18 Burst results for "Dr Terence"

The Evolution of ML  and Furry Little Animals

Talking Machines

08:58 min | 9 months ago

The Evolution of ML and Furry Little Animals

"You are listening to talking machines Catherine Gorman Lawrence and Neil. We are again taping an episode in front of a live audience digitally recorded though on on talking machines. And if you want to be part of our live. Studio audience big quotes. You can follow us on twitter at Ti Okay. N. G. M. C. H. S. Or hit us up on the talking machines at gmail.com and our guest today for this interview on talking. Machines is Dr Terence. Annouce key doctors and thank you so much for taking the time to join us today. I really appreciate it Great to be here so we ask all of our guests the same question I. How did you get where you are? What's been your academic and industrial journey. You're also very involved in the reps conference. Tell US everything well. A wise man once told me that careers are only made retrospectively and I have no idea how he got here. There was no plan. It went through a sequence of stages starting with graduate school at Princeton in theoretical physics. From there when I finished that I for reasons that have to do with the field of physics. At the time which was a little bit more bummed I went into neuroscience so that was a post doc and then from there that's when I met. Geoffrey Hinton and had changed my life because we met him at a small seminar here in San Diego and set nineteen seventy nine. We hit it off and From that over the next few years you know blossoms the the Boehner Sheen and back prop and you know. The rest was history. Terry who you post talking with where you post talking in San Diego no no. This was a post doc at Harvard. Medical School in the Department of Neurobiology with Stephen Kofler who was widely considered to be the founder of modern neurobiology and It was an experimental post. Doc I actually recorded from neurons. Subic seventy nine. You mentioning physics. It was a little bit more bond a in some sort of connection modeling. That was also a very quiet period. That wasn't a lot going on it. Was this sort of age of classical. Ai Right you're absolutely right. This was in fact. It was the neural network winter. The seventies and it was primarily because of the failure of the perception. That's neat because you say failure of the percents on I read about that a lot. Do you really did fail. All was the men's ski paper little. What the mid ski books are in Minsk. Eighty books have killed it but was it a fair representation. Well you know it's interesting. I think that that's the myth that that book killed it but I actually think that there are other things going on and and Rosenblatt had died as well which seems pretty significant. Yes well He. He was a pioneer. But you have to understand that digital computers were regally primitive back. Then you know that even the most expensive you know the biggest computers you could buy. Don't have the power of your wristwatch today. Rosenblatt actually had to build an analog device. It a million dollars in today's dollars to build a analog device that had potentially otters driven by motors for the weight sums the learning. Wasn't it potentially because you know digital computers? Were good at logic but they were terrible. Doing a floating point is amazing so he built that at Cornell. Right that's right yeah Funded by the owner. Any case by by the time that we were getting started computers was the vaccine era. It was becoming possible. Do Simulations You know they were small-scale by today's standards but but really meant we could explorer in a way that Frank Rosenblatt couldn't so what you're saying around the perceptual and so just forbid of context for Central and sixty one. Is that right? It was fifty nine. I think it was the book but you know it was in that era of early sixty zero and so then there's this period where the digital computer actually wasn't powerful enough to do much and then digital kind of overtook and divinity but these analog machines would just now impractical from a point of view of expense. So you're saying it's less the book and more of a shift to the Digital Machine. That in those early days wasn't powerful enough to simulate the perception. Yes so I I have you know. I have a feeling that history will show that A. I was like the blind man looking under the Lamppost. His keys and someone came along and said where did you lose your keys He said well somewhere else. But this is the only place right can see. I was reading Donald BACI quote. I recently At the beginning of his book about the I which is just a fascinating area and I guess he spent a lot of his career and he did work in in the wool on radar and he was talking about the Radio Club. Which is these early Cybernet assist and the potential of the analog or digital computer to be what represented the brain and his perspective was he. He was sure it wasn't a digital computer and he wasn't sure it was an analog computer either and he thought it was kind of somewhere in between but it feels like that in between is what you're saying is that was the difficult bit to look and perhaps a police were able to look now. That's right I you know. It's I think it's being driven. This is true all science that what you cannot understand is is really determined by the tools that you have for making measurements for doing simulations in it's really only this modern era that has given us enough tools both to make progress with understanding how the brain works and also with a because of the fact that we have a tremendous amount of power now but just to go back to that early era. I think you know I once asked L. Annual you know who is at Carnegie Mellon and it was a time when Geoff Hinton was an assistant professor and I was at Johns Hopkins and I you know he was at the first fifty six meeting at Dartmouth or a I was born and I I said well. Why was it that you didn't look at the brain and for for inspiration and he said well we did. But there wasn't very much known about the at the time to help us out so we just had make doing our own and he's right. That was a era. You know the the fifties was kind of the the beginning of what we now understand about the signals in the brain. Actually potential synoptic potentials. So you know in a sense. What what he was saying was that we basically use the tools we have available the time which was basically computers but what they were good at. What were they good at? They were good at logic at rules. A binary programming. So that you know that was In a sense they were forced to do that. That's a really. WanNa come back to nine hundred seventy nine in a moment but this is an interesting context to that because of course. Vena initially was someone who spread across. Both these areas of Norbert Vena who was at mit founded cybernetics spread across both these areas of the analog and digital he did his PhD thesis on Russell and Whitehead's book but one thing I was reading about recently is there was a big falling out between Vina. I'm McCulloch Pitts. And it's sort of interesting. That Vena wasn't there at the I. E. T. in fifty six and I sometimes wonder was that more about personalities and wanting this sort of old guard to stay away because you always feel veto with someone who who bridge these worlds it. You know that's the fascinating story. I actually wrote a review of a book about Warren McCulloch came up. They were friends. They actually had had been friends yet. It has something to do with their wife's. Yeah I think the lifestyle McCullough was not line with its a side story but but I guess the point you're making which I think is an I'd like us to take us back to seventy nine and the meeting with Jeff is and I think that that's true. Despite the story between humans the real factor that drove things then was the sudden available at a t of increasing cheap digital computer. And no longer the need to do this work that Rosenblatt and McCain and others had done having to wire together a bunch of analog circuits. That you couldn't reprogram to build system. Yeah I think that was a dead. End It for the very reason you gave. Which is that you know you. It's a special purpose device. That isn't good for anything else. And and really if you're trying to explore you need the flexibility of being able to try many ideas and that's in that really is a digital simulation allows you to

Frank Rosenblatt Geoffrey Hinton San Diego Norbert Vena Twitter Catherine Gorman Lawrence Dr Terence Subic N. G. M. C. H. S. Harvard Minsk Boehner Sheen Warren Mcculloch Princeton Cornell Donald Baci Terry Mcculloch Pitts
"dr terence" Discussed on Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"dr terence" Discussed on Your Dream Life with Kristina Karlsson, kikki.K

"Who are the people in your dream life right down whatever comes to mind. What change do you have to help your loved? Ones Your family your friends thinking about the k. people in your life. What are you drains for them? Now that putting expectations on others can be potentially intially restricting for them but in general terms but are you hopes and dreams for key people in your life and what would you want for them. What can you do to help make that happen right? Whatever comes to mind What you dream of for your community? The amazing Dr Terence Trent who features in my book titled Title Dreams To the Betterment of others. What dreams do you have for the betterment of your family or the betterment of your community or or the world in general of any dreams return so far that can be tied to debate amount of others to give them right it maiming you use your imagination and write down whatever comes to mind? How could you tell your dreams to the betterment of your family? Your friends your community the world now that you have worked through these questions ones Ruben this recording and keep cycling through these questions until you feel you have captured s Minna Dreams as possible on paper when you can't think of any more answers to the questions put pen down and just breathe breath well done you have.

