3 Burst results for "Dr Subbiah"

"dr subbiah" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:21 min | 3 years ago

"dr subbiah" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Some of us so painfully sensitive to rejection? Well, it turns out we can't help it. It's science. Lisa Cantrell is a psychologist and professor at Sacramento state. She's also one of those people who cries into her pillow for months after a bad break up. She did some digging to find out why. So few months ago, I did one of those at home genetic test. You know, the ones where you spit into a clear plastic tube ship it off to a lab, I did it because I'd heard about genetic variation that can make people more sensitive to rejection. And I was so convinced I had it. I've always been a bit sensitive. I remember this one moment in fourth grade, miss Brown asked a question in class that I knew the answer to she made eye contact with me, but then called on someone else. I could feel the tears welling up in my eyes. I asked to excused ran to the bathroom and cried into my shirt as I got older got worse, and it affected my relationships. One time in grad school. I sent my boyfriend at the time a text he didn't respond. My chest tightened. What had I done wrong. Sure. Everyone feels a little hurt by rejection, but I would seemingly become debilitated each time and last year after a particularly rough break-up not sleeping staying up all night crying. I started to wonder if something was wrong with me. Began looking up research on the biology of feeling rejected. I came across something called the OPR one, gene. We all have this, gene. But for proximity one in five people this gene has a tiny variation that can affect how their brains respond to pain the tiny variation is called a geo, and I called up Dr John carsoup a researcher at the university of Utah. Who's studied this, gene? And the G eleo what seems to do is seems to lower the capacity to produce opiate receptors. So you have less of them opioid receptors. Dr Subbiah tells me help us counteract pain when endorphins rush into the brain they attached to those opioid receptors and stop the pain signal. This is actually what happens during the runner's high and endorphins also Russian when people experience emotional pain. So basically what I learned from Dr CB is that people with this Leo also known as g carriers. They seem to have fewer of these. Receptors? So they're not as able to deal with pain. Whether it's a torn ligament or social rejection is this what has been happening to me, my whole life several weeks after shipping off my saliva, an Email popped up in my inbox. My results have come in. I sat staring at the message and opened if I were g carrier. It would mean that there was a biological explanation for my feelings, I hadn't been overreacting all these years. I was experiencing more pain than others. With my hands shaking slightly. I open the file and scroll through lines of my genetic code to find the OPR one, gene. There typed in small font.

Lisa Cantrell OPR Leo Sacramento state Dr Subbiah Dr John carsoup Dr CB miss Brown university of Utah researcher
"dr subbiah" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"dr subbiah" Discussed on KQED Radio

"My shirt as I got older. This got worse and it affected my relationships. One time in grad school. I sent my boyfriend at the time a text he didn't respond. My chest tightened. What had done wrong? Sure, everyone feels a little hurt by rejection, but I would seemingly become debilitated each time and last year after a particularly rough break-up not sleeping staying up all night crying. I started to wonder if something was wrong with me. I began looking up research on the biology of feeling rejected. I came across something called the OPR one, gene. We all have this, gene. But for approximately one in five people this gene has a tiny variation that can affect how their brains respond to pain the tiny variation is called a geo, and I called up Dr John Carr CBS a researcher at the university of Utah. Who's studied this, gene and the G L heal? What seems to do is seems to lower the capacity to produce opiate receptors. So you have less of them opioid receptors. Dr Subbiah tells me help us counteract pain when endorphins rush into the brain they attached to those opioid receptors and stop the pain signal. This is actually what happens during the runner's high end endorphins also Russian when people experience emotional pain. So basically what I learned from Dr CBS is that people with this geo also known as g carriers. They seem to have fewer of these. Receptors? So they're not as able to deal with pain. Whether it's a torn ligament or social rejection is this what has been happening to me, my whole life several weeks after shipping off my saliva, an Email popped up in my inbox. My results have come in. I sat staring at the message and opened if I were g carrier. It would mean that there was a biological explanation for my feelings, I hadn't been overreacting all these years. I was experiencing more pain than others. With my hands shaking slightly. I open the file and scroll through lines of my genetic code to find the OPR one, gene. There typed in small font g..

Dr CBS OPR Dr Subbiah Dr John Carr university of Utah researcher
"dr subbiah" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"dr subbiah" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Always been a bit sensitive. I remember this one moment in fourth grade, miss Brown asked a question in class that I knew the answer to she made eye contact with me, but then called on someone else. I could feel the tears welling up in my eyes. I asked to be excused ran to the bathroom and cried into my shirt as I got older. This got worse and it affected my relationships. One time in grad school. I sent my boyfriend at the time a text he didn't respond. My chest tightened. What had I done wrong. Sure. Everyone feels a little hurt by rejection, but I would seemingly become debilitated each time and last year after a particularly rough break-up not sleeping staying up all night crying. I started to wonder if something was wrong with me. I began looking up research on the biology of feeling rejected. I came across something called the OPR in one, gene, we all have this, gene. But for approximately one in five people this gene has a tiny variation that can affect how their brains respond to pain the tiny variation is called a geo, and I called up Dr John Carr CBS data a researcher at the university of Utah who studied this, gene. And the G eleo what seems to do is seems to lower the capacity to produce opiate receptors. So you have less of them opioid receptors. Dr Subbiah tells me help us counteract pain when endorphins rush into the brain they attached to those opioid receptors and stop the pain signal. This is actually what happens during the runner's high and endorphins also Russian when people experience emotional pain. So basically what I learned from Dr CBS data is that people with this geo also known as g carriers. They seem to have fewer of these receptors. So they're not as able to deal with pain. Whether it's a torn ligament or social rejection is this what has been happening to me, my whole life several weeks after shipping off my saliva, an Email popped up in my inbox. My results have come in. I sat staring at the message unopened if I were g carrier. It would mean that there was a biological explanation for my feelings, I hadn't been overreacting all these years. I was experiencing more pain than others. With my hands shaking slightly. I open the file and scroll through lines of my genetic code to find the OPR one, gene. There typed in small font g..

OPR Dr Subbiah Dr CBS miss Brown Dr John Carr CBS university of Utah researcher