17 Burst results for "Dr Swain"

"dr swain" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

05:49 min | 2 months ago

"dr swain" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"To your smart device. Asking it to play us is probably the smart thing you could do. Hey, Alexa, Wave the flag Smart choice. Welcome back Jim Bohannon Short 186650 Jimbo is Dr Carol Swain is our guest political scientist, Retired professor of law at Vanderbilt University, a lifetime member of the James Madison Society and founder of Be the people News dot com and again If you could get the binge TV network you can see Some of the things that she does on video. Ah, she had a run in with the folks that linked in. They caved on that. For the moment, Facebook still keeps her in a suspended state or daring to a show, eh, MIM that illustrated Democratic members of Congress wearing Ku Klux Klan robes. Well, just so happens that Democrats were those who founded that particular. Organization. And again she is living proof that yes, indeed. There is discrimination on the social media to Ah, people who have a conservative viewpoints, and that includes the people. Who are women and people who are of color, and Dr Carol Swain is living proof of that. I want to get into Ah, there their real agenda and then more calls. How do you define the real agenda? That should work here? Because I mean things like what you mentioned about math a moment ago. I mean, that's just dumb. And I'm sure that they are not just trying to look dumb. Right and a Sephora's big tech When I wrote a book that was published into this and 11 and updated, uh, this year be the people called to reclaim America's space and promise I talked about the alliance. Between the Obama administration's National Security Agency and Google and how dangerous that Woz and that opened the door for the Democrats to have alliances with Facebook. Twitter and other um, tech platforms, and I think that one reason why they are shutting down conservative voices is They really do and did have a dog in the fight, and we saw them openly fighting for Democrats. And I can tell you that when I ran for mayor, um The day of the election in 2019, we had planned to send out reminders on my, um uh, page Mayor page on Facebook. We could not get anything to load. We could not get anything to post until seven p.m. and that was when the polls were closed. And you know, it just seemed odd, but I really do believe that they interfered with us so that we could not send out reminders. For that election, and so they are in the camp of the Democratic Party and what they do for Democrats. All too can't as campaign contributions. Well, absolutely. Again. What you just said would not surprise me in the least. 186650 Jimbo 18665. Oh, 546264 Dr. Carol Swain. Here is Clint in Anchorage, Alaska. Good evening. Hey, How are you today? We're well headed. Great. Had a question for the doctor. Um I've noticed. I'm 46 years old. I've noticed, you know that she mentioned earlier. The ties to Of Christianity to slavery and whiteness and The kind of I'll get thrown together these days, and I have noticed kind of ah, gravitation of people of color towards the Islamic religion and had this question for some time. And I wonder why that is. That's the Um Nations practicing Islam today still practice slavery. So well, he was like that of the places on the planet. Not every of course not. Every Islamic society does, but of the places on the planet, which do still practice out nowt purchasing of human beings that you'll probably find more of it there than any other particular segment of the planet. I think that that would probably be true, Dr Swain. And every now and then we hear about cases in the United States where they're practicing it here with someone that manages to escape on alert Theater three authorities And so I mean, that's factual. I don't know that black people are gravitating towards Islam. If anything, they're becoming more secular humanists. And black lives matter, and those organizations are progressive organizations and critical race theory comes out of Marxism. Uh, it's like a derivative of the critical theories that were Marxists. And there's no place for God and Christianity is seen as an enemy. They want allegiance to the state. And so Americans who you know, swear an oath to the Constitution. As well as those who believe in a God who was above man who put that service to God above man. Those people are threats. And so I think that's where Christianity Um, is singled out And as far as Islam, a lot of the Islam and other religions. A lot of the schools are promoting what we would consider pagan religions. And that is the way the weekend Christianity and to seduce you know the Children. I want to come back and talk about the specific things you were just talking about. When we return again our number 186650, Jimbo, and you could find out more about Dr Carol Swain. The best website is be the people news dot com Be the people news dot com 186650 Jimbo back in a.

Google United States Jim Bohannon National Security Agency 2019 Facebook James Madison Society Twitter Democratic Party Congress Sephora Democrats Islam Swain Carol Swain today seven p.m. Vanderbilt University Democratic this year
"dr swain" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

09:18 min | 2 months ago

"dr swain" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Smart device, asking it to play us is probably the smart thing you could do. Hey, Lex, a wave the flag marked choice. Welcome back. Jim Bohannon Short 186650, Jimbo as we speak with Dr Carol Swain. Political scientist, retired professor of law at Vanderbilt University Lifetime member of the James Madison Society and founder of Be the people News dot com and as the break intervene, she was just explaining That while of Facebook may have gotten in your way a bit, but that something called the binge TV Network has not pleased if you would to repeat the way that you couldn't find the bench TV network. It's um, anyone that has a smart TV on any number of the ants like broke. Ooh! Amazon far. As well as pick up plutonium. Those ABS If you put in binge TV network, my channel will pop up. Click on it and you can watch the 30 minute show. And they show us about. Faith, politics, culture, Whatever's on my mind there, enough, All right. Here's a call from Frank and Cumberland, Maryland for Dr Carol Swain. Hello, Frank. Urgent independent thinking. Do you have enough of those qualities that criticize Israel for not accepting black people is immigrants and paying the few immigrants in Israel there to leave? And as much, as is ago receives billions of dollars in American aid? Well, first of all, I was not aware of that policy. But if you have any comments, Dr Swain feel free. With the call of Sam like an ad in my mind like something like he was programmed true. First, I know there've been a number of people of the Jewish faith from Africa, which I think would they are people who would be considered people of color by most of the definition who, in fact, have, in fact found homes and I'm not sure what the question what exactly is the question? The question is just to find a way to smear Israel. Quite frankly, and I'm not sure that that contribute much to the program in question. 186650, Jimbo, is the number 18665. Oh, 54626. You have mentioned critical race theory and a number of people, of course have heard about that. I don't know that that we have all had it explained to us necessarily. In terms of just what exactly is the critical race theory? I can tell you that when you see diversity, equity and inclusion, training or equity education coming to your neighborhood, it is all steeped in critical race theory, which is a philosophy that came from the universities. Ah, and it Pretty much are used that Um, Western civilization in particular has been set up to benefit white people and whiteness. And in the American context, you know, the white people have all benefited from that white skin. They all have white privilege. They are oppressors and non whites of the oppressed and that the only way that quite people can redeem themselves is to is to become consciously. Anti racist and By the coming anti racist They need to dismantle the structures that they have set up to benefit themselves, and they need to challenge a racism wherever they find it. So if you are a college student, or now anyone in caper 12 where you being indoctrinated you go home. You challenge your parents and your grandparent's about there are systemic racism. And it was news to most of them. Right. Pardon? That's news to most of them, isn't it? Those parents? No, but it also you know has to do with. Ah, it's not just Christianity is seen as part of whiteness. Capitalism and all of these structures of things that people are told that they need to dismantle and unfortunately, uh, Corporation schools. It's sweeping America. President Trump tried to do something about it late in his term he did in the executive Hey, Sand, an executive order. Up in it in the federal government because the trainers make millions of dollars and there's no standards. They don't make me into dollars Procession is a million dollar industry. But people are making, you know huge salaries doing diversity training. And there's no standard sister. What qualifies someone to be a diversity trainer. I think a lot of the people that we laughed that a few years ago there were getting degrees that ended in studies. You know. Women's studies black studies, LGBT Study Chicano studies. We wondered where they were going to get jobs where they university equity inclusion training now. Yeah, And so that that's the part of this was well, they're They're jobs that at stake here and so I guess from what you just outlined, then then let's say people like, uh, like John Johnson, who found a Johnson publishing and Ebony magazine, Uh, Berry Gordy founded Motown Records. These people can't be real black people because they're capitalists. Is that is that how this works? Well, I mean, pretty much. Um, if you're liberal, you're still in the club. If you're black, conservative, you're not. And I think Candice Owens and I both have been called black white supremacists. Oh, I'm sure you have been called all kinds of ugly names over the years, and you know something. I'm just pro American. And I can tell you that Critical race theory. The way I see it, Ah, practice at most places. It runs Canada, a civil rights laws and the equal protection clause of the 14th amendment, and I think that people are should document what happens in those required courses. And Ah, if they are being bullied and intimidated and then a hostile workplace or school environment, they need to file lawsuits and that and I believe that non white Need to stand up in fight for the civil rights of whites, just like many white sport for the civil rights of racial, ethnic minorities. To me, there is something incredibly patronizing about the notion of You were here to make you free. So do exactly as we tell you Don't think for yourself, do what you're told. And this will liberate you that that that strikes me as kind of an odd point of view. It's even worse than this. The whole notion that whiteness is property and that white people have all these privileges privileges because of the color of their skin. To me, that's a white supremacist argument coming from the lamp. And you see it. The colleges universities how they administrators a quick to resurvey forces. And separate graduations and lowered standards for minorities. That is the true white supremacy, and it's racist. Whole argument is racist. And I think that we need Tomo Call them out on that. And white people need to stop cowering in fear. They afraid they're gonna be called a racist. You already been called a racist. You already been told that because of the color of your skin and your ancestors that you're guilty. You have nothing to lose, but standing up for your rights, and I think that the point you just made it is very, very critical. And that is that these these lowered standards for people of color Well, They're only black. What can you expect? That is the implied extremely racist point of view. We have to make special They couldn't go ahead. The worst thing is that because to make everyone equal, they're going after classes for gifted students where there are always some minorities in those classes, some blacks, Hispanics Get into the classes for gifted students. They're going to take them away from everyone. And then when you say that math is racist, and the teachers should not require Um, exact answers on math problems because it's racist. Do you think that teachers really gonna set the black kids in the mountain authority kids in the corner and teach them that and the rest of the kids get taught? Real man. Know if the teaches believe that they're going to teach the whole class that there no right answers to math. And so then where would the next generation of engineers, scientists, architects? Um pharmacists and even caches come from if we all of a sudden say that math is racist, there are no right answers. We're not going to teach people math. Well, obviously this comes from people who are not. Shall we say the sharpest knives in the drawer? We'll go back. We'll talk some more about Their real agenda. Dr. Carol Swain, our guest again. Her website is her named Carol. M. As in whatever the M stands for Swain s w A. I n dot com 186650. Jimbo is our number and we'll be back in.