Minna Dreams Dr Terence Trent Ruben
"dr terence" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"dr terence" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"The founder and president of the classic learning tests and the website again, a seal t- exam dot com dot com LT exam dot com. Okay. You just said that Benjamin Franklin has been purged from the SAT's the, and therefore I guess he's being taught less in secondary education. Why in the world? Would they do that? Because Franklin was not a theologically orthodox Christian of any kind. He was kind of a Yankee wit. And you know, why would they do that mentioned earlier? Terrence Moore the story killers, which I think is if you want to understand the common core and the history the lead up to it story killers. I highly recommend he's been a lot of time on Franklin quintessential Franklin is self reliance. And it's it's responsibility innovation crease lately against the socialist model that we're beginning to adopt in America in Venezuela story killers is the book what's his name again? Terrence Dr Terence more see he's actually a principal at a cent classical in Colorado. Okay. She's a publicly funded charter school. Okay. So Franklin is. One of many, and I think Franklin not an orthodox Christian, of course. But Christian authors as well from Jonathan Edwards to were kind of a staple of American al-salam. Yeah. For generations. But how do you get away from that? Emerson Thoreau are kind of on the back of Franklin. I mean, how do you get away from you know, self reliance is part of what thorough talks about? I mean. I guess what's wrong with self reliance. What's the what's the issue there? That's kind of that's kind of amazing to me that somebody's gonna going to take issue with self reliance. Yeah. So Dr more what he would point to in story killers is a dependency on the state rather than a dependency on oneself. And they kind of in that you see the political what he believes are very strong political underpinnings from very one sided common core. But so it's not too much to call us at least, I wouldn't think cultural Marxism. It certainly too much for you. Because you have to be careful, but it's not too much for me to say, cultural, Marxism, this is very disturbing. And I think that there are a lot of good, folks. Listen to the show who know what we're talking about. And I think they're probably has thrilled as I to know of the existence of the classic learning tests because we do have to do whatever we can do. And I think this is a great you've given people a great lever as I say Bush. Yeah, you wouldn't suspected often people think? Okay. SAT ACT I'm giving up three or four hours on a Saturday. A couple two or three times a year junior senior in high school, but it is this kind of precise wedge that really is the engine behind what is actually driving all it really even into the lower grades middle schools and beyond American curriculum. Well, look, the idea that they're pushing out Ben Franklin that is sheer lunacy. I can understand if somebody says, well, we don't like Columbus. Because. But I get at least begin to understand somebody's point. But in the case of Ben Franklin. It's madness. I mean Franklin is as American as it gets and the common core..

Benjamin Franklin founder and president Franklin Terrence Moore Terrence Dr Terence Jonathan Edwards Emerson Thoreau Venezuela America Columbus Colorado Bush four hours
"dr terence" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"dr terence" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Talk thirteen AWOL him on all these cab county educators who came out and community supporters for their health fair the health initiative, they emit beautiful card. Just thank you. Thank you. Dr Tiffany Brown. Dr Maliki Douglas, Dr Terence Harvey, and Dr Mr Robert r Mr. Tarrant Harvey, and Mr Robert, hey, good, and miss Chauncey Rosiere all of that great in hard work that you all the pudding in in the community while the health fair and kind of education round up for the cab county. We predate you all for caring enough for the community. Go beyond the call of duty this let's go back to Mel what a bus leaving from give us all the information phone number and tell us how people can put their young people on the bus, and what they need to do at this point. At this point, they need to call the office or call call myself four zero four seven three four zero nine one four number again, really slowly four zero four seven three four zero nine one four or they can go online ups and dot or G UP C, N dot ORG. UPC in dot ORG will leave in six o'clock in the morning in front of the serenity club serenity clubs directly across the street from the driving fitter on more than avenue nineteen thirty three mauling avenue. That's nineteen thirty three more than avenue directly across the street from the drive in theater, we should be. We'll leave it around six o'clock. And then we'll should be returning around somewhere around six thirty seven o'clock. It's a four and a half hour drive is an hour difference from here, and we will be serving some food and feeding the students, but it's a dynamite. A very good opportunity because I've seen a whole lot of kids lives change just by having the the exposure again, they can reach me or if they can't get to me tonight. Then you.

Dr Tiffany Brown Dr Mr Robert Dr Maliki Douglas Dr Terence Harvey Mel Mr Robert Chauncey Rosiere Mr. Tarrant Harvey
"dr terence" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

