12 Burst results for "Dr Ted Fujita"

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:23 min | 3 months ago

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on WGN Radio

"As healthy and it's hard to get these things were pushed all the way down to the ground, and Dr Ted Fujita ones were the first ones to look at. Horn damage and haven't left a bit of wind damage. And that's one of the reasons why the wind that across island parts of western Illinois where you were between 1900 miles an hour that the net one tornado right there. Wow. That's that. That is very interesting. That 2000 Yeah. 2008 Storm you just referred to is the first time and on ly time I have ever heard the alarms. But remember, there was a game at Wrigley Field that night, too, and there was like a complete freak out. That happened because they didn't know exactly what to do with the people. And the they like the city. Tornado alarm went off and you're like, Well, I mean, I was like, what is that? I don't know what that is, but it didn't even stop for well and one of the things that Happened after that of them with that? Everybody said, OK, the people at Wrigley, You need to have some sort of an organized way of getting people out of this building, and they realized at that point that they don't it's Wrigley is really just a skeleton. It's not like a building. Well back then it was now It has obviously a little bit more fabric kind of wrapped around it, but any time you get people in and out to arena during these events Very difficult to evacuate them in a safe and orderly fashion thing. The Oregon because they like that feeling, answer guy. It was was trying to get them all to leave. And then they were playing the Oregon trying like exit music, and people in all people did was just like going to the concourse. And hunker down in 2008 was not a particularly great year for the franchise, either. So you know, you never knew and again. It was a totally different than what you have now is that hold built up structure that they've got a little bit more protected, but again, doesn't There's not a lot of extraneous space that Ridley Teo to keep people safe? And I was at Soldier Field the day that is November storms came through and all they do that. They just told us to get into the concourse and at that point is like now what? But at least until you could have got a lot of little more structure, right. That was the Washington, Illinois Tornado Day, right? Yeah, And even when even when I'm in the stand with a friend of mine who's also meteorologists, we're looking at our radars. I'm going this doesn't look good. Everything like what? What? What? Soon if people found out that the two of us Where meteorologist Over sudden we became the point. So it's for information. And when we started walking back before they made the announcement, the whole train of people followed us. It was kind of like the type type very well that I'm a bit. You're a lot of fun at a football game rigged a mile, which is you're sitting there. Eight. By the way. Is that a messa scale? Is that what that is? Watch the football game. Were they playing? The Giants set down what you remember or the Jets? Who were they playing? The Baltimore Raven. All right, the real quickly wrote your name. Yeah, What's that? You're in New York. But that's okay. Someone's going to take it real quickly. The bottom line is is bad. Is this wass No injuries, no fatalities. Amazing, but that's pretty amazing and that and I think that goes to the heart of the watches the warnings the way people get information now on their phone. Away. Now you have your screen. Get get goes to total blue. If you're watching cable TV compared to 30 years ago, A 20 years ago, we would tell people you have to buy one.

Wrigley Wrigley Field Illinois Dr Ted Fujita football Oregon Soldier Field Jets Ridley Teo Washington Giants New York Baltimore
"dr ted fujita" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:41 min | 3 months ago

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Their full bloom right now. They're about to start losing in the next couple of weeks there their leaves, But they those act like sails, and there was just enough. Moisture underneath and then dry layer on top because it hadn't rained it. Just pull these suckers right out of the ground. You know if you go back down on how good your memory is, but August 4th 2080 event I was just referring to. We had math of tree damage on the north side of Chicago around Wrigleyville Lakeview up into the Rogers Park area, And that was due to the fact that we had so much rain that the ground was so wet. You'd look at some of the tree that came down even in the Western suburbs. You don't just focus In Rogers Park. Literally the entire root ball was lifted up out of the ground. But what's also important to note and if people want to go on to the National Weather Service state and look at this for them. There's a lot of photos of trees that got snapped at their base, so the ruble remained intact. And when that happened that usually an indication that the tree was probably disease, which is one of the reasons why they'll take a tree down because the inside of the tree and basically hollow, I would not be surprised if this ended up being probably a $1,000,000,000 damage event, always from Iowa into Ohio and row. It is amazing, high risk satellite imagery that shows the corn flattened in parts of Iowa and into Illinois. You don't see that too often You take a corn stalk this time of the year. It's about as healthy and it's hard to get these things were pushed all the way down to the ground, and Dr Ted Fujita ones were the first ones to look at. Horn damage and.

