20 Burst results for "Dr Tom Shy"

"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

07:27 min | 6 months ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Network I'm Vivian. Williams Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio I'm Dr Tom Shy and I'm Tracy mccray Tracy. There is a growing epidemic of cancer of the back of the throat also called the oral ferrings it's being caused by the human papillomavirus or HP HP infection is a viral infection that commonly causes warts. There are more than one hundred varieties of human papillomavirus most HP viruses. Don't cause cancer but some types of genital HPV can cause cancer in multiple locations including the cervix, the general, the genital area in both men, and and in the back of the throat in here to discuss HP related cancer of the throat is Mayo clinic ear nose and throat surgeon Dr. More. Welcome back to the program Dr More thanks very much for. Pleasure Fargo to have your Human Papillomavirus I. Guess. Causing wards is one thing but causing cancer quite another right. So we used to see a type of cancer in the head and neck that was a malignant cancer potentially had a very bad prognosis behaved a little bit differently than the typical cancers that we saw from tobacco and alcohol which are the. Common Most must be recognized that the most common causes of head neck, cancer. You would see sort of little Wardi Larry growths around these tumors and after further testing and eventual studies of these tumors we found that these were tumors very cynical similar to cervical cancer in women that were caused by Human Papilloma high risk viruses but occurring in the tonsil and back of the throat and tongue has this changed or increased the in-incident it's rapidly growing. So it's the most commonly increasing incidents cancer in the body, and there's multiple speculations on why that so people are not sure if the virus more of or sexual practices transform. To allow more people to have this in the back of their throat but it's commonly still increasing cause of cancer and who's it increased risk men and women There's a Bi modal distribution. So men and women in their thirties to fifties, and then another high incidence in men and women in their sixties and seventies more common and win but both men and women more common in people with multiple sexual partners. There's more common in people with high risk sexual behavior. We often see it in people who don't really fit that mold either and. You said relatively young age group and to you when you look in the throat, it almost looked warts. Yes. It has a very characteristic appearance where it'll look abnormal it's ulcerated. It looks like something that doesn't belong there but often have a peppery, which is the word most people used to describe Wardi kind of projections around it and do people come in to you because they have a sore throat. No, they come in because they have spread of the disease to lymph nodes in the neck. So most people don't have a lot of sore. Throat. Symptoms a lot of bleeding until it gets very large or very advanced, but it commonly and quickly spreads to lymph nodes in the next most people come in because they have a lump just below their jaw line in the upper neck is you said the age group is thirty to fifty, and then there's younger what about the HP vaccine? So they HPV vaccine is the one SCHERF fire way that we think will drop that incidence in the future. There's a long latency period between exposure infection chronic infection to cancer so that might be two. Decades more of latency period but the incense of the viral transmission is also still going up in the vaccine is very effective in most of the studies at preventing the chronic long-term infection that leads to cancer used to be that the vaccine was I only really recommended to young women. It then was expanded to both boys and girls in the adolescent age group most recently, the vaccine age group has escalated all the way up to forty five years of age with the knowledge that if you get the vaccine before you've been exposed to the. Virus that it will possibly have very long term preventative effects getting people to change their sexual habits as maybe a little bit more difficult how how can you go about prevention and in that message for people who are listening I, think just a good thorough discussion with people good thorough discussion with your children get their discussion with your patients is a pediatrician having you know your Eyes Wide Open and knowing what your risk for and how to prevent those infections is a good place to start. All right. So you said the main symptoms of. Swelling lumping in the neck any other symptoms sometimes chronic sore throat on one side or the other. There's another interesting site predilection. So the tumor doesn't occur in the lips or the oral tongue or the gum line because that has a very plate-like armored surface that prevents entrance of the of the virus into that tissue but there's ridiculous or perforated tissue in the Tonsil, and there's tonsil on the very back of the tongue deepen the throat. So some people just have this odd sensation of a foreign body feeling a lump in the throat that. Just. Doesn't go away. I recently saw gentleman who had a big lump in the back of his time in his throat that he had for a year but didn't think much of it because he felt otherwise well. So you said that most people don't come in with his sore throat they come in with lumps in their neck because of the tumor has spread to the lymph nodes in the neck. But if someone had this cancer and look in the mirror carefully, would they be able to see something or is it something only you can see? Her mouth. Some people will get a flashlight and look back at their tonsils which are in the very back of the throat on the sides of the mouth and say Oh ones larger than another that doesn't look normal. That's not common. Most people just feels something back there but have a hard time seen it, and the back of the tongue is almost impossible for a person to see themselves the Dennis looks for it when he does his exam and feels for it, which is really important. So. Lot of time, these tumors are underneath the surface of the skins. There's not much to look at, but you can feel like a hard acorn beneath the surface of the skin throat and a lot of times when you go to Dennis and your dentist as a really good oral exam will put a glove on put his fingers in your mouth and feel the back of the tongue and floor the mouth, and that's a good way to diagnose it also. So how do you treat it? It's surprisingly highly treatable, and this is was the most exciting thing for us as physicians is it's a tumor that can cause bad problems even death left untreated but is highly susceptible to treatment. There's a lot of immune related factors to that. So we think the body's immune system is very effective against HP related cancers for various reasons, and so if we can get the process started by stimulating a strong immune response, the body can sometimes takeover. So we started to cone down a whole lot of our treatments are treatments in head neck cancer, very heavy handed. They cause a lot of long term side effects of scarring and fibrosis, and dry mouth and all these. Things that can bother people for life, and because this tumor is so well treated, we started to deescalate or drop off a lot of severity of our treatment leading to pretty high curates but then better quality of life long term does that mean that you can usually cured with surgery alone or surgery and radiation and not use chemotherapy we try to individualize and use all those tools and are toolbag for the right tumor for the right patient. This is multidisciplinary treatment and our multidisciplinary treatment most often starts out with trans oral surgical removal..

cancer sore throat HP HPV vaccine Dennis Mayo clinic HPV Mayo Clinic Radio Fargo Williams Tracy mccray Tracy Dr Tom Shy Wardi
"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

05:16 min | 7 months ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Welcome everyone to Mayo Clinic Radio I'm Dr Tom Shy and I'm. Structural heart disease is a problem with tissues or valves heart. These problems can range from defects that are present at birth to diseases that develop over time on today's program, we'll learn more from Mayo clinic expert. Now, you got to think that twenty five percent of the world's population has it pf L. people walking around. Don't know you can't hear it on exam doesn't cause any problem normally. So the vast majority of people it's just there doesn't require anything besides reassurance if it's fan and hasn't caused a problem, but it is a potential source for problems also in the program will learn about a minimally invasive procedure called hip arthroscopy and how to keep yourself safe from infection during manicures and pedicures. There are several valves in your heart that control the flow of blood from one part of the heart to another and the mitral valve is located between the two chambers on the left side of your heart called the left Atrium and the left ventricle there. Several abnormalities that can affect the mitral valve including mitral valve regurgitation that is the valve leaks, land, micro valves, dinos, valves too narrow and restricts the flow of blood between the Atrium and the ventricle. mitral valve repair and mitral valve replacement are procedures that may be performed to treat diseases of the mitral valve. What treatment is best for you depends on the abnormality and how severe it is here to talk about mitral Valve Peres, mayoclinic interventional cardiologists, Dr Peter, pollock Dr Pollock is the director of structural heart disease at Mayo. Clinic in. Florida welcome to the program Dr Pollock. Thank you so much for having me. It's great to be here good to have you in studio. So tell us about the heart valves, how many are there and what are they actually do? Inside. The heart. Well as a reminder, the heart is divided top and bottom left and right to four chambers. So the top chambers are thin walled receiving chambers there the Atrium they collect blood and delivered to the more muscular pumping chambers ventricles at the base of the heart and with four chambers we have four valves and they're all designed to be perfect one way valves they allowed to go ford without resistance, and then when the ventricles contract they stop blood from flowing the opposite direction so they shouldn't leak and they shouldn't provide any resistance going. For disease is when either of those things happen as you just mentioned if they start to leak, we call that regurgitation. If they start to narrow, we call that stenosis and it can be the right side vows, which are the tricuspid and Pomona valve or the left side of vows which are caused more symptoms because the left side of the heart receives blood from the lungs and pumps it out to the body, and so we get most of the valve treatments related to the Arctic and Mitral Valve the valve on the left side of the heart. And why did they become diseased? Well. It depends on the valve and the nature of the condition. There are number of different things that can cause valve disease far and away valve disease is a disease of it's one of the things that you don't do to yourself, but just happens if you live long enough. Like, everything else they wear. Indeed, indeed, about ten to fifteen percent of people over age seventy or seventy five, we'll have moderate to severe severe valvular heart disease. So how how would you know what are the signs and symptoms that you have? Developed so predominantly is going to be an exertion limitation. So you'll feel short of breath because the pressure of the left ventricle trying to pump blood out of the body in the case of Mitral regurgitation that pressurized blood is now leaking back the left Atrium where blood was collecting from the lungs to that pressurized blood raises the pressure in the left Atrium raises the pressure in the lungs and we feel elevated pressure in the lungs as shortness of breath. So shortness of breath is one of the cardinal symptoms of all valvular heart disease. Also fatigue although fatigue is a difficult symptom as you know because so many different things can feed into a sense of fatigue. Sure and so how do you nail down the diagnosis? Today's Day and age it's going to be the history and physical exam first and foremost and then echocardiographic. You. Look at the valves and with echocardiographic, we use ultrasound technology from the outside of the heart weaken outside of the chest. We can look at the heart see the valves moving in real time, and we can use color doppler to see if there's leaking, we can measure the speed of blood flow through the vows just like when you put your thumb over the end of a garden hose as evolve narrows. The speed of blood going through the valve increases, and so we can measure the speed of blood using the doppler principal and faster blood means a narrower vow whether it's the Arctic or Mitral valve that started to narrow. You know most internists still carry a stethoscope. Can you actually hear what that the there's an abnormality with one of the valves using the stethoscope? Absolutely. That's the first way that we're going to. Valvular heart disease is through the presentation of a Murmur and Murmur just like we talk about a per when I can't per that's a pleasant sound of something good. A is an unpleasant sound historically, and so while I like listening to murmurs. Valvular Heart Disease Dr. A murmur is is a sound of blood rushing through a heart valve and it signifies some degree.