Candice Owens John Johnson 30 minute Facebook Africa Amazon Motown Records Jim Bohannon James Madison Society Carol Swain Johnson Sam 54626 18665 Swain Vanderbilt University Jimbo Hispanics both Berry Gordy
"dr swain" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

08:36 min | 2 months ago

"dr swain" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Welcome back Jim Bohannon Show 186650, Jimbo. Our number And the breath for law advantage. But university Dr Carol Swain is our guest. She has run into difficulties with Facebook and just to make sure we have as we take some calls for you here. What's your current status now on Facebook? Has this been resolved? Or are you still under this suspension? For a couple of things. I'm still under the suspension, and secondly, I am returned from Vanderbilt's on no longer there. And while we're talking about big tech About a month ago linked in suspended me for three days because I shared the MIC Lindale study. S so it's It's not just one of them, Okay? They backed down after I said I was going to go public, and so, um, you know, they say which one was this? The Linked in back down. Okay, Very good. All right. We have a call from a fellow Tennessee and John in the Union City, Tennessee. Good evening, John. Good evening, Dr Swaying as a fellow Virginian. Also, I was born in Virginia and 1954 may have you have nothing but my highest respect and for standing up to these Internet thugs and bullies. And I want to tell you that all of this censorship they're trying to foster on Americans is going to come back to bite them, and I I can always say you are a warrior goddess and let them beware because you have been awoken and they have filled you with a terrible resolve. Well, thank you. And which part of Virginia where you born in? I was born in Shenandoah County, Virginia. Okay, um, that all right, well, Virginia's a special state, even though there's lots of efforts to ruin it, and it's always had to struggle, I guess against Forces that would take it down the wrong path. Thank you, John. Appreciate your thoughts, and I'm sure that more than a few people feel this way you, Dr Swain? I would imagine that Intercessor is for Carol Swain. Must have grown its membership because of all of this. Well, I have not been paying attention to the numbers, but I know that people all across the country and probably all across the world. Pray for me at times and Um It makes a difference. Very good. 186650, Jimbo. Our number when 8665. Oh, 5462 Sixes would go to Steve in Atlanta. Hello, Steve. Thanks for taking my call. Appreciate it, Miss Man. Thank you. This swing Thank you for being a fighter on being a Tribute to everyone who who Who feels as though the world's coming down on us in the United States, all normal, rational people, and I would love to see you run for political office. Uh, School, state or national, you would be a force to reckon with. I bet you've heard that before, Dr Swain. I did. I went from Mayor of Nashville in 2018 and special election. I came in number two on the field of 10. Nashville was never elected a Republican. I ran in the general election that next year. Came in number three and a feel of about the same size, heavily outspent spent. But I've never felt that running for office was the call of my life. The only reason I ran for office. When I beat in Nashville was that they needed someone, you know that could that had a platform and I was able to help control the dialogue director dialogue because there were lots of issues. It would never come up if I had not been in the race. I learned a lot of positive things from the process. But I think that my platform And the things that I can do, Um, from this vantage point, maybe more important than what I could do in Congress or At some office like that? Well, that is certainly your choice. But I'll tell you, there'd be a lot of people and I would be one of them. Who would applaud you and and back you? Should you change your mind in that regard? Thanks for your call Steve. Thank you have to be independently wealthy to actually run and be successful and not be corrupted by the process because it's very corrupting. Even for people that go there with the best of intentions. Well, there's certainly that that fact that that Theo go there and stay there requires tons of money. I know a number of people who have left in fact public life and in Congress in particular because of the fact That even Mork than voting on bills and committee and subcommittee and on the floor. Even more than serving constituents is the need to constantly constantly constantly beg for money. Beg for money, beg for money. And of course, there are those People out there who are are quite willing to provide that money if the price is right, and I certainly see what you're saying. Well, I think that we need statesmen and women and that they have to be profiles in courage, and they have to care more about America and the American people. And being returned to office. So when they get there, you know they have to be committed to doing whatever they said they were gonna do and to their values, even if it costs them. Are there seat and the next election? There's not enough people like that. Who would be profiles in courage? Yeah, I think that you've touched on a very key factor there, Dr Swain, and that is that there are more than a few people who are initially motivated by the desire to do the right thing. However, they define what the right thing is. They are principled. And they are idealistic and they get to Congress. They discover. Of course, early on that you are a backbencher. You're a brand new person. You have zero influence, even if you're in the majority party. Even less. If you're not, but you work and you, you you put forward the best average of possibly can. And after a while you may get a little bit of seniority had been elected two or three times. And then when you start to show a little bit of seniority, you start Tell yourself what you know next time out there. I could maybe get a subcommittee chairmanship and I could really do the things that I promised I would try to do when I was first elected to this seat, and if I could only get elected one more time. And at that point you have begun to equate your re election with the welfare of the Republic. And at that point, as far as I'm concerned, you have in star Wars parlance crossed over to the dark side. Am I wrong? Well, that's sort of like the process. But I want people that throw them set throw themselves on the sword. If they have to do in the first time, the best stand on principle. And too many, uh I'm going to say Republicans. I'll pick on Republicans. Um, They do things that ideological because it's not based on principles. If you're operating on principles, you know what to do. You're not gonna do some of things that Done on January 6th. Ah! Or other times where they have not operated on a principle. Points Well taken. We're gonna continue our discussion here at 186650, Jimbo, when 8665 Oh 546 to 6 with Dr Carol Swain, political scientist and the retired professor of law at Vanderbilt University Lifetime member of the James Madison Society. What is the James Madison Society? It's ah conservative scholars that have, um, associate with Princeton University. Uh, you go through a program and then once you have been Elected. You've gone through that program. You remain a lifetime member. And it was actually found that after I left, for instance, But I went back and served as a scholar there. Very good. 186650 Jimbo 18665 Oh 54626, also founder of Be the people news dot com What is that briefly? Well, maybe that's where I post my blog's podcasts have a TV show conversations with Dr Carol Swain that It started last December..