Rogers Park Dr Ted Fujita Iowa National Weather Service Wrigleyville Lakeview Chicago Ohio Illinois
"dr ted fujita" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

12:39 min | 11 months ago

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"Us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. Nobody knows knows for certain when or where tornadoes will strike over the years increasingly complex techniques have been developed to study the storms is that create tornadoes but the twisters themselves are still one of nature's most destructive mysteries meteorologists have an understanding of the whether mechanics that are most likely to produce tornadoes but even if the conditions are perfect nobody knows where or when a tornado might emerge shaw or how powerful it will be high above North America. A ribbon of air currents constantly flows from West to East it brings. It's cold air from the Arctic across the entire continent. This wind highway is called the jetstream during the week of April twenty fifth if th two thousand eleven for jetstream was blowing over a hundred miles an hour forty thousand feet up in the air. As it skimmed over the Rocky Mountains uh-huh it collected the dry air around the peaks and brought it east that same week. A thousand miles to the south Balmy warm ocean air. There was rolling up off the Gulf of Mexico and moving north. This humid air would settle over the southern United States for several days. These two. Oh weather fronts were about to collide and explode into a series of massive storms. They would wreak havoc over nearly a third of the country and spun on over three hundred and fifty tornadoes. In seventy two hours. It would become known as the two thousand eleven super outbreak. Although tornadoes have been spotted on every continent except Antarctica. The specific types of weather and wind needed to create Tornados aren't common in every climate one of the few places where these conditions are. Common is the Great Plains region of North America this area experiences over a thousand tornadoes a year. More than anywhere else on the planet because of this a large swath of the midwestern United States is known as Tornado or NATO ally for a tornado to form fast. Moving cold air needs to meet warm. Humid air the the cold air shoves the warm air down and rolls over it forming a horizontal twist of wind like an invisible tube of air spinning sideways days. Then because warm air rises this spinning tube of air is pushed vertically in a process known as an updraft this. This is the origin of a thunderstorm. If the wind increases in strength it will form a giant rotating cloud bank called a super cell this spinning tube of air acts as an insulator for the warm air rising up the middle the cold air drops down along the sides pressuring warm air up the center as more air is moved through the system. The storm grows producing powerful wind and Hail Hail Occurs as the Super Cell Lifts Water Vapor High in the atmosphere often miles above the ground when the vapor turns to rain it freezes as it falls falls through the frigid air large clumps of hail mean the water had a long time to collect and freeze on the way down the size of Hale is a good indicator indicator of how high the storm clouds have grown during the super outbreak. The clouds were over. Six miles high people found chunks chunks of hail the size of a fist hail that large can punch holes through windshields and caused severe injuries to anybody caught outside right sometimes a Werhlin section of the supercell close to the ground spins off into a small intense vortex. This vortex is a a tornado and they occur in about thirty percent of supercell storms that can be small and last for seconds like dust devils in the desert or they can be what Tom and Brad saw in Tuscaloosa enormous spinning towers of debris with wind speeds of over two hundred miles is an hour. No matter how big it is if a tornado touches the ground it can suck up and spin objects in its path. Tornadoes IOS can hurl cars like toys crush ten story grain silos as if they were soda cans and etched grooves into the earth that or a quarter mile wide ride entire neighborhoods can disappear into their funnels as though they had never existed twisters leave shocking and sometimes sometimes surreal scenes of havoc in their wake. There have been sightings of license plates and pencils driven into tree trunks and cows rose lifted from one field and deposited in another a half mile away found completely unharmed most tornado fatalities Talib's or caused by flying debris Oklahoma state medical examiner. Eric Pfeiffer had only been on the job one day when a deadly tornado hit the town own of El Reno in two thousand thirteen he said until you see firsthand what a tornado can do to the human body. You don't realize realized how extremely violent they are. The injuries are similar to a high speed motor vehicle accidents. But they're much more. Numerous things like trees nails glass and steel are torn loose and can act as a cutting implement. Imagine a piece of sheet metal title. Travelling at two hundred ninety miles per hour it becomes a blender for most of recorded history Tornados were simply measured by the number of people they killed or homes. They destroyed the spectrum of Tornado. Damage has only been scientifically Ryan typically measured for the last fifty years in one thousand nine hundred seventy one. Dr Ted Fujita. A researcher based at the University of Chicago proposed proposed a new system of measuring tornadoes that combined to win speed and level of damage. His initial system was a scale from zero to five with with zero being the least destructive and five being catastrophic Dr Fujita had studied this catastrophic level of devastation. His this whole life starting in nineteen forty five with a terrible event that occurred not far from his university. In Japan Fujita personally finally witnessed the aftermath of the nuclear bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima. He found that the severity of damage from a tornado was similar to nuclear blasts. A few years after its creation the Fujita scale would be put to the test in one thousand nine hundred seventy four. A surge of tornadoes hit thirteen states. Over two days Fujita and his team examined the damage and categorized derived every tornado touchdown. With the new data the Fujita scale became the standard of measurements for tornadoes across the world. The swath of tornadoes that Fujita studied in nineteen seventy four was the most destructive ever measured. That is until two thousand eleven today. A day and enhanced version of Fujita scale is the bedrock of Tornado studies with over forty years of data collected by meteorologists. These six levels levels on the scale have become much more detailed. The modern scale is from E F zero to F five an F zero Tornado. NATO might only touch the ground for a few seconds and caused very little damage an F. three twister will drive fence posts through trees at one hundred and sixty five miles an hour and an e. five will wipe the earth clean with winds peaking near three hundred miles per hour our only fifty nine tornadoes had been categorized as five since nineteen fifty between nineteen seventy four when Fujita developed the scale and two thousand eleven there had been nineteen e F. Five's recorded there would be four of them. During the two thousand eleven outbreak and tens of thousands of people would be caught right in their path. Anyone living in Tornado alley would only have as much warning as the national weather. Service could could give them the official goal of the NWS his to provide at least fifteen minutes warning of impending tornadoes. During the outbreak they would successfully hustle averaged twenty four minutes warning. This is how lives are saved. As Weather Service meteorologist West Browning explained after a powerful Tornado in Missouri. Hurry.

