luther King then unknown nationally Rosa. Parks was in, the, audience and three days later Rosa Parks refused to per seat, she made quite, clear that the reason she refused to give up her seat. Was she was thinking of Emmett till well? Howard. Speech only three days before that had been the focus dad had been the first, event Montgomerie to really focus on that issue so they the issues you know. The till case I think you can find a pretty clear link to. The Montgomery bus boycott and of course, then the decision was to organize a move. Around Rosa Parks action and king was chosen, to head that, we're going, to come back and talk more about that with our guest David beta again he's the author of. TRM Howard will reintroduce you. To him as well and be back in a, moment Laura Ingram idea of, apologizing apologize say something incorrect on the other side is trying to racial is something they should issue the apology I. Would demand. That, Andrew gillum and all these people should apologize Laura Ingram until two on news and information five.

murder Montgomery Justice department university of Alabama professor of history Alabama Mississippi Dr Martin Luther King FBI Emmett David Beethoven TRM Howard Dr TRM Howard Jim Bohannon Brian Dunham Laura Ingram Be FBI Howard Gene Hackman
"dr trm howard" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"dr trm howard" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Online you'll find us at jimbohannonshow dot com you can follow me on twitter at jimbotalks we'll be talking tonight about a person with whom you're probably not familiar and we will explain to you why you probably should be we will take a step back from everything that is in the immediate instant headlines of the day and try to put some perspective on this country and some of the struggles we have faced in the past few decades and we will do so in the company of dr david beethoven he's professor of history at the university of alabama we're gonna be talking about t r m howard dr entrepreneur civil rights pioneer dr beta why should we be concerned about theodore roosevelt mason howard well one no the history of the civil rights movement we need to know about him we probably would not have heard of meg grabbers we probably would have not heard about fannie lou emmer and we probably would not have heard of rosa parks quite possibly without dr trm howard he was a pioneer in the true sense of the word he was an enabler but he wasn't just a civil rights leader he was very successful entrepreneur surgeon provided low cost healthcare for the poor without any government aid so he's quite a renaissance man in in many interesting ways other words a man who accomplished a great deal for a white man and to do what he did as a man of color at that time in our history that that is a double accomplishment well certainly if you're in mississippi in the early nineteen fifties don't wanna insult anyone there but it was it was the worst of the worst in terms of jim crow there were whole black county majority black counties in mississippi that didn't have a single black voter give you you know just a thumbnail example if you were a black person in a trial you would be addressed by your first name and there would never be an all it would never be a black person on the jury to judge it so he thrived in that environment because he just sort of stood out really ever met gerber's life wrote about and she said it was almost almost magical about him there he had this negro who had somehow beat the system was riding down ceiling on the highway in the latest buick skylark and snappy dresser and like to bed at the horse track and was supremely selfconfident wherever he went and you know he combined all these things together so he's not our stereotype of the civil rights leader he sounds like the kind of person who would either at that time in that place would either learn his place real fast or else get the hell out and move north yeah well he knew there were certain boundaries you couldn't cross but i've come across a number of letters were you know this white person wrote a letter and and just just very insulting and he was a very powerful white person in the mississippi delta and i just came across this layer from howard where he spoke up to the guy but he would he did it in a kind of very clever way very disarming way but very very strong way as well one eight six six five o jimbo our number one eight six six five zero five four six two six how did dr howard come or mister howard was a doctor too so dr howard how did he come to your attention well my wife and i were doing a book on before the rise of the welfare state how people provided things like medical care now was this remarkable hospital all town all black town amount by the mississippi delta that was a.

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"dr trm howard" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