Virginia Steve James Madison Society Princeton University Atlanta Carol Swain John January 6th United States Facebook Jimbo 2018 Republican Vanderbilt University Swain 8665 Congress 18665 Oh 54626 Union City, Tennessee last December
"dr swain" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:46 min | 3 months ago

"dr swain" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"I just heard you. Good story on health director from Boston has a loose in Hawaii recline has helped director Dr Swain, each yet who lives in Florida. Yeah, well, after we'll have to check that one out, Peter and see See what's going on. So I, As you know, I've been Florida right now, you know Jennifer Low that the the medical director for the Public Health Health Commission in in Boston She says she's in the front lines, and she's going to return in the summer. So if if she's in the front lines what 7.5 hours away that I'm certainly I'm in the same time zone. I'm in the front lines and in Boston down here in Florida, and I'm planning to return in the spring. You don't have to go. You don't have to wait till the summer to get how we car back to get get into the front lines. Packing the sandbags and loading the ammunition into the for the big fight. The campaign of a lifetime against the seasonal flu known as covert 19. 844 542. 42 Bill Gates is so concerned about climate change so concerned about climate change. These only invested a couple of billion dollars in a private jet company for his fellow plutocrats and billionaires. He's really, really worried about the about climate change. We don't have time for these cuts, but we will be right back with these cuts and what they how How was the vaccination program going? We want to hear from some people to see how it's going. Why is Charlie Parker hiding?.

Jennifer Low Florida Peter Bill Gates Charlie Parker Public Health Health Commissio Boston 7.5 hours Hawaii Swain each 19. 844 542. 42 couple of billion dollars Dr one
"dr swain" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

06:47 min | 8 months ago

"dr swain" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Skunk is a creature both commoner. From whom other animals gladly have stayed? He may be as fresh as the bright morning do. And yet who confessed him I wouldn't. You. It's a few days later in Springfield and breakfast time in the White Frame House on Maple Street, but it isn't just any day nor yet any breakfast this is a big day in the life of the Anderson. This is the day of the skunk raffle Leslie. I don't care what anybody says. Bob Stewart had no right to charge me seven dollars and fifty cents printing the tickets Jenn. It's for a very worthy cause hundred tickets that's seven and a half cents a piece the minister said you couldn't have found a better way to dispose of lily must have printed each ticket by hand. And sprinkled diamond dust over the. Here's you. Thank you. I told him I WANNA very plane tickets the very plainest he had. Why did he have to be so fancy because he knows the money's going to church and he wanted everything to look nice seven dollars and fifty cents to get rid of something we didn't even own in the first place. or The sugarbowl. Garage, you've got to put sugar on Mili Syria. That's fine. I'm surprised you didn't sleep apnea garage to keep the silly animal company. Jin. Yes he did. But slept in the garage. Well, he said it was lillies last night and he didn't want anything to happen to him what can happen to us that hasn't already happened. Isn't there anymore sugar. I'll get some deer tells me gunky practically nothing this one eats like his father was a tapeworm. Own Dear, what's the matter I could have sworn? We had another bottle of cream cream. Give it as soon as Ben comes with cream last night I know dear but I thought we had another. Yes dear. Migrating have plenty of mill. Well, that's nice. You're sure I'm not disrupting any of your plans I mean you wouldn't have more important. Lily perhaps. Gin You know lily doesn't like milk. Oh well then it's all right. I certainly wouldn't want us anything you might need for Lily Jim given body isn't this the most wonderful day you've ever seen the morning betty, the warm sunshine the golden leaves is need good just to be alive. What. I said. But matter father nothing dear sit down and could use. I'll have your breakfast ready in a minute provide billy has already eaten it. Jim You're not being fair. I'm not being fair half of my breakfast out in the garage with that polecat and I'm not being fair. Daddy morning deer. Out in, the Garage Clyde Beatty. Never mind to sit down each breakfast thinking you. Dear I'll have your cereal readiness daddy not now. Kathy. I want. Tell US something Daddy. What is it Kathleen? I sold the ticket. Fun. Eight ticket. You had twenty five of them. I still got twenty four. Oh, that's great. That's just great. The drawings in less than an hour and we've still got twenty four tickets and we don't have to sell all take. Do we I told Dr. Swain. It'd be twenty five dollars for the church. If we don't sell all the tickets I'll have to give him the money myself well, twenty four tickets only six. Six or seven fifty for the printing six dollars for the tickets. Thirteen dollars and fifty cents to get rid of that miserable scone. Isn't miserable Patty. He's killed. Your brother comes in here on my dad. Yes. Come in here. I now, but do you realize what? defrosted skunk is costing me. I don't know that thirteen dollars and fifty cents. It is. Your sister was so positive she could sell twenty five tickets. You know how many she's sold. One. At one measly little ticket for twenty five cents now have to make good for the rest. Dad when I was a boy I never brought a skunk home I had more consideration for my parents. Dad I'd have been booted from your Donald City Hall if I even mentioned bringing skunk into the House Dad, my children all go. Please skunks frogs lizards and I've got to get rid of them. You realize we're stuck with twenty four tickets dad. What is it? I didn't sell all mine either. Gosh it is easy to sell tickets on a skunk. People are prejudiced many yourself and besides somebody add to stay here and take care of Lily. How many did you sell? So I got a bunch of Fellas to sell them for me. They took the seventy five. Take many. Did you sell? Nineteen. Out of seventy five well, the Fella said they tried nineteen. We've got eighty tickets left I'm sorry that mother is there any cream betty not? Gosh it isn't as if we didn't try I still have some control over my temper. Let me have the five dollars. He's nightclub Daddy. Dad Yes. All I've got is a dollar ninety. Nineteen tickets at twenty five cents is four, seventy, five, not a dollar ninety that's less commission. What Commission? Well I had to give the commission they sold them for a quarter, but we only got a dime. But Dad, you don't know how hard it is selling skunk tickets. They were doing me a favor thirty dollars. That's what it comes to Margaret, thirty dollars to get rid of a skunk. Has More coffee. Dear. Maybe maybe we better just keep it. We're not gonNA keep anything and you and I are going to have a long talks about what happens to boys who brings skunks into the house. Ready you find do now I'm going to see if I can get rid of some of these tickets. We ever heard of a rapper with only two thousand tickets. The House off cluttered up with scouts, camps, Selah tickets. To the darn thing shot in the first place. About your this is Jim Anderson look about those tickets Yes. Yes. They were very nice but. We've got quite a few of them left Bob, and after all you did make seven fifty on the deal and the money does go to the church. So I thought if you'd like to.