Dr Fujita Fujita Us Tornado alley Dr Ted Fujita Japan Fujita NATO North America Rocky Mountains Arctic Gulf of Mexico shaw NWS Antarctica El Reno Great Plains Hale Weather Service Eric Pfeiffer
"dr ted fujita" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

15:34 min | 1 year ago

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on Parcast Presents: Summer of '69

"Is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. Nobody knows for certain when or where tornadoes will strike over the years increasingly complex techniques have been developed developed to study the storms that create tornadoes but the twisters themselves are still one of nature's most destructive mysteries meteorologists allergists have an understanding of the weather mechanics that are most likely to produce tornadoes but even if the conditions are perfect nobody knows where or or win. A Tornado might emerge or how powerful it will be high above North America. A ribbon of air currents constantly flows from West Take East. It brings cold air from the Arctic across the entire continent. This wind highway is called the jetstream. During the week of April Twenty Fifth Two thousand eleven for Jetstream was blowing over a hundred miles an hour. Forty thousand feet up in the air as its skimmed over the rocky mountains. It collected the dry air around the peaks and brought it east that same week. A thousand miles to the south Balmy warm ocean. Air was rolling up off the Gulf of Mexico and moving north. This humid air would settle over the southern United States for several several days. These two weather fronts were about to collide and explode into a series of massive storms. They would wreak havoc over nearly a a third of the country and spawned over three hundred fifty tornadoes. In seventy two hours. It would become known as the two thousand eleven super outbreak. Although tornadoes have been spotted on every continent except Antarctica. The specific types of weather and wind needed needed to create Tornados aren't common in every climate one of the few places where these conditions are. Common is the Great Plains region of North America this area experiences over thousand tornadoes a year more than anywhere else on the planet because of this a large swath of the midwestern United United States is known as Tornado Alley for a tornado to form fast. Moving cold air needs to meet eight warm humid air the cold air shoves the warm air down and rolls over it forming a horizontal twist of wind like an invisible tube who've of air spinning sideways. Then because warm air rises this spinning tube of air is pushed vertically in a process known as it's an updraft. This is the origin of a thunderstorm. If the wind increases in strength it will form a giant rotating cloud bank called a super supercell this spinning tube of air acts as an insulator for the warm air rising up the middle the cold air drops down along the sides rides pressuring warm air up the center as more air is moved through the system. The storm grows producing powerful wind and Hail Art Hale occurs as the supercell Lifts Water Vapor High in the atmosphere often miles above the ground when the vapor turns wants to rain it freezes as it falls through the frigid air large clumps of hail mean the water had a long time to collect and freeze on the way down the size of Hale is a good indicator of how high the storm clouds have grown during the super outbreak. The clouds were over six miles high. Hi People found chunks of hail the size of a fist hail that large can punch holes through windshields and caused severe injuries injuries to anybody caught outside. Sometimes a whirling section of supercell close to the ground spins off into a small intense vortex X. This vortex is a tornado and they occur in about thirty percent of supercell storms. They can be small and last for seconds like dust devils in the desert or they can be what Tom and Brad saw in Tuscaloosa enormous spinning towers of debris with wind speeds beads of over two hundred miles an hour. No matter how big it is if a tornado touches the ground it can suck up and spin objects. It's in its path. Tornadoes can hurl cars like toys crush ten story grain silos as if they were soda cans and etched grooves into the earth. Thera quarter mile wide entire neighborhoods can disappear into their funnels. As though they had never existed twisters stirs leave shocking and sometimes surreal scenes of havoc in their wake there have been sightings of license plates and pencils driven into the tree trunks and cows lifted from one field and deposited in another a half mile away found completely unharmed. Most Tornado fatalities are caused by flying debris Oklahoma state medical examiner. Eric Pfeiffer had only been on the job one day when a deadly tornado. Hit the town of El Reno in two thousand thirteen. He said until you see firsthand what a tornado can do to the human when body. You don't realize how extremely violent they are. The injuries are similar to a high speed motor vehicle accidents but they're much more numerous things like trees nails glass and steel are torn loose and can act as a cutting implement. Imagine a piece of sheet metal. Travelling at two hundred ninety miles per hour it becomes a blender for most of recorded history Tornados were simply measured by the number of people they killed or homes. They destroyed the spectrum of Tornado. No damage has only been scientifically measured for the last fifty years in one thousand nine hundred seventy one. Dr Ted Fujita. A researcher based at at the University of Chicago proposed a new system of measuring tornadoes that combined to win speed and level of damage his initial system was a scale scale from zero to five with zero being the least destructive and five being catastrophic Dr Fujita had studied this catastrophic straffic level of devastation. His whole life starting in nineteen forty five with a terrible event that occurred not far from his university in Japan. Fujita personally witnessed the aftermath of the nuclear bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima. He found that the severity of damage from Tornado was similar to nuclear blasts. A few years after its creation the Fujita scale would be put to the test in nineteen seventy four a surge of tornadoes hit thirteen states. Over two days Fujita and his team examined the damage and categorized every tornado touchdown with the new data the Fujita scale became the standard of measurements for tornadoes across lost the world. The swath of Tornadoes Fujita studied in nineteen seventy four was the most destructive ever measured that is until l.. Two thousand eleven today. An enhanced version of Fujita scale is the bedrock of Tornado studies with over forty years of data collected by meteorologists. These six levels on the scale have become much more detailed. The modern scale is from E F zero to F five an F. Zero Tornado might only touch the ground for a few seconds and caused very little damage. An ETF three twister will drive offense posts through trees at one hundred and sixty five miles an hour an e. five will wipe the earth clean with winds peaking near three hundred miles per hour only fifty nine tornadoes have been categorized as five since nineteen fifty between nineteen seventy four. When Fujita developed the scale and two thousand eleven there had been nineteen e f five recorded? There would be four of them. During the two thousand eleven outbreak outbreak and tens of thousands of people would be caught right in their path. Anyone living in Tornado alley would only have as much warning. The National Weather Service could give them the official goal of the NWF his to provide at least fifteen minutes warning of impending tornadoes during the outbreak. They would successfully average twenty four minutes warning. This is how lives are saved. As whether service meteorologist West Browning explained after after a powerful Tornado in Missouri..

Dr Fujita Fujita Tornadoes Fujita Tornado alley Tornado Alley Dr Ted Fujita Jetstream United States North America West Take East Arctic Gulf of Mexico El Reno Hale Antarctica Oklahoma NWF Japan National Weather Service
"dr ted fujita" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