mitral valve heart valve left Atrium left ventricle Valve Peres Mayo clinic Mayo Clinic Radio Dr Tom Shy Dr Pollock stenosis Florida Dr Peter director principal
"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Coming up on Mayo Clinic. Qna we can really make a difference in terms of minimizing the effects over time on large numbers of people flattening the curve in the Cohen one thousand nine pandemic for another words to prevent that big spike. We know that there will be some cases. We know that there will be some desks. Unfortunately but we want to minimize as much as possible. Eliminating a spike in corona virus cases could help by easing the overall strain on the healthcare system. We WanNa make sure to have adequate supplies. Adequate number of gowns and masks for our healthcare providers supplemental oxygen. Iv lines ventilators. Things like that that we need for those individuals who developed severe disease question. How can you help to flatten the curve? The whole idea of social isolation is to try to bend that curve the answer next on Mayoclinic QNA. I'm Dr Tom Shy. I'm Tracy mccray during today's podcast about the covert nineteen pandemic. We'll share portions of a recent interview with detrick. Clayton coal the chair of the division of Preventive Occupational and Aerospace Medicine at Mayo Clinic. He's also along and critical care. Medicine Specialist Dr. Call will explain a phrase. You've likely heard in the news. From government and healthcare leaders called flattening. The curve will learn what that means and why it's such an important goal in the pandemic. We all need to be in on this effort to make it work. Let's begin with Dr Coles definition of flattening the curve in epidemiology which is sort of the study of populations when we look at an illness like covy nineteen at a certain point it reaches a certain area where it we see a spike in the number of cases and the number of fatalities and the whole idea of social isolation is to try to bend that curve in other words to prevent that big spike. We know that there will be some cases. We know that there will be some deaths. Unfortunately but we want to minimize that as much as possible. And so that's why this whole social isolation thing that we've never seen in our lifetimes going on right now is actually being done to protect the population as a whole but if we look at other epidemics and other worldwide pandemics. We know that by learning from what we've had in prior cases things like Spanish flu and Plague and things like that that if we can get people separated where they're not spending a lot of time in close quarters We can really make a difference in terms of minimizing the effects over time on large numbers of people. The idea is to create some distance from each other to slow the spread of the virus and eliminate that spike in cases. So you might wonder. How long do we need to stay? Separated to flatten the curve. Well it's hard to know. This virus is very interesting. Our immune systems have never seen this particular strain of virus before so we have no way to develop immunity. We don't have a vaccine for it at this point and and so many of the novel viruses that come out. It has potential for worldwide distribution again. I think all of the epidemiologists the physicians scientists that are all looking at the data literally day by day at this point will will look at the data that the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and prevention are collecting and we'll make sort of collective decisions about how long to keep people away from each other doctor. Cole says we do know if we can. Prevent CASES OF COVERT NINETEEN FROM SPIKING. There will be less strain on the healthcare system as a whole for those individuals who developed severe disease. We WanNa make sure to have adequate supplies adequate number of gowns and masks for healthcare providers to take care of them so they don't get the illness adequate amount of supplemental oxygen. Iv lines ventilators. Things like that that we need so taking care upfront to keep people away and keep away from each other directly and to minimize the total number of cases will be saving supplies and allowing us to really focus the resources that we need for those that develop severe forms of the disease which will be a small percentage of the total number of people that actually develop the disease. Dr Call says it's important to be part of social distancing efforts. If not for yourself for people who are in the higher risk categories with any of these epidemics. The the risk is real. Obviously we know that there are certain populations that need to really focus on the idea of social isolation and so as many people have heard. This is our older population. And when we say that people in the seventy to eighty year old age range and above eighty years old or those with significant chronic diseases that involve some form of immunosuppression where the immune system just doesn't work like it normally would and that could either be from the condition itself or from medications that are given to treat their underlying illness that cause a reduction in our immune power so to speak along with Dr Kohl. We hope you'll be part of prevention efforts while also keeping perspective and I think people need to remember that for the average person that even if they become positive. It's more like a regular flu. Meaning the Yes. They may have aches and coffin that but for a lot of the people that have experienced it within twenty four to forty eight hours already starting to feel better already so just like the regular flu. It's important to stay home if you're sick. Take what you need to control your fever cough into your elbow. Wash your hands and you'll likely be feeling better soon this edition of Mayo Clinic. Qna uses facts known through March sixteenth. Twenty twenty newer episodes will contain even more about the virus. It spread and news about treatment and the vaccine. We hope you'll keep listening. Our thanks to Dr Clayton Coal. The chair of the division of Preventive Occupational in Aerospace Medicine at Mayo Clinic his time and information. We'll have another conversation with Dr Kohl in an upcoming podcast until next time. Do what you can to help flatten the curve and be well. Mayo Clinic. Qna is a production of Mayo Clinic News Network and is available wherever you get and subscribe to your favorite podcasts to see a list of all Mayo Clinic. Qna podcasts visit news. Network DOT Mayoclinic Dot. Org then click podcasts. Thanks for listening.

Mayo Clinic social isolation Qna Dr Kohl Mayoclinic QNA Mayo Clinic News Network flu Preventive Occupational and Ae Dr Tom Shy Dr Coles Dr Clayton Coal Dr Call Cohen Clayton coal Plague Tracy mccray
"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q

Mayo Clinic Q

06:50 min | 1 year ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q

"Coming up on Mayo Clinic. Qna we can really make a difference in terms of minimizing the effects over time on large numbers of people flattening the curve in the Cohen Pandemic for another words to prevent that big spike. We know that there will be some cases. We know that there will be some desks. Unfortunately but we want to minimize as much as possible eliminating a spike in corona virus cases. Could help by easing the overall strain on the healthcare system. We WanNa make sure to have adequate supplies. Adequate number of gowns and masks for our healthcare providers supplemental oxygen. Iv lines ventilators. Things like that that we need for those individuals who developed severe disease question. How can you help to flatten the curve? The whole idea of social isolation is to try to bend that curve the answer next on Mayoclinic QNA. I'm Dr Tom Shy. I'm Tracy mccray during today's podcast about the covert Nineteen pan-demic we'll share portions of a recent interview with Detrick Clayton coal the chair of the division of Preventive Occupational and Aerospace Medicine at Mayo Clinic. He's also along and critical care. Medicine Specialist Dr. Call will explain a phrase. You've likely heard in the news. From government and healthcare leaders called flattening. The curve will learn what that means and why it's such an important goal in the pandemic. We all need to be in on this effort to make it work. Let's begin with Dr Colton definition of flattening the curve in epidemiology which is sort of the study of populations when we look at an illness like covy nineteen at a certain point it reaches a certain area where it we see a spike in the number of cases and the number of fatalities and the whole idea of social isolation is to try to bend that curve in other words to prevent that big spike. We know that there will be some cases. We know that there will be some deaths. Unfortunately but we want to minimize that as much as possible. And so that's why this whole social isolation thing that we've never seen in our lifetimes going on right now is actually being done to protect the population as a whole but if we look at other epidemics and other worldwide pandemics. We know that by learning from what we've had in prior cases things like Spanish flu and Plague and things like that that if we can get people separated where they're not spending a lot of time in close quarters We can really make a difference in terms of minimizing the effects over time on large numbers of people. The idea is to create some distance from each other to slow the spread of the virus and eliminate that spike in cases. So you might wonder. How long do we need to stay? Separated to flatten the curve. Well it's hard to know. This virus is very interesting. Our immune systems have never seen this particular strain of virus before so we have no way to develop immunity. We don't have a vaccine for it at this point and and so many of the novel viruses that come out. It has potential for worldwide distribution again. I think all of the epidemiologists the physicians scientists that are all looking at the data literally day by day at this point will will look at the data that the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and prevention are collecting and we'll make sort of collective decisions about how long to keep people away from each other doctor. Cole says we do know if we can. Prevent CASES OF COVERT NINETEEN FROM SPIKING. There will be less strain on the healthcare system as a whole for those individuals who developed severe disease. We WanNa make sure to have adequate supplies adequate number of gowns and masks for healthcare providers to take care of them so they don't get the illness adequate amount of supplemental oxygen. Iv lines ventilators. Things like that that we need so taking care upfront to keep people away and keep away from each other directly and to minimize the total number of cases will be saving supplies and allowing us to really focus the resources that we need for those that develop severe forms of the disease which will be a small percentage of the total number of people that actually develop the disease. Dr Call says it's important to be part of social distancing efforts. If not for yourself for people who are in the higher risk categories with any of these epidemics. The the risk is real. Obviously we know that there are certain populations that need to really focus on the idea of social isolation and so as many people have heard. This is our older population. And when we say that people in the seventy to eighty year old age range and above eighty years old or those with significant chronic diseases that involve some form of immunosuppression where the immune system just doesn't work like it normally would and that could either be from the condition itself or from medications that are given to treat their underlying illness that cause a reduction in our immune power so to speak along with Dr Kohl. We hope you'll be part of prevention efforts while also keeping perspective and I think people need to remember that for the average person that even if they become positive. It's more like a regular flu. Meaning the Yes. They may have aches and coffin that but for a lot of the people that have experienced it within twenty four to forty eight hours already starting to feel better already so just like the regular flu. It's important to stay home if you're sick. Take what you need to control your fever cough into your elbow. Wash your hands and you'll likely be feeling better soon this edition of Mayo Clinic. Qna uses facts known through March sixteenth. Twenty twenty newer episodes will contain even more about the virus. It spread and news about treatment and the vaccine. We hope you'll keep listening. Our thanks to Dr Clayton Coal. The chair of the division of Preventive Occupational in Aerospace Medicine at Mayo Clinic his time and information. We'll have another conversation with Dr Kohl in an upcoming podcast until next time. Do what you can to help flatten the curve and be well. Mayo Clinic. Qna is a production of Mayo Clinic News Network and is available wherever you get and subscribe to your favorite podcasts to see a list of all Mayo Clinic. Qna podcasts visit news. Network DOT Mayoclinic Dot. Org then click podcasts. Thanks for listening.