Lily Jim Jim Anderson Bob Stewart White Frame House Springfield Clyde Beatty Jenn Ben billy Dr. Swain Kathy Kathleen betty Patty Donald City Hall Margaret
"dr swain" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

07:36 min | 8 months ago

"dr swain" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Skunk a creature both commoner urbane from whom other animals gladly abstained. He may be as fresh as the bright morning. And yet who confessed him I wouldn? It's a few days later in Springfield and breakfast time in the White Frame House on Maple. Street. But it isn't just any day or yet. Any breakfast this is a big day in the life of the Anderson. This is the day of this Congressional Leslie. I don't care what anybody says Bob Stewart had no right to charge me seven dollars and fifty cents for printing the tickets. Jenn. It's for a very worthy because hundred tickets at seven and a half cents a piece. The minister said, you couldn't have found a better way to dispose of Nellie must've printed each ticket by hand. And sprinkled diamond dust over the. Here's your coffee. Do Thank you. I told him I. Want it very plane tickets very plainest he had. Why did he have to be so fancy because he knows the money's going to the church and he wanted everything to look nice seven dollars and fifty cents to get rid of something we didn't even own in the first place. Or the sugar bowl but duke it out to the garage. You've got to put sugar on cereal. All, that's fine. I'm surprised. You didn't sleep out in the garage to keep the Animal Company. Jim Yes. He did. But slept in the garage. Well, he said it was lillies last night and he didn't want anything to happen to him. What can happen to a skunk that hasn't already happened. Is Anymore Sugar. I'll get some deer tells me gunky practically nothing this one east like his father was a tapeworm. Own dear what's the matter I could have sworn we had another bottle of cream cream no David as soon as bad comes cream last night I know dear but I thought we had another highly. Yes. Dear. Margaret. Have plenty of mill. Well, that's nice. You're sure I'm not disrupting any of your plans. I. Mean you wouldn't have a more important use for it. Lillee perhaps. Gender you know lily doesn't like milk. Then it's all right. I certainly wouldn't want to use anything you might need for Lilly Japan. Is the most wonderful day you've ever seen good morning betty the warm sunshine the gold leaves is neat good just to be alive. What? I said. But father nothing dear sit down could use I'll have your breakfast in a minute provided billy has already eaten it Jim. You're not being fair. I'm not being fair half of my breakfast out in the garage, but that polecat and I'm not being fair. Daddy morning deer. Out in the garage with Clyde. Beatty. Never mind to sit down breakfast. I'll have your cereal ready to minutes daddy not now Kathy. Daddy. What is it Kathleen? I saw the ticket fun. Eight tickets you're twenty, five of them. I still got twenty four. Oh, that's great. That's just straight the drawings in less than an hour. We've still got twenty four tickets and we don't have to sell all the tickets. Do we I told Dr Swain it'd be twenty five dollars for the church. If we don't sell all the tickets have to give him the money myself round twenty four tickets are only six dollars. Six Seven fifty for the printing six dollars for the tickets. That's thirteen dollars and fifty cents to get rid of that miserable Scott. Isn't miserable Patty. He's killed your brother comes in here. Yes, come in here. Now, but do you realize what that defrosted? Skunk is costing me I don't know dad thirteen dollars and fifty cents. It is. Your sister was so positive she could sell twenty five tickets and you know how many she sold one. Dad One measly little ticket for twenty five cents. I'll have to make good for the rest. Dad when I was a boy I, never brought a skunk home. I had more consideration for my parents. Dad I'd have been booted from the city hall if I even mentioned bringing a skunk into the House Dad my children wallets. Skunks, frogs, lizards and I've got to get rid of them. Do you realize we're stuck with twenty four tickets dad. What is it? I didn't sell all mine either. Guys it is easy to sell tickets on US gun. People prejudiced many. Did you sell and beside somebody had to stay here and take care of? Lily how many did you sell? So I, got a bunch of Fellas to sell them for me. They took the seventy five taking on many. Did you sell? Nine thousand nine. Out of seventy five well, the Fella said they tried nineteen. We've got eighty tickets laugh I'm sorry. Mother isn't there any creams that he not? Gosh it isn't as if we didn't tie while, I, still have some control over my temper. Let me have the five dollars. He's nightclub Gaddi. Yes I'll I've got a dollar ninety? Nine hundred thousand tickets at twenty five, cents four, seventy, five, not a dollar ninety. That's less commission. What Commission? Well I had to give the of the commission they sold them for a quarter, but we only got dime. But Dad you don't know how hard it is selling skunk tickets. They were doing me a favor thirty dollars. That's what it comes to Margaret Thirty dollars to get rid of a skunk. Has More coffee here maybe maybe we better just keep it. We're not going to keep anything and you and I are going to have a long talk Sunday about what happens to boys who brings skunks into the US. I'm going to see if I can't get rid of some of these tickets. We've ever heard of a rapper with only two thousand tickets. At the House all cluttered up with Scott and sell the tickets. The the darn thing shot in the first place. This is Jim Manson. Look about those tickets. Yes they were very nice but we've got quite a few of them left Bob, and after all you did make seven fifty on the deal and the money does go to the church. So I thought if you'd like to take about twenty-five chances. Elo Bob. Bob. Find. Just. Wait until I. Want some more tickets printed all. It'll be a cold day in July. Can't hung up on me. That's what he did. The near them just hung up. We've got the church very few minutes well. You go ahead with the kids I'll be along as soon as I get through here. Okay Hello Heck. This is Jim Addison. Just fine. Thanks say heck. She's fine to thank you say. Yes. They're all fine say hey. Have you heard about the raffle were holding. Well all the money goes to the church and the tickets are only a quarter apiece. Oh it's. For a skunk heck. But.

Bob Stewart US Jim Yes Scott Jim Addison White Frame House Nellie Jenn Anderson Springfield Lilly Japan Animal Company Jim Manson Margaret Thirty Jim Beatty Dr Swain betty
"dr swain" Discussed on The goop Podcast

