18 Burst results for "Dr Syn"

"dr syn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:12 min | 3 months ago

"dr syn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is Jason and has been used her life from the BBC. More than a year into the pandemic. The number of covert related deaths in Brazil is now as high as it's ever. Bean nearly 3000 people every day at the moment. But even more shocking is the number of babies who have died since the start of the outbreak. 1300 babies under the age of one Being recorded is dying from Cove in 19. BBC. Brazil's Natalia Pasadena is being given access to one pediatric intensive care unit in the northeast of the country. And then Dr Syn, Attica, NATO gently lays her hands on the defense head. Cradles her tiny frame, rubs her belly and tickles her toes. With no visits allowed due to the fear of infection. It's the doctors and nurses who offer comfort to these critically ill Children. All of whom are fighting covert 19. There's civil Mason is off you, Pamela. It's been an immense challenge working in the ICU without any parents being able to visit. It's just words exchanged over the phone. It's so hard for them to understand how their child's case could have become critical. And in some cases, unfortunately, the child might die. Doctors in Attica NATO is a pediatrician at Albert Saving Hospital in the northeast of Brazil. Together with her colleagues, she was determined to help families maintain some form of contact with their Children. The explosive you project been able to connect these families by a video the staff got together. Brought tablets and phones. Then we started to make video calls from inside of the ICU so as to allow at least some contact with the Children. Lucas was just one when he contracted the virus. After showing signs of a fever and breathing difficulties. Jessica his mom took him to the hospital worried she asked for a covert test. You know that? The doctor said, My dear, Don't worry, there's no need for a covert test. It's probably just a minor sore throat. Weeks later, after Lucas condition worsened, he was finally admitted to an ICU. But help came too late to pick up in some lucky with passion keeps sinking. A covert test could have saved my son. Because then he would have received proper treatment, but the doctor didn't want to. He just gave a diagnosis off the top of his head. More young Children are known to have died of covert 19 in Brazil. And anywhere else in the world. With 1300 deaths of Children under the age of one. The death toll for babies in Brazil is 22 times higher than in the United States. Why are so many young Children dying in Brazil? Dr Fatima Medina is a leading epidemiologists from the health and geo vital strategies. The Muslim problem. A graph e not detect soldier cars. We have a serious problem detector cases. We don't have enough test for the general population, even fear work for Children. Because there is a delaying the diagnosis. There is a delay in care for the child. So on Lee when they are already seriously ill, do we get a diagnosis? Marina says, with surging infection rates across the country, as well as a lack of testing. It's also about poverty and access to care came back there. My God, she could I just ask the most vulnerable are black Children and those from very poor families as they have the most difficulty accessing help. These are the Children most at risk of death. Backing Albert Saving Hospital under the watchful eye of Dr Syn. Attica Tornado. There is some good news on the ward. One of her patients is being discharged.

Natalia Pasadena Jessica United States Brazil 1300 babies 1300 deaths Pamela Jason Marina 22 times Fatima Medina BBC Albert Saving Hospital Lucas Backing Albert Saving Hospital NATO Attica Attica Tornado Lee 19
Alarming Number of Babies, Children Dying of COVID-19 in Brazil

BBC Newshour

01:58 min | 3 months ago

Alarming Number of Babies, Children Dying of COVID-19 in Brazil

"More than a year into the pandemic. The number of covert related deaths in Brazil is now as high as it's ever. Bean nearly 3000 people every day at the moment. But even more shocking is the number of babies who have died since the start of the outbreak. 1300 babies under the age of one Being recorded is dying from Cove in 19. BBC. Brazil's Natalia Pasadena is being given access to one pediatric intensive care unit in the northeast of the country. And then Dr Syn, Attica, NATO gently lays her hands on the defense head. Cradles her tiny frame, rubs her belly and tickles her toes. With no visits allowed due to the fear of infection. It's the doctors and nurses who offer comfort to these critically ill Children. All of whom are fighting covert 19. There's civil Mason is off you, Pamela. It's been an immense challenge working in the ICU without any parents being able to visit. It's just words exchanged over the phone. It's so hard for them to understand how their child's case could have become critical. And in some cases, unfortunately, the child might die. Doctors in Attica NATO is a pediatrician at Albert Saving Hospital in the northeast of Brazil. Together with her colleagues, she was determined to help families maintain some form of contact with their Children. The explosive you project been able to connect these families by a video the staff got together. Brought tablets and phones. Then we started to make video calls from inside of the ICU so as to allow at least some contact with the Children. Lucas was just one when he contracted the virus. After showing signs of a fever and breathing difficulties. Jessica his mom took him to the

Natalia Pasadena Brazil Dr Syn Attica Nato Bean Albert Saving Hospital BBC Pamela Mason ICU Lucas Fever Jessica
"dr syn" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

03:38 min | 3 months ago

"dr syn" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Dr Syn, Attica. NATO gently lays her hands on the defense head, cradles her tiny frame, rubs her belly and tickles her toes. With no visits allowed due to the fear of infection. It's the doctors and nurses who offer comfort to these critically ill Children, all of whom are fighting covert 19. Civil Mason is a few family. It's been an immense challenge working in the ICU without any parents being able to visit. It's just words exchanged over the phone. It's so hard for them to understand how their child's case could have become critical and in some cases, unfortunately, the child might die. Dr Syn Attica. NATO is a pediatrician at Albert Saving Hospital in the northeast of Brazil. Together with her colleagues, she was determined to help families maintain some form of contact with their Children. They will save you some project. We've been able to connect these families by a video, the staff got together and brought tablets and phones. Then we started to make video calls from inside of the ICU, so as to allow at least some kind. In fact, with the Children, Lucas was just one when he contracted the virus. After showing signs of a fever and breathing difficulties. Jessica his mom took him to the hospital. Worried. She asked for a covert test match with this, you know that the doctor said, my dear, Don't worry. There's no need for a covert test. It's probably just a minor sore throat. Weeks later, after Lucas condition worsened, he was finally admitted to an ICU. But help came too late. They'll pick up in some lucky or passion A Cal. I keep thinking a covert test could have saved my son. Because then he would have received proper treatment with the doctor didn't want to. He just gave a diagnosis off the top of his head. More young Children are known to have died of covert 19 in Brazil. And anywhere else in the world with 1300 deaths of Children under the age of one. The death toll for babies in Brazil is 22 times higher. Then in the United States. Why are so many young Children dying in Brazil? Dr Fatima Medina is a leading epidemiologists from the health and geo vital strategies. Problem. A graphic. Not that ex soldier cars. We have a serious problem detector cases. We don't have enough test for the general population. Even fear work for Children because there is a delaying the diagnosis. There is a delay in care for the child. So on Lee when they are already seriously ill, do we get to die? Gnosis, Marina says, with surging infection rates across the country, as well as a lack of testing. It's also about poverty and access to care came back there my own she could. I just ask the most vulnerable are black Children and those from very poor families as they have the most difficulty accessing help. These are the Children most at risk of death. Back in Albert Saving Hospital under the watchful eye of doctors Sin Attica, NATO. There is some good news on the ward, One of her patients is being discharged.

