13 Burst results for "Dr Susan Taylor"

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

07:40 min | 5 d ago

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"In the news chair. It's gonna be fun. Get ready okay. Ct the whole thing is science core this this episode just gonna tell you lots of stats and lots of good research coming out sephora. Just released a study on racial bias in retail. This was really cool because they partnered with four academics who very well known in this world doctor. Cassie pittman cleaner. Dr david crockett. Witnessing fowler and dr patricia raspberry and so sephora like new they had to bring in the big guns to help them study this back in nineteen. They have also in the spotlight for anyone who didn't know they've been in the news two four about some some stuff that was why the study was initiated. Because they knew they had issues in this with both the retail associates and their customers Profiled so so. I went to a presentation that gave showing us the highlights of the research at just a couple of things. I wanna point out. But i'm going to link to. They gave us this little booklet with more of the highlights at a leg to on the blog. So you can look into this. Because i think a lot of other retailers or if you work in beauty or even if you're shopper which she while are of beauty there's things that you can take away from this. That are interesting and so far is gonna Going to work on some stuff. But here's the highlight so three and four retail. Shoppers feels to seventy four percent of people. Feel that the marketing failed to showcase a diverse range of skin tones body types hair textures. So even though we've just been talking about there's been movement in the last couple years clearly. Not everybody feels that they are being spoken to in the beauty world and in fact black. Shoppers are three times more likely to feel like this than white shoppers. They also looked at all. Shoppers of colors not just black and white But in addition to locate shoppers they looked at the associates the retailers and what was going on there and a lot of the retailers talked about a lack of training to help people diverse background. So when someone walks in the store and have a hair type different than yours if you're the retail associate. You're like nobody gave me training on how to do this. The other thing. They didn't seem to get training on was implicit bias. Only forty percent of retail employees surveyed reported having unconscious bias training. Now that might sound familiar to you because remember back in two episode to forty three. We had dr susan taylor on. She's a dermatologist. And she was talking about how everybody at u. penn which is where she works was getting this implicit bias. Training for doctors. Obviously retail associates needs the same type of thing. You look at a shopper. You think things regardless of your race it informs the way you interact with that shopper and retail associates want this training so sephora actually has made a pledge that by the end of the year one hundred percent of all new employees will had implicit bias training which i think is using is really cool so middle linked to more of the highlights. You guys can see them They also made a lot of Claims about how they're going to adjust their retail practices. They are part of the fifteen percent. Pledge and they said they are tracked by the end of two thousand twenty one to fifteen percent of the brands that they sell be black owned businesses. So that's a really great thing and they're gonna come back to us with a list of the brands. And the tab i think balance before dot com. So you can see what they are. So i like that. This is one of the beauty brands. That in the wake of last june's big movement Actually is really following up and like getting some shit done. So i like That doesn't mean there's more not more work to do but you guys can read about that some more okay another study. Maybe not as important. But i think it's kind of interesting garnier by the hair-color brand commission to survey to learn more about how women change their hair color routines during the quarantine. Nothing's shocking here. But thirty percent of women dyed their hair at home during the quarantine and got that information on how to do that from instagram youtube. And something a little bit more interesting. More than half of women's of fifty two percent agreed that they've gone gray faster during quarantine than they would have. Otherwise what do you think that's about so that they have. They believe that they like their bodies have made their. They've biologically gun gray faster or that. The yeah now. Let me say like during the stress. Limbaugh marie faster right. So i don't know i mean. We all have been experiencing sort of a low grade. Chronic end sometimes like acute stress this past year. It's possible that played into the gray hair. But i also thinking about it you. I looked in the mirror or looked in a camera at myself so much more this year. There's nobody else to be looking at them now in the subway looking at other people. I'm looking at myself a lot. So i feel like you might see your gray hairs coming quicker. Even if they're not yeah. I think it's difficult to to really say that. Like you know with real authority later like how do you know. You've really gone grey fast. Yes i think. Yeah i think you were being more critical of ourselves as you say because really looking only at ourselves zoom facetime etcetera. And yet you're looking at yourself in the mirror zoom. You ain't happy. It's also one of those instances. We talked about lab muffin. correlation does not equal causation. Noticed it but we're not sure why that is. Yeah okay guess. What else happened this past week. The consumer electronics show yoyo every year. The the go walk around the consumer electronics show. There's like beauty brands trying to do techy stuff at every year. I'm like but do we really need that well. This year was online. Yeah there was no data show showboating. Yeah so i just wanted to bring two of the beauty. Innovations that one the beauty Innovation award from the show was the laurie al water. Save the justice. Basically you know what it is. Yes i actually spoke to gave from. Laurie created about this. Yes a special shower and in-home distance but right now just in salons basically what they do. Is they micronized. The hair care and sort of like infused into the water spray so that you can cut water usage when you're shampooing conditioning in doing treatments by eighty percent at first i was like. Oh it's just a faucet that lets out like eighty percent less water. That doesn't sound fun. No the products are infused into the water and they rinse cleaner. They're formulated specially to work with this technology to save water. They won an award for that which is really cool. I think he's genius. I think like what he's doing is is incredible. And i think that you know he was talking to me about the how much water is wasted by salons and of no fault of the boats but used but like just what's going on the back bar. They washington senior caller go. Yeah it's crazy it's just like it's like just hoses back there just spending all this water so if we can cut what's going on in the salons thing but how much water we can save. It's it's brilliant. I'll tell you how much eighty percent. But just i think the gallons it's just it's why yes of course and then. The other thing that wanted award was sorry. There's also construction going on outside of my house so great doing great. Today was the amaury pacific lip factory so basically this is an in store system that dispenses custom lip colors based on a app that you use so i i know they have this at the Songsoo amaury pacific like store that they have in korea. So i went to go. Look the service cost about eighteen dollars. when you get it there i thought that was really cool. So that one word. I will also say that. Why s. l. yves saint laurent is launching a custom lipstick device. Not in store but for home use that one is two hundred and ninety nine dollars not even with the refills and that is my highlights from the consumer electronic show Moving on.