The goop Podcast

03:38 min | 10 months ago

"dr swain" Discussed on The goop Podcast

"Okay, let's get back to my conversation with Tom Philpott and then the other thing that I thought was just staggering in terms of and again, I get that. It's sort of one of those were not good as a country at solving upstream problems and it's like just letting the calamity hit us and maybe hopefully we'll learn. But you'd I didn't realize I had no idea that California also has a history of massive. Flooding and I know look we'll get to Iowa on a second where that's I think you right the there're between two thousand and three and two thousand seventeen central Iowa has endured no fewer than four hundred year storms. But California's long overdue for a massive flood and I can only imagine the fact that the floor is sinking in the Central Valley that it would be even more devastating than it was when it happened. was in the nineteenth century there was. Yes, eight, hundred, fifty, one, fifty, two that Winter California's not going to stay very long at this point, the the gold rush is still going starting to Peter out a little bit and the rain comes as a California and basically your rain comes a winner rain and snow come in the winter and it's pretty dry all summer. So the rain comes at a certain point in December and just doesn't stop for weeks and weeks and weeks and it also, there's already some snow in the mountains. It hits the snow and melts it in it just keeps on raining and raining. and. So what happened was basically the entire Central Valley. So talking about. What is about an hour to get to the Central Valley from La Driving, north is pretty far down into northern to southern California all the way up to the Oregon border or close to the Oregon border. You get this entire such ballot under ten feet of water. Probably the one of the worst natural disasters in history. United States and the interesting thing about it is it's been pretty much raced from popular memory. I've talked to lifelong Californians who are really into the state's history that have never heard of it. But archaeologists and Paleo climatologists looked into the fossil record they've looked at tree rings and. Residues around streams that have been there forever, and what they found is that a storm of this caliber or even much bigger happens about every one, two, hundred years. And the last one happened around one hundred and fifty years ago. In. So one hundred, sixty years ago I should say and so. I'm doing math wrong because one hundred, seventy years of eighteen fifty in that gets us all the way to. Two Thousand and now we've got twenty more years. It's one hundred and seventy years, and the idea is that were probably due for one of these coming up soon, and then when you look at climate change research with the climate change scholars find is that. California snowpack. As we go forward is going to be dwindling because of climate change we're GonNa see fewer and fewer storms and more drought years we saw in twenty eleven to twenty. Sixteen. But at the same time, we're GONNA see more powerful storms and there's a guy at Ucla in Dr Swain you says that from his research that he's done, we're looking at one of these things happening in the next twenty years and so consider the Central Valley at that time..

California Central Valley Tom Philpott Iowa Oregon United States Dr Swain Ucla La Driving Peter
"dr swain" Discussed on The Big 98

The Big 98

07:51 min | 11 months ago

"dr swain" Discussed on The Big 98

"You while you're trying to get things up and running, you're also having to do all that you were you work, you know so many front. I just can't imagine the The heavy lift and you had to do on that very challenging. Sounds like your sounds like you guys are working very hard. They're doing a good job with it. Well, I appreciate you saying that I'll pass that along to my husband. I got three little ones at home, too. So I like to tell them, you know they're making making a sacrifice on behalf of the state as well. So we're all we're all here to serve it. It's the best kind of work to do whatever we need to do for kiddo, So I'm very grateful to be able to be a part of that. Well, that that's great that he understands you need to work and I'm sure it's taken a lot of understanding a statewide you know, for for families to realize that How did you handle graduations where most of those virtual as well Oh, my gosh. Yes, Graduation. We put out some guidance to help folks being creatively about different ceremonies. And you know, for the most part district decided to delay. I'm indu graduations a little bit later. Socially distance on football fields airflow, etcetera. So we had A number of graduation that happened in June and even into July. There were few that did kind of the car parade, maybe decorate their cars and kind of go in a line and get their diploma in and out of the car window. I had the great fortune of goingto Haywood County High School's graduation in the early summer, they social distance thing and really, really a thoughtful process. But you know, it is one of those milestones for your life. When you graduate from high school, and I think I've been Just respect how how much care and bought linen stock from our superintendent district and high school graduation is always so memorable. Something to think about this this year. It will. It will even be maybe more memorable. You know, we graduated when in the middle of a pandemic, You know it had to do it these conditions. You'll never forget that either as long as you live, you know Oh, that's right. That's right. 20 funny. We will never forget. That's right. That's for sure that you mentioned that the Governor Governor Li gave you a grant with some $50 million. He recently made another announcement of a CE Faras, the Financial Stimulus Accountability Group. They announce 61 million In Corona virus aid and relief that discuss that the latest amount of money that you can get Yes. So it was another really important investment. I think in our public schools and allowed for grant to individual districts, we know that as they're setting up their programs, and then all of the different opportunities they'll have. Weather remote learned within this here, but they need some extra support. And so they are grants that range from $50,000 to $150,000 to help our district really needs the needs that their students throughout the year on DH, then I think something that you know I come from a family of educators. I am in an educator married to an educator, and hopefully I'm raising three educators at home. I really love this profession, but He just announced $77 million toward health and safety materials for plastering teacher there will be 80,000 classroom kit that are direct to teachers. Give them disinfecting wipes in hand sanitizer and all the things they need to keep themselves in their students safe as an educator and talking to my Aunt Molly on last night about it. It just means a lot to know that we care about all of our school stakeholders, especially during these difficult times. So it's been a big investment in education and his commissioner, I just I love hearing that news. Great news. Very good news. Today. We're discussing the work of the Tennessee Department of Education. What they're doing right now how they've handled a covert situation and in moving forward with their plans to re open our guest is Dr Penny Schwinn. She is the commissioner of Education for Tennessee. Dr Swain. You touched earlier on the nutrition programs to feeding programs. You know that that things changed rapidly with that in March, when when you had to start dealing with Kobe How did you? How did you deal with that and then moving forward into the summer feeding programs? What has been going on there? Yes. So I will be with this since learning that happened in the spring and the Neil site with the number of districts to consolidated those vice and had a few across the district. We have a website. It's called cool meal finder dot com. Families can put in there. It's code, and it tells them where they can get the most for the nearest food service for their family. There's nothing that happened, I think was really important that we asked for a number of waivers from the federal government. And that allowed for Tennessee to give every child regardless of whether they are school aged or not, And regardless of where they live, to have access to a free breakfast, lunch and supper or breakfast bunch of back on DH that went across the state, and so we saw just compared to other states. So many more kids bed throughout the school year, and we also saw a lot of district to continue those programs into summer. And I think that that was really critical, especially for some of our community to rely on the food service programs for that that carried through into August, and we expect that will be the same level of distribution of nutrition services. As we go into this school year, Tennessee taken care of their own as I know we always D'oh. That had to really be solved in there more years. You had to hurry. If you weren't planning to these programs, you know that start doing things a bit early and helping out kids. But again, it sounds like your staff. Just really took in and worked really hard. We did, and I think it was. You know, I'm so I've never been more proud of the team that the thing that I have the great privilege of working with here, but what I think made it a soy positive as possible, And I think it's productive possible was that the team here at the department work so closely the district That collaboration and unity and teamwork across the state really allowed us to serve our students as a state community, as opposed to kind of the department or the district operating separately, and that was that felt really good. And I think mental lot, everybody How great is the need in Tennessee? Far off? Sorry, kids as far as nutrition and the meals, you know when they're when they get they get food at school. But then once they go home I know A lot of kids are in pretty bad financial situations. How great is uneven in Tennessee? You know, it is one of the things that I wish we Azad country talked about. Even Mohr and Tennessee's on such a good job on this, but we have students in every part of the state. I'm in every district who do rely on that and see if you've been in a lunchroom with Susan. Come from families were really struggling financially. He seems stuffing their lunch in their pocket to take home to meet for dinner later. There's nothing more heartbreaking on that wire. Public schools are just so important to our communities. But we have that in urban rural suburban across the state, but but we have over half of our two really do rely on school meals. Regularly for food. And so it is a big deal. Yeah, that's a lot. I didn't expect it to be that many. Yeah, Yeah. Did they get they get breakfast, lunch and dinner or is that just in the summer they get breakfast, lunch and dinner. Yes, depends on the district. So some district breakfast, lunch snack, and then some district you have after school care will be breakfast, lunch.