United States Fatima Medina Jessica Marina 1300 deaths 22 times Attica Albert Saving Hospital Lucas NATO Lee One Sin Attica Syn Brazil one age of one Weeks later under her patients
"dr syn" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

03:33 min | 3 months ago

"dr syn" Discussed on WBUR

"NATO gently lays her hands on the infant's head, cradles her tiny frame, rubs her belly and tickles her toes with no visits allowed due to the fear of infection. It's the doctors and nurses who offer comfort to these critically ill Children, all of whom are fighting covert 19. Stabling Mason, just a few family. It's been an immense challenge working in the ICU without any parents being able to visit. It's just words exchanged over the phone. It's so hard for them to understand how their child's case could have become critical and in some cases, unfortunately, the child might die. Dr Syn Attica. NATO is a pediatrician at Albert Saving Hospital in the northeast of Brazil. Together with her colleagues, she was determined to help families maintain some form of contact with their Children. The explosive you have some project we've been able to connect these families by a video the staff got together. Brought tablets and phones. Then we started to make video calls from inside of the ICU so as to allow at least some contact with the Children. Lucas was just one when he contracted the virus. After showing signs of a fever and breathing difficulties. Jessica his mom took him to the hospital worried she asked for a covert test alleged with you know that the doctor said, My dear, Don't worry. There's no need for a covert test. It's probably just a minor sore throat. Weeks later after Lucas condition worsened. He was finally admitted to an ICU. What Help came too late. They'll pick up in some acuity or passion. A Cal. I keep thinking a covert test could have saved my son. Because then he would have received proper treatment, but the doctor didn't want to. He just gave a diagnosis off the top of his head. More young Children are known to have died of covert 19 in Brazil. And anywhere else in the world with 1300 deaths of Children under the age of one. The death toll for babies in Brazil is 22 times higher. Then in the United States. Why are so many young Children dying in Brazil? Dr Fatima Medina is a leading epidemiologists from the health and geo vital strategies. The Muslim problem. A graph e not detect soldier cars. We have a serious problem detective cases we don't have enough test for the general population. Even fear work for Children because there is a delaying the diagnosis. There is a delay in care for the child. So on Lee when they are already seriously ill, do we get a diagnosis? Marina says, with surging infection rates across the country, as well as a lack of testing. It's also about poverty and access to care came back there my own she could. I just ask the most vulnerable a black Children and those from very poor families as they have the most difficulty accessing help. These are the Children most at risk of death. Back in Albert Saving Hospital under the watchful eye of doctors. Sin Attica Tornado. There is some good news on the ward. One.

Jessica United States Marina Fatima Medina 1300 deaths Lucas NATO Lee 22 times Albert Saving Hospital Syn One Brazil Dr one age of one covert 19 Weeks Mason Muslim
"dr syn" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

02:30 min | 3 months ago

"dr syn" Discussed on WBUR

"A number of sellers have bean arrested, but we don't know exactly what happened to them after the arrest by the authorities are expected to give an update later today at a press conference in the city of Kanna, where most off the Victims are When they have been, you know, products, which you've given concerned because of incidents like this with poisoning. You seen those brands taken off the shelves? All those particular types of projects taken off the shelves? Has that not happened in this case? I ask, because how will people be careful in the future? If they want to buy this powdered juice? Will they know where to go to our people being told Just two now drink, you know, get the fresh oranges and use that, despite the fact that is more expensive. Well at the moment. There is no any clan vacation that these products have been taken off the shelf, but what we understand is that most of them are sold. That smaller shops and in neighborhoods not in big supermarkets. So many believed that perhaps they have been bored for long time and they have been there in the local neighborhood shops and their experiment dates of actually passed. And then there was shortage is also taking a mean saying that perhaps some people told these substances in their houses after the boredom long time it go on. Then they expired while being at home, so there are a lot off. You know issues that the authorities are looking into. But at the moment that clarity whether these products have been taken off the shelf, especially in supermarkets, all the smaller shops Exact Thank you very much. Indeed. Our correspondent is like a lead in Abuja. I said to you, South America now because more than a year into the pandemic deaths in Brazil and now at their peak, But what is most shocking in Brazil is a number of babies dying from covert 19. Since the beginning of the pandemic. 1300 babies under the age of one have died from covert 19 with exclusive access to one Children to ICU in the northeast of the country. The BBC's Brazil correspondent attack to pass Arena Has been speaking to staff about caring for those critically ill Children. Dr Syn, Attica. NATO gently lays her hands on the infant's head, cradles her tiny frame, rubs her belly and tickles her toes with no visits allowed.

1300 babies Brazil South America NATO BBC Kanna Abuja Attica one later today Dr two more than a year covert 19 Syn age of one Arena
"dr syn" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

03:02 min | 3 months ago

"dr syn" Discussed on WJR 760

"Press conference. Governor Whitner says there is no new restrictions coming in Michigan. She spent the last half hour talking about the recovered response. And now the vaccine responses going in Michigan. The governor says 5.4 million people have been vaccinated. But she said that we're gonna have a tough couple of weeks ahead of us because of the B 117 vary it the governor says the way to fight this is through wearing masks, social distancing and hand washing, and the most important thing you can do is still get vaccinated. However, for the first time the governor spoke very highly of therapeutics. She spoke highly of Regeneron, which President Trump took, which gave him a miraculously recovery. She also spoke about the effectiveness of rim disappear, which she says Will give people less time in the hospital, she says. There's no word yet on restrictions in Michigan. But again, the thorny question came up toward the end of the press conference was her her health director. She and Curtis her tell Elizabeth Hotel went to Alabama last week on spring break with them and their Children. Now with Michigan supposedly being the number one hot spot for covert in the United States. Is this any time for our chief health executive? Go to the beach. We'll have more on this throughout the day. Dr. Arnold Manto, epidemiologist at the University of Michigan Hospital, says Getting a blood clot from the Johnson and Johnson Bank scene is a long shot, and he says he thinks people should get it even if they can. One in a million shots. So if we only had this vaccine, I would say Is frequency of side effects is so low that people should still get it. Of the six patients who experienced blood clots. All six were women, and all six were between the ages of 18 and 49. Infectious disease specialist, Dr Matthews. Simms of Bowman says he believes the J and J vaccine will be out for distribution relatively soon remember so low, I think they're going to say they're too low for us to really tell yet we're going to keep a close eye on it, and we're going to move ahead in the end. That's what I think will happen. Is that for sure? I don't know. How will the public react when if and when they do that? Hard to say. Dr. Syn spoke this morning with Paul W. Smith, the state of West Virginia, is offering remote workers $12,000 cash to move to the mountain state and a year's worth of free outdoor activities. The deal also includes a year's worth of golf, zip lining, whitewater rafting and skiing. And for those who move there, they'll be paid $10,000 in additional $2000. Should they stay? A second year on Wall Street Today? Stocks are mixed. The Dow was up 187. But the S and plea s and P's about flat. Ken Rygel Ski WJR News Guy Gordon in two minutes. We know that interest rates right now, third an all time low. This is an.