06:08 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"KOA NewsRadio eight it's a Monday show. It's a little schizophrenic. That's okay. All over the place because we got cool stuff coming up right now. I have a guest in the studio now his name is Ethan, Cranston. He is from golden view classical academy and Ethan made a little movie, and he wants more money for as little movie. So let's talk about it for a second and pull that microphone right towards you. So it's uncomfortably close as what I always tell people up. Wait. Let's turn. There we go. Congratulations on your big win, Ethan or thank you so much and thanks for having me on the show. We'll tell people about the contest for C span. Well, she's been every year puts on student Cam documentary contest. Essentially, what this is put together a forty five minute video on talking about that your topic. This year is what does it mean to be an American now, what grade are you in senior, the senior, okay? Back when I was a kid Ethan these documentary contest, we had essay contest and speech contest. I feel like this is almost replace that a little bit because the topics are very similar, and this year's topic was what it means to be an American, and yours I just posted a link to it on YouTube. I couldn't I couldn't figure out a way to embed it. So I posted a link on YouTube all go back in and bet it after the show 'cause I can't embed it from YouTube. So don't worry about that book. But how did you decide how to approach this because yours I haven't seen anybody else's, but yours is very inspiring. I think that that's the phrase all us. It's very it's you're just talking to regular people. How did you come up with the concept of what you are documentary was going to be about our, thanks? But don't worry. We still have plenty of essay contest to go around. Okay. Good good. Yeah. But as far as they came up with the my answer to the question with how what it means to be an American which is a spirit of exploration is I started where most people do. Do is coming up something like freedom opportunity. Liberty one word prototypical American virtues that are certainly true. But might not be uniquely American Express the whole idea. So from there, I tried to look at our political structure see may there's a predominant political idea. But as is obvious, excuse me, as is obvious on a very polarized system. So there isn't really one emergent view that we can consider to be American. So from there, I talked to a historian Dr Terence more to learn about what people the past it thought and most notably. He talked about Alexis de Tocqueville who came over to American looked at everyone around here and a few things that he noticed is first that there's a lot of bankruptcies. Yeah. There you go. Okay. We're bankrupt society but without without risk. There is no bankruptcy. Exactly. And why well that might not appear to initially be a great thing what he took away from. It is the people are willing to take risks willing to explore and with that is also the spirit of the frontier that was expressed to that time people going off and exploring frontier in the modern day. We might not have that same manifest destiny. Going in our trailer to new lands, but we can still be exploring new highs of technology or whatnot. I thought it was a very interesting Tien considering you live here, which was frontier for a very long time. I mean Denver was kind of a window to the west in a lot of ways. And I always think when I'm driving across Kansas. I always think man what it must have been like to be that first pioneer driving across and thinking this flat desert. This flat plane is never going to end it just goes on and on. But I thought that was it was that on purpose that you kind of went. Okay. I'm in Denver. What can I incorporate it from that that the the mentality of of Denver writes, well, I think it takes a certain type of people to be willing to go across that intimidating landscape. Yeah. And they got they saw the Rockies. They're like. Nope. Here's good. That's free. Pretty much is Denver's made up of a bunch of people who said, no, here's good. This is fine. I'll just stop here. Go ahead. Yeah. So that certain type of person is the American as Tocqueville says. So I think this is applicable anywhere in. Erica. But of course, being here helps you come up with the idea and really see it information. Now, you go to a very very successful charter school. And I think that that has given you a different perspective than some other of your peers have gotten did you have a chance to look at some of the other films that that you were up against and sort of gauge them for their feeling versus how you approach this. Do you? Do you feel like you came at it from a different perspective? Certainly a excuse me looking at a few others. They're all very interesting. They took on important issues. I focused more on the the classical traditional on aspect of the question of historically. What does it mean to be an American? There's that still apply today. I'm part of which is definitely because the school the doctor. Terrence more this store, and I spoke with actually used to be a history teacher at the school. Now is this the first year you entered? No, it's not this is my fourth year entering my third time winning something as very nice. What are you doing with all your filthy lucre, your your big two hundred and fifty bucks that you one here better their sharp stick in the eye? Yeah. I wish I could say I was doing something siding with it. But I'm saving for college. Chats exciting. That's a very very good plan. Now, can you is this just for high school students or is this something you can do in college as well? Unfortunately, this is going to be my last year, it is just through high school is this something you want to pursue making. Or is this something that you do for fun? Or is this something you go? Wait a minute. You know, documentaries are having a more. Now, Ethan, they're having a moment. Yeah. All these video and photography has started out as a hobby. But it's really interesting field media as a whole, and I looked to pursue in the future. Do you know what else you might wanna do? Yeah. Currently I'm enrolled at the school of mines to study, mechanical engineering. So that's a your real slacker. You're a real layabout you're gonna have trouble getting through life at this at this rate anyway way that I really just wanted to have you on and congratulate you and let people know that we have an award winning filmmaker in our midst right here in golden. And I I would say I wish you nothing, but the best in the future. But I think you're gonna be fine. All right. Well, thank you very much. That's Ethan, Cranston. Let's check in on the traffic.

Ethan Denver Alexis de Tocqueville Cranston YouTube KOA American Express Terrence Dr Terence Rockies Kansas Tien Erica forty five minute
"dr terence" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"In. The screener says his savings are running very very low. He's already had an impact, you know. I don't know how long I can stay afloat. No meetings are playing for today in DC to talk about ending the partial shutdown President Trump says the deadly bomb attack on US troops in Syria will not alter his plan for Syria commander in chief is telling top senators in a private meeting. He is not going to radically adjusts his plans to draw down US troops in both Syria and Afghanistan all this coming after US central command confirmed that four Americans were killed in an explosion in Syria to US troops as well. As to American civilian defense workers this coming just days after ministration began the process of withdrawing troops Republican rand Paul though said he's proud of the president this president has guts to tell a group of senators as well as the American people writ large at the US has been at war in too many places for too long and that the president is following through on his America. First campaign promise health officials say the anti vaccine movement has reached crisis. Proportion study from last year ranked Austin and Travis county among the top fifteen areas with the highest rates of people opting children out of vaccinations for non medical reasons. Dr Terence McCarty with Texas health says the vaccine hesitancy movement is now one of the top ten health threats across the world. It really is incumbent physicians to have these conversations with their patient and just how the parents are concerned he says foreign away the greater risk is developing those diseases. The vaccines are designed to prevent adding that there's no scientific validity between alleged links to autism and vaccines, Patrick Osborne. Newsradiokkob J thirty-three. Here's Austin's on time traffic.

president US Syria Patrick Osborne Dr Terence McCarty rand Paul Austin Travis county DC Texas America Afghanistan
"dr terence" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Legal path to immigration are being affected by this partial shutdown. Attorney Hans Meyer in Denver says the partial government shutdown has led to the cancellation of thousands of non detention immigration hearings. People who are trying to take the legal steps they need to become citizens following the law trying to get their day in court. So they can get a decision to either grant than their status or maintain their status, and they can't get their day in court, which is immensely frustrating. Because in some cases, eligibility might be at issue, if we wait too long, researchers at Syracuse university are estimating nearly seventy thousand immigration cases, have to be postponed. I'm Jacky Quin charge of official oppression against former Williamson county judge Dan Gaddis has been dropped sheriff Robert showed he sent word to county officials. He no longer wants to pursue. That charge. Gaddis was charged last year after allegedly threatening to zero out showed his budget. Let's see stop tweeting about things Gaddis found to be too. Controversial. The Hutto school district is rezoning at schools again to stay ahead of population growth, the school board will vote tonight on a new zoning map, which is necessary because the district needs to fill the new curly elementary with as many as six hundred students when it opens up in the fall. But parents like crystal Ashley say it's frustrating because kids are shuffled from campus to campus every time schools are rezoned. She spoke with CBS Austin going from kindergarten in one school first through third in one school and fourth and fifth and another says, it's unfortunately part and parcel for fast growing school districts, and it won't be the last time, however, any new school zoning likely won't happen for another five years. Patrick osborne. Newsradio KLBJ World Health Organization says the anti vaccine movement is now one of the top ten health threats to the world. Dr Terence McCarthy from Texas health says the vaccine hesitancy movement started on research that was later discredited the diseases that the vaccine. Are so affected by preventing any connection between autism or any other diseases. It's not at all a scientifically shown to be valid a report from last year. Right. Travis county among the top fifteen areas in the nation with the highest opt out rates for vaccinations. Seven thirty three at KLBJ. Here's Austin's on time traffic.