Tennessee commissioner Tennessee Department of Educat Haywood County High School Governor Governor Li Dr Penny Schwinn superintendent Dr Swain Financial Stimulus Accountabil Neil Azad Mohr Susan
"dr swain" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"dr swain" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Give to others. I hope to buy many more. It was excellent. John New York, New York just finished watching Uncle Tom over the Fourth of July weekend. I'm a longtime Eldorado but listen to your show for over 20 years. Thus, I had very high expectations for Uncle Tom, given your track record of your show in books. Uncle Tom outperform the high expectations I had because I learned history and gained insight on several issues, which I had not learned from listening to thousands of your radio shows and TV appearances. That's how great Uncle Tom was for me. Fantastic work so timely as well. Sage. There was ever a time when the U. S needs to hear your voice on 11 which is a spinal tap reference, he writes. This is a time. 10 out of 10 rating for Uncle Tom. Is from Tom in Safety Harbour, Florida. Just watching Uncle Tom. What a fantastic documentary. I appreciate all the work you put into making this. I was happy to pay for the opportunity to watch this. I only wish you could make it this Julie available to those who need this vital education, your views and those of such as Candace Doctor. Dr Swain, Carol Swain, Herel Kane and the rest of the cast taught me a lot. These lessons are invaluable to many people, but they need to see it. There's anything I can assist you in your efforts going forward to be happy to help. Thank you again for your efforts in messages. I think Tom needs a merchandise. Yeah, just got Uncle tom dot com You can get a uncle Tom T shirt. It's right, be the first in your hood and be sure and send me a selfie and I posted on social media. Me just do one more short one. I just watched Larry's documentary, Uncle Tom. Fabulous, Brave. Amazing. I went into Twitter to thank him to get the word out today. I found Twitter suspended me from I Thank you, too, Larry. I don't want to pull the tweet down. Please that, Larry? No, though I doubt he'd be surprised. That the powers to be are suppressing conversations about your documentary. And this doesn't that pretty much sum up so much that would have the heart of the documentary. How ironic. Please think Larry for creating this documentary I learned So much. Now I told you that Barack Obama could have done a whole lot to stop this nonsense. And won the reasons in my opinion that his popularity went up to 70% after got elected, but before he took office because so many people felt okay. Even if I didn't vote for the guy. At least he's not going to be a victim, and he's not going to playing the race card. At least he's going to be dissing people like Al Sharpton and putting them in the place where they are. Everybody knows that America is a flawed country, like all countries orbit for crying out loud. To the fullest extent possible that's ever been in all of human history. America can allow people to realize your potential. That's what the truth is, and Obama knows and could've done something about it again. This is the commencement speech. Obama what nationality? What gender? What race would be richer, poor hair straight..

Uncle Tom Uncle tom dot Barack Obama Tom T Larry Twitter John New York America Carol Swain Al Sharpton Herel Kane Candace Doctor Julie Safety Harbour Florida
"dr swain" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

07:12 min | 2 years ago

"dr swain" Discussed on KPCC

"Atmospheric rivers. So you have this river that that sort of? I'm picturing it actually the in the story that you did I'm thinking of a river, that's actually certain number of miles wide certain number of miles deep. It stretches out into the Pacific, and then carries all this moisture aimed just flows into California and drops all that all that rain there. That's essentially, correct. These these atmospheric rivers are usually a couple hundred kilometers wide, but can be a couple thousand kilometers long, and as they can carry in in the air above your head as much as twenty times the water. That's in the Mississippi River at the mouth. Twenty nine. It's a phenomenal amount of water, and it's all in the form of water vapor above your head. So it's really kind of amazing to think about and and is global warming going to exacerbate this. All available evidence suggests that the answer is. Yes. And this is one of those cases brothers actually pretty high confidence because model projections are consistent with survey shins, which is also consistent with pretty basic theory. And that basic theory is simple enough that I'll just take a moment to explain it here, essentially as temperatures increase the amount of water, vapor that the atmosphere can hold increases exponentially. So as even as temperature increases relatively slowly, the amount of potential water, vapor in the atmosphere increases much faster than temperature. So as you evaporate. More water you allow for the the the ceiling or the upper limit on the amount of moisture in these atmospheric rivers to increase, and so you don't necessarily increase the amount of precipitation all the time, but you definitely increase the maximum potential precipitation that can fall out of these sorts of systems reflate, oh, this is science Friday from WNYC. Studios. Talking with Daniel Swain climate, scientists here in California you visit California. I'm in San Francisco where everybody talks about waiting for the big one. And they mentioned the big one is going to be an earthquake. But you don't hear many people talking about the big one being a flood that could fill up the central valley are people beginning to talk about. Yeah. I think the comparison to the earthquake hazard in California is an apt one. And actually the contingency planning exercise conducted by the US Geological Survey in the state of California a few years ago actually referred to a repeat of eighteen sixty two like, flooding, California as Californians quote other big one the original dig one being a large magnitude earthquake and the state the state assessment essentially found that that are repudiating sixty two flood could actually be economically. And in terms of the statewide disruption far worse than a large earthquake in Los Angeles or San Francisco and could cause upwards of three quarters of a trillion dollars in damages, and that's a pretty sobering statistic. And the other really sobering aspect of this is that a lot of these damages would occur in California's most important economic region. The central valley where there's so much agriculture the San Francisco area where Silicon Valley generates so much economic activity, and of course, Los Angeles region home to Hollywood and lots of other industry, all of these places are are locations that would be very hard hit. So I think there there is increasing interest in recognition in the hazards posed by a really big flood event. But I think in certain circles, it's still overshadowed by other risks everyone in California knows about earthquakes and many people prepare seriously for them and increasingly people are really aware of the wildfire risk. And that's that's so awareness. I think that has grown due to some really tragic events in the last couple of years, but we don't have as much recent experience with these really large flood events. And I think that does mean that it's it's it's a little bit. It's a little bit more abstract for a lot of people than some of these other risks that were more familiar with. I think what might make it abstract to people is that we just. Came out of a a huge drought in California. Right. And now we're talking about a huge flood in California. Is that the future we go from one extreme to the other? Yeah. It's absolutely. The case that California has recently had a lot of drought and a lot of wildfire. So so scarcity of water has been more on the news than than overabundance. But that is in fact, what we expect California's future to look like where even if even if we don't see a tremendous change in the average annual precipitation as part of the world, we do expect to see increasingly dramatic swings from one extreme to the other from very wet to very dry conditions and then back in the other direction, and that does present some real challenges because it suggests the first of all we can't you don't wanna focus too much on just on average precipitation metric because it's not really telling us much about what's happening. A lot of the time with the drought and flood risk. But it also means that managing water scarcity or managing flood risk becomes more challenging because we have to deal with ever greater extremes on opposite ends of the spectrum. And this is. Essentially the future that we expect to see in California warmer almost all of the time. But both simultaneously wetter in some years and dryer in others. And when you say challenging that means the m word money, right? How do we prepare extreme? It's it's certainly a inexpensive challenge to address. But but it is also practically speaking even to know. In in in the ideal world where money was no object. Exactly what we would want to do. Because some folks say, well, of course, the obvious solution is to build more dams to store more water in the wet years. But there's a number of issues with that approach one of which I think is sort of highlighted by the risks were currently talking about in terms of the risk of catastrophic failure of some of these big important pieces of infrastructure, given a big enough storm. All right. So we'll we'll have to we'll have to leave it there. We're out of time Daniel Swain, Dr Swain is a climate scientists with the institute of environment and sustainability at the UCLA thank you for taking time to be with us today. Thanks so much for having me. You welcome PJ, Liederman composer theme music. Our thanks to audio engineer, Jim Bennett, and all the folks who made our stay very pleasant here at K Q E D in San Francisco, if you missed any part of this program or would like to hear it again. You can subscribe to our podcasts podcasts you can ask. Smart speakers to play science Friday. You can hear science Friday any day you'd like. And of course, we're always active on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram of all the social communities have a great weekend. Am I roughly toe in San Francisco?.