Paul W. Smith $12,000 Ken Rygel $10,000 Curtis $2000 United States Arnold Manto Michigan Matthews Guy Gordon West Virginia Simms six patients Alabama Syn 49 two minutes last week University of Michigan Hospita
"dr syn" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:20 min | 5 months ago

"dr syn" Discussed on KTRH

"The program, a familiar name a familiar voice. Doctor ran deeps in Asia We're talking about Cardiology, heart disease myths. That we're going to set straight whether it's cardiology, lung disease cancer, lots of patients the public in general Has these ideas. They may not be totally right. They may not be totally wrong, but if they get in the way of doing the right thing they get in the way of Seeking help in a timely fashion or doing the right thing. And so Dr Syn Asia is here. We'll talk about him or in a moment if you want to get more information. Houston cardiology dot com Houston's own So think about that. Think about myths that you may you may have with regard to heart disease, and we're going to talk about some things that you may not have thought off. All right, So it reset. So welcome to the program. Our website Dr Joe Giladi dot com. Dr Joe Galotti dot com. What I would like you to do go to the website go to the newsletter Link. Sign of Brown newsletter. First new and improved newsletter went out Friday this past Friday. Despite the frost, we sent it out, and if you sign up or when you sign up, you will be getting the insider's guide to dietary. Fiber. It's a freebie. Everybody needs to know about fiber. Even if you've got heart disease, dietary fiber plays a role. So go to the website Dr Joe Galotti dot com. And sign up for the news letter. All right, so With regard and I have been thinking about this with the Storm the disruption. Our lives and our practice and and the patients we take care of have been disrupted. The week was basically obliterated. Trying to get good patient care that we normally do. But when you look at The preparations that in an ideal world should have Taken place. Paying attention. To the things that are invisible in a sense. We heard about outside pipes where they insulated. Were they in good condition? Where is your water? Shut off. I had I had to think. Where to? Why? Shut my water off! So that my pipes don't freeze. Do you know where it is? Where is the power? Shut off. Have you ever gone to your fuse box? In your apartment or Home. We heard tragically, people died from carbon monoxide poisoning. Do you have Carbon monoxide detectors. Do they work? They have batteries in them. What the same for smoke detectors. Just as a side note the life The smoke detector is 10 years. So if you have smoke detectors in your kitchen.

"dr syn" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:16 min | 6 months ago

"dr syn" Discussed on KTRH

"Exercise and lift weights by straining those muscles, we get big. Biceps. When you strain the heart, it gets thick. The hypertrophy that Dr Syn Asia is talking about. So it's it's opposite of what we want for other muscles. We don't want the heart to get big and bulky and stop working. Absolutely yeah. And then incorporating lifestyle modification is So important move today than ever. You know, we're talking about incorporating exercised diet, right? Yoga, meditation. Lifestyle modification. When I did my lifestyle medicine board in 2017, you know, they talked about all these pillars in We have been incorporating them in our practice. Throughout all these 28 years. I've been have been a big big believer in that because I practice it myself. If you practice yourself, you have to lead by example. And we tell our patients These are so important Medicines clearly are important. But if you know, you know, we talk about the positive nutrition and the Hippocratic Hippocrates when you know Assistance should be teaching. Let your food be your medicine. That's right. Medicine. Be your food music tonight. It's music to my ears. When I hear that So he didn't cover of nutrition is full, so important. And of course exercises also so important because, you know, didna people see over. It is my jeans off course it is. Jim Patino DNE is not your destiny. Life than modifications can order your Gina expression, But you called epigenetic simply expend to patients. When you do regular exercise, you eat better food. You can alter the expression off your genes, right? Yes, we can modify the disease itself. Just amazing what lifestyle modifications going toe, especially the cure. What Free healthcare hundreds to more than $1000 per month and disability compensation and tens of thousands for college tuition. These are just some of the U. S Department of Veterans Affairs. Benefits.

Jim Patino DNE U. S Department of Veterans Af Gina
"dr syn" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

05:50 min | 6 months ago

"dr syn" Discussed on KTRH

"Volunteer marathon runner all around Renaissance man and it is It is really great to have him on the program this evening to follow along with the program. Don't forget Dr Joe Giladi Kamisar website. Dr Joe Galotti, calm. We have a new Tab on the website to sign up for our newsletter. There's a tab on the top that says, subscribe, Click It Window opens up share with US Your Email and name and you will be on the list to get the newsletter which is coming out in just a week or so, as we have been talking about doctor ran deep soon. Asia is a cardiologists here in Houston and with February being American heart Month. It is, unfortunately, just the one month that we talk about heart disease, but it's something I know that Dr Syn Asia talks about 24 7 in his practice and his world, Duchess in Asia. Thanks for coming on tonight to your health first. It's really a pleasure to get you one. Finally. Thank you so much. Oh, it's a pleasure. Well. As you and I, and just for a little bit of fun disclosure doctor Soon Asia and I were residents back in Brooklyn together. Back in 1987 88 89. It's It's amazing that we are reconnecting now, both in Patient care and on the radio and education, So I always like to see these circular loops reconnect and it's It's a pleasure. Being able to get you involved in what I'm doing. Absolutely loving it. Yeah, now, okay, so with heart disease As we both know. The general public needs to realize the importance Of not only their heart and heart function, but heart disease. No matter how you cut it, it's the number one killer of all of us. Pretty much around the world and so just to start off here, Dr Syn Asia Why is it or what? Pearls of wisdom? We give everybody tonight to begin to think seriously about their heart and keeping it healthy. But you do you just pointed out, you know, heart disease. If you look at the statistics, it is number one cause of death in the U. S. And in fact, no, it is number one cause of death all over the world, including Asian countries, you know, in the U. S. Data is very scary. We have 655,000 people die of heart disease every year. So by definition, we have 1% dying off heart disease. Every 36 seconds minutes, staggering statistics and you know it's currently we have got close to 18 million people diagnosed with Call me after disease and heart disease. It's a really big spectrum off which the largest wooden is coronary artery disease, which is the blockages in the arteries of the heart. Now and yeah, keep going and so and that leading onto the corny under disease, which is basically the actress process, which causes the build up of plaque in the artist, the heart. And then the actress Croesus process be the receptors. We will talk about leads to the build up of plaque in other vascular beds. We talk about Rotted best leading to prod rocker disease that leads to strokes. And we had the beautiful vascular disease. Better. The assets process and the pressure vasculature at least two personal vascular disease and clarification and in civil cases, me even possibly to amputation. So the entire Evening process of axis closest that will affect depending on the heart. The garage are trees, the brain the person Jessica reaches, it can essentially affect the entire body. Really, and it's the entire and that's what I feel. At times. There is an under appreciation that it is every in essence, every artery. In the body can be affected and damaged and caused a malfunction in that part of the body. And it's yes, it is the heart the corroded artery, but it is the smaller arteries in other organs that could be affected. Absolutely, And that is the building of the axis Closest. Where do you have the LDL particles or the ferry particles that entered the balls off the arteries and then lead onto the process off the inflammation? And ultimately leading toe actress Croesus or a build up of plaque. That is the closest and the heart attack is actually there. There is a complete occlusion. Off one of the artists, the heart that leads to damage to the heart muscle and the acute event leading to the heart attack. Yeah, now, I would. I would say that The most important part. Of heart disease or one of the many important parts is understanding the risk factors for heart disease, and we can never hear about these much that. You know, we could never hear enough of them. And so From your perspective. What? What are the risk factors that everybody needs to know about? Sure. No, That's an excellent point for education. As you know, we have the American Department next month and education is so important for people to know..