Mayo Clinic social isolation Qna Dr Kohl Mayoclinic QNA Mayo Clinic News Network flu Dr Tom Shy Preventive Occupational and Ae Dr Colton Dr Clayton Coal Dr Call Plague Tracy mccray Centers for Disease Control immunosuppression
"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q

Mayo Clinic Q

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q

"Coming up on Mayo Clinic. Qna primary route of transmission for this is thought to be respiratory droplets simple steps. You can take to protect yourself from the Cova. Nineteen Virus Respiratory. Droplets are usually transmitted when someone coughs or sneezes some protection can come in as little as twenty seconds the best thing you can do to protect yourself and your family from getting infected. A number one is to wash your hands. Wash your hands. And then keep your distance. And so we recommend something called social distancing or maintaining some space around here so To avoid being coughed honor sneezed. On by someone. Who might be ill question? What else can you do to be a part of a community effort to slow the spread of Cova nineteenth practice? What we call by train etiquette the answer next on Mayoclinic QNA. I'm Dr Tom Shy loose. And I'm Tracy mccray during today's podcast about the corona virus and covert nineteen. We'll share portions of a recent interview with Dr Nominee. Roger Poxy a Mayo Clinic Pediatric Infectious Disease. Physician you'll hear about how the viruses spread. And why we're all being asked to practice something called social distancing and Dr Rajapakse. He will tell us the number one thing. We can all do to protect ourselves and our loved ones from this illness. It's pretty simple and should relieve some anxiety you may be experiencing. We'll cover a lot of ground but let's start with the term that's being used around the world. Dr Roger Poxy explains why it's called covert nineteen so Kobe nineteen Sounds FOR KRONA virus disease. Two Thousand Nine Hundred. Ninety two thousand nineteen refers to win. The first reported cases of this disease were reported Kobe. Nineteen is a virus that can cause a variety of symptoms most commonly it causes fever cough and breathing issues cornyn viruses that including corporate nineteen can create a spectrum of illness and so some people will be very mildly affected and some people have more severe disease so the severity of illness can range from having a cold or flu. Type illness all the way to needing to be hospitalized or being an intensive care unit Dr Roger Poxy says children can contract corona virus but in general they're cases tend to be less severe. We now have a multiple reports of kids who have been infected with cove in nineteen Thankfully it seems that children if they have symptoms at all have mild symptoms Maybe some cough fever type symptoms. Most of the severe illness and deaths that have been reported seemed to be an older adults so those older than sixty years of age. I'm as well as those who have underlying medical conditions such as underlying heart disease lung disease or diabetes. We're seeing the virus appear in many countries around the world including the United States. Dr Raji poxy explains what we know about how it's being spread from person to person. The primary route of transmission for this is thought to be respiratory droplets respiratory. Droplets are usually transmitted when someone coughs or sneezes and someone else either inhales it or touches something that a virus particle lands on then touches their own eyes nose or mouth generally from coughing and sneezing with a respiratory droplet. Those can transmit about three to six feet from the person who has coughed or sneezed. And then they're large enough that they tend to Ben drop down to the ground. The best thing you can do to protect yourself and your family from getting infected. A number one is to wash your hands really as simple as it sounds. That is the most effective way to prevent illness and infection. The second thing is If you do have symptoms to practice what we call respiratory etiquette. That means Coughing or sneezing into your elbow or into a tissue and then washing your hands. While afterwards We know viral particles. End Up on your fingers and hands can be transmitted to other people And so that's one way to protect yourself and your family The other main thing that we would encourage people is to stay home. If you're feeling ill with coffin fever especially this avoids exposing people at school or at work to infection and illness. Also Dr Roger Poxy recommends washing with soap and water for at least twenty seconds frequently multiple times a day after you use the bathroom anytime you cough or sneeze and before you eat. She says if you don't have access to soap and water use alcohol based hand sanitizer and beyond cleaned hands. Dr Raja poxy says we should be using social distancing from others to avoid that droplets zone of three to six feet that she mentioned that transmission of infection is by responded trae droplets in the community setting. And so we recommend something called social distancing or maintaining some space around yourself to avoid being coughed on or sneeze on by someone who might be ill that also means that if you are yourself sick You should really not be going to work or to school To avoid spreading illness to other people these are a lot of the measures that we hope the public can help us out with as we manage this situation in order to decrease the spread of illness as much as we can a final thing you can do is seek the latest updates on Cova nineteen from trusted organizations so the best of information on the covert nineteen situation are if you live in the United States the CDC website or the World Health Organization website and then in many areas your local state Or public health departments will likely have information on their websites as well. So those are the best places to get the most accurate and up-to-date information. There's been a lot of misinformation that has circulated through media and social media. And so it's really important that people know where they can find the information that they need. The information is also changing very quickly. And so you want to be looking at the most up to date information that's available especially if you have things travel planned in the coming months. This podcast backed by information from the Mayo Clinic. News Network is another source for the latest on the covert nineteen pandemic this edition of Mayo Clinic. Qna uses facts known through March fifteenth. Twenty twenty newer episodes will contain even more about the virus. It's spread and what you can do to protect yourself from getting it. We hope you'll keep listening our thanks to doctrine Apu Raja poxy Mayo Clinic Pediatric Infectious Disease Specialist for her time and insight for this conversation until next time remember to wash your hands keep your distance and be well mayoclinic. Qna is a production of Mayo Clinic News Network and is available wherever you get and subscribe to your favorite podcasts. To see a list of all male clinic. Qna podcasts visit news network DOT Mayoclinic Dot Org. Then Click on podcasts. Thanks for listening and be well. We hope you'll offer a review of this and other episodes when the option is available comments and questions can also be sent to Mayo Clinic News Network at Mayo Dot Edu..

Dr Roger Poxy Mayo Clinic Apu Raja poxy Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic News Network Mayo Clinic Pediatric Infectio Qna Cova Mayoclinic QNA United States Dr Raja poxy Dr Tom Shy Dr Nominee Cova nineteenth heart disease Dr Rajapakse Infectious Disease Specialist fever Tracy mccray Kobe
"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

Mayo Clinic Radio

08:16 min | 2 years ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Radio

"Uh-huh. Welcome back. To Mayo Clinic Radio, I'm Dr Tom shy, and I'm Tracy McCray. A study published this summer in mayo clinic proceedings found that the risk of having a heart attack while pregnant while giving birth or during the two months after delivery continues to increase for American women. The study led by NYU school of medicine. Researchers found that the risk of suffering a heart attack among pregnant women rose twenty five percent from two thousand to two thousand fourteen possible reasons for this increase include women having children later in life and more women being obese and or even diabetic, which are key risk factors for heart disease in here. Discuss mayo clinic cardiologists, actress, Sharon Hayes, welcome back to the program. Dr Hayes, it's nice to have you here. It's great to be here is nice to see. So these have to be alarming statistics. Don't you think? So they're very alarming. If we think about in the US we. A higher maternal mortality rate than most developed countries. Anyway, for a lot of reasons, and then we look at the heart disease risk, which is by interest. The fact that it is rising is concerning largely because we believe that most cardiovascular disease and heart attacks can be prevented. So with the alarming. I think there are some action items that we need to be looking for as well. Is there a racial discrepancy here? Also, I mean as other more black women who have a heart disease during pregnancy and delivery than than white women. So there's a there is a disparity and the disparities have to do with race, particularly African American women who have about triple the death rate overall for maternal mortality and an increase in in cardiovascular mortality, but also just access and prenatal care. There's so many things that have to do with this that are both risk factors and age of the mother, but also things about our systems of care or lack thereof now, Tracy mentioned a couple of the possible reasons and diabetes obesity. What what what would you say? Well, I think it's clear that and we've known this for a long time as the older you are a mother the higher risk the pregnancy is and the higher risk. The mother is for having underlying heart disease to start the pregnancy. And so we're seeing older mothers. Seeing people who are having children at ages that really they didn't have them before. And that is sort of that one of those high risk groups that we which should look at there's been a rate of rise in the risk factors, particularly obesity, and diabetes, which are powerful and are not necessarily screened for entreated during pregnancy is one of the other things we've learned is that. Overweight, women can lose weight healthily during pregnancy and have a healthier baby and healthier them. But they have to be under the appropriate care is that because women in the US are having babies later part of it is the older age of women in the US. But many of these countries were talking about Scandinavia and Great Britain and others that there was a quote. In from UK AAC comment where they were looking at maternal mortality. They said the actual lead the rate or risk of death of the unprecedent father is now greater than the pregnant woman in the UK. And we can't say that about the US. Wow. That's that's drifting is it. Yeah. That's pretty powerful. And why do you think that is their system compared to ours? You know, their system of care of their access to care. Every woman has a has a primary care doctor. Every woman is going to get the appropriate care. That's not true in the US. So what should women do a before they become pregnant particularly of their obese or have diabetes. Well, I think they should see either their obe- or their primary care doctor if they have one and to have some preconception planning, what does a healthy pregnancy? Look, like, what are my risk factors if I'm really overweight, am I you know, in general, we don't advise those women have the same thirty pound weight gain that an individual who is. Normal weight would have. So what is a healthy pregnancy? Look like for me. And then monitoring through the pregnancy to make sure that we identify those individuals who develop hypertension, new hypertension during pregnancy or new diabetes during pregnancy and importantly, an a slightly off topic. But definitely related is individuals who during their pregnancy women during pregnancy develop hypertension, or diabetes, even if it goes away after they deliver are at higher risk for heart attack throughout their entire life. And so that marks a woman who failed the stress test of pregnancy, and we need to watch her. Maybe they need to see a cardiologists. Maybe they need lipid lowering therapy or greater monitoring for the high blood pressure. So pregnancy is such an important time for women's health and babies health as well as her future heart health. How does pregnancy affect the heart? So a normal pregnancy are the woman's blood volume increases by about a third. So that means the heart has a lot of extra work blood pressure. Typically, actually in a normal pregnancy goes down think about the uterus where the baby it goes from a fist size, Oregon too. Big enough to have a nine pound baby in it. So women actually have this ability to make new blood vessels. And which so when they prove that they can do that. That's a pretty healthy thing if they have a Preterm birth or a baby that doesn't develop fully because they're placenta isn't healthy enough. Those are all markers of risk for that pregnancy, but also future pregnancies and future heart disease, in that woman based on the statistics that we talked about use adjusted that maybe there are some things that we ought to be doing differently. Well, I think that preconception planning is really talking to what are the health risks that I had that? I can correct before I even get pregnant what medications my on. What that occasion show? I if I'm on medications. What should I switch to? I think making sure. That women recognized that heart disease that they are at risk for heart disease. And so that they pay attention to symptoms. I mean, one of the areas, and it's it was a sizeable number of the individuals who suffered a heart attack after birth in this study that was referenced at the beginning of the segment had a condition called spontaneous coronary artery dissection, this is an area of interest of mine. This happens in people with healthy hearts with healthy vessels with no cholesterol, or anything it is. So there's nothing to prevent it. But he got a recognize symptoms right away. So you get in and get the appropriate treatment. So it's multilevel. It's pre-. It's during and making sure that we address the issues that arise and making sure that everyone on the team, including the patient knows what the signs and symptoms are of heart disease. I think that's a great point. Because it's been awhile. It's been awhile since I was pregnant, but the only thing the only thing that I thought about before we got pregnant was to start taking folic acid. That was the only pre planning that we did at all. And even someone who's got some heart issues. I didn't even think about heart health when it came to being one of the things I should be watching for when I was pregnant, exactly. So the big issues are the increasing rates of diabetes and women having children when they're older would you suggest that if you're thinking about having children, maybe ought to think about it early on. Well, that's great to say theory because in general healthier pregnancy is going to be in a women's twenties on the other hand, the reality is women, find partners later, or whatever. So I would say to that older woman. The woman who has thirty or thirty five in coming into their first pregnancy is that is even paying more attention because that's also the age in which we're starting to see more risk factors. And so would it probably be healthier to have pregnancy at younger ages. Yes. But the reality is we're going to have older mothers and continue to do. So so making sure those older mothers are

US diabetes heart disease Tracy McCray Sharon Hayes mayo clinic NYU school of medicine Mayo Clinic Radio hypertension UK obesity Dr Tom shy Great Britain Scandinavia Oregon
"dr tom shy" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