11:11 min | 1 year ago

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"Welcome to natural disasters apart. CAST original I'm your host Kate and I'm bill. Every Monday will explore moments in history when the natural natural world turned deadly. You can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcasts originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Awed casts to stream natural disasters for free on spotify just opened the APP tap browse and type natural disasters in the search bar at podcast podcast. We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast I and twitter at podcast network and if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. Nobody knows for certain when or where tornadoes will strike over the years increasingly complex techniques have been developed to study the storms that create tornadoes but the twisters themselves are still still one of nature's most destructive mysteries meteorologists have an understanding of the weather mechanics. That are most likely to produce tornadoes but even if the conditions are perfect nobody knows where or when a tornado might emerge or how powerful it will be high above North America. Rakha a ribbon of air currents constantly flows from west to east. It brings cold air from the Arctic across the entire continent. This wind highway is called the jetstream. During the week of April Twenty Fifth Two thousand eleven for Jetstream was blowing over a hundred hundred miles an hour. Forty thousand feet up in the air as it skimmed over the rocky mountains. It collected the dry air around the peaks and brought it east that same week. A thousand miles to the south Balmy warm ocean. Air was rolling up off the Gulf of Mexico and moving north. This humid air would settle over the southern United States for several days. These two weather fronts were about to collide and explode into a series series of massive storms. They would wreak havoc over nearly a third of the country and spawn over three hundred and fifty tornadoes in seventy two hours. There's it would become known as the two thousand eleven super outbreak. Although tornadoes have been spotted on every continent except Antarctica. The specific types of weather and wind needed to create Tornados aren't common in every climate one of the few places where these conditions additions are. Common is the Great Plains region of North America this area experiences over a thousand tornadoes a year more than anywhere else on the planet it because of this a large swath of the midwestern United States is known as Tornado Alley for Tornado to form fast. Moving cold air needs to meet warm humid air the cold air shoves the warm air down and rolls over it forming a horizontal twist of wind like an invisible tube of air spinning sideways. Then because warm air rises this spinning tube of air is pushed vertically in a process known as an updraft. This is the origin of thunderstorm. If the wind increases is in strength it will form a giant rotating cloud bank called a super cell this spinning tube of air acts as an insulator for the warm air rising ising up the middle. The cold air drops down along the sides pressuring warm air up the center as more air is moved through the system. The storm grows producing powerful wind and Hail Hail Occurs As supercell Lifts Water Vapor High in the atmosphere is fear often miles above the ground when the vapor turns to rain it freezes as it falls through the frigid air large clumps of hail being the water had a long time to collect and freeze on the way down the size of Hale is a good indicator of how high the storm clouds have grown during the super outbreak. The clouds were over. Six miles high people found chunks of hail the size of a fist. Hail that large can punch holes through windshields and caused severe injuries to anybody caught outside. Sometimes a whirling section of the supercell close to the ground spins off into a small intense vortex. This vortex is a tornado and they occur in about thirty percent of supercell l.. Storms that can be small last for seconds like dust devils in the desert or they can be what Tom and Brad saw in Tuscaloosa enormous spinning towers of debris with wind speeds of over two hundred miles an hour. No matter how big it is if a Tornado oh touches the ground it can suck up and spin objects in its path. Tornadoes can hurl cars like toys crush ten story grain in silos as if they were soda cans and etched grooves into the earth that or a quarter mile wide entire neighborhoods can disappear into their funnels. Josh as though they had never existed twisters leave