thirty percent korea fifteen percent Laurie instagram fifty two percent forty percent one hundred percent eighty percent youtube Today last june this year two This year one david crockett Cassie pittman amaury pacific seventy four percent
"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

01:33 min | 3 months ago

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"So you can see my friend just like using her hands to explain how it just like envelopes you in the cloud of like yourself. It's so beautiful anyway, also Vegan and cruelty free, which we love free alcohol as Paraben silicone. So if you like to check all those boxes, this is for you. So it's forty dollars for ten mel dropper which looks really small. On, the website, of course, I did the math for you guys. That is two hundred drops of oil. You really only need like to but like you're going to get obsessed in just like kind of Bay than four to six per day. But even still at that little tiny vial, then will last you a month or two, and of course, you could buy a larger bottle if you like it's it's Gis luxury skin sent for anyone who's just like I want to smell like me better I. Love that Jazz. I Want Philly Jessica Model. Years, I. Love It. I wonder what we need video to see her explain it. You. You think my accent is I don't think event accent at all a Utah. Name sometimes. Will Use this Jersey minds philly. But when listeners are from the Philadelphia area, they always say like listening to me, 'cause they hear Philadelphia Oma guy just give me a beer forget about my accent is so thick anyway and hers is like that all the time she to water. Oh, my God do. Not. H. Two O. People wooder boy that's how they say it in Philly. Oh boy. Okay. Get. The oil put your little fluids, stick all over your face and have an awesome weekend. We'll see you next week. Next.

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

04:12 min | 3 months ago

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"For having me. that. Was An amazing discussion. I cannot wait to bring more people onto the show to continue this discussion because like I said, I thought her perspective was really interesting. It was very nuanced and I was surprised by parts of it. So yes. Such a scientists like she came at it with like a data driven mind that I just found really interesting and Great to talk to FM Five Oh. Yeah. Yeah. I I really like she was awesome. Anyway. Thank you so much doctor. Taylor. Okay. Let's get to the raised around Can I start? Yes. Okay. Of course, go ahead. I wrote about this brand flu we'd for my gender Are By gender see genderless I hate these kind of like. These catchy is non aired yet. It just say they all sound like marketing terms but I wrote a story bizarre about how the there's the beauty industry is. No, longer looking at gender in very you know binary way and one of the brands that we included was flu. We'd beauty definitely check them out. They are Vegan. Cruelty, Ray, all all that good stuff, and when things I love about the Mr Very affordable. So a product that I am loving is this little crayon that they have is called a universal crayon and I love this kind of Rose Goldie color called Rose Rover and I'm using it today a my eyes and. My Lips and my cheeks. So if you like this, you know you're does monochromatic looks that are like all. How do you really do that without looking like muddy? You know we're just looking like you're not really wearing makeup I. Love this because it has a little bit of like dimension and say sparkle but like a glimmer in it that it doesn't look like you're just wearing like great. Now you look kind of muddy or nothing's happening. It's a really pretty crane on your stride. Is that what's on your cheeks Gal Cheeks? My is gala lips. It's a Glimmer Shimmer and Glee Gleam Yeah Jank you and again, twelve dollars check it out. Fluid Beauty F., L. U. I d.. E. Dot us. Wow us. It's one of those I. Get no money for recommending it. I'm just really obsessed and that's thing with all of our raise ones I don't know why said that I guess it's spelled it out and that's what that's what we do they show. Yeah. That's what we do and we have that would do the Israeli spelled them out. So I was like L. E. Dot us So check it out. I'm really into it flew. Hashtag not an add on an ad. Savannah's just giving you lots of information. Yeah. Okay. So an I am a fan of Mona Lisa shore royal. So this is somebody I met the brand owner via instagram. New New Fragrance, of course, I'd like to try it. So I tried it and I liked it and she'd given me to samples. So I also get gave one to my best friend just the other jazz in. Philadelphia. And I really liked it. But then I was like I, don't know there's not that much to it. It's a very simple sent. She called me to rave about it. She's obsessed with it I like that again a couple more times than I was like she absolutely right. So first of all, it's an oil not alcohol based ray there's no alcohol in it. So it just sort of stays on your skin and your clothes and just sort of gives you a sense. It is one of these skin sense that I love. Okay. Just you smell like you but better if you are not a perfume person and you're looking for those kinds of sense you know. I have a couple other favorites. This is my new false skin you better sent. It's an amber resin extract and sandalwood oils, but it does not smell woody. These are some of the ingredients that are used in mosques that you think of a skin musk will often have these kind of ingredients in it but because she put it in a oil form it just I feel like musk's an ambers when they're in will smell different header don't yeah I think I'm no perfume or so hope nobody know perfumers laughing when I say this but make so they got like hangs onto the skin it. Yes. Again, I've got one grip assuring that's exactly what Frederic Malle say. I. Wish we had like a video..