08:30 min | 2 years ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Welcome back. To Mayo Clinic Radio, I'm Dr Tom shy, and I'm Tracy McCray. Tracy, you may have heard the story of the professional musician who played the violin while he was undergoing brain surgery. Well, it's absolutely true story. Dr kindle Lee in his surgical team implanted electrodes into Roger fresh brain to stop a tremor that could have ended his professional orchestra career of more than forty years. It's amazing. Deep brain stimulation surgery involves implanting electrodes within certain areas of the brain these electrodes produce electrical impulses that impede the abnormal impulses. What wasn't working right before? Now does Roger fishes story was recently recounted in the Ken burns documentary. The mayo clinic faith hope science here to talk about the progress being made in treating patients with spinal cord injury is neuro surgeon and director of mayo clinic's neural engineering laboratory, Dr KENDALL Lee, welcome back to the program, Dr Lee. Well, thank you so much for having me here. It's a pleasure. Good to see you again. So it tell us about violin story. We're all dying to here. Yeah. Sure. So deep brain stimulation as technology that now allows us to treat patients for a variety of disorders, including Parkinson's disease tremor to stonier Tonia, yes, Estonia disorder where patients have very severe rigidity in their muscles. And they cannot control it. And some of these patients may not be able to walk because of this Tonia or they might have their neck Stony ah where they can't control the movement of the neck. And so as it turns out this deep brain stimulation has now approved by the FDA for these disorders now in the case of Roger fresh what he has it's a little bit different from this movement disorder. You know, he is a one of the concert masters with the Minnesota orchestra who is a master at playing the violin. Now, I suspect because he practiced so much probably hours and hours every day that he developed what is called more use dependent tremor. So somehow, his brain circuits and likely because of how much he plays the violin develop an abnormal circuitry in his brain oscillation is what we call it, which is basically manifested as tremor in his and his hand overuse syndrome kind of. Yes, exactly, you know, you've probably heard of. Like in golfers certain coffers because they're so what's called. Yeah. Where right when they're ready to put a very, easy whole their muscles tense up. And they have a movement problem, and they miss it's similar to that. Yes. Yes. Yes. Tremor with this. And so when he developed this he didn't know that there was anything that he could do he went to variety of physicians. But there was really nothing that was offered when he came to see me he had his violin with them. He walked in. I saw him, and I like my other patients Parkinson's disease essential tremor dystonia where I can pretty much tell what they have right away. I thought he looked perfectly normal, and then he said, well, wait, and so he then proceeded to take out his violin. Which by the way, it's a very very expensive by Linda brought to my office. And he started to play this music, and I'm not a musician. I don't fully understand. But when he plays her notes, you could hear vibrato in a lot of shaking. I didn't know he didn't mean to do that. But he said, no, he's trying to hold the note perfectly still, but he can't do it. Because he's he's having this this tremor only when he plays certain kinds of notes. And so we presented him to our neuro modulation committee because this is an unusual kind of situation, and he was approved by our neuro modulation committee to undergo the surgery, which at that point. We were not one hundred percent sure that we could help them. And so in the operating room typically for the deep brain stimulation surgery. I do the surgery with the patient awake. Particularly in situations like this because I I don't know beforehand whether or not. We're going to be able to treat this, and we need to know whether or not the tremor goes away with the so they need to be awake during surgery. Yes. And in this case was unique because not only did he have to be awake. But we had to have the violin. He play head to play violin has to have the violin. Because that's the only time that the tremor comes out. So how does deep brain stimulation work? But I gotta ask you though, you say the patient is awake. But you got to put a hole in the skull to get this needle in. They're not awake for that. When you drilled on say they are away for that. You do it under local. Yes. So, you know, just like a dentist would use novacaine up the teeth the same type of anaesthetic that I use that numbs up the skin and to a tiny little hole in the skull. But by the way, this surgery is incredibly precise. It's done using a what's called a stereo tactic had frame, and we get an MRI. So even though we don't see inside. Incision, and we actually can see the brain through the MRI, and we have the ability to target very very precisely within any area of the brain. Did you know where you wanted to put this needle? Yes. So there's a little place there. It says can't play violin. And you stick the needle in here. Yes. Actually, this is this is one area of research that we've been doing research on the mail neural, engineering laboratories, exactly what you just asked. So how does the brain stimulation work, and we have developed several technologies to figure out how it works, and in particular, very excited about technology called the wink system that we have now tested that shows that it appears that deep brain stimulation can release different kinds of neural chemicals in the brain that stops abnormal oscillations, or these are oscillations that ultimately caused the tremor and TBS appears to release those chemicals that causes that kind of tremor. And Furthermore, we now know we have an marvelous map of the brain circuitry. We pretty much know all of the various circuits. That's. Causing this type of tremor. And in this case, it's coming from an area of the brain called the switches center, the brain deep. That's why it's called the deep brain stimulation and more specifically called the V. I am and Travis intermediate is part of the now this case is unique because that's the usual area for essential tremor when we did this surgery on that area. He got pretty good trauma control. But it wasn't perfect. And the interesting aspect that also Ken burns picked up on is that we had to add a second lead that is not so usual, so we needed to find that. And he okays it in the movie. Yes. That's great. Well, I mean, let me be clear this is stole brain surgery, and therefore it has inherent risk. And I of course, had to discuss all of this with Mr. fresh, and all of my patients that it has risks such as causing a plead hemorrhage stroke and so forth. So we have to take those risks. But in this case, the potential benefit far outweighed in our opinion, the risks that he talk for his quality of life. It was a dealbreaker. Yes. Absolutely. You know, the amount of tremor that Mr. Frisch has actually would be considered, you know, not so much in the sense that you, and I if we had it it would not affect our life but for him because he's a concert master, this was actually devastating. Now. The other interesting thing is he has a remote now where he can turn these electrodes on or off if he's not using them if he's not playing the violin. Right. That is correct. So he can and and that soon as he turns it off all of his tremor comes back. Yeah. He demonstrates in the movie. Now, the other interesting thing is when we add the second lead in another area just in front of the V IM what we discovered his his tremor control, actually is almost Supra physiologic. Meaning that, you know, everybody you and I under certain conditions would have little bit of tremor physiologic Trevor well, interestingly he can now hold on note almost superhuman.

essential tremor Dr KENDALL Lee Ken burns Roger Parkinson Tracy McCray Tonia Mayo Clinic Radio mayo clinic Dr Tom shy Minnesota movement disorder director FDA Mr. Frisch Estonia Linda Trevor
Marijuana is now legal for medical purposes in 30 states

Mayo Clinic Radio

04:50 min | 2 years ago

Marijuana is now legal for medical purposes in 30 states

"Recently the US food and. Drug. Administration approved a. Form of medical, marijuana after the treatment. Of seizures associated with two rare, and severe forms of epilepsy and it really seems like we hear more, and more about people using marijuana to treat all sorts of medical problems and to help overcome the side effects of some. Traditional medical treatments thirty states and the district of, Columbia currently, have laws legalizing medical marijuana in some form here to discuss as, internal medicine specialist and addiction expert Dr John Ebert welcome back to the program Dr, Ebert it's, great to see you thanks for having me back Dr Robert, thanks for coming, so medical marijuana legitimate for medical use since we last spoke about this the national academies. Of science came out with a report, in that report essentially summarizes all the available medical literature looking at the efficacy or the effectiveness of it in the safety of medical cannabis and what they found was that it is very effective for three specific conditions and one of them is specificity the other one is chronic pain what was that first one so asbestos muscle spasms so some people that have spinal cord injuries or some people who have multiple sclerosis can have incredibly painful specificity the muscles spontaneously spasm very painful it's like a charlie horse but constantly okay right it's effective for that it's effective for nausea and it's effective for chronic pain and specifically neuropathy pain or pain that comes from a nerve so what's interesting about their findings as they didn't have a lot of data that actually supported that it was truly effective for the indication that the new drug approved by the f._d._a. is indicated for which is which is epilepsy or the severe forms of epilepsy there is some existing data but but they didn't have a lot i think it's important for patients who are interested to to or interested in exploring this as a methodology to talk to their clinicians and and really asked the question would it seem like the condition that i have might be effectively treated by medical cannabis and those clinicians i think need to have that information or there is that information's available on the internet and can be searched and can be learned so that they can share that with their patients Is there some. Science behind it you know why it works yeah so there's been lots of science in the space which has somewhat been impeded by the fact that under federal law, medical cannabis is illegal so there's no research so there is there has been you can? Actually and there, has and is ongoing research it is possible to have approval to do research with medical cannabis so there's there's research suggesting that is for these conditions so why why does it work Well what's interesting about so I I. Sorta fi patients for medical cannabis and when I speak with these patients, a lot of. Them are interested in medical cannabis because they nothing else really seems, to have worked and most of the patients at up. Certified have been for chronic pain? They say I want to? Try. Something new and I say it might be effective for pain and one of the things that they they really struggle with some of those. Preconceived notions about what. It is to to smoke pot, if people traditionally, smoked tied in what it is to. Use medical cannabis very different experiences so if someone smoked a medical. Marijuana cigarette for non medicinal purposes you get a hundred. And four? Different chemicals in there States like Minnesota that we are in now have actually limited their program to two of those chemicals so of the hundred, and four possible. Chemicals that, you get when you smoke a joint, if you will you only get two, of them in Minnesota in those two are tetrahydrocannabinol which is the the molecule that gets people high. When they smoke in Canana dial now we think that the Kanana dial. Has some, very interesting and important therapeutic properties it doesn't work like tetrahydrocannabinol but it can actually. Help with pain as an anti inflammatory, it can actually help with pain to reduce nerve transmission which is how it might be working. For seizures and epilepsy that new medication approved by the FDA basically just, pure CBD or. Dial in most of the states have that as one of the, molecules that you can get when you are when you're Subscribed or your proof for medical marijuana in

Medical Cannabis Cannabis Marijuana Minnesota Dr Tom Shy United States Dr John Ebert Mayo Clinic Radio Mccray Dr John FDA Kanana Muscle Spasms Columbia Canana Nausea Dr Robert Depression
"dr tom shy" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio I'm Dr Tom shy, and I'm Tracy McCray and I just talked to dab all. Right we're that's really that helps, when you should cough. Dab when you call All right Dr cozine let's. Talk about teenagers there's talk about your teenagers well one of, the things that's funny is that we were talking about well child. Visits and, so it's nine nine years old. And eleven years old when you go and set up that. Eleven year. Old one they do not want. You to call it a well child visit they're like mom do we really. Have to, so, I started wild child visit and that makes them happy that's great So do you, see, teenagers, just giving you the I'm not gonna say a word and sit here thing or, the definitely, do that and. My policy. Is that, once. A kid is twelve or. Thirteen I absolutely kicked the. Parents, out of the room sometimes they don't want to say anything to me, alone either, but that gives them, an opportunity to talk to something that. They might not be super excited to discuss with their moms, or dads it's an I always talk about drugs alcohol sex all. The stuff, that makes adults really uncomfortable and. Do they do they do they're, they're really it's pretty surprising. I think I'm always tempted to sort. Of underestimate what somebody's going to tell me about pretty much, they just start talking does let me just say so I got this important question so when the parents would you kick the parents. Out of the room what's the most, common, question, that a teenager asks there there's not a most common usually I'm kind of trying, to go, them along okay. And the Likely condoms and they turn purple by it's it's it's at least, they're hearing they're hearing about, the really importance of taking care. Of yourself and respecting. Yourself one of the things that also happens. When you said kids to wild child visits is a depression screener and when what age do you does mayo clinic start doing that with their patient we. Start routinely, at the thirteen year while visit and that's what the.