Stuff Mom Never Told You

09:28 min | 3 years ago

"dr trm howard" Discussed on Stuff Mom Never Told You

"Bit about my life and also a little bit about what women's lives for like in general? For me, I was brought up in a family that was very loving and believes that people should follow the golden rule. We should treat each other as we wanted to be treated. And I carry that with me. I became active in the civil rights movement in nineteen sixty four. I went to Mississippi with the freedom summer project and some of you may have heard about it because that was the time when. The civil rights movement with recruiting northern students to come down to Mississippi because in Mississippi black lives did not matter in nineteen sixty four. And they thought that the attention of northern students might bring additional visibility and potential Power to shine a spotlight on what was going on in Mississippi. And during that summer with three young men and two Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael Schnur were killed. If a hands of the clan with people may not know is that. While they were looking for the bodies of three men, they found bodies of other black men. His hands have been bound or feet chopped off, and those murders weren't even investigated. Once the bodies were found until years later. But because people organized, there was a voting rights back within a year and Mississippi now is more African American elected officials than any other state in the country. I mentioned that because it was formative for some of the ideas that lake to Jane, which is that you have to stand up to unjustice fardie. If you take action, you can make change that. Sometimes they're even our risks. But together we can really build a better world. I return back to my campus and a friend of mine had been raped at knife point in her bed in off campus housing. We went with her to student health to get a gynecological exam for her, but was told that students health didn't cover gynecological exam, and she was giving a lecture on the promiscuity now because we sat with her, they called it a sit in, but over time because people protested and organize. Now, student health would cover gynecological exams, and people would be given careful comforting counseling, and they're also is support and attention about the crisis of rape on campus. Those changes happened because people organized, we still have much further to go. There still are attacks on women's health plan. And parenthood is under attack, but we make progress when we organized and those were some of the lessons that I learned also from the civil rights movement on the campus to give a sense of how women were treated broadly. I formed pulled together a group called the women, radical action program or wrap W R A C and we did studies about and supported women to promote women's positions on campus this it probably was the first campus women's organization of the new and emerging women's movement in nineteen sixty five. And we found that the sensors, they've four times as much attention to mend students as to women's to called it significant presponse. How often would a teacher actually engage. With the students. And because of that and other things, you sound ways to support women on campus founding was discrimination against women, faculty members. They mostly were kept as adjunct professors and not allowed on his tenure track. And there were other issues with people need to understand the emergence of Jane within the context of lessons from an emerging movement in civil rights. Context of. Changes going on in the society where on the one hand, women were at the universities and entering into into public life and yet we're not treated equally. So there was this emerging women's movement developing and also in the context of. Values that many of us shared believing that this should be a country that treated all people equally gave people equal support and and respect. I love that. So really one of the big takeaways from what you've done with Jane is that organizing and people Power can really change culture and change laws and change lives that you know, oftentimes we feel at least I feel overwhelmed that, oh, just little me, what can I do to change this? The seem so bad up against so many fights. But actually, if you're if you really work hard and organiz, you can't change things. Absolutely. Absolutely. To bring us up to Jane to explain how my involvement with that, how that developed against this backdrop. A friend of mine told me his sister was pregnant and was nearly suicidal because she wasn't ready to have a baby, and she wanted an abortion. I had never thought about the issue before that I recall, and I've never had to face the issue myself, but I met, I try to do what I could do to help. Again, sort of as part of the golden rule trying to be one to others. I went to the network of doctors from the medical committee for human rights, which was the civil rights medical on, and I found a doctor Dr. TRM Howard who had a clinic on sixty third street in Chicago friendship clinic. I didn't know history at the time with. He had been a dynamic civil rights leader in Mississippi and came to Chicago when his name appeared on clan deftness. I called up agreed to do the procedure that's I didn't really think much more about it, but word must have spread because short time later, someone else called. I thought it was a coincidence and then we're, it must have spread and someone else called that point. I realized they really was the broader problem that needed to be addressed and being an organizer, I decided to create a system and call Jane over time. The women of Jane themselves performed eleven thousand abortions between nineteen sixty five and nineteen seventy three. When RoH became the law of the land and the experience of Jane, those improves the lives of women who came through who are looking for a way to decide when or whether they could have a child exchange, the lives of the women who work in Jane. Letting them know what they could do to improve the lives of women on a broad scale. And it also provided a basis giving people confidence. I hope now to say we can make change if we organize. So let's say I'm a woman who calls Jane. Can you walk me through the logistics? Once I call what happened? Well, first, they were to. Two or three years of Jane heroes. When I first started it, it was a very small service just kept growing and growing when he started, someone would call up and ask for Jane. Even before they said they were asking for Jane. I knew immediately there was a sort of hesitant pause of phone and I just knew immediately what they were probably calling about. They say, what that they usually said, some version that they were pregnant and we're looking for an abortion for some women. We'd do the counseling on the phone. We've been trying arrange a time where they could come in and have a longer conversation and could talk with them and find out what did he tells or a long they were had been pregnant, what the medical history was a little bit, and then we just go through the details of what to expect.

Jane Mississippi rape unjustice fardie Chicago Dr. TRM Howard Goodman James Chaney RoH Michael Schnur three years one hand