Gal Cheeks flu musk Mona Lisa Frederic Malle L. E. Dot Rose Goldie Ray Taylor Philadelphia Savannah Rose Rover
"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

07:47 min | 3 months ago

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"Mac many black women love back. Why do they love cosmetics because they can find shade that matches their skin tone. and. You know it doesn't have to necessarily be a high end brand. Avon does a great job in matching skin tones. So I think that's a huge development in the last twenty or thirty years. Let me also give you another example There have been a couple of studies recently that have demonstrated the importance of not only blocking Uva at ub be light at visible light particularly people with darker skin tones who have Malaysia or post inflammatory hyper pigmentation to common causes of darkening of the skin and now companies have A. formulated. Tinted sunscreen step lock visible light. and so there is a much more progress in terms of basic science then translates into over the counter products. So I have to ask then sounds like you have some favorites. What do you personally like to use like what's in your skincare cabinet? Oh, a von and Mac Foundation I I have been. So I'm also very fortunate in that. You know I get samples and I love to try things. So you know my my cabinet is Kinda obscene. Got His L. U.. Like some of your sunscreens, for example, because a lot of friends with darker skin always like needing sunscreen recommendation. Yes. So they range from like Neutrogena has an SPF fifty five that goes on pretty sheer. And feel IOS, which is that a higher price point has milk that goes on pretty Sheeran is not too sticky. So you know you can get sunscreens different price points. Also what I might think goes on in a sheer fashion in isn't sticky someone with a different skin tone darker skin tone might not agree. So you know some of it is is file in error trial and error. But I just want to point out that you can get a great products that at various price points and it's a matter you had. A preference yet you had also talked about anti-aging a little bit. What are your do us over the counter topical or you like Prescription Woman knows? Well so I think you I think there is an important role of exposure elision with Alpha hydroxy, acid products like colic products and I their couple Avon products a new and there's one ultimate supreme. Let me just give a disclaimer I have done worked for those companies in the past, all the ones that I've mentioned. So they looking like a true academic like it. Well, it's true right so I was talking about the new products by Avon that have cholic acid that are great for oration. They're not too aggressive skinceuticals different price point has several products that are great for. A discoloration there's a discoloration defense, the guts great antioxidants and vitamin C. Products Assira with vitamin C.. Byrd rule. Lick acid. I love. See for. Yes absolutely they have a highly erotic acid cream. On. So there's a great cleanser us. It's in my bathroom. Now by skin better science, you know I even like Avena clear election foaming cleanser really simple is a neutrogena grapefruit exfoliating cleanser so it doesn't necessarily be fancy really expensive. It's what works for your particular skin. It sounds like you have an epic medicine cabinet. I it's fun I i. like that you. Just about like you know the fancy product sets really not all price points. Oh, absolutely. Sure from the best products. Are you know relatively inexpensive? You know so I'm also. Quite familiar with Seta. Fills Sarah. Day Abi now you know great price points. Great. Really. Good good products. For sure. Sa- before we let you go, we're going to lighten things up with a little speed round of questions. Just, to get you know just Tony Listeners can get to know the real Dr Taylor like. The whiteness yet again off the white jacket yeah. stugotz. So. This is quick ground lightning round. What is the first product you ever fell in love with? I'm old girls who I can't even bamber. Yet. Look old. So when I was a kid. Really for a moisturizer we had baffling catch Lada. But but. There was a lotion that came out that was transformative for me. It was baffling intensive care lotion. Having Sassy eating dry. Skin and I would you buy mother grandma would give me these lotions and that's why did you put your lotion on? Will I did? Until Basil Lean. Intensive Care Lotion came out. And did you use it on your body interface on? It's your your body or head to toe? Everywhere. Okay. Who Celebrity that you just know you? It'd be best friends. Quick of course. Okay. What is your most favorite indulgence snack and please be specific Okay. So I Love Love Love. Chocolate chocolate chip ice cream by springer's springer's ice cream parlor is in stone. Harbor New Jersey. And they have the best ice. Cream. Anywhere in the world. I don't know what but I feel like people who knows springer's in probably like screaming now was always like huge line in front of it. Sounds good. It was a great place on the Left Bank in Paris. That was pretty good but springer's even better. The ice cream in Paris than springer no no. Other way rally around. Oh I'll get the sorry. My brain's not greatly. Okay. So. What is the song that pumps you up or put you in a really good mood Gun You know what? It's so funny because I was. Beyond say song, I was trying to remember today..

springer Avon Avon products Paris Mac Malaysia New Jersey Avena Byrd Left Bank Sheeran Tony Listeners bamber Sarah Basil Dr Taylor
"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