heart disease Asia Dr Syn Asia Dr Joe Giladi Dr Joe Galotti Croesus Houston American Department Brooklyn Jessica
"dr syn" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

09:37 min | 9 months ago

"dr syn" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"So most commonly, we diagnose it by patient's symptoms if they present with a typical symptom of heartburn, or, as Casey put regard situation where they're complaining off acid contents coming back into the stomach. It's a pretty pretty typical diagnosis off acid reflux. In addition, there are other symptoms, which would also point to acid reflux, which will be people having food hang up in the esophagus or discomfort with the act of swallowing. Those are also some of the typical symptoms. In addition, we also suspect acid reflux and people with atypical symptoms, which could be just having some discomfort in the upper abdominal or epi gastric area, complaining off cough, A typical symptom would be bubble caught up in the back of the throat or of global sensation. People who often complain off belching burping throat discomfort with swallowing or recurrence, sore throat. So all these would be more symptoms, pointing to the presence of acid reflux, and how common are those other symptoms such as cough and Everything that you mentioned. Not the classic heartburn symptoms are fairly common like, so when you end up asking patients often you'll find that they tend to have a lot of those symptoms. Absolutely. So Casey back to you on Dr Trivedi mentioned how it's diagnosed. What are some of the things you know, Aside from not being pregnant or losing weight? What are some of the other things that people can do to help prevent or stop the gas yourself? Jill reflux disease and can they stop it? So there's some things that I tell patients regarding lifestyle modifications for GERD, first of which maintaining a healthy bm I which is body mass index on DATs, a measure of heightened wait. Normal beyond my range that I typically tell patients to shoot for his 18.5. To 25, some maintaining a healthy weight is very important. Also getting a good night's sleep is very important because we know that disturbs sleep actually increases accid exposure within the esophagus. We tell people don't sleep with the full stomach. Specifically, don't lie down within 2 to 3 hours of eating on Do you also want to elevate the head of the bed approximately 6 to 8 inches. And I usually tell people to purchase a foam wedge to put under the mattress. Sleeping on more pillows actually does not help because it increases the bend at the waist or it causes neck pain. Also tell patients to sap smoking a swell as to avoid other irritants to the G. I tract specifically and said's, which are nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs. Those are very damaging to the G I tract. And those include ibuprofen. Motrin, Advil, Aleve aspirin. Um, Lastly, it's very important to reduce the intake of certain known trigger foods. And those things include things that would irritate the G, I tract or even cause relaxation of the muscles. Those things include spicy foods, fatty foods, fried foods, alcohol, so everyone who lives in Wisconsin so I'm sorry. I'm not telling you to eliminate them. I'm telling you just to reduce everything in moderation, Caffeine. Garlic, Anything tomato based, including catch up so anything that could potentially irritate the acid exposure in these in the stomach in the esophagus, So Dr Sand Vansen obviously Ideally, people would change all these things. They would be perfectly normal weight, but I'm sure you probably see a lot of people who make these changes but still have symptoms. Despite that, So how successful are these lifestyle changes in Wendy's decide when to start someone on medications. Lifestyle like sell alterations can be very effective, especially if people are compliant. With those changes. Lifestyle changes mainly focused on trying to help the esophagus empty. We typically will start patients on medical therapy when they essentially start to have persistent symptoms. Despite the lifestyle modifications that includes, like Dr Trivedi mentioned Persistent heartburn type of issues or persistent sensation that things are reflecting back from their stomach into their Asaf Agus. In addition, we will consider medication therapy for those that have complications associated with their reflux disease that may include difficulty swallowing or when we do an endoscopy, if they have persistent alterations are alterations of their Asafa Ghous as well. And what are the most common types of medical therapy that people are put on for? Gastroesophageal reflux disease, so the primary medications that we have now focused on kind of changing the composition of the stomach contents that's primarily focusing on decreasing the acid of the stomach. So by decreasing the acid in the stomach, you're focusing on trying to minimize how much acid is re Fuxing back into the esophagus. Unfortunately, we don't have a lot of good therapies right now that focus on helping with clearing the esophagus of acid, so our primary medications now they fall in the class. So what's called Proton pump inhibitors or the H two receptor blockers, which both focus on decreasing acid content of the stomach. Now, Dr Trivedi do one of those medications work better than another. Do you typically have patients on both? Or is it obviously it's just dependent on their symptoms. I'm sure it truly is dependent on their symptoms, So it kind of depends on what category you would fault Bush toe put the patients and If they have mild symptoms, you know, occasional one or two symptoms here, and they're often related to dietary indiscretion. Besides lifestyle modifications, you can probably consider each two receptor antagonist like Family to dinner, Pepcid ran Italy nor Zantac as an initial starting point. Most people will find some relief and will not have to take Proton pump inhibitors. However, if they're still symptoms, start getting to be persistent, recurrent and recalcitrant. Then you have to resort to Proton pump inhibitors. I mean, you can take a A pyramid like approach where you can start with antacids and go to Proton bomb inhibitors. But it all depends on the severity and the recurrence of symptoms often by the time patients. He's a gastroenterologist. They've already tried most of the over the counter option. So we are often will start with Proton bomb perimeters, either in single, smaller those higher those, depending on the need. And you know this is something that people will often ask. And you hear about a lot on television. In terms of the side effects of a lot of these medications, and with Proton pump inhibitors, especially there's been a lot out there about The potential complications of taking them and patients are concerned about being on the long term. How valid are those concerns? And do you try to get people off of them because of up? So unfortunately, Proton bomb innovators have learned a fairly bad rap in the recent times. This is kind of my favorite victim, which I tell patients that everything under the sun, including son has side effects, so it's always a pros and cons situation. If they need a medication than if they're symptomatic they have and lifestyle modifications are not helping than they need the medication. Proton pump inhibitors have been in the market at least for 30 plus years, and they have stood the test of time because initially these were prescription. Now they are over the counter Jack that generally proves the safety with time. What has generally been found with these is that they have been found to interfere with the absorption of calcium, vitamin D magnesium vitamin B 12, So there are concerns related to that and often, actually, most studies have not shown deficiency as a concern. Most studies have not shown osteoporosis or fractures as a concerned with prolonged use of Proton pump inhibitors. It's always in conjunction with other risk factors like age menopause, family history that adds to the risk factor off osteoporosis so hard to really isolate the proton pump inhibitor alone and just to finish with you, Dr Syn Vansen. Why does sometimes then why do sometimes the medications not work for everyone? So there's a number different reasons one of the things that we Always have to confirm is that we have actually have an accurate diagnosis of girders. Well, so one of the ways we do that is by doing various studies, including an upper endoscopy, where we placed the camera scope that advances through the mouth into the esophagus. And look to see if there is any breakdown in the lining of the esophagus that would suggest GERD. Number two. We actually have testing that can look to see how much acid is actually returning into the Asaf Agus, which is called a Ph. Study, and S. So one of the primary reasons that medical therapy may not be effective is that we don't have a true diagnosis of curd. And unfortunately, sometimes the symptoms of GERD can overlap with other conditions. So we always want to confirm that the actor we have an accurate diagnosis. Then we also want to confirm that patients are actually taking their medications and not missing a lot of dough sing of their medications, which can make medical therapy obviously ineffective and then also that medications are taken in the timely fashion as well. Where ideally, they should be taken 30 minutes before meal. So sometimes medical therapy may not be effective because we're having patients incorrectly taking their doses of medication. So ultimately, when they come to see you, they're still having symptoms despite taking their medical therapy, and then you decide what additional studies they'll need. So to confirm whether or not they truly have the diagnosis of reflux.