Mayo Clinic Radio mayo clinic Dr Tom shy Tracy McCray Dr cozine nine nine years thirteen year eleven years Eleven year
Number of opioid prescriptions remains unchanged, Mayo Clinic research finds

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

20:33 min | 2 years ago

Number of opioid prescriptions remains unchanged, Mayo Clinic research finds

"Network. Hi, I'm Vivian Williams for the mayo clinic news network, opioids continue to be in the news. A mayo clinic study found that despite increased attention to opioid abuse, prescriptions have remained relatively unchanged for many US patients. The research published in the b. m. j. shows that opioid prescription rates have remained flat for commercially insured patients over the past decade rates. For some Medicare patients are leveling but remain above where they were ten years ago. Dr. Jeffrey Molly is the lead author of the study and scientific director of the mayo clinic division of emergency medicine research. He says the data suggests not much has changed in prescription opioid use since about five years ago. Now based on historical trends of opioid use pain medicine specialist. Dr. Michael Hooton says, there are Maine's an unmet patient need to better target the use of prescription, opioids. Leads the centers for disease control and prevention has previously reported that opioid prescription in the US has increased dramatically from nineteen ninety nine to two thousand ten mayo clinic is broadly researching opioid prescribing practices to find ideal doses for individual patient needs. The researchers say the goal is to achieve the best possible patient outcomes and experience with minimal exposure to opioids. This research has been translated into opioid prescribing guidelines, tools for medical practices at mayo and beyond. And in other news, what you might call the dog days of summer, maybe something more menacing for a person prone to migraines. So how and why does summer weather sometimes trigger these headaches? That's a great question. Says Dr. Rush me, hawker sing, a mayo clinic neurologist. She says that patients ask her that all the time and there's just not a great answer for some people. Extreme weather conditions may cause imbalances in brain chemicals. Which eventually can lead to severe throbbing pain of a migraine. Sunlight could also be a trigger and other weather triggers include high humidity, extreme heat and dry air. Dr. Hucker cing says, these conditions may lead to another migraine creator dehydration. Lots of people forget to drink enough during hot weather and dehydration concert, be risk for migraine attacks to happen. Her advice to people with migraines is to avoid extremes in summer weather and everyday schedules. She also says to be consistent with your eating habits and your sleeping habits, the mayo clinic news network. I'm Vivian Williams. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom jive and I'm Tracy McCray for teenagers issues like peer pressure, academic expectations, and changing bodies. You're going through that right now or at your. It was a long time ago that I was a teenager Dr side. Thank you. All those things can cause a lot of ups and downs, highs and lows. But for some teens, the lows are more than just temporary feelings. There is symptom of depression. Depression can affect how your teenager thinks feels and behaves. And in extreme cases it can lead to suicidal thoughts, the centers for disease control and prevention reports that suicide is the second leading cause of death for young people. Age ten to twenty four. Fortunately for most teens, depression symptoms can ease with treatment such as medication and psychological counseling in here, disgust teens in mental health is mayo clinic pediatric psychiatrist, Dr Paul cork and welcome back to the program Dr Croke and it's good to see you glow. Thanks for having me today. Thanks for being here. So Dr, Carr, convince increasing number of suicides in this country has to be of some concern is very concerning and it's it's probably complex causes. It's something that's being as you point out, talked about and written about quite a lot quite often. And it's been been estimated that the the overall rates have nearly doubled less twenty years. Much of that involves teenagers. As you pointed out with young people, it's the second leading cause of death. Sadly there are in the neighborhood of, you know, forty, five thousand completed suicides annual in the US young people account for usually about ten percent of that. So there there's a host of things to think about. And I, I would argue that my field in particular we need to, we need to brace this as maybe failure that we need to relook at things and continue research in ways to do better his problem in the future. So you said suicide rates for teenagers as doubled over the last twenty years. So have the rates of depression doubled as well. That's one of the one of the considerations. The thought is that actually exhibiting depression is increasing as well. But there are other there are other factors to to present a balanced view here. There has been the argument made, perhaps we are just getting better at quantifying and qualifying into things, and we have more mental health professionals. Now, psychiatrist to identify these things. People are talking about mental health as well, and there's hopefully less stigma and people feel feel freer to talk about it as you point out. There's also as far as causes that are driving this potentially. There's been a lot of speculation is life becoming more fast paced and stressful for for teenagers general? Some of us at our age. We have sometimes difficult time wrapping our brain around that. But indeed, if you look at look at some of the things that are going on in the challenges teens face today, it's not. It's not benign another. Another, very very, I would argue poorly understood but important consideration is the internet. Did you. Title social media things like Facebook, Twitter, and the platforms that I don't even know about the using, how does that contribute? I mean, what's the relationship there? Well, the thought the thought there have been there have been studies Dr shops that can that suggest that that more time spent on that thing contributes to depression, but it's probably not that simple. I mean, the arguments been made, and this has been looked at that overall. Maybe maybe teenagers into some extent, adults are spending more and more time on these platforms with these technologies and overall feeling less connected in the genuine face to face empathic sort of fashion. The other pernicious aspect of these technologies. Something that I see in my day to day practice often is that there's a fair amount of negative behaviors broadly describe it that there's what's called cyber bullying. It's rampant with a lot of the lot of the young people that I work with and it some thought that there's been some suggestion that it the effects of this may be more. More lasting severe than face to face based face bowling, for example. So Dr shaves alluded to the fact. I've got two teenagers at my house, so I'm gonna ask a question and went to expect a choir of angels to start to rise up around me as I ask it, how can apparent distinguish normal teen moods, team behavior swings from signs of depression hut. Can you tell the difference? It's a great question and it's a, it's a deceptively simple to in that as you point out teens in general, have a host of neurologic integral suck logic changes because can bring his getting up and can contribute to meeting us and predictably. They tend to think that moms dads are less interesting to be around in the less at this age. Can you imagine didn't happen? I'm sure I know that's why I'm so confused by it, but getting on getting more on point with your question, pervasive changes in what you could you could refer to personality, so dark, dark, irritable moods that are there. All day long day after day after day that are per she added in more than one environment. So if there's feedback from teachers, schools, sports teams, the, you know, Joey, your Sally is just not not the same as they were before declining functioning academics is a as usually big telltale sign that previously a or b students suddenly see your or student changes in peer groups, changes in behaviors, changes in sleeping patterns, and then a focus on dark kind of things. Thoughts are or talk about suicide, for example. And the again, a related question I think would be, what do you do about these these various social media platforms and internet use? And that's another another thing I think broadly, did you stay engaged with your your children and it's not easy in teenagers. A couple of things I wanted to ask you about first of all access. I mean, there are so many more people who seem to be depressed, isn't access to a mental health prof. National more difficult because there are more so many more people out there and not enough of you. And I think the second part of that question is even if you are pretty certain that your child is is depressed. There's concern about how effective the treatment is in what the treatments going to pay. Those are great questions, and the short answer you're absolutely right on the first count that access is to mental health professionals. Psychiatry in particular is not not at all what it should be, and it's even more problematic for young people collectively, we are trying to address that. No mayo clinic is led the way things, for example, that are called collaborative care models or integrative behavioral health where we actually do things like we embed psychiatrist within a large network of primary care clinics for very different kind of role than what we're used to. It's more of a role of supervision coaching consultation on cases, so that family practice doctors, Tournus and pediatricians, for example, get more more depth and more comfortable with. Treating identifying treating things like depression, anxiety, youngster teenager, good things. All good. And to get your to get your other question identification and the definition diagnosis of this is challenging and for parents, it's often the way we do. This is often hard to understand in that we don't, you know, it's based on interviews and questions. There's no lab test or x Ray for this, but ongoing monitoring in mild cases, watchful waiting is appropriate where, again, parents and teachers have awareness. We do very simple, but important things like help youth structure, their sleep hygiene, their habits, their study patterns. But overall, if if symptoms are moderate to severe, they're impeding functioning and academic social and family treatment is important in the first. The first line for depression is usually a combination of psychotherapy, things like cognitive behavioral therapy or what's called interpersonal therapy and the judicious use of medications, and how can parents support thirteen. NHS ongoing communication about about their life in general encouragement, sometimes reminders to to take care of their health overall and setting that example as well making time for family dinner every day, those kind of things. And if parents think it is an emergency, they should call nine one one. Well, unfortunately, depression in suicides in America and including among teenagers is on the rise. It's important though to if there is a problem to get access to mental health care, even though it may be difficult and you've got some effective treatments. Exactly. We've been talking about teenagers and mental health when mayo clinic pediatrics, Kaya trysts are all Corcoran Dr. Clarkin thanks for being with us. Thank you decker shaft. We're going to take a short break. When we come back, we'll look at some new research on diet and dementia. You're listening to Mayo Clinic Radio on the mayo clinic news network. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom shy and I'm Tracy McCray Tracy. We know that a diet that's filled with fruits and vegetables is good for waistline, but it's proving to be good for our brain as well. A recent study published in the journal of Alzheimer's disease showed that people with normal cognitive function who followed a Mediterranean diet had lower amyloid deposits in the brain. As we've learned before on this program, amyloid deposits in the brain are one hallmark of Alzheimer's disease in here to discuss is the lead author of the paper, mayo clinic, epidemiologist, Dr, Maria vassal, Laki, welcome to the program. Thank you for having me. That was pretty, you're Greek is pretty good. Thank you. I assume you are Dr Solanki. Great to have you with us. I, you know, I married into a great family, and so I set nice people. We have. So what's good for the body is good for the brain? Is that what we're saying? This is what we think that is accumulating evidence suggesting that died has been officially fact for the brain to and for against the climb. The my says, well, although we don't have definite evidence for that, but that is good body of literature supporting that. Is that what prompted you to the study? Yes. In the mayo clinic study of aging, we are studying cognitive decline and also by Marcus of Alzheimer's disease. So one of them would be the the position in the brain, and we had this cons and the date do study that inside of the association with diet. So when we talk about amyloid deposition in the brain amyloid is a as I recall, it's been a while protein, right? Yes. And we knew from autopsy studies that patients who had Alzheimer's disease before they died, had these deposits amyloid for whatever reason, there's an association between the two. And now if I'm correct, we can actually. Detect those amyloid deposits under numerous Gan, correct. We, we detect them in, for example, in pets can so we introduce some only gives through the blood and they go and highlight areas of the position. So we have the scans and we know the as where we have elevated amused and you said that you studied people with normal cognitive function. So how do you determine if someone buddies brain is normal and they can be in the study? So in them out participants in the mayo, Cain, excite the venting. They go a very comprehensive competition with nine defense near psychological tests, and then they are evaluated by physi- centers. Well, we also take information by informant the partner. So we have a lot of information. And then by consensus, we gather all the information and the nurse that helped the the coordinator, the physician and the psychologists, they decide based on data that we have. Whether someone would be within the normal function range or someone would have a little more cognitive decline than than we would expect for their age or whether someone would being the dementia, what was the age? They average age of this today participants. So for this Pacific style, the was seventy years and older. So the me Nate is about seventy eight years old fifty, five percent of them were men and what do the studies show ultimately? So we asked them about their eating habits. They last twelve months. So the head Thuan cer- about one hundred and twenty eight different questions on the food groups that they think that the amount and also how often they would. And we found that vein vigils were falling closer, the Mediterranean diet, and those that had the higher Sam shown of vegetables were less likely to have elevated levels of amyloid position in the brain. Now we have to point out that this is a. Sectional study in our terminology, which means this is like a photograph. We don't have the dimension of time, so we don't know what came first and what game second. So as we say in our area of research, we cannot assess the Kazadi between the two. However, we, this is information that supports previous information that we know that that has been officially fact. There's also the possibility that another factor could be in place that we haven't measured that we don't know about yet, but this is a first sign that our study showed supporting evidence of beneficial association. We all talked about it and we've talked about it on this program, but refresh our memories of regard to the Mediterranean diet. We know that it's mostly fruits and vegetables, but what what can't you eat or shouldn't you eat if you're on that diet? So it's it's a very colorful diet. It's high consumption. Oh fruits and vegetables, legumes nuts, also moderate to high consumption face less consumption of meat and saturated fats and more fat in the in terms of olive oil are consumed in the diet. Also, there is optional. Moderate use of alcohol is well mainly wine. And usually it happens in social occasions where it was wine on the list or not on the list. Why was on the list for them died when we started status the nineteen sixties. Now, alcohol is is optional in a way because for some of the conditions, we should not drink. It's very, there's incredible if we cannot control the amount of wine. So it's really optional. All right. The question is people who followed this diet for their entire life. People who live in the Mediterranean, I guess, do they have a lower incidence of Alzheimer's disease than we have? I don't. Don't have a definite answer that as far as research is concerned, very rigorous clinical trials research. So we don't have definite evidence to suggest dietary interventions in our life. Today we have though a big amount of survey tional data in some clinical trials that would support that good violence died like the Mediterranean diet, but also other diets like the dash diet or the mind. Diet were societas with slower cognitive decline. Certain familiar with either one of those, the dash and the what was the other. Mind so that does diet. These, they enter approaches to stop hypertension and the mind is Mediterranean dash interventions for new the generative delay. So haven't studied this. Are you pretty much convinced that murder? Mediterranean diet is a good idea not just before overall health, but also to prevent cognitive decline. Are you convinced? I think we need to learn much more, but with we have enough to follow the advice of the gates now to have a good balance, healthy diet and the Mediterranean diet, but that is one of them. The good thing is that although we don't have any new commendation based on this data, and although we said it's like a photo Akra sectionals Patty, it adds an additional motivation that what is good for my general health. What is good for my cardiovascular can support my brain health, and that can happen directly may be. Through defense mechanisms or indirectly, supporting my cat. Vascular system puts also would be very important for brain health and dimensions. What's next in your research? So what we would like to do and other sets us also doing is to follow people onto the to see whether we follow the Mediterranean diet or any other beneficial diet pattern, whether changes in our bio markets in the brain. I'm for example or changes in our coq nation, beneficial changes associated with a good balanced diet. We've been discussing how diet may play a role in preventing or delaying cognitive decline and dementia with mayo clinic, epidemiologist, Dr. Maria vessel Ocoee. Thanks for joining us Dr. Bustle Ocoee. Thank you for having me, and that's our program for this week. Find more information on the mayo clinic news network to this, your health and medicine questions. Anytime at hashtag Mayo Clinic Radio, you've been listening to Mayo Clinic Radio on the mayo clinic news network producer for the program, Jennifer. Era for Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom. I'm Tracy McCray. Thanks for joining us. Any medical information conveyed during this program is not intended as a substitute for personal medical advice, and you should not take any action before consulting healthcare professionals for more information. Please go to our website, radio dot, mayoclinic dot org. Please join us each week on this station for more of the medical information you want from mayo clinic specialists. No.

Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic Radio Depression Alzheimer's Disease United States Migraine Dr Tom Jive Vivian Williams Tracy Mccray Opioid Abuse Maine Dr Side Medicare Dr. Hucker Cing Dr Shaves Dr. Michael Hooton B. M. Maria Vassal
"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

"We'll explain why regular dental visits are important for adults you're listening to mayo clinic radio on the mayo clinic news network welcome back to mayo clinic radio i'm dr tom shy and i'm tracy mccray have you been putting off your annual checkup with have you been putting off your annual checkup with dentist all you probably skipped it all no not at all well if you have either one of those you're you're not alone recent survey of two thousand adults in the united states found that six in ten adults were scared to visit the dentist that's amazing it is well we know that regular dental checkups help us to keep those pearly whites good oral health is important for overall health as well and here to discuss the importance of regular dental checkups is mayo clinic prostate aunt est is that right correct dr thomas lena's i have learned over the years that's was very good too thanks great thanks for having me so dr selena's did the results of that survey surprise you six hundred ten people are scared to go to the dentist no i think it's pretty common actually looking at the american dental sociation most recent survey of a number of adults both vulnerable and regular populations all have a same similar type common fear the dentist i think it's related to a lot of their perhaps maybe just lack of knowledge of knowing what's involved or what might be involved so it's a common fear we see in the united states unfounded though right well i think i think it is unfounded i think you can have a number of fears at we're all afraid of certainly the fear of the unknown fear of pain for of lack of control those are all common fears that we all experience especially when we visit the dentist a precedent est by what you replace missing parts isn't that what a prosthetic does sub specialty of the official region so we have various types of work that we do related to replacing not just missing teeth but missing parts of the jaw and or facial structures as well some folks missing part of their orbit there i their nose these can be made actually pretty similar fashion as teeth are with perhaps just different materials i think about the people who are afraid to go to the dentist and the fear of pain or the fear of loss of control i guess they touch on things other than dentistry so how can you help a patient to get over those fears i think it all starts one where young you know schooling from very young age as this is something that's normal it's something that is common with regard to health maintenance getting little kids into see the dennis that at a very early age goes on throughout life it goes on through regular practices and seeing your doctor senior dentist and i think if we can just make that happen in general i think that gets to be something that people are less afraid of because it's more familiar preschool age children in this country on really embarrassingly have the highest level of the k and some parts of the world so you know i think a lot of the starts with access to care it starts with just regular oral hygiene there's a number of things that we have available now in the dental setting that makes people a bit calmer when it comes to seeing your dentist with regard to sedation and just relaxation techniques i think dentists now recognize that and many dental offices have become spas more than anything else so people are generally in tune with feeling well and getting the dentist as part of.

mayo clinic
"dr tom shy" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

03:46 min | 3 years ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"All set and make sure you ask about their spring special one thousand dollars off lifetime entry fees freedom boat club of woodbridge wants you to join them right now freedom virginia dot com why welcome back to mayo clinic radio i'm dr tom shy and i'm tracy mccray have you been putting off your annual checkup with the dentist have you been putting off your annual checkup at the dentist you probably skipped it all no not at all well if you have either one of those you're you're not alone a recent survey of two thousand adults in the united states found that six and ten adults were scared to visit the devas that's amazing it is we know that regular dental checkups help us to keep those pearly whites good oral health is important for overall health as well and here to discuss the importance of regular dental checkups is mayo clinic prostate aunt test is that right correct thomas salinas i have learned over the years that's a very good salinas a level thanks great thanks for having me so dr selena's did the results of that survey surprise you six hundred ten people are scared to go to the dentist no i think it's pretty common actually looking at the american dental association's most recent survey of a number of adults both vulnerable and regular populations all have same similar type common fear the dentist i think it's related to a lot of their perhaps maybe just lack of knowledge of knowing what's involved or what might be involved so it's a common fear we see in the united states unfounded though right well i think i think it is unfounded i think you can have a number of fears that we're all afraid of certainly the fear of the unknown fear of pain fear of of lack of control those are all common fears that we all experienced especially when we visit the dentist a precedent est by what you replace missing parts isn't that what does is sub specialty of your facial region so we have various types of work that we do related to replacing not just missing teeth but missing parts of the jaw and facial structures as well some folks are missing part of their orbit there i there knows these could be made actually on pretty similar fashion his teeth are with perhaps just different materials thinking about the people who are afraid to go to the dentist and the fear of pain or the fear of loss of control i guess they touch on things other than dentistry so how can you help a patient to get over those fears i think it all starts when we're young schooling us from a very young age as this is something that's normal it's something that is common with regard to health maintenance getting little kids into see the dentist at a very early age goes on throughout life it goes on through regular practices and seeing your doctor senior dentist and i think if we can just make that happen in general i think that gets to be something that people are less afraid of because it's more familiar preschool age children in this country on really embarrassingly have the highest level of the k and some parts of the world so you know i think a lot of the starts with access to care it starts with just regular oral hygiene there's a number of things that we have available now in the dental setting that makes people a bit calmer when it comes to seeing your dentist with regard to sedation and just relaxation techniques i think dentists now recognize that and many dental offices have become spas more than anything so people are generally in tune with feeling well and getting the dentist as part of this.

one thousand dollars
Lyme Disease isn’t the Only Tick-Borne Illness to Think About