01:57 min | 3 months ago

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"Beautiful in aesthetically pleasing and you know I'm very fortunate to be able to go to Europe from time to time and I stock up on sunscreen there because they don't leave a residue or rabbit correct on they have so much more leeway in terms they were more in terms of their the regulations get were sinuses were all the light. Goods sheer one. That's right. They do so I can't put all the blame on the companies I think their hands are tied in many ways. So can I ask You more broadly? WE'RE NOT GONNA get sunscreens hot and sounds like but more broadly speaking what are some of your the biggest improvements for products for skin color say in the last twenty years or so. Well I think that many cosmetic companies are now thinking about the consumer was skin of color. And meeting her needs and are doing focus groups and instead of saying, okay, we have XYZ product. How can we now marketed to people with darker skin tones instead of bats they're saying, let's find out what the needs are and let's bill new products based on that. I think one a really concrete example are now the numbers of shades of foundations of which. Thirty years ago. There were like four or five. But now you know each company might have twenty thirty, forty different shades that match the skin. Hughes. So that's a huge huge development. You know I think of.

Europe Hughes
"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

01:49 min | 3 months ago

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"Agreed upon by the medical community. The most effective sunscreens are the physical blockers that is titanium dioxide zinc oxide. So you know twenty, thirty, forty years ago you'd see the person with the white schmear across their nose, right? That's titanium zinc oxide. Then companies became a much more sophisticated with their formulation and they made them micronized broke them up into little tiny articles. Well, those tiny particle still created a white pass, but in an attempt to provide the most effective type of sunscreen. Many companies have gone forward and continue to go forward with these micronized titanium and zinc oxide that still leave a cast. On the other hand you have. Chemical Sunscreens. And they perform better in terms of not leaving a terrible way cast but. It's a little bit controversial. People don't necessarily a chemicals voting unquote on their skin the FDA recently. Published a couple of articles that demonstrated absorption of some of the chemical ingredients into the bloodstream. So again, that swayed some people from utilizing it, and then for for a in a certain respect, our hands are tied meaning the the manufacturers of sons. Their hands are tied by FDA regulations in Europe where there aren't the same of regulations. Or their? Broader. Many of those sunscreens are.

FDA Europe
"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

07:55 min | 3 months ago

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"And. That's great. That's great to hear. So. Justin I obviously work in the beauty industry. We're unlike the consumer side of what you do obviously your doctor and we've been noticing some changes in that world as well. So I wanted to ask you about like over the counter products and what's available out there Do you first off that like really a difference if you're looking for like a cleanser moisturizer does the color of your skin change what kind of product you should look for? Well? So that's a complicated. Question to answer. Let me give you this example. I think in the world of beauty dermatologists are very involved in the world of beauty navy on a different respect. But in the world of beauty, we hear so much about anti aging everything is anti aging right and anti aging for the white population means wrinkles, lines, age spots by call them liver spots well, people with with Brown skin ages. Well, just very differently. So for example, instead of the liver slut spots or age spots, we will observe overall darkening of our assent exposed skin phase or the via the neck. So overall darkening, it can be uneven skin tone discoloration, all manifestations of aging. So products that are going to address fine lines and wrinkles are going to be for me raped I'm gonNA. Sagging I'm not GonNa have those got some wrinkles but His. It's GONNA be loss of. A sagging on. So it's good that whole aging process is going to be a little bit different enhanced the products that I am going to benefit from or going to be different I was thinking because. My Grandmother. Rest in peace she is Puerto Rican and she didn't have a line of her face not align but she. said. She got little her skin tone down a little a little deeper in some some spots. So. Then what what do you think then about and again, I'm bringing this up because. You know for about maybe four five episodes ago I felt like we did shoot maybe at least three or four news items just about brands that were taking products off the shelves, renaming their products that were lightning brightening Excuse me they. They were lightning the reigning lightning products that had. Just I would say blatantly problematic name white seeing in the name even. Beautiful. Fair, in Love Layer. And you know. They were designed to lighten the hyper pigmentation that you're talking about but the names were if she's shaking your head shaking your head. Right so hard. So what are your feelings on those? So they're two different issues when it comes to products to like brightness skin. It's been my experience that here in the United Stade's women want to return their skin tones to what they were worn. So. Right. If they have stay sonnen induce darkening skin associated with aging they want their skin to go back to what it looked like when they were twenty the same skin tone in Hugh and they will use an embrace skin lightening creams. They will also utilized or dermatologist for a chemical peels for example, 'cause that the procedures can like the skin. So that's one subset or let me just say they're. Who Have Acne, and they have what we call. In cemetery hyper pigmentation increase pigmentation after the inflammation of the acne aboard bump gone away today WanNa make that dark marco away. Okay. That's one a while you're shaking your head where So that's one. Indication or set of indications for lightning. Okay. Fortunately in many countries and I can think some Asian countries like. India Japan some of the African countries, a lighter skin tone is synonymous with better prospects of marriage higher, socio economic status. So those women and men want to bleach their skin. So they appear lighter and hence can have more benefits societal benefits. So bats though in those societies, we often see those products. Fair lovely, etc etc.. I think that's not so much. The case here in the United States. Are they the same ingredients though like I know you're talking about Color Ism, but and I were like. You know if you're using hydrocortisone or say even like another brightening ingredient isn't that the same ingredient in both types of products or are they really quite deaf know it can be. You can absolutely have the same ingredients in these marketed sort of different. They're marketed differently and understanding understanding it's like. It's not the the ingredient that's the problem. It's the marketing in the enchant and the kind of the narrative behind it. I would absolutely agree with that. Now there's a whole nother subject and other discussion we can have, and that is a some of the illegal ingredients in skin lightening products that could be quite harmful. So for example zones steroids. Cat very potent strong ones can be included a illegally in some lightning dreams and people can have. Quite dramatic side effects. We know that mercury can be included in some of these products with catastrophic results know renal failure, etc. but that's outside the norm these ingredients are banned. There'd they're not approved for use in lightening creams. So you know I just want to mention it because. Potential problem. But if you have a hydrogen known that is approved, it is how in what way is being used? So you're absolutely right. How is it marketing? How's it being used by the patient? I understand. That's where racing the changes this year, which are frankly long-needed. Can we ask about sunscreen to like this is another area that I don't know people of color have been under served like. The sunscreens leaves such a cast on anyone like Oliver Darker and there's it's still a problem I know it's changing but why do they do that? First of all? What's going on with the formulas and? Like. Is there any inherent problem? The way they're developed like why haven't there been better sunscreens for people? Of Color. There are caused by in the car inside from Dr Taylor. There's Ways to answer the question. It is generally.