Dan Gaddis Hutto school district Robert Austin crystal Ashley Travis county Hans Meyer Denver Williamson county Jacky Quin Patrick osborne Syracuse university World Health Organization Dr Terence McCarthy Attorney Newsradio CBS Texas official five years
"dr terence" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:54 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Have you seen any problems and Austin's airports this ongoing? Partial government shutdown is taking its toll on air travel TSA suggesting travelers to arrive early as many federal employees are left without immediate pay. Yeah. The national air traffic controllers association is suing the Trump administration over the shutdown the president of the union, Paul Rinaldi. He was on FOX business channel last night. It's really starting to deteriorated that long. This goes it's really become deep concern of ours. We're starting to see officiency capacity, and certainly safeties Sautin to a road. Now. President Trump signed a Bill providing back pay to federal employees who are affected by this ongoing partial shutdown, but what is he talking about? What is he talking about? Specifically our safety is in risk here. What does he what does he what does? He mean. It's really starting to deteriorate it that long. This goes it's really become deep concern of ours. We're starting to see efficiency capacity, and certainly safe. 'these Sautin to a road safety is starting to erode now understand capacity is starting to erode because we have some terminals that have been shut down at various airports. But what does he talk about? Specifically are you concerned about your safety and Austin's airport? Well, I wouldn't be yet. But understand the threat of it as far as TSA being affected a lot of people don't feel like TSA provides much safety. I I disagree. But, but I understand the possible threat there, I what I'm hearing though, Austin airport things are still running real well as far as people getting through security, they're still getting through pretty quickly. But I wonder because I know that things have been affected by by this strike out there or the shutdown. I wonder if part of the reason things are still moving well is because people are heating the warning and getting out there earlier thinking there are going to be problems. And that's keeping the flow going much better. And it's very possible versus a bottleneck as you see a lot. Listen, I hesitate to bring this next story up. But it is in the news. It is a big story. And if you're an anti faxer get ready here, we go five one two eight three six zero five. Here we go you anti factors out there. And Austin has the most and Texas is leading the nation with anti vaxxers. You're you're you're creating a dangerous world, and it's all your fault, according to the weld health or the World Health Organization, they say the anti vaccine movement is now one of the top ten health threats. The world is facing Dr Terence McCarthy with the Texas health. So the vaccine hesitancy movement started on research that was later discredited. The greater has the diseases that affects danger so affected by preventing any. Connection between autism or any other diseases. It's not at all a scientifically shown to be valid. Yeah. Report last year ranked Travis county among the top fifteen areas in the nation what the highest opt out rates when it comes to vaccinations. It's your fault anti vaccine moms and dads hard to take in. You you have. Now, you have now joined the various viruses diseases that kill the world. You're now among the top ten most threatening things on this planet. You're being brutally honest there. But that's not me not me. I know the World Health Organization the numbers Perry. Mccarthy says you're a threat. Yeah. There's data to support. What Todd is talking about. The you cannot argue it. I don't have kids, but I could not imagine having children and not vaccinating them for what you need to vaccinate them for equate that to buying a car and saying, you know, what I had this new car, but I'm not going to change the oil. I'm not going to change the tires. I'm not gonna do everything you're supposed to do to maintain it and take good care of it. I don't understand the think come on, man. What are you talking about? You. Don't get your flu shots. Well, that's, but that's that's me for me. And I don't you get a flu shot. I should get a flu shot. Don't you get a flu because I'm always I hear all the stories about when you get a flu shot. Sometimes you feel like crap for a couple of days feel like. But I I know also in my mind that I need to be getting flu shot Kalem is on the title, Don show. Good morning Caleb. The morning, Tom. Question. I know you already talked about this before. But why can't we use all the money we seized from the drug traffickers and use that money to build the wall? Then, you know, then why wouldn't they do it? They can't do it or something. And I was just calling this new I'll be brutally honest with you. I agree. A hundred percent Ted Cruz has a has a proposal that would take money from the that was seized from El Chapo, billions and have a news that money to build a wall. Ted Cruz likes that idea. It'll never happen Caleb because Democrats and Republicans really do not want to solve the legal immigration crisis. Both have had opportunity to do that in years past when they had full power of house and Senate and budgets. But they really don't. That's the dirty secret of American politics. They really don't want to solve the legal immigration crisis. They just wanted to give the impression that they're trying to. That's all the money's there. The money's there five point seven billion dollars. It's like point zero one percent of the total budget. It's easy. We have found almost thirteen billion dollars in the past few weeks to pump into public education in Texas. Shirley, the United States of America could find five point seven billion dollars to build a wall. Now, are you saying that Donald Trump doesn't even want to to solve the problem? Now, I think he does. But I think he does I didn't say I didn't say Donald Trump. I said, Democrats and Republicans. Okay. Publican party, right. It is seven twelve here on the Todd dot this coming up in tech news. You will you will be surprised as to how much some of these big video games have been making over the past year..

President Trump Austin World Health Organization TSA Texas Dr Terence McCarthy flu Trump Ted Cruz Paul Rinaldi Sautin FOX president Travis county United States
"dr terence" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Good morning. I'm Mark Caesar. This update is brought to you by pew appliances. President Trump says a deadly bomb attack on US troops in Syria will not alter his plan for Syria commander in chief is telling top senators in a private meeting. He is not going to radically adjust his plans to draw down US troops in both Syria and Afghanistan all this coming after US central command confirmed that four Americans were killed in an explosion in Syria to it US troops as well. As to American civilian defense workers this coming just days after administration began the process of withdrawing troops Republican rand Paul though said he's proud of the president this president has guts to tell a group of senators as well as the American people writ large that the US has been at war in too many places for too long and that the president is following through on his America. First campaign promise US military, says there's an urgent need to improve the nation's defense against incoming missiles details about the missile defense review the first since. Two thousand ten are expected when President Trump visits. The Pentagon senior officials tell reporters at the new study finds in order to adequately protect the United States. The Pentagon needs to place a layer of sensors into space to more quickly detect track and ultimately defeat incoming missiles, the new strategy is aimed at better defending the US against potential adversaries such as Russia and China who have been developing and fielding a much more expensive range of advanced defensive missiles, including hypersonic weapons that could threaten America and its allies, Tim McGuire, Washington. The Texas public policy foundation is tapping the brakes on this idea of giving pay raises to all teachers senior adviser Kira Balu says the raises should only go to the very best Dallas has done just seen one of the greatest bourbon turnaround in Texas. The US history. Blue says the Dallas district is giving incentives. If kids are reading and doing math on grade level health officials say the anti vaccine movement has reached a crisis study from last year ranked Austin and Travis county among the top fifteen areas with the highest rates of people opting out of vaccinations for non medical reasons. Dr Terence McCarty with Texas health says the vaccine hesitancy movement is now one of the top ten health threats across the world. It really is incumbent Don physicians to have these conversations with their patient and just how the parents are concerned he says far and away the greater risk is developing those diseases that vaccines are designed to prevent adding that there's no scientific validity between alleged links to autism and vaccines, Patrick Osborne. Newsradio KLBJ tax revenues in bastrop county and the communities within the county took a dip in the month of January that goes against the statewide trend, according to the state controller smithfield's revenue saw the biggest drop. It was down nineteen percent from the same time last year officials. Are not sure why that decline occurred 6:33 KLBJ here's Austin's on time traffic.