shocking and sometimes surreal scenes of havoc in their wake there have been sightings of license plates and pencils driven into tree trunks and cows lifted from one field and deposited in another a half half-mile away found completely unharmed. Most Tornado fatalities are caused by flying debris Oklahoma state state medical examiner. Eric Pfeiffer had only been on the job one day when a deadly tornado. Hit the town of El Reno in two thousand thirteen. He said until you see firsthand what a tornado can do to the human body. You don't realize how extremely violent they are the injuries. Juries are similar to a high speed motor vehicle accidents. But they're much more. Numerous things like trees nails glass and steel deal are torn loose and can act as a cutting implement. Imagine a piece of sheet metal. Travelling at two hundred ninety miles per hour it becomes a blender for most of recorded history Tornados were simply measured by the number of people they killed failed or homes. They destroyed the spectrum of Tornado. Damage has only been scientifically measured for the last fifty years in one. Nineteen seventy-one Dr Ted Fujita. A researcher based at the University of Chicago proposed a new system of measuring tornadoes that combined wind wind speed and level of damage. His initial system was a scale from zero to five with zero being the least destructive and five being catastrophic Dr Fujita had studied this catastrophic level of devastation. His whole life starting in nineteen forty five with a terrible terrible events that occurred not far from his university. In Japan Fujita personally witnessed the aftermath of the nuclear bombing of Nagasaki Sake and Hiroshima. He found that the severity of damage from a tornado was similar to nuclear blasts. A few years after its creation the Fujita scale would be put to the test in nineteen seventy four. A surge of tornadoes hit thirteen thirteen states. Over two days Fujita and his team examined the damage and categorized every tornado touchdown. With the new data up the Fujita scale became the standard of measurements for tornadoes. Across the world the swath of tornadoes that Fujita studied in nineteen seventy four was was the most destructive ever measured. That is until two thousand eleven today. An enhanced version of Fujita scale is the bedrock have tornado studies with over forty years of data collected by meteorologists. The six levels on the scale have become much more detailed. The modern scale is from E F zero to F Five E F. Zero Tornado might only touch the ground for a few seconds and causes. It's very little damage. An AF three twister will drive fence posts through trees at one hundred sixty five miles an hour and an e. a five will wipe the earth clean with winds peaking near three hundred miles per hour only fifty nine tornadoes had been categorized as five since one thousand nine hundred fifty between nineteen seventy four when Fujita develop the scale and two thousand eleven there had been nineteen e F. Five's recorded ended. There would be four of them. During the two thousand eleven outbreak and tens of thousands of people would be caught right in their path. Anyone living in Tornado alley would only have as much warning as the national weather. Service could give them the official goal of the NWS his to provide provide at least fifteen minutes warning of impending tornadoes. During the outbreak they would successfully average twenty four minutes warning. This is how lives lives are saved. As Weather Service meteorologist wes Browning explained after a powerful Tornado in Missouri. We saw many people digging through their possessions Russians what we saw though invariably was a lack of as has been said before life threatening injuries. Not only because we had a thirty four minute lead time from the National National Weather Service but because our media partners carried that morning immediately to the public and thirdly that the public did what we have told them to do do the National Weather Service maintains a network of weather stations throughout the country. But the storm prediction center is based in an on assuming office park in Norman Norman Oklahoma. The center is located in a squat round brick building surrounded by parking lots and prairie grasses a little plaque planted in front identifies this as the most important hub for storm tracking in the United States within the walls of the SBC there is enough meteorological era logical technology and personnel to maintain a comprehensive twenty four hour. Watch of every weather front from puget. Sound to Key West on.