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

10:32 min | 3 years ago

Lyme Disease isn’t the Only Tick-Borne Illness to Think About

"In the sun with your family. You grab the sunscreen because you know a sun protection factor or SPF of thirty is going to protect your exposed skin from getting sunburned. But Dr Don Davis. A mayo clinic dermatologist says, most people don't know that skin covered by clothing still can get sunburned. She says, natural clothing without sun protective factors. We'll have an SPF of approximately one to four based on how tight the we've is and how breathable the material is. So it actually does not give you that much some protection, but she says there are special types of clothing that will protect you. The clothing industry has now allowed micro fibers into certain clothes, which then have a UP f. or universal protection factor that's equivalent to the SPF of sunscreen. She says, universal. -tection factor is even calculated the same way SPF is it's the ratio of the number of minutes. You spend outdoors without developing redness to the skin with the clothing on verses without the clothing on. So Dr Davis says, if you can spend fifty minutes outdoors with a piece of clothing before developing mild readiness versus ten minutes without you would have a protective factor of fifty over ten, which is a UP f of five. So the next time you're shopping for clothes, check the tag to see if it lists the items, universal protection factor, and here's some news about some research mayo clinic is doing to help stop a cancer associated with sun exposure melanoma. The most deadly type of skin cancer mayo clinic center for individualized medicine is learning about melanoma at the molecular level to allow for treatment that better targets and individuals disease. That's because not all melanomas are the same every year about ninety thousand people are diagnosed with melanoma. And more than nine thousand people die from the disease in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, the incidents has been rising for the past thirty years, especially among young people. Mayo researchers are working to find better treatments for the mayo clinic news network. I'm Vivian Williams. Welcome back to Mayo Clinic Radio. I'm Dr Tom shy, and I'm Tracy McCray. Well, Tracy, it's tick season, and it's time actually to learn how to stop those suckers according to a new report from the centers for disease control and prevention. Illnesses caused by disease infected ticks mosquitos and fleas have tripled in the US in recent years, lime disease is the most common illness carried by ticks, but it's not the only one. There's an applause, Moses Ehrlich news what and even Rocky Mountain, spotted fever to just name a few. We'll get to the pronunciation of that in just a second must be lik Yosef here to discuss, tick, borne illnesses and how to prevent them and how to pronounce them as mayo clinic microbiologist and parasite expert, Dr. Bobby Pritt, welcome back to the program, Dr it. Thank you. It's great to be here. The doctor sites has that right. He did Arlecchino SIS. Alright. Why in the world? Is there a tripling in the amount of diseases from these suckers. As doctor says, we have more of them that ticks are spreading their spreading their ranges, and that's due to a lot of different factors. Some of it has to do with weather, some of it has to do with human behavior. A lot of it has to do with hosts like all those dear and wrote cetera out there. They are perfect reservoirs for the ticks defeat on. Over the winter. Now they survive over the winter. They can hang out under the leaves, and then come out as soon as the snow melts is lime disease stole the most common tick illness. It is in the country and particularly in the upper midwest and the northeast, some three hundred thousand cases year more than that. But for a couple of generations ago, no, I'd never heard of Lyme disease. Is it because it had not been diagnosed yet or because there wasn't a Lyme disease. At that point, there was some disease, so it had been diagnosed by then, but there wasn't a lot of it. There weren't as many forested areas where our dear used to like to hang out. We used to be more of a farming society. There used to be wider areas that were just open fields for crops. Now we have all these nice wooded areas that the deer just love the rodents just love that's perfect habitat for ticks. And we love to go out into those beautiful green spaces and and our behavior off. Also drives this. We want to go out and go for a hike in the woods, and we should. It's just now we have to be aware that those ticks and the mosquitoes and the fleas are out there and we have to be able to protect ourselves, shall we get from the tick that bit the deer? Yes. Well, actually it's usually the mouse that it gets it from. So the tick is born not infected with Lyme disease, but then when it bites its first mouse or small rodent, it becomes infected. And then in order to change into its next life cycle stage, it needs to take another meal. And that could be from us. What what dear after do you know the deer are actually more of just a blood source there, a food source, the ticks like defeat on dear, but dare themselves actually don't get infected with Lyme disease, the mice. We blame the deer also part of life cycle though for some of the other things like Anna plasmapheresis in our lick Llosa's when it comes to ticks, is that what the problem is or what are, what are other diseases that ticks spread? Well, as you mentioned, Rocky Mountain, spotted fever, Anna plasma, SIS, there's busy. Oh, SIS Bradley, amo- Twi. That's a mouthful. There's also the to Nick new tick borne diseases that we identified here at mayo clinic Bradley, mayo knee. I named after the mayo brothers and also are leaky Muris. So there have been nine new pathogens spread by ticks or mosquitoes. Just identified since two thousand four is one of those the ones that results in allergy to meet. Yes, that's a really odd one. And people get really. Bad ineffective reaction if they eat meat, if they're bitten by a certain type tick, amazing lime disease, the most common one. So let's say that you know you had a tick on your body or you don't. What are the symptoms? What do you look for for lime disease, fever is one and brash. Those are two big ones all the disease that looks like a target for lime disease. It's that so called target white rash. The problem is is not all people have that. It could also be an hard to see areas like if it's on your scalp under your hair or your back, that's why tick checks with a friend or sometimes helpful. Have sunlight look in the spots that you can't easily see, but even if you don't have a towel rash, if you have other symptoms, you should go to your doctor. You could have body aches, muscle aches. Those are the big ones joint pains. And then how if you, if you have those symptoms go to the physician, how do they diagnose it? How do they know if you have lime disease? There's a few tests we do for Lyme disease. We look for antibodies that your body forums is part of its immune response to the organism. So that's called serologic testing. PCR's not a big part of Lyme disease, but we testing, but we do offer it as more of a junked of test for other diseases. We have PCR test. We have Serology. So we have a number of ways in the laboratory that we can detect these tests and they can be pretty definitive. They can, yes. Are there any advances being made in the battle against the ticks? Yeah, it's interesting that you ask that because there's a whole new tick, borne disease working group that was sponsored by the government, which actually on one of the subcommittees working groups, and we are looking at all of those. Things. What are the gaps in our existing technologies? And then what are some of the new technologies that can help fill those gaps? Does a number of different things be looked at? Some will be going through the FDA for approval, but nothing's really here yet. So we're still, unfortunately relying on technology from the nineteen seventies and eighties like serologic testing. Well, in the tricky thing is back in the nineteen seventies, for instance, if you were going to go onto the woods, you didn't think twice, not maybe at the most. You just looked for ticks on your body when you got back, but times have changed. And so before you go into the forest or through a walk in a meadow or whatever the case is, what should we do about these things? Exactly. If you're going to go out into the woods and you think you're going to go off the beaten trail, you need to be applying some sort of tick or insect repellent. We recommend deet anything with thirty percent deter more. There's also a carrot in the Environmental Protection Agency actually has a whole list of all the different options. And there's also permission that. You can spray on clothing. Essentially, the idea is choose what you're going to be using and make sure you do it consistently. You could also do some simple things like tuck your pants into your socks, less bearskin for those ticks grab onto all good. Good thoughts. So you talked to us about the symptoms of Lyme disease. You talk to us about the diagnosis. They'll tell us about treatment, and if it's important to be treated and if you don't get treated or even sometimes if you do the complications. Yes, treatments important. And if you think you have tick borne disease, you definitely want to go to your physician. Some of these diseases are life threatening things like Rocky Mountain, spotted fever. That's life threatening in children in adults. Erlich Yosef can be life threatening. Usually the treatment is a drug called dachsie cycling, even for children with cases of Rocky Mountain, spotted fever. A lot of times we say, don't give certain antibiotics, doxycycline children that is not the case with Rocky Mountain, spotted fever. So usually antibiotic treatment is required. And most cases patients will respond if they're treated early, if they're not treated, early, complications can arise like with lime disease, the disease can disseminate. It can go to your joints. It can go. To your nervous system and that hurt breaking your heart. People have died of lime and Okada's. So it's important to find out if you have it get a definitive diagnosis and be treated and as early on as possible. Exactly. Is it ever too late to undergo treatment? It's less effective. So I wouldn't say it's too late. You'd still wanna go to your doctor and see what your treatment options are, but it may be less effective. All right.

Lyme Disease Fever Mayo Clinic Rocky Mountain Mayo Clinic Center Mayo Clinic Radio Dr Don Davis Erlich Yosef Mayo Clinic Bradley United States Cancer Tracy Mccray American Cancer Society Dr Tom Shy Sis Bradley Environmental Protection Agenc Vivian Williams Anna Plasmapheresis Moses Ehrlich
"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

05:07 min | 3 years ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

"Welcome back to Mayo Clinic, Radio. I'm Dr. Tom shy, and I'm Tracy, McCray, temporal, manipulate joint. You did that good. That's fine. But I'm going to call it TM Jay from now on the act like a sliding hinge connecting your job own to your skull, and it lets you move your jaw up and down side to side so that you can talk. Thank goodness shoe and yon TM J disorders can cause pain in your jaw joint and in the muscles that control jaw movement. In most cases, the pain and discomfort associated with TM J disorders is temporary, and it could be relieved with self managed care or nonsurgical treatments. But if conservative measures don't work, some people would TM J disorders may benefit from surgery here did discuss is oral Meg Zillow, facial surgeon, Dr.. Jonathan fill more DM de MD, and I saw that on your name tag. And I said, I've never seen that before. DM de MD. What does it mean? A D is just a dental degree equivalent to DDS some say, doctor of mall, dentistry or mass destruction. But he's just a dental degree that's worded by some dental schools. The program welcomed the program director to have you how common RTM J disorders. The estimated incidence in adults in the United States is about five percent. So the best information we have right now is about six percent for women about three percent for men, but there's someone going studies that are setting new light on that right now, so we can get our audience oriented. You can actually feel your TM J J can't you. Yeah. If you press just right in front of your ear and you open and close, you can feel a little bulge and that's common. It feels like it's right under the skin, but actually it's about an inch to an inch and a half deep is just that the joint is very well transmitted through the skin there. Here's where you're gonna. Wanna watch this on YouTube. Got it. Okay. How do you know that you've got trouble with your team J with that area? So the main problems are with dysfunction that involve opening and closing or chewing, and most of it has to do with either pain, or if you have a problem with the actual motion where you might have some locking or things like that. And I would hasten to say that a lot of times people will say, well, I have TM, Jay, which is a a place and TMD being temperamental disorders a little bit more specific, but it can involve problems with the bone and the joint, but it can also involve problems with the surrounding musculature. And so sometimes those are easily confused and sometimes even for a doctor, a difficult to distinguish tension in your jaw, is that part that leads to a problem with your J? Yes. So you can have problems with jaw posturing or with grinding and clenching those common. Only will cause problems associated with the the powerful muscles that close your jaw, the master muscles, that one that you can feel when your job bulges out on the side when you clench down or your temporarily muscle appear on your by the temples, you can feel. So those often will become sore when people have those clenching or grinding job posturing habits when they carry a lot of tension in their job. In some cases, those can contribute toward having problems with the joint itself because it increases the load that you're putting on the joint. But in many cases, it's mostly muscular problem. It tells about the joint itself. I mean there these two bones that are connected and isn't there a little disc in between the two bones to help cushion the motion? That's right. So the base of your skull, I guess you could say it's the socket portion and the ball portion is part of your lower jaw mandible, and they slide. And like you said, in the beginning, it's a sliding hinge and the disc is a pad that helps kind of negotiate that movement as it moves back and forth, and that can wear out is certainly can. You can have tears in it. It can have a hole in it can become a displaced anterior Lee. So it forward where people will get kinda stuck on it and have a hard time opening things like that. That's going to be terribly painful or is it just bothersome? That's a another great question. So in many individuals, the disk does get out of place and they'll have a click. The click is usually painless, and that's okay. If you have range of motion and you have click in your job, it's extremely common. I got a brother-in-law who's always begging me to fix the click in his jaw and say, I'm not touching you. You're gonna be okay, but if it becomes a painful click or if you have a problem where you had some clicking and then it's gone and you can't open anymore, you're probably stuck behind that disc. You could go onto adapt or you may be candidate who need surgery. May I demonstrate.