US President Trump Syria Pentagon Mark Caesar America bastrop county Texas Newsradio KLBJ Patrick Osborne Travis county rand Paul Austin Dr Terence McCarty Tim McGuire Kira Balu Dallas senior adviser
"dr terence" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"High school. They're gonna have to add in another middle school is she going to be channeled through seven different schools. When we haven't changed our address Hutto says this won't be the last time it'll have to rezone, and it's very likely kids will continue to be shuffled to manage that growth. The World Health Organization says the anti vaccine movement is now one of the top ten health threats the world. Is facing Dr Terence McCarthy from Texas health says the vaccine hesitancy movement began with research that was later discredited the greater rest has developed the diseases at that backstage so affected preventing any connection between autism or any other diseases. It's not at all a scientifically shown to be valid a report from last year ranked Travis county among the top fifteen areas in the nation with the highest opt out rates for vaccinations. A charge of official oppression against former Williams a county judge. Dan, Gaddis has been dropped Jeff Roberts showed he has sent word to county officials that he no longer wants to pursue. That charge. Gaddis was charged last year after allegedly threatening to zero out showed budget must stop tweeting about things that got us found to be too controversial, including some internal county business and sales tax revenue took a dive in bastrop county and communities within it for the month of January. According to the state, comptroller Smithville is revenue saw the biggest drop of nearly nineteen percent from the same time last year, the city of bath drops revenue dropped by almost six point five percents. Elegant was down more than seven percent. This drop in revenue comes at a time in which most of the state and actually saw increases and right now at Austin's airport. Cloudy and fifty seven degrees. I'm Patrick Osborne. You can get Austin news on demand at NewsRadio. KLBJ? Let's say you just bought a house bad news is you're one step closer to becoming your parents. Which means you're going to start telling your kids to clean up before the cleaning lady comes doesn't make sense. But you're the parents. And they're.

Gaddis Travis county bastrop county Jeff Roberts World Health Organization county judge Dr Terence McCarthy High school Hutto Patrick Osborne Austin's airport comptroller Austin Texas Williams official Dan fifty seven degrees nineteen percent
"dr terence" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Health threats. The world is facing in two thousand nineteen that Fain hesitancy is the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines. Dr Terence McCarthy from Texas health says the vaccine hesitancy movement started on research that was later discredited. It really is incumbent on physicians to have these conversations with their patients and just talk. The parents concerns that make it clear that that far and away the greater risk is to develop the diseases at that backstage are so so effective at preventing any connection between autism or any other diseases. It's really dot at all a scientifically shown to be valid among the other top health threats of twenty nineteen air pollution climate change and the flu pandemic the Senate confirmation hearing for US attorney general nominee William bar has wrapped up our seems bound for confirmation with a vote that could be as early as next week. The former attorney general would. Regain control of the Justice department, which he led under George H W Bush during his testimony tried to reassure wary. Senators he'd allow independence for the special counsels Russia probe saying he wouldn't carry out any order to fire Robert Muller without cau- CBS's. Steve Dorsey, says California, Senator Dianne Feinstein is pledging to vote against bars confirmation unless he promises to make special prosecutor Robert Muller's final report public. We spend almost half of our lives. Doing one thing staring at screens of some kind which I'm doing right now as I read a new survey finds the average person looks at a screen for forty two percent of the hours that were awake. That's about six hours and forty three minutes every single day play that out over the course of an average lifetime. Twenty two years of our lives. It'd be sent spent staring into a TV screen computer screen or smartphone screen more than half. And people say they take breaks from looking at one screen. And look at a different screen. Well, there's like five screens in this room allow exactly look at. I think even more than that. I mean, we got our phones here at least six it's it's just ridiculous glasses. But I'm getting there, and it's just going to continue to get worse. And it doesn't get worse than this stealing cookies from a girl scout. No that story coming up next KRLD news time, six forty four your trusted source for news, traffic, and.

Robert Muller George H W Bush Steve Dorsey Dr Terence McCarthy Senator Dianne Feinstein Fain Texas attorney US attorney Justice department William bar Russia California prosecutor CBS forty three minutes forty two percent Twenty two years six hours
"dr terence" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"From the KRLD weather center for the rest of the day. You're going to see some cloudy skies, and it's going to be cool tonight with the low near fifty tomorrow really nice day with a high near sixty and for Friday, partly sunny, some showers moving in with a high of sixty five but then the cold front comes in. And it's going to get really chilly really fast on Saturday right now. It's fifty eight a KRLD. Thanks for joining us this afternoon. It is three forty. I'm Susie Sali's along with John little live in the Mercedes Benz of plano newscenter. The World Health Organization announced today that the vaccine hesitancy movement is now one of the top ten health threats. The world is facing in two thousand nineteen vaccine hesitancy is the reluctance or refusal to back Sonate despite the availability of vaccines. Dr Terence McCarthy from Texas health says the vaccine hesitancy movement started on research that was later discredited. It really is incumbent on physicians to have these conversations with their patients that and just taught the parents bigger concerns and make it clear that that far and away the greater risk is at to developed the diseases that the backstage are so so effective preventing any connection between autism or any other diseases. It's really dot at all a scientifically shown to be valid. Among the other top health threats of twenty nineteen air pollution climate change and the flu pandemic Geraldine news time three forty one virtual strike machine. I Mike Rogers with the other side of the news. And over the years we've done quite a few stories about bowling good bowlers bad bowlers marathon bowlers in speed bowlers. And then there's John Bates retired high school principal from Wisconsin who currently does bull in a senior's league. And he carries a pretty good average two for a guy who's eighty five. Now, my average is one sixty one, but his impressive as that is it's nothing compared to his average at home where he bowls on his we console which he got in the spring of two thousand eight got my first perfect score mayor of two thousand nine it took him about a year to finally do it. But once he had that first three hundred game..