Acne Justin I Puerto Rican Love Layer Oliver Darker United Stade United States Dr Taylor Hugh India Japan
"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

07:43 min | 3 months ago

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"Necessarily look at those areas if a patient isn't aware that he or she who's of African descent can develop melanoma, they won't be on the lookout they might think it's a fungal infection of their their nail, for example. So that's an example of how a generally disease can look quite differently. There's another rash that we see commonly you've heard of excellent. So x amount we think of as Radan slammed itchy patches on the skin will in people with darker skin tones, they can present as bombs on the skin. We called it the popular variant, and if you're not aware of that, you're not gonNa make the diagnosis as a physician. So common disorder that presents different differently in people with darker skin tones. So Dr Taylor I WanNa, know like, are there other ways that racism? Or Ito obsessed with sturm. Cultural Confidence on cultural incompetence I jack. Simply from using incorrectly. Does it do those racism, our cultural incompetence for dermatology. Other than like the text other yet other than academia. So No I don't think racism provides dermatology quite honestly you know I've been a dermatologist for. Thirty years thirty one years and I I would say, no, absolutely not. That's not to say that things don't some things need don't need to be a change shore you know need to be improved, but I don't think it's necessarily pervasive. We're asking right now this. Topic until so let me just say this. Let me let me say this. So one concern that all of us have and we've really mobilized is the fact that dermatology is the second least diverse specialty in medicine and the only specialty that is on the bottom is orthopedic, surgery? So. That means in terms of what we call underrepresented minorities. You are M.'s, and those would be people of African descent lat next and indigenous. They had the lowest numbers in dermatology. There are now a multitude of efforts. To address that issue and to change it. So for example, some of our leading germ or The Society of Investigational Dermatology the American Academy of Dermatology the Women's Dermatology Association. derm section of the National Medical Association you know in low nervous Oh, they association professors of Dermatology or lead anyone out have all come together to create programs to to change this. So everyone is really working on it and a level of the different dermatology programs a we are amid hand. So we're looking at a rubric had a we. Had A we. Evaluate a germ applications to make sure we are. Considering the all candidates, no matter what their background is. So that's hall to say we still have a lot to to do but I think there's really a heightened awareness. Let me also say. That Kovic has made a huge difference for for a number of reasons in in changing and helping people to think about an address, some structural racism. So for example, we all know that people of African descent lack next are disproportionately affected by Covid and some of that is probably related to being first line workers. an having multiple comber abilities. But in addition to that, Cova has caused most of this country warranty and it has been added time when they've been horrible murders in this country. People have for the first time really paid attention to what's happening in our country, and that has really been a catalyst to make a change, for example, at Penn medicine centrally. There has been a request. That every person in the Medical Center have unconscious bias training. And as of today, one thousand employees had medicine of undergone unconscious bias training and it's not just pan. It's many medical centers. So the we just for our listeners, can you explain what a unconscious bias is? Yes, I apologize so. We can have you ever experienced actually he'll. We all have. We all have right. So unconscious bias or our biases that we might not be aware of right and they might be biased sees a They are biased against people who probably look different from us. So The test there there's a task called the Harvard. Implicit bias. Harvard Implicit Association tests, and what they do is they lash these pictures and you have to pick you have a split second to decide you know what you prefer and you pick, and then they do it analysis right and they can say you prefer white people you firm black people are you know and helps you be able to understand your biases and they are built a from your family unit how you were raised etcetera but the did you have bias when you took it, I'm biased towards black people. Accounts by biased right you you learned it in the training APPS. Larry interest, right. So the first step I think to be impartial. is to understand kind of where you're coming from. Now I think that's really important for everyone. And then to learn about concept's like being an anti racist being an ally. So if so if you to you know observed someone saying something to me that's racist or a micro aggression. You are my ally it's you speak up and say, Oh, wait hold on a minute. That's not right. You know you have really offended attacked You know my colleague Susan. Based on what you said we should sit and talk about this and unpack this. And this kind of training you weren't getting in the medical fields up until this year like Penn wasn't not. Many people were I. Think many people really aware of it right. It's it's really been a.