acid reflux Proton Dr Trivedi heartburn Asaf Agus Casey cough reflux Dr Sand Vansen Wisconsin ibuprofen neck pain Dr Syn Vansen Caffeine Wendy menopause Advil Bush Asafa Ghous
"dr syn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:45 min | 10 months ago

"dr syn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm bringing in John Rogers, one of the report's authors, and he's also a professor of education at UCLA and faculty director at the University's Center X John. Welcome to the show. Thank you Can Xena very happy to be here? So you surveyed hundreds of high school principals and that some of those results were pretty stunning. How is it that principles were responding to providing meals, providing technology providing emotional support? Was that coming off from them? It came from them and then their staff is well. I think one of the things that we see is that as the pandemic emerged, schools responded in very proactive ways to try to meet the extraordinary needs that were were playing out. So school's as you suggested, provided meals, they provided mental health counseling. They connected students to health care. They were the cornerstone of their communities, sustaining their communities through a very difficult time. And one of the things that's interesting and we can't lose sight of is that students, often low income students, in particular, are also provided meals at school. John has that become more of an acute need during the pandemic. Absolutely many of the principles talked about emerging hunger that was playing out not just for the students, but the students, Families and a number of principles reported that they not only work providing meals to their students, but to their students, siblings and other members of their students, Families and they were doing this in very complicated ways because students could no longer receive the meals in the school cafeteria. Schools, sometimes provided them in locations in the community sometimes even provide sending the meals out directly to the students, Homes. One of the other things that's been exacerbated by this pandemic across the country is the access to the technology that's needed for remote learning, which was interesting that your you found that a lot of principles were actually helping with that as well. Remote learning has really exacerbated that inequality. John, is that right? It certainly has. We've had a digital divide for some time. But during remote learning, we saw that high poverty schools were much less ready to jump in and enable all of their students to participate on the first day, And that was not just because Many students lacked either the devices of the connective ity. It was also because some teachers and other key staff at schools didn't have those either devices or connective ity on the first day, and so high poverty schools were far less like leading schools and more affluent communities. To be ready early on on DH. Then, even after school's ramped up, it was the case that high poverty schools were more likely to have many students who lacked either the laptop or tablet or some sort of connective ity that allowed them to participate fully in the remote learning environment. On some of the principles that you spoke to had or that that we're part of the study had to really come up with some creative solutions. Let's listen to how one principle responded to what was happening. My name is Dr Syn Chickens. Always I'm a high school principal in South Central Los Angeles, and one of the innovative things we did was to buy Facebook ads to push out to our community. Often our families don't have working phone numbers or continuously moving. And so this is one way to reach them and to make sure that he stayed in communication with us to get updates about student information and community resource is John. I would never have assumed the Facebook ad could be used that effectively. What were the other ways that principles were making use of some creative solutions? Principals tried to reach out students in a variety of different ways. Somewhere fairly traditional phone calls, emails text messages Principles. Also, half of our principles reported that they did home visits there. They're staffed at home visits in order to connect with students who otherwise were not participating fully. I should note that there was a real divide in this that again. Students in high poverty schools were far more likely to either not be participating regularly or to be out of contact entirely, and this was because students in high poverty schools were far more likely to be experiencing a set of challenges that were created by the pandemic..

John Rogers principal Facebook John UCLA faculty director professor of education Dr Syn Chickens South Central Los Angeles
"dr syn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:36 min | 10 months ago

"dr syn" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is Brian Lehrer. Join me. My guests and listeners from around the country for a live conversation about the economy and the election. Can the middle class in America be saved with young voters have with their parents have to their parents even have enough? The election is coming soon. America now is the time to talk about the economy, jobs and our expectations. Tune in tonight at eight on 93.9 FM Am 20 or ask for spot Speaker to play W Welcome back to the takeaway. I'm tan Xena Vega. It's been six months since the corona virus pandemic cause school systems across the country to shut their doors. And scramble to adapt to remote learning. And though the challenges posed by covert 19 remain as acute as ever, we're now getting a better sense of how public high schools fared in the transition to this new reality. In a report released today, the Institute for Democracy, Education and Access found that 92% of schools had to provide meals to students during the pandemic. 93% supply technology like tablets and laptops, and 43% provided support for students whose loved ones passed away. For more on the survey's findings and what they say about our education system I'm bringing in John Rogers, one of the report's authors, and he's also a professor of education at UCLA and faculty director at the university's Center X John. Welcome to the show. Thank you, Tenzin. I'm very happy to be here. So you surveyed hundreds of high school principals and that some of those results were pretty stunning. How is it that principles were responding to providing meals, providing technology providing emotional support? Was that coming off from them? It came from them and then their staff is well. I think one of the things that we see is that as the pandemic emerged, schools responded in very proactive ways to try to meet the extraordinary needs that were were playing out. So school's as you suggested, provided meals. They provided mental health counseling. They connected students toe healthcare, They were the cornerstone of their communities, sustaining their communities through a very difficult time. And one of the things that's interesting, and we can't lose sight of is that students, often at low income students, in particular, are also provided meals at school. John has that become more of an acute need during the pandemic. Absolutely many of the principles talked about emerging hunger that was playing out not just for the students, but the students, families and a number of principles reported that they not only were providing meals to their students, but to their students, siblings and other members of their students, Families and they were doing this in very complicated ways because Students could no longer received the meals in the school cafeteria school, sometimes provided them in locations in the community sometimes even provide sending the meals out directly to the students, Homes. One of the other things that's been exacerbated by this pandemic across the country is the access to the technology that's needed for remote learning, which was interesting that your you found that a lot of principles were actually helping with that as well. Remote learning has really exacerbated that inequality. John, is that right? It certainly has. We've had a digital divide for some time. But during remote learning, we saw that high poverty schools were much less ready to jump in and enable all of their students to participate on the first day, And that was not just because Many students lacked either the devices of interconnectivity. It was also because some teachers and other key staff at schools didn't have those either devices or connective ity on the first day, and so high poverty schools were far less likely than schools and more affluent communities. To be ready early on. And then even after school's ramped up, it was the case that high poverty schools were more likely to have many students who lacked either the laptop or tablet or some sort of connective ity that allowed them to participate fully in the remote learning environment. On some of the principles that you spoke to had over that that we're part of the study had to really come up with some creative solutions. Let's listen to how one principle responded to what was happening. My name is Dr Syn Chickens. Always I'm a high school principal in South Central Los Angeles, and one of the innovative things we did was to buy Facebook ads to push out to our community. Often our families don't have working phone numbers or continuously moving. And so this is one way to reach them and to make sure that he stayed in communication with us to get updates about student information and community resource is John. I would never have assumed the Facebook ad could be used that effectively. What were the other ways that principles were making use of some creative solutions? All principals tried to reach out students in a variety of different ways. Somewhere fairly traditional phone calls, emails text messages. Principles. Also, half of our principles reported that they did home visits there. They're staffed at home visits in order to connect with students who otherwise were not participating fully. I should note that there was a real divide in this that again. Students in high poverty schools were far more likely to either not be participating regularly or to be out of contact entirely. And this was because students in high poverty schools were far more likely to be experiencing a set of Challenges that were created by the pandemic challenges that related to economic and security challenges that that called for young people in high poverty schools. To be essential workers themselves or to care for siblings who were not being supervised because they themselves were out of school. And so we saw that That that those principles in high poverty schools were far more likely to have to take these steps to connect with students. John. What about the emotional support that principles were providing for students who like that, who may have been stressed because of the exacerbated issues because of the pandemic because they may have lost someone? Tell us a little bit about that role. Yes. Many principles spoke to us about the trauma that was unfolding in their schools. The students were experiencing death and their families death in the broader community and or sickness that was playing out. Many schools provided mental health support to their students. They tried to create a sense of community and support. Of course, this was particularly challenging in an environment where they couldn't Connect with the students through through traditional means, and they had to do this virtually, and so fostering that sense of support and community through zoom or other virtual means was a challenge. But school's tried their best to meet that need. So much there that ah, educators air trying to make up.