California San Francisco Daniel Swain Mississippi River WNYC Pacific US Los Angeles Facebook engineer Silicon Valley Twitter Jim Bennett institute of environment Hollywood thousand kilometers hundred kilometers trillion dollars three quarters
"dr swain" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:11 min | 2 years ago

"dr swain" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Atmospheric rivers. So you have this river that that sort of? I'm picturing and actually on the story that you did I'm thinking of a river, that's actually certain number of miles wide certain number of miles deep. It stretches out into the Pacific, and then carries all this moisture in just flows into California and drops all that all that reindeer, that's essentially, correct. These these atmospheric rivers are usually a couple hundred kilometers wide, but can be a couple thousand. Kilometers long and they can carry in the air above your head as much as twenty times the water. That's in the Mississippi River at the time twenty time, it's a phenomenal amount of water, and it's all in the form of water vapor above your head. So it's really kind of amazing to think about and and is global warming going to exacerbate this. All available evidence suggests that the answer is. Yes. And this is one of those cases, there's actually pretty high confidence because model projections are consistent with survey, which is also consistent with pretty basic theory. And the basic theory is simple enough that I'll just take a moment to explain it here, essentially as temperatures increase the amount of water, vapor that the atmosphere can hold increases exponentially. So as even as temperature increases relatively slowly, the amount of potential water, vapor in the atmosphere increases much faster than temperature. So as you have operate more water you allow for the the ceiling or the upper limit on the amount of moisture in these atmospheric rivers to increase, and so you don't necessarily increase the amount of precipitation all the time, but you definitely increase the maximum potential precipitation that can fall out of these sorts of systems. Plato and there's a science Friday from WNYC studios. Talking with Daniel Swain climate, scientists here in California you visit California. I'm in San Francisco where everybody talks about waiting for the big one. And they mentioned the big one is going to be an earthquake. But you don't hear many people talking about the big one being a flood that could fill up the central valley are people beginning to talk about. Yeah. I think the comparison to the earthquake hazard in California is an apt one. And actually the contingency planning exercise conducted by the US Geological Survey in the state of California a few years ago actually referred to a repeat of eighteen sixty two like, flooding, California as Californians quote other big one the original big one being a large earthquake and the state the state assessment essentially found that that a repeat eighteen sixty two flood could actually be economically. And in terms of the statewide disruption far worse than a large earthquake in Los Angeles or San Francisco and could cause upwards of three quarters of a trillion dollars in damages, and that's a pretty sobering statistic. And the other really? Sobering aspect of this is that a lot of these damages would occur in California's most important economic regions the central valley where there's so much agriculture. The San Francisco Bay area where Silicon Valley generates so much ecconomic activity, and of course, Los Angeles region home to Hollywood and lots of other industry, all of these places are are locations that would be very hard hit. So I think there there is increasing interest in recognition in the hazards posed by a really big flood event. But I think in certain circles, it's still overshadowed by other risks everyone in California knows about earthquakes and many people prepare seriously for them and increasingly people are really aware of the wildfire risk, and that's that's own awareness. I think that has grown due to some really tragic events in the last couple of years, but we don't have as much recent experience with these really large flood events. And I think that does mean that it's it's it's a little bit. It's a little bit more abstract for a lot of people than some of these other risks that were more familiar with. I think what might make it abstract of people that we just came out of a huge drought in California. Right. And now we're talking about a huge flood in California. Is that the future we go from one extreme to the other? Yeah. It's absolutely. The case that California has recently had a lot of drought and a lot of wildfire. So so scarcity of water has been more on the news than than overabundance. But that is in fact, what we expect California's future to look like where even if even if we don't see a tremendous change in the average annual precipitation as part of the world, we do expect to see increasingly dramatic swings from one extreme to the other from very wet to very dry conditions, and then back the other direction, and that does present some real challenges because it suggests the first of all we can't you don't wanna focus too much on my average precipitation metric because it's not really telling us much about what's happening. A lot of the time with the drought and flood risk. But it also means that managing water scarcity or managing flood-risk becomes more challenging because we have to deal with ever greater extremes on opposite ends of the spectrum. And this is essentially the future that we expect to see in California warmer almost all of the time. But both simultaneously wetter in some years and dryer in others. And when you say challenging that means the m word money, right? How do we prepare extreme? It's it's certainly a inexpensive challenge to address. But but it is also practically speaking even to know in the ideal world where money was no object. Exactly what we would want to do. Because some folks say, well, of course, the obvious solution is to build more dams to store more water in the wet years. But there's a number of issues with that approach one of which I think is sort of highlighted by the risks were currently talking about in terms of the risk of catastrophic failure of some of these big important pieces of infrastructure, given a big enough storm. All right. So we'll we'll have to we'll have to leave it there. We're out of time Daniel Swain, Dr Swain is a climate scientists with the institute of environment and sustainability at a UCLA thank you for taking time to be with us today. Thanks so much for having me. You welcome PJ, Liederman composer theme music. Our thanks to audio engineer, Jim Bennett and all the phone. Otsu made our stay very pleasant here at K Q E D in San Francisco, if you missed any part of this program or would like to hear it again. You can subscribe to our podcasts podcast. You can ask a smart speakers to play science Friday. You can hear science Friday any day you'd like. And of course, we're always active on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, all this social communities. Have a great weekend. Am I replay toe in San Francisco?.

California San Francisco Daniel Swain Mississippi River Los Angeles San Francisco Bay Pacific Plato US engineer Otsu WNYC studios Facebook Jim Bennett Instagram institute of environment Twitter Silicon Valley Hollywood
"dr swain" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"dr swain" Discussed on Overdue

"Do you go here he's like remarking on how like the town hall meeting is like the last bastion of true democracy that did remind me of gilmore girls milan taylor looking at leslie harrington to like object to this thing that he always does and then i was i was picturing taylor yeah yeah so the selena case gets i think she gets she doesn't go to jail right she gets off to get then tell what happened which means that docker swain has to admit to the abortion he confesses hip and they talk like no one's going to send him to jail is rightly say right right he's upstanding and white yeah yeah sure correct true and then there's like two more major acts of like violence in the book that i thought were like rather glib booklet before you move at a ted carter in the movie oh yeah sure their unwavering and cillian antenna together selena in the in the book says herself he's not coming back to his career is going to be to important him he's not gonna need he's not gonna need a wife it's flipped almost from the movie he's not going to need a wife who's who's been volved in a murder he's not coming back from it and he doesn't she's very she's also self away like he's not strong enough the they make you so the movie what what ends up happening is so dr swain gives his testimony and he's got the signed confession and like totally makes it it doesn't clear her because she did kill him but it does make it.

milan taylor leslie harrington ted carter selena murder gilmore cillian dr swain
"dr swain" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"dr swain" Discussed on Overdue