The Society of Investigational American Academy of Dermatolog Women's Dermatology Associatio Harvard Implicit Association Radan Penn medicine Dr Taylor National Medical Association Harvard Ito Medical Center Penn Covid Cova Kovic Susan Larry interest
"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

02:23 min | 3 months ago

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"Of color be of African descent or lat next descend or Native emit indigenous. Populations that you know they're growing and there's a real need. And so. I'm happy to report that in the last five years ten years there are a whole host of textbooks that have been published that center upon. Individuals for darker skin tones, diseases that occur disproportionately in them or present differently from someone with white skin I'm also happy to tell you that some of the quote unquote mainstream textbooks are indeed making sure they include a people with darker skin tones to help traumatologist in residents and medical students be able to make the correct diagnoses there have been a lot of. In literature in articles about this particular need. So I really see the tide turning I'm very proud of the skin color society for all their efforts, as well as the American Academy of Dermatology. So under the auspices of the American Academy of Dermatology Mike Holly Denied Danielle Kaczynski have started an effort to create a skin of collar curriculum for dermatology residents. So we've been meeting with a group of dermatologists for the past six months and we have made significant progress. and. I, think we are going to be able to launch this curriculum on skin of colored to residents and bent medical school students in the next three to six months, and this has been entirely supported. By the academy. So this yeah, this is just an example of the the fact that our organizations have recognized the need to educate more broadly and a really rising to to the occasion. Can I just ask you just I know you have another question have four that you said that some skin diseases and some skin conditions present differently in different skin tones can you give us an example of that because we're not doctors? Yes..

American Academy of Dermatolog Mike Holly Danielle Kaczynski
"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

06:33 min | 3 months ago

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"Worry we gave a nice bio on you before you came on the line do truly one of the most amazing dermatologist in the United States like I'm so excited you're here we want to hear about your career little bit before we start talking about the issues of the day that we brought you on to talk about. So first off what made you want to become dermatologist well, you know. When I went to medical school, I. wanted to be an interest and I wanted to treat people from the inner city with hypertension and diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But then during my fourth year medical school did my very first dermatology rotation and I loved everything about the specialty The fact that he could range from Piatra patients to you know those in their eighties and nineties the fact that there was a little bit of surgery. Pediatrics was cosmetic. Dermatology in general dermatology. The fact that you could actually see in feel in touch the pathology as opposed to like pretending, you can hear it you know through the stethoscope so that really changed my whole focus. Now when I graduated I decided nonetheless to do a internal medicine residency. But halfway through I said, you know you've got to remain true to yourself and what are you gonna be happy you know thirty years from now practicing so I went back and did another residency in dermatology in here we are. Also, that added a little bit of time onto your career. It did. Yes it was so worth it. Yeah, and so you I know you're the founder of many amazing things that I've gotten many resources from one of the things that you're known for is. Working at the skin of Color Center can you and you co-founded that ready did yes. So I'm back with that is when that started back in nineteen ninety eight I did my dermatology residency at Columbia. Presbyterian. Medical Center in about ten years after I had finished I got a call from one of my professors who said you know here in New York, there's the need for a center that specializes in skin disorders for people with darker skin tones, and he said, this was my my mentor. Dr Deleo. He says, you know they say to me you're a nice guy but I want someone who looks like made and so he called me one day and said, would you be interested in coming to New York in creating some type of center and for me it was an incredible challenge an incredible need. This type of center didn't exist anywhere in the world and my mandate was to name it started to figure out what the mission was and that was a wonderful wonderful challenge. So what I decided was. This would be a center for. Instance in clinical dermatology, we would also perform clinical trials, research trials, and at that point, many dermatologists were very afraid of doing any types of cosmetic procedures on people with darker skin tones. So we wanted to really gorge path that. So that's Why we created the skin of Color Center, I am delighted to report it still in existence. Now, it's now affiliated with Mount Sinai and there's a new wonderful director WHO's there? Can, I just ask Dr Leo was he a White Guy? Dr Dalil I didn't know you. Know can Dr till now goes bad. You know I'm a tall white guy and they don't want to see a tall white guy. They want someone who looks like you and you know he's just been a wonderful inspiration over all of these years I'm very fortunate to have had him as a mentor Academic Sense. So when you let your medical residency, did you feel like you were prepared to treat all the patients that you were about to say is at the level of care that they are. Yeah. So I had the distinct honor and privilege of a doing my dermatology residency New York City in Manhattan like one of the most diverse places on earth. So from the time I was the first year. Dermatology residents I saw people with all skin tones. And all ethnicities and racial groups. So when I completed three years of residency, I did indeed the very prepared in diagnosing and treating disorders in people with darker skin tones. Then I opened up a private practice in Philadelphia, which is my hometown and I found that over time many women and men of color sought me out because you know it's not just the skin tone, but it's also the customs habits. Women did not have to explain to me what they do with their hair because I have the same hair and so there is a cultural competence and we wanted to create a center were all the doctors no matter what their race or ethnicity was culturally competent. Hardy, you think maybe cultural competence fits into. like some of the textbooks that doctors used to learn about skin and how do you think that the issues actually affect the health of patients in the long run What is your take on this this? This conversation because it really does start from like the education doesn't it that people like dermatology students receive and then bring into their practices And then we see in everything from like skin care products in the conversations at Jenin, I have right here on the spot caster. So let me start by saying these are very or conversations to have and I think we're very fortunate in twenty twenty twenty to be able to have these candid discussions I think in the past many of the dermatology textbooks were centered around people with white skin because that's what many of the training programs in many of our professors and the authors of these textbooks were exposed to and they knew. What we have found is that the demographics are changing that there are many people.