Fujita United States Tornado Alley Dr Ted Fujita spotify Tornado alley Jetstream Dr Fujita Japan Fujita National National Weather Serv facebook twitter Kate NWS Gulf of Mexico Weather Service North America Instagram El Reno
"dr ted fujita" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Hubei abby. Nine hundred and twenty-five Indiana, experienced a tornado that killed nearly seven hundred people. Grocery store owners malate is there and it caught a far and they couldn't get out. And I was told that they screamed and hollered can save me. Save me. Nobody can get to something died. Forty years later, the nineteen sixty five Palm Sunday outbreak became the largest tornado outbreak ever in Indiana, more than one hundred thirty people died how many persons heard the tornado warnings and failed to protect themselves and were then killed no one will ever know for sure summit is known gave their lives trying to warn others. Mile and a half wide path of destruction from the south berry through Palmira into the boarding area. Super outbreak of nineteen seventy four would shake not just Indiana. But nearly the entire eastern half of the United States. I was amazed at a three story, limestone. Heavy building could be damaged like thought. It would also help enhance our understanding of the storm's thanks to research by a man known as mister tornado. Important to find out which particular one of the one hundred hundred stones would implode in eight hundred Dr Ted Fujita was from Japan. He lived in a city that was a primary target for one of the atomic bombs dropped by the United States. The only reason he lived is bad weather that forced the selection of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as the primary targets. Instead, he was a brilliant guy. Both in terms of researching joy NATO's as well as being extremely capable in in making diagrams and drawings of results to the point that it was easy for people to understand grad Forbes, considered an authority on severe weather and tornadoes studied under Dr Fujita at the university of Chicago. So he was a good good teacher in that respect as well of a what was learned that other people could. And then quickly assimilated into into the the common. Practice of meteorology in talking about store. I'm coming here. That's fine gift you know, that we do research on. Things that he had learned some of them going back to Fargo in nineteen fifty seven the terminology that he learned from looking at storms. Wall cloud Supercell tail cloud to those terms are still used today by by store chain. The Fargo tornadoes Forbes refers to where the subject of a short film made by Geeta that you can watch on YouTube. He studied the storms. He drew the animation terms that he came up with for. Became part of the weather jarred main reason why we need to find out. What did? You know, what people should do that the kind of thing we wanted to find out who studied a tornado for the first time before he came to the US that was in Japan in nineteen forty eight. He came to this country as a researcher, and then became a meteorologist at the university of Chicago where he taught Forbes and many other meteorologists, and weather researchers and inspired hundreds of people with his research was he kind of a mentor to you and the other people in the team. Definitely.