Jay Mayo Clinic Dr. Tom shy Meg Zillow United States YouTube program director Jonathan Tracy McCray TMD Lee three percent five percent six percent
"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

Mayo Clinic Health Minute

05:07 min | 3 years ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Health Minute

"Welcome back to Mayo Clinic, Radio. I'm Dr. Tom shy, and I'm Tracy, McCray, temporal, manipulate joint. You did that good. That's fine. But I'm going to call it TM Jay from now on the act like a sliding hinge connecting your job own to your skull, and it lets you move your jaw up and down side to side so that you can talk. Thank goodness shoe and yon TM J disorders can cause pain in your jaw joint and in the muscles that control jaw movement. In most cases, the pain and discomfort associated with TM J disorders is temporary, and it could be relieved with self managed care or nonsurgical treatments. But if conservative measures don't work, some people would TM J disorders may benefit from surgery here did discuss is oral Meg Zillow, facial surgeon, Dr.. Jonathan fill more DM de MD, and I saw that on your name tag. And I said, I've never seen that before. DM de MD. What does it mean? A D is just a dental degree equivalent to DDS some say, doctor of mall, dentistry or mass destruction. But he's just a dental degree that's worded by some dental schools. The program welcomed the program director to have you how common RTM J disorders. The estimated incidence in adults in the United States is about five percent. So the best information we have right now is about six percent for women about three percent for men, but there's someone going studies that are setting new light on that right now, so we can get our audience oriented. You can actually feel your TM J J can't you. Yeah. If you press just right in front of your ear and you open and close, you can feel a little bulge and that's common. It feels like it's right under the skin, but actually it's about an inch to an inch and a half deep is just that the joint is very well transmitted through the skin there. Here's where you're gonna. Wanna watch this on YouTube. Got it. Okay. How do you know that you've got trouble with your team J with that area? So the main problems are with dysfunction that involve opening and closing or chewing, and most of it has to do with either pain, or if you have a problem with the actual motion where you might have some locking or things like that. And I would hasten to say that a lot of times people will say, well, I have TM, Jay, which is a a place and TMD being temperamental disorders a little bit more specific, but it can involve problems with the bone and the joint, but it can also involve problems with the surrounding musculature. And so sometimes those are easily confused and sometimes even for a doctor, a difficult to distinguish tension in your jaw, is that part that leads to a problem with your J? Yes. So you can have problems with jaw posturing or with grinding and clenching those common. Only will cause problems associated with the the powerful muscles that close your jaw, the master muscles, that one that you can feel when your job bulges out on the side when you clench down or your temporarily muscle appear on your by the temples, you can feel. So those often will become sore when people have those clenching or grinding job posturing habits when they carry a lot of tension in their job. In some cases, those can contribute toward having problems with the joint itself because it increases the load that you're putting on the joint. But in many cases, it's mostly muscular problem. It tells about the joint itself. I mean there these two bones that are connected and isn't there a little disc in between the two bones to help cushion the motion? That's right. So the base of your skull, I guess you could say it's the socket portion and the ball portion is part of your lower jaw mandible, and they slide. And like you said, in the beginning, it's a sliding hinge and the disc is a pad that helps kind of negotiate that movement as it moves back and forth, and that can wear out is certainly can. You can have tears in it. It can have a hole in it can become a displaced anterior Lee. So it forward where people will get kinda stuck on it and have a hard time opening things like that. That's going to be terribly painful or is it just bothersome? That's a another great question. So in many individuals, the disk does get out of place and they'll have a click. The click is usually painless, and that's okay. If you have range of motion and you have click in your job, it's extremely common. I got a brother-in-law who's always begging me to fix the click in his jaw and say, I'm not touching you. You're gonna be okay, but if it becomes a painful click or if you have a problem where you had some clicking and then it's gone and you can't open anymore, you're probably stuck behind that disc. You could go onto adapt or you may be candidate who need surgery. May I demonstrate.

Jay Mayo Clinic Dr. Tom shy Meg Zillow United States YouTube program director Jonathan Tracy McCray TMD Lee three percent five percent six percent
"dr tom shy" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Welcome back to mayo clinic radio i'm dr tom shy i'm tracy mccray we are with dr donald hensrud he's an expert in public health and preventive medicine and also the author of the mayo clinic diet book so dr hensrud we all you have a question before we get to memento matter of fact diary food diaries i mean between keeping a diary for macho man spending and how much i'm eating i i lose out both ways how helpful is a food diary it can be very helpful for some people first of all there's a food record where you just write down what you eat a food diary you may include other things where you were who you were with how you were feeling and it can help people identifies situations where they might overeat or you are feeling is interesting it is and weight loss's very interesting weight management the psychological effect of that is tremendous and people who've tried to lose weight worked with them for years and years there's a vicious cycle will that develops people feel guilty they beat themselves up they've then they eat more and then they feel more guilty it can really impact somebody's psyche we try and take the heavy lifting off of them and get them to enjoy food and how they're feeling when they're with somebody they enjoy and paradoxically that can help help better eat better and manage wait i love cheetos you love ice cream there is an emotion and forget they're both good for you all right mithra matter of fact red meat is killing us well if you look at the objective data yes read especially processed meat is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer.

tracy mccray dr donald hensrud mayo clinic dr tom shy
"dr tom shy" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"An that i can find that um having access to delight in view along with uh changes and electrical lighting impacted she let's be so we really homed in on that on these two i subsequent studies showing one of near testing the effect of uh having access to delight and you and how that impact uh people's productivity in their performance in their satisfaction and in another study or specifically focusing on blue enriched late and how that intact their performance um there's out of action and there's a lot we're talking about the living lab were learning about the work environment with dr brent bauer medical director of the while living lab and for montreal canada behavioural science consultant dr anya yum rasic thanks so much of ring let us both of you are pleasure old you can watch and that's our program for this week for more information visit the mayo clinic news network for today's podcast and previously aired programs tweet us your health and medicine questions any time at hashtag mayo clinic radio or email us at mayo clinic radio app news network dot mayo eighty you may answer your question during an upcoming program you've been listening to mayo clinic radio on the mayo clinic news network producer for the program is jennifer o'hara for mayo clinic radio i'm dr tom shy said i'm tracy mccray thanks for joining us any medical information conveyed during this program is not intended as a substitute for personal medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting a healthcare professionals for more information please go to our website radio dutton mayo clinic dot org please join us each week on this station for more of the medical information you want from mayo clinic specialists no these days it's more important than ever to look good especially for small business and on social media the answer is creator seven easy to use software get let you create amazing logos images business cards character mascot you name it on pc or mack easy to use amazing logos and designs where do i get creators seven just visit radio show logo.

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"dr tom shy" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Mm sd card block of that dalil clinic radio i'm dr tom shy of and i'm tracy mccray well it's a time of year tracy chicane were unfortunately not talking about the holidays it is flu season here in the united states you haven't had yet i will possibly going on yeah thanks giving well when you're in california i think i was ill in with the flu while we should have had the doctor on a month at gulf sorry about that well influenza as you probably know as a contagious respiratory or or longer breathing infection and it's an illness that caused by viruses that can allows you know make you miserable a fever chills cough headaches all common symptoms of the flu i had all four of those at probably at it i know seasonal influenza in the u s usually peaks between december and february although flu season can vary from geared a year and experts are worried that this could be a particularly bad year is that hype that fake news i dunno he'll go to find out here to discuss flu season is the head of mayo clinic's vaccine research group dr gregory poland welcome back to the program dr poland you good to be here can hardly look you in the eye and admit that i just got my flu shot this morning an hour ago i got my flu shot oh you know don't feel bad about that because we do say to people get it as soon as it comes out but you made a very important point the peak of our influenza season the us's typically between december and february march time frame so the point is it's not too late to get it and remember when you do get it takes about two two weeks to get that peak of immunities so we don't wanna wait any longer so i guess that brings up the question what do we know about the flu season so far and the effectiveness of the vaccine shaping up to be a.

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"dr tom shy" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"The money will go and how you could get involved her theme holland can river keepers will tell us about the wreath boris the red and new effort to plant trees along the red river it will tell you have any threes will go and we'll also preview the bike mud that i had opened her and give away at other one hundred dollars at the rush limbaugh raise the pay as monday on the need to delve morning so six about a about arab 1100 the flag w e f g sd card back to mayo clinic radio i'm dr tom shy vw's and i'm tracy mccray tracy according to the cdc the centers for disease control and prevention in the last fifteen years the number of people who have been given and opioid prescription and the number of deaths from an opioid overdose have nearly quadrupled i mean it's like we're in in this stuff out like candy big problem the alarming statistics don't really stop there it's estimated that more than twelve million americans miss used prescription old beal aides last year there's no doubt that we have an opioid epidemic in america so what's the root of the problem then how can we find solutions here to discuss the opioid epidemic is mayo clinic ends these yala gist and pain medicine experts dr michael hooten welcome back to the program dr hoon it's good to see you again thank you in beer what is it that makes you interested in studying studying opioid abuse the the interest m's primarily from the.

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"dr tom shy" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"dr tom shy" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"Skimpy insurance coverage had a low price but it may not help on when they get said senate republican leader mitch mcconnell has put off this week's vote until next week at the earliest police dog confirming seven people are dead three others missing after flash flooding swept away a family at a swimming holen central arizona this weekend at least two of the dead were children the cold spring swimming holds about ninety miles north of phoenix where monsoon storms are expected there through the middle of this week president trump's personal lawyer says no crime was committed when president trump's son and his soninlaw took a meeting with the russian lawyer after being told she was with the russian government j secolo on nbc's meet the press is nothing illegal about that meeting so that's live wunderlich covering up is is a a big word to use but there was nothing illegal to cover up but adam schiff top democrat on the house intelligence committee says you can't say that yet if there's any kind of and understand the comes out of that meeting you get us the dirt you start leaking durham hillary clinton and we will look favourably on repeal the magnitsky act that is a very serious crimes schiff on abc's this week magnitsky act leading sanctions against russia i'm michael toscano in time now for your alternates talk weather outlook and we can expect mostly cloudy skies today through this evening the daytime highs in the upper 60s to lower 70s overnight lows will be in the upper 40s to lower 50s sunny and warm on monday with afternoon highs in the mid 70s win nsw will be out of the south between ten and fifteen miles per hour find our app in the apple app store or google play and take us with you wherever you go alternative talk am 1150 i'm dr tom shy and i'm tracy mccray we hope you'll join as for mayo clinic radio on the mayo clinic news network we circle it the gameboy it thumb actually because it was the same type of a phenomenon we tend to hold the device in the same position in the hand and because we're using both of the.

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