Color Center New York United States Medical Center Piatra Dr Deleo Dr Dalil Dr Leo New York City Mount Sinai Philadelphia founder Hardy Jenin Columbia private practice director Manhattan
"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

05:21 min | 3 months ago

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"Okay. So . we're here with Dr Taylor, , don't worry we gave a nice bio on you before you came on the line do truly one of the most amazing dermatologist <unk> in the United States like I'm so excited you're here we want to hear about your career little bit before we start talking about the issues of the day that we brought you on to talk about. So . first off what made you want to become dermatologist well, , you know. When . I went to medical school, , I. . wanted to be an interest and I wanted to treat people from the inner city with hypertension and diabetes and cardiovascular disease. . But then during my fourth year medical school did my very first dermatology rotation and I loved everything about the specialty <hes>. . The fact that he could range from Piatra patients to you know those in their eighties and nineties the fact that there was a little bit of surgery. . Pediatrics was cosmetic. . Dermatology in general dermatology. . The fact that you could actually see in feel in touch the pathology as opposed to like pretending, , you can hear it you know through the stethoscope <hes> so that really changed my whole focus. . Now when I graduated I decided nonetheless to do a <unk> internal medicine residency. . But halfway through I said, , you know you've got to remain true to yourself and what are you gonna be happy you know thirty years from now practicing so I went back and did another residency in dermatology in here we are. . Also, , that added a little bit of time onto your career. . It did. . Yes it was so worth it. . Yeah, , and so you I know you're the founder of many amazing things that I've gotten many resources from one of the things that you're known for is. . Working at the skin of Color Center can you and you co-founded that ready did yes. . So I'm back with that is when that started back in nineteen ninety eight I did my dermatology residency at Columbia. . Presbyterian. . Medical Center in about ten years after I had finished I got a call from one of my professors who said you know here in New York, , there's the need for a center that specializes in skin disorders for people with darker skin tones, , and he said, , this was my my mentor. . Dr Deleo. . He says, , you know they say to me you're a nice guy but I want someone who looks like made and so he called me one day and said, , would you be interested in coming to New York in creating some type of center and for me it was an incredible challenge <hes> an incredible need. . This type of center didn't exist anywhere in the world and my mandate was to name it started to figure out what the mission was and that was a wonderful wonderful challenge. . So what I decided was. . This would be a center for. . Instance in clinical dermatology, , we would also perform clinical trials, research , trials, , and at that point, , many dermatologists were very afraid of doing any types of cosmetic procedures on people with darker skin tones. . So we wanted to really gorge path that. . So that's Why we created the skin of Color Center, , I am delighted to report it still in existence. . Now, , it's now affiliated with Mount Sinai and there's a new wonderful director <hes>. . WHO's there? ? Can, , I just ask Dr Leo was he a White Guy? ? Dr Dalil <unk> I didn't know you. . Know can Dr till now goes bad. . You know I'm a tall white guy and they don't want to see a tall white guy. . They want someone who looks like you and you know he's just been a wonderful inspiration over all of these years I'm very fortunate to have had him as a mentor Academic Sense. . So when you let your medical residency, , did you feel like you were prepared to treat all the patients that you were about to say is at the level of care that they are. . Yeah. . So I had the distinct honor and privilege of a doing my dermatology residency New York City in Manhattan like one of the most diverse places on earth. . So from the time I was the first year. . Dermatology residents I saw people with all skin tones. . And all ethnicities and racial groups. . So when I completed three years of residency, , I did indeed the very prepared in diagnosing and treating disorders in people with darker skin tones. . Then I opened up a private practice in Philadelphia, , which is my hometown and I found that over time many women and men of color sought me out because you know it's not just the skin tone, , but it's also the customs habits. . Women did not have to explain to me what they do with their hair because I have the same hair and so there is a cultural competence <hes> and we wanted to create a center were all the doctors no matter what their race or ethnicity was culturally competent. .