Dr Ted Fujita Forbes Indiana United States Geeta university of Chicago Japan Fargo Hubei Palmira NATO Hiroshima researcher YouTube Nagasaki one hundred hundred stones nineteen sixty five Palm Forty years
"dr ted fujita" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Housing jer. In nineteen twenty five Indiana, experienced a tornado that killed nearly seven hundred people on the grocery store owners boy is there and it called a far and they couldn't get out. And I was told that they screamed and hollered and save me. Save me. Nobody could get to them. So they died forty years later, the nineteen sixty five Palm Sunday outbreak became the largest tornado outbreak ever in Indiana, more than one hundred thirty people died how many persons heard the tornado warnings and failed to protect themselves and were then killed no one will ever know for sure. Summit is known gave their lives trying to warn others. Path of destruction from New South berry, drew pal Myra to the boarding area. Super outbreak of nineteen seventy four would shake not just Indiana. But nearly the entire eastern half of the United States. I was amazed at a three story, limestone. Heavy building can be damaged like that. But it would also help enhance our understanding of the storm's thanks to research by a man known as mister tornado important. To find out which one out of one hundred hundred stones. Eight hundred Dr Ted Fujita was from Japan. He lived in a city that was a primary target for one of the atomic bombs dropped by the United States. The only reason he lived is bad weather that forced the selection of Russia and Nagasaki as the primary targets instead of brilliant. Both in terms of researching tornadoes as well as being extremely capable in in making diagrams and drawings of results to point that it was easy for people to understand Greg Forbes considered an authority on severe weather and tornadoes studied under Dr Geeta at the university of Chicago. So he was a good teacher in that respect as well of a what was learned other people could then quickly assimilated into into the the common practice of of meteorology and talking about storms coming head fine case that we do rethought. Things that he had learned some of them going back to Fargo in nineteen fifty seven the terminology that he learned from looking at storms. Wall cloud Supercell tail cloud to those terms are still used today by by stone. The Fargo tornadoes Forbes refers to the subject of short film made by Geeta that you can watch on YouTube. He studied the storms. He drew the animations terms that he came up with for. Became part of the weather. Jar main reason why we need to find out. What did? Huge tornado a what people should do that the kind of thing. We study to tornado for the first time before he came to the US that was in Japan in nineteen forty eight. He came to this country as a researcher, and then became a meteorologist at the university of Chicago where he taught Forbes and many other meteorologists, and whether researchers and inspired hundreds of people with his research was he kind of a mentor to you and the other people in the team..

Dr Geeta Indiana Dr Ted Fujita Greg Forbes United States university of Chicago Japan Myra Fargo Nagasaki researcher YouTube Russia one hundred hundred stones nineteen sixty five Palm forty years
"dr ted fujita" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Defense sirens for I for air raids, but then figured out later. They were good to us for tornadoes and this super outbreak. That's the focus of your special coming up here at seven on ninety three WIBC because of that Craig me if I'm wrong here. It's how we've got our alert system set up today. It is. I mean, a lot of what happened back in afforded the meteorologist and structural engineers and scientists an opportunity for research. Dr Ted Fujita was one of the main researchers, and he's the one you hear f five he's the one who that scale is named after Ted Fujita. And he led led the way with that research. He wanted to map out every tornado find out how how high the winds were at one time. They thought they were like five hundred six hundred miles per hour inside a tornado. Now, they know, you know, it's more like one hundred two hundred miles per hour. But he led the way in the research, and so much of that research is why in the eighties and nineties things started changing the got upgraded radar Doppler radar now dual polarization radar. I mean, it sounds like scientific jargon. Maybe but it lets us actually see inside the storm. Chris davis. St. news director from WIBC. Joining us in studio. We've got one of those awesome new specials coming up here. The top of the hour seven o'clock super outbreak about the tornado outbreak. Chris when you and the staff of the newsroom or putting these things together these specials, these documentaries. How many man hours go into putting something like this together? And this one the research for it started about a month and a half ago. And usually what happens is, you know, I think the the main interviewers in this one where Kurt darling and myself, we started calling around and visiting different places one up to Monticello visited the town there visited a guy name rod pool who went through the tornado. He was fifteen years old when that f- four happened in nineteen seventy four talk to another gentleman up there. Larry Crabb who was a teacher then. So, you know, it's research like that finding who the people are that.

Dr Ted Fujita WIBC Chris davis Larry Crabb Kurt darling Craig director St. fifteen years
"dr ted fujita" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Well, I'll tell you one thing. You know, we in the weather. Profession. All of us are great at conceptualizing how nature's putting our weather together. We have to do that in order to be able to forecast it. So in in terms of my television presentations, I always was frustrated by the plexiglas boards and the magnetic the blinking highs and lows. You know, which constituted a weather show years ago. I thought this so much more in this story to put a cross. So we were among the first stations in this market to computerize our weather graphics, I always felt that was the way to go as well as accessing the amazing satellite imagery and putting this across. We've been excited to put the model data that all of us in meteorology in broadcast meteorology can put across and share with our viewers today in terms of the newspaper weather page. I was always frustrated at how poor a lot of these weather pages were. They've improved a great deal since then, but I always thought. What the Tribune weather page would be a success. If it was hanging on the wall of the classrooms around the area, and if we could use not only the page is a means to communicate tomorrow's weather in the weather and the, you know the days ahead but also to educate somehow. So we incorporate a little vignette every day which tries to describe how and conceptualized graphically how the weather's going to be put together. I always thought that Dr Ted Fujita and his ability to visualize tornadoes and micro Burson down person on the work he did over the years, you go through his catalog of papers and and the visuals he produced..