John Bates World Health Organization KRLD Dr Terence McCarthy Susie Sali Sonate Mike Rogers flu Benz Texas plano Wisconsin principal
"dr terence" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

05:41 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on WJR 760

"Continuing our conversation with Dr Terence Keeley. So of a purposes of this discussion, I'm sorry. To all the groups that want to be included. I'm just gonna talk about men and women here for a second. I recognize thousand ways to do this. But it's easier for me to speak this way. All right. A man or woman come together, they decide they want to have a child in the traditional way, we all know what happens his DNA her DNA come together. Create embryo create a baby that baby is born with all their traits. Now, the idea that you could take okay men won't want to have a baby come together DNA DNA. But then wait before we get to the point where it starts to just state and become a child. We're going to make sure that it doesn't have this or doesn't have this or doesn't have that. Now accepting Dr Kelly the fact that it's irresponsible right now because the scientists to inexact, and you don't know the side effects. Let's say we are a hundred years from now, we're you know, the side effects. Talk to me about the morality of trying to Jeanette it a perfect child or a perfectly healthy child or an incredibly intelligent child or any of the other things that are controlled by DNA. Well, it's a very very profound question to which I would start off by saying that I'm a biochemist. I'm actually I have no greater insight into morality than you will anyone else. Ultimately, this is a question that can be onset only really in congress. It's only when our elected representatives have all the facts before them, I can response public opinion that ultimately these decisions will be made is this may be an American versus British thing. But our idea of believing anything to congress here versus a biochemist is a no-brainer. Okay. We're picking the Biochemists over the congress. So I'm turning to you. We don't go to our congress for anything important. They can't even can't even decide how to balance a budget right now. So I am interested in your. Because you are a scientist, and you do work in this area. Although I recognize you're not paid to be an ethicist or Morris. I'd like your opinion on well, my opinion is that it is absolutely legitimate to correct certain diseases. Have you have a couple of examples who has symptom assistant fibrosis or other inherited diseases. I say absolutely let's go in and correct it so that couple can have children where of course, becomes more. Horrid is your suggestion, for example, of of grace or intelligence or your suggestion of colors, which new stop speaking, Adolf Hitler and blue eyes. So I think that if you're going to use these technologies to stop children having pain or diseases. I think that's a good thing. I think once you start to try to design humans to be better. Then I suspect that's a step too far. You said something there that I want to make sure I understand can you affect the child. By engineering, the DNA of the parents before they conceive. I'm sorry. This is a very bad line. Can you can you also question again Hanyu affect the DNA of the child by going in and engineering the DNA of the parents before they conceive. Oh, I see. So you want to go to the echo the spam? Ulta that of course, you could do that. He's not a technology. That's done very much. Yes. You answer would be. Yes. Of course, you could you suggest that so different moral question. No, I wasn't even aware of was technologically possible. But when you said, yes, absolutely. We should do this for diseases is that still done at that. Same point that same juncture where you're doing it to the embryo before. It is implanted back into the woman. Yes, you could do it. Then. Well, it is a question for bigger minds than mine, and it is a fascinating thing to contemplate and. Right now is last question, by the way, is there is there something in Chinese law that allows for this. That's difference than say British law or American law mean right now, are there places where you can do this kind of experimentation versus places where you can't. It's a very good question. You've asked the answer is almost certainly this was illegal or certainly unethical onto Chinese practice. But the reality is, and there's no point pretending otherwise, it doesn't matter. What laws they're gonna pass that would always be certain people in small jurisdictions. When no one is watching who will do these things were living very much in the global wealth and money is power and a very powerful people living on small islands can do almost anything. So we will stop these things. But it it'd be like prohibition. They would always be people who will escape. The rules. Dr Terence Kelly, professor clinical biochemistry university of Buckingham, visiting senior fellow Cato Institute. Please read this piece for USA today. Very very enlightening that he wrote. Thank you so much for spending time with us, Dr Kelly enjoyed it. It was lovely. Thank you, a brief will come back with more on seven sixty WJR. I met Lauria oxygen with another business IT minute. And Paul's lands, chairman of imagine entertainment when you brought Oxy men. I two words out of your mouth data security, Matt we know what's going on with equifax and Home Depot and so forth. And we deal with credit card information answer last. We wanna do is to expose our networks or expose our guests to IT security failures. Now, Paul you already had an IT staff, but you made the call to bring us in on top of that why it gives me great comfort to know that we have a reputable organization company of the highest standards looking after our data security. Okay. So bottom line Paul would you.

congress Dr Kelly Dr Terence Keeley Paul scientist Dr Terence Kelly Adolf Hitler Ulta Jeanette imagine entertainment USA Morris equifax Buckingham Matt chairman Cato Institute Home Depot visiting senior fellow professor
"dr terence" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