John Rogers Facebook school cafeteria school America Brian Lehrer principal Xena Vega Institute for Democracy Tenzin Dr Syn Chickens professor of education faculty director UCLA South Central Los Angeles
"dr syn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"dr syn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A WalMart in El Paso, Texas, killing 23. NPR's Hannah Elam reports. The Anti Defamation League says right wing extremists remain a serious threat in the U. S. Theeighty. L says the decrease in mass shootings since the deadly El Paso attack isn't for lack of trying. The group tracked at least 18 attempted terrorist attacks and plots by right wing extremists in the past 12 months. Half involved wait. Supremacist. Others were motivated by antigovernment views, anti abortion beliefs and hatred toward Muslims and women. Del Paso attack targeted Hispanic shoppers at a WalMart one of the deadliest hate crimes in U. S history. In the years since Theeighty L says white supremacist vitriol continues to spread Theeighty L recorded more than 2600 incidents of white supremacist propaganda in the 1st 7 months of 2020 Nearly the same number for the entire year. In 2019 Hannah Lam NPR News, a record high closed for the NASDAQ 10,900 to the Dow Up to 36. This is NPR. Live from Kiki Dee News. I'm Danielle Benton. Former President Barack Obama is weighing in on a state legislative race in the South Bay City politics. Reporter Guy Mars Roddy has more Obama released a nationwide list of endorsements on Monday that includes one California State House race He's supporting and Raval we appointed to the Federal Election Commission in 2013. Ravel's running for state Senate seat in San Jose against fellow Democrat Dave Cortesi of Santa Clara County supervisor Campaign finance reports filed late last week showed the race turning into a typical intraparty contest with organized labor lining up behind Cortez, e and businesses and the State Chamber of Commerce. Supporting Raval filing show Cortez he has more than twice as much cash in the bank is Raval. With three months until election Day. I'm gone. Mars Iraqi news. Public health experts warn that millions of tenants could face evictions if state protections and on August 14th as scheduled, leaving people homeless and quickening the spread of covert 19. Dr Syn Dari Maces Thie, interim health officer for Sonoma County, She says renters need stronger protections during public health emergencies. It'll be very difficult to shelter in place, if you are out of housing or homeless convictions would overburden our health care system. With more people being prone to illness. A spokesman for the California apartment Association said in a statement that they are encouraging owners to work with tenants on repayment plans and that greater government assistance is needed..

Raval WalMart NPR Barack Obama Dr Syn Dari Maces Thie El Paso Cortez Hannah Elam U. S. Theeighty Kiki Dee Hannah Lam Federal Election Commission Theeighty L Texas Danielle Benton State Chamber of Commerce
"dr syn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"dr syn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Create some significantly hazardous conditions on our roadways. City officials say they have pumps ready to clear city streets. And high water vehicles ready for rescues if needed for NPR news on Victoria Hansen in Charleston, President Trump now says the popular video sharing at the TIC Tac will be shut down in the United States if it's not sold by September 15th. NPR's Franco Cardona's reports. The president is no longer against an American company buying the Chinese owned APP. President Trump threatened to ban the Chinese company from the US entirely, but now says he's okay. If a U. S company like Microsoft purchase it. But he says the party's only have until September 15th toe work out a deal in the United States. Government should get some sort of fee. So when we closed down on September 15th unless Microsoft or somebody else is able to buy it and work out a deal inappropriate deal, so the treasure of the really the Treasury, I guess you would say of the United States gets a lot of money. President Trump said Any such deal would not be possible without US government involvement. But he didn't explain how the U. S Treasury Department would receive such a payment. Franco Ordo Nia's NPR News. Congressional leaders remain deadlocked on the next round of Corona virus relief legislation. Negotiations today failed once again to yield an agreement, including a deal on extra unemployment benefits, which expired for millions of Americans last week, Democrats have largely been pushing to extend the $600 per week jobless benefits. NPR's Claudia Gross Ella's reports, Republicans are offering less They have been pushing this idea that they don't want the $600 payment this extra payment a week. They want $200 so they want to cut that dramatically. However, we've heard Republicans say they're willing to negotiate with Democrats on that, perhaps look at a higher number. Meanwhile, Democrats have helped strong to the $600 figure, including Speaker Pelosi. However, we've heard some Democrats say that they would be willing to bend on it. That's NPR's Claudia Chrysalis reporting. This is NPR news. Live from Kiki Dee News. I'm Danielle Benton to more inmates at San Quentin State Prison, died of complications related to the Corona virus over the weekend. Ladies tell Maria Dylan has more on the outbreak there. One of the inmates who died, 48 year old Orlando Romero had been on death row since 1996. State corrections and rehabilitation Department officials didn't identify the other man. He was the 21st incarcerated person to Diet San Quentin. Currently, 145 inmates in custody there have active cases of covert 1953 infected with the Corona virus has been released for treatment. More than 2000 inmates have contracted the Corona virus at San Quentin, nearly 1/3 of the prisons. 3000 inmates have been tested in the past two weeks. Mark, tell Maria Dylan kick you in the news. Public health experts warn that millions of tenants could face evictions, estate protections, and on August 14th as scheduled, leaving people homeless and quickening the spread of covert 19. Dr Syn Dari Maces, the interim health officer for Sanoma County. She says renters need stronger protections during public health emergencies. It'll be very difficult to shelter in place. If you are out of housing or homeless evictions would overburden our health care system with more people being prone to illness. A spokesman for the California apartment Association, said in a statement that they are encouraging owners to work.