Dr Ted Fujita Tribune Burson
"dr ted fujita" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Choice and but if finally came through and so off i went so if you if you i know many people particular if you're listening to this podcast probably love weather and are familiar with the enhanced scale that we use today but take a moment and just google or look up dr ted fujita and his many contributions to the field of meteorology because they're amazing thank people don't realize the the scope of what he did in the field and in particular for the storm chasers out there that some of the terms that we use tail clouds caller clouds wall clouds all sorts of weather phenomena he coined those terms in in the fifties rice the bond the study of the fargo the tornado that hit fargo north dakota and so yeah he was fundamentally in a lot of severe weather observational and and diagnostic type meteorology and then along came the satellite era and he was critical in order to be able to rectify the satellite photographs and that means to be able to take what is just sort of this distorted view of the spherical earth in plot that onto weather maps with with the you know county and state lines on it and so on he was very critical to the early development of that type of thing so and vani went on to discover or at least understand that there were microbursts these very narrow intense downdraft that occur and recusing catastrophic commercial airline act let's let's talk a little bit about that so right i grew up in in in an era where there were a lot of aircraft incidents related to microbursts than fujita was sort of instrumental in sort of understanding those why do we not hear as much about microbursts now well i it's we don't hear about the microbursts deaths now because of the czech knowledge.

north dakota google dr ted fujita vani
"dr ted fujita" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"We use them every day to learn design and strategize dry race boards and now glass marker boards are must have in every stage of life for the visual display products you need and the quality of service you deserve us marker board is the place to go a full service shop with a highly trained staff us mark aboard is able to handle any request no matter how large or small visit us mark aboard dot com today and use the promo code geeks to get twelve percent off your next order come see what us market board can do for you this week on whether geeks i'm joined by dr greg forbes of the weather channel he has alerted the public to more tornado warnings than any other human being on the planet saving lives every year today dr forbes talks about his early career working with dr ted fujita and his journey to the weather channel what are some of his most memorable moments and what we can do better as a community to warn the public and what will the future bring all that and more from the storm master himself dr greg forbes thank you for joining us on the weather geeks podcast via pleasure marshall so this is a new fourman we're talking all about whether geeking out and we thought it would be appropriate to have one of the most recognizable figures at the weather channel to help us kick off the podcast look forward to so i know you have known you for many years as a former professor at the at penn fence city tell us a little bit before we get to your pin state career about how you got interested in weather well i got i inner.

dr greg forbes professor dr forbes dr ted fujita penn fence twelve percent
"dr ted fujita" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"dr ted fujita" Discussed on WCHS

"To budgeted we used to hear about them add to add we dole uh we can now what uh uh detect the presence of these doubt burst how does that because obviously we we can't stop the the air from actually doing bad so we must be able to fill out too to avoid flying into it uh either urologist like dr ted fujita dr john mccarthy work together with the faa it and the national weather service and put instruments at the leading airports around the country and special radars to detect down burst and were now able to detect the down verse before they even in reached the ground were now able to warn pilots away from the down burst and that's how we took the what used to be the number one cause of commercial airline accidents and eliminated it but you know jim one of the problems in meteorology is when we do our jobs well nothing happens the planes don't crash you get your destination safely there's a very low death toll associated with the big tornado and so it's sort of an out of sight out of mind problem uh sometimes we get candidates for cutting federal funding for say weather satellites because people don't realize it's the weather infrastructure the keeps the death toll so low i want to go back and talk about all of that another aspects of uh pretty remarkable book warnings the true story of how siam tamed the weather our guest is meteorologist mike smith smith who wrote the book published by greedily books right now we have a call from a bill springhill florida hello bill his bill there uh well i guess we don't have bill after all uh but we'll certainly ah again be taking your calls at one eight six six five oh jimbo what eight six six five five four six two six oh we're back to do a bike smith here uh uh uh again with the with the the dow drafts a used to smash airplanes the crowd uh i i was swimming that uh uh radar must be one of the principal tools that has helped tame weather with that'd be correct no question about it uh in the early 1990s the national weather service installed about 130 doppler radar is around the.

mike smith smith florida the dow dr ted fujita dr john mccarthy jim principal