07:47 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on WJR 760

"Care solutions. Now, here's Mitch. This is really fascinating. And if you're one of those people who. Is kind of arrested. Their attention by what could the future hold in the speed with which we're moving you're gonna wanna listen to this because a Chinese scientist shocked, and in many cases, repelled the world by announcing a few days ago that he had helped engineer the the first. Gene, edited baby. In the world this baby. He claimed was and we'll get some details on how you put this type of thing together. Because I can't even make an erector set when I was a kid twins. We're talking about here. But the the purpose was to create a baby resistant to HIV or unable to get HIV. Because of the way the genes were. Edited. And now many have found that this is just the whole idea of creating children with certain traits, and, you know, literally changing their DNA before they're born creating their DNA is unethical and is immoral and all the rest, others will say, well, this is what science leads you to Dr Terence keely is a professor of clinical biochemistry at the university of Buckingham and a visiting senior fellow at the Cato Institute, he run opinion for USA today. He clearly is on the side thinking that this Chinese doctor and his research group. He's been called Dr Frankenstein by some are in the wrong, and he joins us here on the program. Dr Kelli, thanks for coming on with us. Thank you for inviting for listeners in our audience who are lay people, which means all of them. How do you do this? First of all, what's the science of this? The science is very elegant. As you know, the chemicals DNA has almost magical ability to link to another length of DNA DNA from the mother one of DNA from the Sava. They come together, and then they can reproduce perfectly. So every cell in the body, and we have trillions of cells. All the DNA has been magically almost magically reproduces extraordinary. What DNA can do adequate controls our genes, and what you can do with Chris PA? That's what the technology is cooled. You couldn't create a little public would as the same as DNA, and you can use it almost like a guided missile to absolutely take you to the DNA you want to change, and then he could link to that already an enzyme that will catch the data. You wanted can put into DNA you do want. It is the most magical ability to. Engineer, the DNA of living, and you could do that, for example to change, I colors or hair colors, or or any other things that are in our DNA. Once you know, the gene there's no reason in theory. Why you shouldn't be able to do that. I think it's very clear that we didn't a relatively short space of time. We will be able to engineer animals like that. So this is done by taking a donor. Sperm donor donor egg much like is done in fertility clinics or things like that. And and and and bringing it together before implanting it into the woman is that correct? That's exactly what it is. And that's what the big issue here because what's done in this experiment. They took him to spam. And they're taken the edge. And they fuse them and produced an embryo, and then at that point they've done this, this engineering technology with Chris PA to change the DNA embryo and people are using Chris Ball and lots of the movement to change the DNA Sosa cells in the body all sorts of diseases, and no one minds that because all those cells eventually will die. But if you're doing it to an embryo, then you're producing a living human who will then be able to pass on to their children that genetic defect. If you've introduced it. And so you now have a situation where you've actually changed the DNA of human beings. And that's my grandchildren in perpetuity. And I read your piece which is very used the word elegant, and I would say that's a a an apt description of the writing in which you basically claim that. We may have is our is our forefathers said the right to life liberty the protection of property and the pursuit of happiness, but not to infringe on the life, liberty property and happiness of others. By basically, dictating what type of person they will become before. They even become a person is that is that essentially the essence of your your resistance to what the doctor is doing. Well, that is half of it. You're absolutely right. You've demonstrated exactly what I said. In fact, I was taking a more narrow approach, and in retrospect, I wish I made it quite clear. Doesn't match up at the moment. Whether or not you believe we should have the right to change, the DNA all features will become a human being fixing that that's a that's a very important document. But forgetting that at the moment, the crisper technology, although nearly magical is simply on experienced recipients to uh need to know, what the side effects off sick philosophical arguments, which are very important way. Using oh, this man is using technology that is still untested sucking on humans, and it's therefore unethical. Even if we decide we have the right to change you. It's completely on that to Subject Human baby who will be a human being so technology that may well have horrible side effects just in that narrative technological base. It's an it's an unethical experiment. Now. Is there any way to really know what the ramifications would be to an embryo? Besides leading one of these embryos grow up. Yes. Of course, some of the genes that predispose us to cancer particularly susceptible to this sort of damage when this sort of procedure takes place. So you may end up with child who is prone to cancer say made we and the other thing is there a thousand one possible things that could go wrong. We just don't know. So at the moment, we're in a situation where this technology could do anything, that's horrible. Right. But what I'm asking for what I'm asking. You is is there a way to test and further know what it can do on living human beings, or do you just do it in a lab? In other words, it could this doctor be saying, well, yeah, that's possible. But we're never going to know that unless we let one of these babies or multiple these babies be born in study them because how else are we going to know the answer to that question is you do some animals he do on mice and rabbits and other animals where eight have much shorter lives. So you can get much quicker result. Right. It'd be you can test, and I eventually, of course, you have to do these things in humans. And of course, there's always the problem gave from one species to another, but the problems will be much much less. If in a few years time, we have an experience of several lifecycles of Saint mice behind us. I'm I understand your your first objection, which is absolutely correct. But I'm fascinated by your second objection on the moral a larger picture thing. And I want to ask you more about that in a moment. Give us a second to check the.

Engineer Chris PA HIV Gene scientist Dr Kelli Dr Frankenstein Dr Terence keely Sava university of Buckingham Cato Institute USA visiting senior fellow Chris Ball professor Sosa
"dr terence" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"They're always doors open, even when they despise other. In fact, the fact that they don't openly despise each other probably makes it less likely that they're going to go up. That's a good point. I think when there's hey, there's there's emotion there. Let's say jasmine and quasi. We didn't see any of this. But jasmine is like I don't trust quasi quasi like hooked up with Maria. When we guess they were still trying to do something even after quasi said, she's not my mansion Zack said, she's the worst version of Neutze. Do you do you think jasmine as a point here? She's like reason to be upset over the F Ozzy. You've got. Yeah. I I was like it's of stupid. But then don't even think about it. If she made her point clear in the house like look, I'm trying to win the money. I'm gonna go out. I'm going to figure things out to to win the money. Like if I hook up with someone else that's going to happen. I get it. And at the same time if she talked to quasi look after the show went out. I want to see where this goes. And then he went right and hooked up with Maria. I actually do see your point. And I do understand perspective where she's coming from do. I think she's wrong or right? I don't know. But I do get at least her mindset when she's thinking about this. Yeah. And I just wanted to know what happened because like from what we saw in. The edit quasi was like I'm done with jasmine, and they never did anything again. But like if they were still hooking up, and and they made amends, and he forgave her whenever then I see her point. But like from our perspective like for me, I'm like Terence REEs like where are you the one who like hooked up with? Someone when quasi said he was only value. No, exactly. That's that's what I also viewed it. But I I also do see her perspective because I'm like, okay. Like, it was still not that we didn't see everything. But I do think there. I don't think either of them is really, right. Like, I think they're both on are you the one wrong with with with with either them, did, you know? And then that's terri-. Does the moment of self healing semblance my office, again, Dr Terence's back we jazz. You both liked a mover. Terrence did that didn't work. So well, probably not as well as he wanted to do is Asian Lewis come up and Terron says, what did your mom think of the what you said to Asia? And Lewis says my mom was proud of me. Yeah. Look, I mean, you talk about when this all happened. Like, it's just a what he exactly said in the fact that he said more on top of that was not right. He could a legit thing. You're beautiful girl. I just for some reason like I'm not like, I don't know wording in more respectful way by instill complement. You're gonna making your feel okay? Usually, not physically tracked you, and then he also apparently said all the guys aren't physically attracted you. So it's just like man like Louis. I it's not it's not how you handle that situation at all. Yeah. I mean, that's what the. Our friendship means too much to me a line was created for like two friends. But I thought this was a poor job by Terrence because terrorists then asks Asia, why did you sleep with him after he said that why not ask Louis that question, but why not leave the door open for Lewis? And then me like I became attracted to her. I got to know her more. We connected more. I felt bad about like, why are you asking Asia? Why she like she was always into Lewis that wasn't the issue. Like that. You know? I don't know why he's asking putting that on Asia. It is it is. It is weird that he asked that. I don't know. Like, I feel like I'm not bringing done enough to know is that like a sexist thing. Or is it just kind of like for some reason? Like, oh, we're gonna ask the girl while you why she did not ask the eye. But you're right..

Maria Lewis Asia Terrence Terence REEs Louis Zack Dr Terence Neutze terri Terron
"dr terence" Discussed on House of Kim with Kim Zolciak

House of Kim with Kim Zolciak

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on House of Kim with Kim Zolciak

"Graduated from Juliette central high school. He made the honor roll. He was on wrestling and track, and he also played minor league football. In the area and coached youth football at the stop DOD. So he was a good kid. He had a fiancee and a couple of supposed to get married a month after Terence and Eric were killed. Terrence was described as a very outgoing loving person. His mother said that he had hoped to go to college and wanted to be a social worker. He likes making music dancing and playing sports or these were just to normal good kids. One was gonna get married. They're just normal everyday guys, right? And Billy said that, of course, they had already entered into rigor mortis, which is generally happens, eight hours or so after murder. So they were missing for at least eight hours, but they had actually been missing for over twenty four hours. And the parents of both boys had been worried sick when they both decided to go out and then never returned. So the ninth they went missing, Eric watched a movie with his mom, stepdad in say, and he left about six PM saying that he had to go Dr Terence somewhere and Terrence and his mother were very close. So she called him a number of times after it started to get late to see where he was, and he never responded, which is really uncharacteristic of him. She then Texas him. He didn't respond and his phone was under her phone plan. So she then called her cell phone provider and to see if she could track where the phone was and the find my iphone type thing, but tried to track down this phone to see if they could place where he was. They couldn't do that, but they could tell them the last person he had a call with in that was Bethany, Mckee who we've already been introduced to in this story. Ever since I turned thirty. My main goal is to get pieces of clothing and excess reason. Shoes that are good quality. That will last me a long time. I'm done buying all like really crappy quality stuff that's gonna break in like two days. So when I was looking for shoes, I came across his brand, and I'm so stoked at their one of our sponsors. 'em jemmy is a mazing. They're redefining the luxury Italian footwear market..