Trump NPR United States president San Quentin Maria Dylan Microsoft Dr Syn Dari Maces Franco Cardona San Quentin State Prison Franco Ordo Nia Kiki Dee Claudia Gross Ella TIC Tac Treasury Orlando Romero Victoria Hansen U. S Treasury Department
"dr syn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"dr syn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"17th. Sources close to the Biden campaign say that an announcement is not expected before next week. One complication is that with the pandemic, it's logistically more challenging to interview potential candidates. Also, the pool of possible running mates is large but in is reportedly considering about a dozen women. Committed to picking a woman as his running mate months ago, And recently he's received growing pressure to choose a black woman. Biden will be 78 by inauguration Day. And so there's extra significance in his choice of a running mate who could be seen as the future of the Democratic Party. Asma Khalid. NPR News State officials in Georgia are opening a 120 bid Corona virus pop of hospital in Atlanta today. Sam Whitehead of member Station W. A B reports the facility is designed to take the pressure off hospitals. Governor Brian Kemp says the facility at the Georgia World Congress Centre will open with 60 beds with the ability to double in size if needed. It's the second time state officials have turned the convention center in Atlanta into a pop up hospital. They shuttered it earlier this year after it on Lee took in a handful of patients. But a recent surge of new Corona virus infections across the state has left some hospitals in Georgia without many critical care beds to take care of the sickest patients. For NPR News. I'm Sam Whitehead in Atlanta Stocks are trading higher on Wall Street. At this hour, the Dow was up 240 points. This is NPR news live from the news on Brian Watt Sonoma County is set to receive state help to try to control the spread of the Corona virus in skilled nursing facilities. Most of the county's Covad 19 deaths have been among residents At such places. Science reporter Danielle Benton has more. The county asked for state intervention in stemming outbreaks last week, County officials say. One important need is securing a facility where they can take sick and exposed residents, said Dr Syn Dari Mace, the county health officer. The goal really is to separate those who have the virus. When does you don't the facilities have struggled with isolating and quarantining infected or exposed residents Statewide, Nearly half of all covert 19 deaths are linked to a long term care homes for the elderly. I'm Daniel Vent in the news. Bay Area airports, stung by the drop in air travel because of the pandemic are seeing a bit more activity. In fact, Oakland International recorded twice as many passengers in June compared to Mei is Julie Chang reports. While those numbers show a significant increase in traffic since the pandemic began, it's still only a fraction of what should have been a busy travel season. Oakland airports Director of Aviation Bryant Francis says he's encouraged by the trend, especially for the shops and restaurants inside the terminals. The larger levels of passengers creates opportunities for those concessionaires to expand hours of stores or restaurants that are currently operating or to reopen some locations that had been closed for several months. Fo in San Jose Airport also saw an uptick and fight activity. I'm Julie Chang news, and I'm Brian. What in Oakland? Thanks for listening. Support comes from California building trades who believes that poverty and housing can't be solved by driving construction workers into poverty. Support for NPR.

NPR News Brian Watt Sonoma County Atlanta Julie Chang Sam Whitehead Biden Georgia Brian Kemp Oakland NPR Asma Khalid Dr Syn Dari Mace Democratic Party Georgia World Congress Centre Oakland International California Lee Danielle Benton Daniel Vent
"dr syn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"dr syn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"See guarantees a postal service that they are going to recognize. Mail in ballots as a priority, and they have a system in place working with local government an electoral boards to make sure all of that male Mail in ballot is delivered in a timely way so that it will be counted calmly spoke to NPR as president. Trump has repeatedly claimed without evidence of mail in ballots invite fraud, election security experts say such fraud is rare. Listening to NPR news live from cake. We D news. I'm Brian Watt. Noma County is set to receive state help to try to control the spread of the Corona virus in skilled nursing facilities. Most of the county's covered 19 deaths have been among residents at such places. Science reporter Danielle Benton has more. The county asked for state intervention in stemming outbreaks last week. County officials say. One important need is securing a facility where they can take sick and exposed residents, said Dr Syn Dari Maze, the county health officer. The goal really is to separate those who have the virus from those you don't the facilities have struggled with isolating and quarantining infected or exposed residents? Statewide, nearly half of all covert 19 deaths are linked to a long term care homes for the elderly. I'm Danielle Benton Sweetie News Bay Area airports, stung by the drop in air travel from the pandemic are seeing a bit more activity. In fact, Oakland International recorded twice as many passengers in June compared to make Vids Julie Chang reports. While those numbers show a significant increase in traffic since the pandemic began, it's still only a fraction of what should have been a busy travel season. Oakland airports Director of Aviation Bryant Francis says he's encouraged by the trend, especially for the shops and restaurants inside the terminals. The larger levels of passengers creates opportunities for those concessionaires to experience hours of stores or restaurants.

Noma County Danielle Benton NPR fraud Brian Watt Oakland Bryant Francis Oakland International Dr Syn Julie Chang president Trump reporter officer Director
"dr syn" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"dr syn" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They're not predicting a speedy resolution. Kelsey Snell NPR NEWS Washington The head of the White House's Corona virus task force, Dr Deborah Burkes says the pandemic has entered a new phase. NPR's Matthew Schwartz has more. At first, the Corona virus hit the densely populated urban centers. But now, Debra Burkes told CNN State of the union Things have changed. What we're seeing today is different for March and April. It is extraordinarily rides spread its into the rural as equal urban areas and to everybody who lives in a rural area. You are not immune or protected from this virus, Burke says Americans are going on vacation, often to covert hot spots. Getting infected and then bringing the virus back to their communities without even realizing it. Burke says that people in multi generational households with an outbreak in their area Should consider wearing a mask even at home. Matthew Schwartz. NPR NEWS Washington Microsoft says its CEO has consulted with President Trump about purchasing the U. S assets of the video sharing APP TIC TAC. NPR's Bobby Allen reports, Trump initially indicated he does not support a U. S company taking over the Chinese based APP. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella says he's working toe win the administration's okay to complete a deal to take over TIC Tac's operations in the U. S. The White House has threatened to impose economic sanctions against TIC Tac that would, in effect, be a national ban. It is owned by a Chinese company, which has raised national security fears in Washington. Microsoft says If the deal is approved, it would ensure data on American citizens is not offshored. NPR's Bobby Allen reporting. Microsoft is a financial supporter of NPR. You're listening to NPR news Live from news on Brian Watch. So Noma County is set to receive state help to try to control the spread of the Corona virus in skilled nursing facilities. Most of the county's Cove it 19 deaths have been among residents at several skilled nursing facilities. Science reporter Danielle Benton has more Connie asked for state intervention in stemming outbreaks last week, County officials say one important need is securing a facility where they can take sick and exposed residents, said Dr Syn Dari Mace, the county health officer. The goal really is to separate those who have the virus from those you don't the facilities have struggled with isolating and quarantining infected or exposed residents? Statewide, nearly half of all covert 19 deaths are linked to a long term care homes for the elderly. I'm Danielle Benton sweetie News They area airports, stung by the drop in air travel from the pandemic are seeing a bit more activity. In fact, Oakland International recorded twice as many passengers in June compared to Mei is Julie Chang reports. While those numbers show a significant increase in traffic since the pandemic began, it's still only a fraction of what should have been a busy travel season. Oakland airports Director of Aviation Bryant Francis says he's encouraged by the trend, especially for the shops and restaurants incite the terminals. The larger levels of passengers streets opportunities for those concessionaires to expand hours of stores or restaurants that are currently operating or to reopen some locations that have been closed for several months. Fo in San Jose Airport also saw an uptick and fight activity. I'm Julie Chang news, and there's more at dot org's on Brian..