Dr Susan Taylor Jessen Hospital of the University of Paris NBD Color Society Michelle long professor
How to Improve Cultural Competence in Dermatology and Skincare with Dr. Susan Taylor

Fat Mascara

05:21 min | 3 months ago

How to Improve Cultural Competence in Dermatology and Skincare with Dr. Susan Taylor

"Okay. So we're here with Dr Taylor, don't worry we gave a nice bio on you before you came on the line do truly one of the most amazing dermatologist in the United States like I'm so excited you're here we want to hear about your career little bit before we start talking about the issues of the day that we brought you on to talk about. So first off what made you want to become dermatologist well, you know. When I went to medical school, I. wanted to be an interest and I wanted to treat people from the inner city with hypertension and diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But then during my fourth year medical school did my very first dermatology rotation and I loved everything about the specialty The fact that he could range from Piatra patients to you know those in their eighties and nineties the fact that there was a little bit of surgery. Pediatrics was cosmetic. Dermatology in general dermatology. The fact that you could actually see in feel in touch the pathology as opposed to like pretending, you can hear it you know through the stethoscope so that really changed my whole focus. Now when I graduated I decided nonetheless to do a internal medicine residency. But halfway through I said, you know you've got to remain true to yourself and what are you gonna be happy you know thirty years from now practicing so I went back and did another residency in dermatology in here we are. Also, that added a little bit of time onto your career. It did. Yes it was so worth it. Yeah, and so you I know you're the founder of many amazing things that I've gotten many resources from one of the things that you're known for is. Working at the skin of Color Center can you and you co-founded that ready did yes. So I'm back with that is when that started back in nineteen ninety eight I did my dermatology residency at Columbia. Presbyterian. Medical Center in about ten years after I had finished I got a call from one of my professors who said you know here in New York, there's the need for a center that specializes in skin disorders for people with darker skin tones, and he said, this was my my mentor. Dr Deleo. He says, you know they say to me you're a nice guy but I want someone who looks like made and so he called me one day and said, would you be interested in coming to New York in creating some type of center and for me it was an incredible challenge an incredible need. This type of center didn't exist anywhere in the world and my mandate was to name it started to figure out what the mission was and that was a wonderful wonderful challenge. So what I decided was. This would be a center for. Instance in clinical dermatology, we would also perform clinical trials, research trials, and at that point, many dermatologists were very afraid of doing any types of cosmetic procedures on people with darker skin tones. So we wanted to really gorge path that. So that's Why we created the skin of Color Center, I am delighted to report it still in existence. Now, it's now affiliated with Mount Sinai and there's a new wonderful director WHO's there? Can, I just ask Dr Leo was he a White Guy? Dr Dalil I didn't know you. Know can Dr till now goes bad. You know I'm a tall white guy and they don't want to see a tall white guy. They want someone who looks like you and you know he's just been a wonderful inspiration over all of these years I'm very fortunate to have had him as a mentor Academic Sense. So when you let your medical residency, did you feel like you were prepared to treat all the patients that you were about to say is at the level of care that they are. Yeah. So I had the distinct honor and privilege of a doing my dermatology residency New York City in Manhattan like one of the most diverse places on earth. So from the time I was the first year. Dermatology residents I saw people with all skin tones. And all ethnicities and racial groups. So when I completed three years of residency, I did indeed the very prepared in diagnosing and treating disorders in people with darker skin tones. Then I opened up a private practice in Philadelphia, which is my hometown and I found that over time many women and men of color sought me out because you know it's not just the skin tone, but it's also the customs habits. Women did not have to explain to me what they do with their hair because I have the same hair and so there is a cultural competence and we wanted to create a center were all the doctors no matter what their race or ethnicity was culturally competent.

Medical Center Color Center Dr Deleo Dr Taylor New York Piatra United States Dr Leo Dr Dalil New York City Mount Sinai Founder Philadelphia Columbia Private Practice Director Manhattan
"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

Fat Mascara

02:06 min | 3 months ago

"dr susan taylor" Discussed on Fat Mascara

"Our podcast Oh. Yes. Yes. If you're just jumping into this episode, the episode right before that recorded a couple of days ago was our emily in Paris. Jamboree. Yes exactly. and now we're GONNA get back into some science. So my how Ya? This is like where you thrive. We have Dr Susan Taylor a dermatologist and professor of dermatology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. So I I met her years ago at because she well, she's the head of the skin of Color Society but NBD should also founded it, and that group has been such an amazing resource of news and information for Jessen I over the years it's just they put on these media events they share information they always. Have Resources for you doctors to talk to if you're in the media PS for finding media friends out there hit ups Dr Susan Towel Taylor any earlier this year I saw her name on an academic paper. She Co authored titled Multi-ethnic Training in residency, which was basically a survey of doctors in training, and they were asking about whether or not. They felt prepared by their schooling and textbooks to treat patients with skin color. What a fascinating topic so Jessen, I thought it would be really great to have her come on talk about that, and also discuss other issues of systemic racism in the practice of dermatology. Just a side note if you're interested in hearing more about skin lightening products, which is topic touch on here in the episode coming up, you might WanNa go back to episode to fifteen. We also discussed this with a Michelle long of. La Yes. Yes. Yes. Just like a little you know an added an added something to this conversation if you want to hear more. Yeah, this is this is why I think it's so important to get so many different perspectives on tackling ya there. There's no one definitive answer to these like really hot button topics it's not like it is written. It's everyone has their own viewpoints and that's what I love about the show. Absolutely. Just you couldn't be more right and really excited to hear Dr Taylor's perspective. So here's the interview..

Dr Susan Taylor Jessen Hospital of the University of Paris NBD Color Society Michelle long professor