"Have abortion in a movie right yeah it's marginally less scandalous while still retaining like the secrets candle of incest he does dr swain i think his name is gets confession which convinces lucas to leave town yeah and then kinda ru and the thing that swain kind of carries drought the book is how he's like ruined this family's life yeah brought destruction upon the town to blames himself for like a whole bunch of real bad stuff that starts domino's that go way back to the abortion all right even though he feels strongly that he did the right thing yes i'm he doesn't regret it but he feels like he there's all this payback now for a long time though selena's life gets better yeah an older brother comes back they they fix up the house yes and and she fireplaces full ahead comes comes back to town so before things or things get bad for slain i wanna read this passage about ted carter ted carter is a good old boy and he he goes on to become like a lawyer or he's gonna go studying to be a lawyer and stuff like that and when we one of the first time we meet him as you know the town oh this is nice boy young carter is said the town like to see him make a go of it with selena cross she's a nice nice enough girl for a shack girl right and his parents have like a whole back story of how wild where like his mom like married a rich old guy and then the older nine so they had the money and they're very proud of their money so they're they're looking after ted but ted ted carter's was the kind of body that older people look upon with satisfaction things can't be so bad they said when this country can produce young men like that in the summer of nineteen thirty nine when the stage whispers of war in europe were already audible to the pessimists in america those who believed that world conflict was inevitable could look at ted carter and be comforted things won't be so bad they said as long as we have big healthy boys like that descend war ted carter's got a magazine body that's what i'm saying.

lucas selena europe ted carter dr swain ted carter ted carter ted ted ted carter america
"dr swain" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:13 min | 4 years ago

"dr swain" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Consciousness of every day white people and so does no way you can argue that the black interest ran answers and not to say that today white people won't think that there's a white interest in sunny that you said that we spent some time yesterday talking about how politics is turn into little slices of grievances right every by identity politics everybody has been identified and then the signed their own grievance um and we as they hit my assertion was we cut become the big uh loud throbbing country of greece ince's and you know something bet the recipe for disaster destruction and in my book i call for us to move away from it then it could politics all of us today america a national identity that the only thing that will hold a nation together mm um do you have a prescription for how to do that i mean i think that's the the right goal but are they are sort of concrete steps we can do to achieve that well you know my book the new white nationalism in america has a chapter but for a thick concluding chapter the first half of it is dedicated to recommendations former as a whole and the second half is addressed specifically to african americans and one reason my book with toyota ignored uh when it was first published is that i did not with the blame just on the white people up felt that there were a lot of action that black leaders to that uh worked against the interests of everyone and it to have fuel off like we sent met and white hatred and i do think some of the issues that legitimate and if we want to move away from it we need to stop shutting down one side uh to the extent that people can engage in rational discord an air and lay out that grievances we need to listen would we doing now is setting day on the voices of people that uh at that they'll hate anyone but they feel like they that children are getting a bad rap right dr swain thank you so much for uh for explaining it and i give you big kudos for being way ahead of the.

greece ince america african americans toyota dr swain
"dr swain" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"dr swain" Discussed on KOIL

"Right to say what they're going to say it doesn't give you a right even though you want to to punch them in the face that can hamper because at the end of civil society altogether the media that has gone all over this and i keep saying that as we watch this collective national meltdown because they don't want to listen to what the president said on site saturday they don't want to listen to what he said on monday they only hear what they wanna here yesterday and they then taken out of context as chuck todd clearly did because the president yesterday did not portray white nationalist as victims he just said that there were two sides responsible in the melee part of that and the president yeah he's heat senate onset of first amendment is a critical part of our democracy protects vile hateful ignorance speech for this reason the aclu of virginia defended them and that was what the aclu's set of virginia but the president he was very clear and very outspoken and so many times it's it's almost so at this point at our hard to even counting how many times and we've been playing we also played what he said over the years and you know at the end of the day we have to ask ourselves this question you know are they accurately portraying who this president is that what he sent anyway joining us to discuss we have dr carol swain and dr wendy of ceppos where those welcome both of you back to the i guess dr swain you've never been in my radio show before because you've been on tv a bunch but it's been awhile now piper pam on the radio show and uh i really welcome the opportunity crowded here i'm reid on that computer all right please do well why not they recode weapon haven't felt much difficulty communicating hit people in that they.

president chuck todd first amendment virginia aclu ceppos dr swain reid dr carol swain dr wendy
"dr swain" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:21 min | 4 years ago

"dr swain" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"The melee part of that and the president he said it onset of first amendment is a critical part of our democracy protects vile hateful ignorance speech for this reason the aclu of virginia defended the and that was what the aclu's a set of virginia but the president he was very clear and very outspoken and so many times it's it's almost so at this point had our hard to even count how many times and we've been playing we also play what he said over the years and you know at the end the day we have to ask ourselves this question you know are they accurately portraying who this president in is is at what he sent joining us to discuss we have dr carol swain and dr wendy assefa was where those welcome both of you back to the well i guess dr swain you've never been on my radio show before 'cause you've been on tv a bunch but it's been awhile now proper pam on the radio show oh and uh i really welcome the opportunity to try to hit from reid on that confusion right please do well why not a return weapon having some difficulty communicating hit people is that they are blurring distinct fan among and between america and and they have punking everyone claim grow at rush when i wrote the book the new white nationalism in america it's couch santa gratien i called it the new white nationalist them they were hit from old vow white supremacy and i would argue that there up or group of white american p the white perparim carney percentage of america and but a much larger group that i would call new white nationalist or right who are not necessarily a biocine any our hatred toward up at group but they are making a case white right white identity for white people to organize and then you have quite he folk what you're trying to make a living they may have voted for donald trump but they're concerned about america and then the last group utter leftist white better trying to overthrow the country let me go to dr wendy as several your response oh really predator our country our new internet that prey now what i know effectively farm illiquid prompt gave during the infrastructure b five gated everything he said at the press conference before.

president first amendment virginia aclu dr swain america donald trump dr carol swain dr wendy assefa reid dr wendy
"dr swain" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:50 min | 4 years ago

"dr swain" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Dan i'm going to five point on fm and am six thirty wmal could doing our conversation with i've got to tell you it is an enlightening conversation with professor carol swain and author of the book way back in two thousand two was nominated for pulitzer prize the new white nationalism in america and its challenge to integration talking about out of course all the controversies regarding the events in charlottesville virginia over the weekend and dr swain one of the things that i wanted to ask you is based on your experience many many years as a professor at vanderbilt university and i believe before that i think you said you're at princeton university is well yeah deal slick 28 year yeah do you think that a lot of the problems that we're seeing in america today as far as the social justice warriors and so forth are these emanating from our universities it certainly ear and it had kit cultural mark the political correct the microaggressions cricket warning and we have a situation now they're on young people uh uh arrive on many crowded hampered they are in it that is all geared towards uh eight hurt indoctrination and they depart for the inclusion and pre beat that they talk about it's only you know lgbt if ethnic minorities it has it very much marginalized unfair and chris and uh and i would pay our republic republican and that they reality crowded camp within only one five that is the lat beat instead of kicking how to thank critically we they indoctrinate with what they have to only what they use that the institutions are and those value a liberal and laugh so i guess the question is i don't see this getting better anytime soon on college campuses i think we can all agree that this basis in liberalism on a colleges today they're not preparing these students for the future now the faith faith there's no way you can educate a perth and a fate they didn't but not the end both take any ideas that might make them feel uncomfortable minority students through an care under primitive act income k thin lat segregate them fail into separate dorm tom universe thick and take them coincided with only with members of their own way there they're that separate graduation ceremonies are all sorts.

Dan carol swain pulitzer prize virginia professor vanderbilt university princeton university america perth charlottesville dr swain social justice chris 28 year