NPR Microsoft TIC Tac Matthew Schwartz Julie Chang Bobby Allen Washington President Trump Burke Danielle Benton White House Dr Deborah Burkes Noma County CEO Brian Watch Debra Burkes Kelsey Snell U. S Oakland
"dr syn" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

07:23 min | 2 years ago

"dr syn" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Sorry, I'm not telling to. Them telling just to reduce everything in moderation, certainly caffeine garlic tomato based, including catch up, so anything that could potentially irritate the acid exposure in the in the stomach, in the Assefa. Guess correct? So Dr San Vanson obviously, ideally, people would change all these things they would be perfectly normal weight. But I'm sure you probably see a lot of people who make these changes but still have symptoms despite that. So how successful are these lifestyle changes in Wendy decide when to start someone on medications? Well lifestyle alterations, can be very effective, especially if people are compliant with those changes lifestyle changes merely focus on trying to help the office empty, we typically will start patients on medical therapy when they essentially start to have persistent symptoms, despite the lifestyle modification studying clues, like Dr travec mentioned, persistent heartburn type. Of issues or persistent sensation that things are reflecting back from their stomach into their Asaf Agha's. In addition, we will consider medication therapy for those that have complications associated with reflux disease that may include difficulty swallowing, or when we do an industry of persistent, alterations are also rations of their Asaf Agha's, as well. And what are the most common types of medical therapy that people are put on for guest yourself jewelry flux disease, so the primary medications that we have now focus on kind of changing the composition of the stomach contents. That's primarily focusing on decreasing the acid of the stomach, so by decreasing the acids, stomach, you're focusing on try to minimize how much acid is reflecting back into the softness. Unfortunately, we don't have a lot of good therapies right now that focus on helping with clearing the Asakusa of acid, so our primary medications now they fall in the class of what's called. The proton pump inhibitors or the H, two receptor blockers, which both focus on decreasing acid content of the stomach now. Dr Trivedi do one of those medications work better than another. Do you typically have patients on both or obviously it's just dependent on their symptoms. I'm sure it truly is dependent on this symptom. So it kind of depends on what category would fall Bush the put the patients in, if they have mild symptoms, occasional one or two symptoms here and they're often related to dietary indiscretion, besides lifestyle modifications, you can probably consider h two receptor antagonists, like family or pep said, ranitidine or Zantac, as an initial starting point, most people will find some relief and will not have to take proton pump and bidders. However, if they're stem symptoms start getting to be persistent recurrent and the calcitrate than you have to resort to proton pump innovators. I mean you can take a. A bit Emmett like approach where you can start with antacids and go to proton bidders, adult depends on the severity and the recurrence of symptoms often by the time patients is aghast Rogers, they've already tried most of the over the counter option. So we often will start with proton pump editors either in single smaller does Hirose, depending on the need. And you know, this is something that people will often ask, and you hear about a lot on television in terms of the side effects of a lot of these medications, and with proton pump inhibitors, especially there's been a lot out there about the potential complications of taking them and patients are concerned about being on the long-term. How valid are those concerns and do you try to get people off of them because of that? So unfortunately proton administrators have owned fairly bad rap in recent times. This is kind of my favorite dictum, which I tell patients that everything under the sun, including son, has side effects. So it's always a pros and cons situation. If they need a medication than if they're symptomatic they have lifestyle modifications are not helping than they need the medication proton, permanent injuries have been in the market at least for thirty plus years. And they have stood the test of time because initially these were prescription now they are over the counter that generally proves a safety time, what has generally been found with these is that they have been found to interfere with the absorption of calcium vitamin d magnesium vitamin B twelve so there are concerns related to that often actually most studies have not shown deficiency as concern most studies have not shown, osteoporosis, or fractures, as a concern with prolonged use of proton pump innovators. It's always in conjunction with other risk factors like age. Menopause, family history that adds to the risk factor of osteoporosis. So hard to really isolate the proton pump inhibitor alone. And just to finish with you. Dr Syn Vanson. Why does sometimes why do sometimes the medications not work for everyone? So there's a number of different reasons. One of the things that we always have to confirm is that we actually have an accurate diagnosis of GERD as well. So one of the ways we do that is by doing various studies, including an upper dos could be where we place, the camera sculpted advances through the mouth into the Asaf against and look to see if there's any breakdown in the lining of the Asaf against that would suggest gird. Number two, we actually have testing that can look to see how much acid is actually returning into the Asaf igus which is called a ph study. And so one of the primary reasons that medical therapy, may not be effective is that we don't have Choo, diagnosis of GERD. And unfortunately, sometimes the symptoms of GERD can overlap with other conditions. So we always want to confirm that, the accurate, we have an accurate diagnosis then. We also want to confirm that patients are actually taking their medications, and not missing a lot of dosing of their medications, which can make medical therapy ineffective, and then also that medications are taken in a timely fashion, as well where I delay, they should be taken thirty minutes before meal. So sometimes mental therapy may not be affected because we're having patients incorrectly taking their dose of medications. So ultimately, when they come to see you there still having symptoms despite taking their medical therapy, and then you decide what additional studies, they'll need to confirm whether or not they truly have the diagnosis of reflux disease. Exactly. So part of our role as gastroenterologist is a we typically see patients, when they're already on medications for their gird. So what we like to do is, if patients aren't responding. We like to clarify that diagnosis with these additional studies. Obviously, we take a thorough history to confirm that the truly have classical symptoms of gas or salvage. Reflux. Disease. And then, also we frequently do set up these patients for upper doc- procedures are studies to make sure that we're not missing alternate diagnosis that would explain their symptoms as well. Great. Well, thank you so much for all the great information. And please join us shortly for our next segment..

Dr San Vanson Asaf Agha reflux disease GERD Asaf Asaf igus caffeine Wendy Dr Trivedi Dr travec Assefa Hirose Menopause Asakusa heartburn Emmett Bush ranitidine