Terrence Dr Terence Juliette central high school Eric football DOD Billy murder Bethany Mckee eight hours twenty four hours two days
"dr terence" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:39 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I guess what is looking is more present right that doesn't sound too pretentious i'm dwi gibson speaking with taryn stamp about his memoir the ocean fell into the drop you know you've had so many amazing encounters ones i never would have expected given the types of roles you've played for instance you write about being inspired by chita rivera right tell us about that well i was at drama school and miraculously i had won a scholarship to go to drama school because you know from a very poor family and how did you win the scholarship i i all dishes and for all the big drama scores and rawda on the london academy none of them had scholarships so i wound up going to auditioning a much smaller academy which was called the weber talk this academy and i remember doing my my cusco pace was was from a fellow and anonymous offered the scholarship but apart from having a a free tuition they gave me money but the money they gave me was what in today's money would be about ten dollars a week so that's all i had to live on so when i got to drama school i was really going hungry most of the time and i wound up getting a showman's job west side story it had just opened in london this theater and i just went along there and i hung out outside the stage door and one of the state's dormant took pity oh mesa they want somebody in the lime box can you can you manage your and did know lime was i said sure sure so i wound up doing it was a follow spot right so i wound up with all my cues on the wall and i wound up doing a follow spot so i saw i couldn't do i couldn't do the midweek matinee because how was school yeah but i did shows on saturday i did every other show and that was high meta i met her backstage and you've got the experience to on a regular basis see how she connected with live audiences in the variances there yeah and she was kind of like so my life my my the first person i ever saw who made a huge impact on me was gary cooper that was the first movie i ever saw and so he had something that was kind of just stopped my thought process you know he had an impact on me i'd never seen anybody like that with that kind of presence and consequently my avas aiming very high and i think that chita rivera was the first woman i saw in life the had that same kind of a heart stopping presence she was great great perform i am here and you mentioned cooper you you open the book with an episode of seeing him when you were very young yes that was the first movie i ever saw it you know and so that's is that when you knew you i wanted to be an actor why would i i guess something in me knew but i never thought about it like that i just thought i loved him on i wanted to go and see his movies and i became an avid moviegoer but it wasn't until i actually because it wasn't anything that i could even talk about at home was just out of the question why because it was like it wasn't like that i mean my dad was a stoker in the navy it was too far flung it was just silly you know to talked about it but but i was the funny thing was i was aware of that i was aware how outrageous so it was kind of my secret on the way i kept it alive was by keeping the secret and it was only when i left school and i went to work and i thought if my life doing this i got to try that so i guess yes i'm dwi gibson i'm speaking with dr terence stamp about his memoir the ocean fell into the drop you want an academy award nomination for your film debut in the title role of billy budd did that give you a greater sense of freedom and choosing your subsequent roles no not really because i was kind of him avas nominated in the supporting actor category so you it was like a fix i thought i wasn't supporting actor avas the title role you know this guy was offended by that but the truth was that it did get me noticed and so i was.

gibson ten dollars
"dr terence" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:56 min | 2 years ago

"dr terence" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I guess what is looking is more present right that doesn't sound too pretentious i'm dwi gibson speaking with terence stamp about his memoir the ocean fell into the drop you know you've had so many amazing encounters i never would have expected given the types of roles you've played for instance you write about being inspired by chita rivera right tell us about that well i was at i was at drama school and miraculously i had won a scholarship to go to drama school because you know from a very poor family and how did you win the scholarship i dish ind for all the big drama scores and rotter and the london academy none of them had scholarships so i wound up going to auditioning a much smaller academy which was called the webber douglas academy and i remember doing my my cusco pace was was from othello and anonymous offered the scholarship but apart from having a a free tuition they gave me money but the money they gave me was what into days money would be about ten dollars a week so that's all i had to live on so when i got to drama school i was really going hungry most of the time and i wound up getting a showman's job west side story if it just opened in london hermitage this and i just went along there and i hung out outside the stage door and one of the stage doorman took pity on me they want somebody in the lime box can you can you manager lime and lead to a lime was i said sure sure so i wound up doing in fact it was a follow spot right so i wound up with all my cues on the wall i wound up doing a follow spot so i saw i couldn't do i couldn't do the midweek matinee because i was at school yeah but i did two shows on saturday i did every other show and that was met i met her backstage and you got the experience to on a regular basis see how she connected with live audiences in the variances there right yeah and she was kind of like so my life my my first person i ever saw who made a huge impact on me was gary cooper that was the first movie i ever saw and so he had something that was kind of just stopped my thought process we had an impact on me i'd never seen anybody like that with that kind of presence and consequently my avas aiming very high and i think that chita rivera was the first woman i saw in life the had that same kind of a heart stopping presence you know she was great great perform im and you mentioned cooper you open the book with an episode of seeing him when you were very young yes it was the first movie i ever saw and so that's is that when you knew you i wanted to be an actor why would i i guess something in me new but i never thought about it like that i just thought that i loved him and i wanted to go and see his movies and i became an avid moviegoer but it wasn't until i actually because it wasn't anything that i could even talk about at home was just out of the question why because it was like it wasn't like that i mean my dad was a stoker in the navy it was too far flung it was it was just silly you know to have talked about it but i was the funny thing was i was aware of that i was aware how outrageous so it was kind of my secret on the way i kept it alive was keeping this i gotta try that so i guess yes i'm dwi gibson i'm speaking with dr terence stamp about his memoir the ocean fell into the drop you won an academy award nomination for your film debut in the title role of billy budd did that give you a greater sense of freedom and choosing your subsequent roles no not really because i was kind of a mm avas nominated in the supporting act to carry category so i knew it was like a fix i thought i was supporting actor title role you know this guy was offended by that but the truth was that it did get me noticed and so i was from that moment i'm always very choosy i always chose things that i thought would interest me as as a perform avas interested in and becoming multidimensional no i'm w gibson and i'm speaking with turn stamp about his new memoir.

gibson ten dollars